Bloomberg Businessweek

Silence on Wall Street

Finance hasn’t had its #MeToo moment. Women say the culture of banking and a web of legal agreements keep harassment hidden

Three women who’ve had long careers in banking sat down for lunch together in Manhattan on the first Wednesday of the year. It didn’t take long before they asked one another the question: Why hasn’t the Harvey Weinstein effect hit finance?

After the movie mogul was accused last October of sexual harassment and assault, powerful men have been pushed out of jobs in the media, the arts, politics, academia, and the restaurant business because women spoke up to allege egregious behavior. Something is different on Wall Street. While the #MeToo movement spreads far and wide, these

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