Futurity

Is telekinesis based on real brains or science fiction?

In "Stranger Things," the mysterious and powerful Eleven can move objects with her mind. Watch this video to learn more about the science of telekinesis.

Staying in and watching Stranger Things instead of going out to trick-or-treating this Halloween?

With the premiere of the new season of Netflix’s creepy, nostalgic 1980s adventure, neuroscientist S. Marc Breedlove examines the reality behind the power wielded by the mysterious character Eleven: telekinesis—the ability to manipulate and move objects with the mind.

Breedlove, professor of neuroscience in the College of Natural Science at Michigan State University, is an expert on the development of the nervous system. In this video, he talks about the history of telekinesis and the complexity of the human brain.

Source: Michigan State University

The post Is telekinesis based on real brains or science fiction? appeared first on Futurity.

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