NPR

How Segregation Shapes Fatal Police Violence

Unarmed black people are much more likely than unarmed whites to be fatally shot by the police. A new study finds that that disparity gets wider in states with more racial segregation.

On the afternoon of April 13, 2014, Dontre Hamilton was lying on the ground near a bench in a Milwaukee city park. A police officer on patrol walked over to Hamilton and asked him to stand up. Their encounter would end in disaster.

The officer patted Hamilton down for weapons — which was not in line with department policy as Hamilton posed no apparent danger — and Hamilton, who had a history of mental health issues, grabbed the officer's baton. The officer in turn pulled out his service

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