Los Angeles Times

Film critic Kenneth Turan explains why he would like to ignore the whole horror genre

Like characters in an old blues song, horror and I met at a crossroads decades ago. I went one way, horror another, and lately, I've been trying to figure out why.

It's not just the deaths of two of modern horror's founding fathers, George Romero of "Night of the Living Dead" and Tobe Hooper of "The Texas Chain Saw Massacre," that got me thinking. Though that played a part.

Equally crucial is the way horror finds itself positioned at this moment as the genre of choice for audiences as well as critics, the sensibility that is front and center in keeping the movie business afloat.

Just to cite the

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