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Investigators Say Austin 'Serial Bomber' May Have Used Tripwire In Latest Blast

"With this tripwire, this changes things," said FBI Special Agent in Charge Christopher Combs. "It's more sophisticated. It's not targeted to individuals. We're very concerned."
Austin Police Chief Brian Manley (from left), ATF Special Agent in Charge Fred Milanowski and FBI Special Agent in Charge Christopher Combs at a news conference on Monday in Austin, Texas. They said a bomb that exploded Sunday night appeared to have used a tripwire. Source: Suzanne Cordeiro

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

Authorities say a fourth device that exploded in Austin, Texas, this month indicates a "serial bomber" — and one who is more sophisticated than the earlier bombs suggested.

Austin Chief of Police Brian Manley said Monday that investigators believe a tripwire might have been used in the device that exploded in a Southwest Austin neighborhood on Sunday night, injuring two men.

"The belief that we are now dealing with someone who is using tripwires shows a higher

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