NPR

For Teens Knee-Deep In Negativity, Reframing Thoughts Can Help

Irritation and gloom may seem like the default mode for teenagers, but parents can help them gain a more realistic and resilient way of thinking. A clinical psychologist explains how.
Source: Jenn Liv for NPR

"Why didn't she text me back yet? She doesn't like me anymore!"

"There's no way I'm trying out for the team. I suck at basketball"

"It's not fair that I have a curfew!"

Sound familiar? Parents of tweens and teens often shrug off such anxious and gloomy thinking as normal irritability and moodiness — because it is. Still, the beginning of a new school year, with all of the required adjustments, is a good time to consider just how closely the habit of negative, exaggerated "self-talk" can affect

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