The Atlantic

The Banality of White Nationalism

The existence of extremists like Tony Hovater doesn’t require extraordinary explanations—they stand in a long American tradition.
Source: Corbis / Getty

In 1963, Air Force Captain Ed Dwight was assigned as the deputy for flight test at the bomber test group at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base outside of Dayton, Ohio. Dwight was a hot-shot pilot—a recent graduate of the elite Aerospace Research Pilot School, recommended by an Air Force board for NASA’s astronaut training program. A Catholic publication put news of his arrival on its cover; a parishioner heard that Dwight was having trouble finding a nice home for his family, and rented him a house in the booming suburb of Huber Heights.

Dwight was black. what happened next:

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