The New York Times

By the Book: Richard Lloyd Parry

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

Q: What books are on your nightstand?

A: The books beside my bed are like the expensive, and suspiciously unsullied, pair of running shoes in the cupboard: an aspiration, and a symbol of the man I would like to be rather than the one I truly am. I’ve got the “Collected Poems” of W.B. Yeats and Ted Hughes, both of which I did in fact read a good deal of over the summer. I’ve got “Asia’s Reckoning: The Struggle for Global Dominance,” by Richard McGregor, which I hear great things about. “Quennets,” by Philip Terry, is a book of experimental poetry, purchased in a fit of avant-garde fervour that I will no doubt get round to one of these decades.

Right at the bottom of the pile is “Ulysses,” by James Joyce. I know, I know ... I read it at university, and then got halfway through it again in my 30s. And then stopped. For a while, I kept it

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

Related Interests

More from The New York Times

The New York Times6 min readPsychology
Your Past is Not Your Future: Overcoming Time Management Regret
Time management regret is a jail cell with an open door. Your positive actions are what may grant you an opportunity to walk free.
The New York Times6 min read
By the Book: Ruth Reichl
The food writer and author, most recently, of the memoir “Save Me the Plums” was 10 when she read Henry Miller. “If it’s over her head, she simply won’t understand it,” her mother said.
The New York Times5 min read
5 People Who Can Help You Love Your Body
Learning to love your body — whatever shape or size you may be — is easier said than done, but these people are out to teach all of us that there’s no time like the present to fall in love with who you see in the mirror.