NPR

From Scraps To Snacks: Pulp Left Over From Juice Bars Is Reborn In New Foods

Juicing is all the rage – and produces lots of leftover fruit and vegetable bits. Once thrown out as compost, that fiber is now sneaking its way into snacks, breakfast foods and even burgers.
Vegetable chips made by Forager and granola from Pulp Pantry. They're among several companies using the fruit and vegetable fiber left over from juicing in new food products. Source: Grace Hwang Lynch for NPR

Cold-pressed juice fills refrigerator cases at juice bars, health food shops, even big box stores – especially at the beginning of the year, when people are trying to "cleanse" after holiday excess. Fans of these elixirs, extracted at high pressure and low temperatures, believe they contain more nutrients and enzymes than conventional juices; they now generate $500 million in sales worldwide each year.

But what happens to all the parts of the fruits and vegetables that are left over after juicing? Once thrown out as compost, that fiber is now sneaking its way into snacks, breakfast foods and even burgers.

The amount of waste produced by making juice has bothered Los Angeles resident

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