The Atlantic

Why Experts Reject Creativity

People think they like creativity. But teachers, scientists, and executives are biased against new ways of thinking.
Source: Hannibal Hanschke / Reuters

In 2007, Steve Ballmer, then-CEO of Microsoft, emphatically predicted that Apple's new phone would fail. "There's no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share," he said. "No chance."

The volume of Ballmer's voice makes him a popular target in technology, but he wasn't an outlier, just the loudest guy in crowd of skeptical experts. RIM CEO Jim Balsillie said the iPhone would never represent "a sort of sea-change for BlackBerry." Cellphone experts writing in Bloomberg, PC Magazine, and Marketwatch all said it would flop.

No one had seen something like the iPhone before. One large screen? With no keypad? That tries to be

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