Newsweek

How Did Life Start? Crashing Meteorites Could Be Cause

It's one of the biggest questions in science today—which means there's lots to argue about.
If a new paper is right, the first life on Earth could have formed in a pond like this one.
10_02_warm_little_pond

Long before there were humans, or hominins, or even single-celled creatures, there must have been something that sparked life on Earth and became everything we see around us today. On that much, scientists agree—but how precisely life began is far from settled.

tries to answer that question with math. It analyzes one of the two leading scenarios: that meteorites streaming in from the solar system deposited the building blocks of store information and oversee the construction of other molecules.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Newsweek

Newsweek3 min read
Adrianne Lenker Steps Into the Abyss
"I get scared of songs disappearing. It's good to record them because I don't have to carry them around anymore," Lenker says.
Newsweek4 min read
'Night of the Living Dead' Still Terrifying Audiences
The simple horror of 'Night of the Living Dead' is the realization that society has gone dreadfully wrong, as frightening a concept now as it was in 1968.
Newsweek12 min readPolitics
Is Trump Ready to ‘Get the Hell Out’ of Afghanistan?
A "devastating" new intelligence estimate on Afghanistan will give Trump cover to order a complete retreat, analysts fear.