NPR

Racism Is Literally Bad For Your Health

Racism affects health outcomes, a new report finds. "The day-to-day little indignities" can negatively impact people's physical health, Harvard researcher David Williams says.
Harvard professor David Williams says, "Much of this discrimination that occurs in the health care context, and in other contexts of society, may not even be intentional." Source: Sarah Sholes/Courtesy of Harvard Chan

Most people can acknowledge that discrimination has an insidious effect on the lives of minorities, even when it's unintentional. Those effects can include being passed over for jobs for which they are qualified or shut out of housing they can afford. And most people are painfully aware of the tensions between African-Americans and police.

But discrimination can also lead by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health asked members of different ethnic and racial groups about their experiences with discrimination. Ninety-two percent of African-American respondents said they felt discrimination against African-Americans exists in the United States today, and at least half said they have experienced it themselves at work or when interacting with police.

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