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Listen: Michael Pollan on psychedelics, death, and depression

Hear Michael Pollan describe his experience with psychedelics and how research is beginning to investigate their impact on mental health.

In Michael Pollan’s latest book, he’s a willing, if reluctant, participant in the emerging study of positive impact of psychedelic drugs like acid on human mental health.

“Your book is a trip!” says Deirdre English, lecturer in the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley, as she opens a conversation with Pollan about the book, How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us about Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence (Penguin, 2018).

“You know, in the lingo of the times, they create a ‘safe space,'” he says of the drugs. “And you need a safe space if you’re going to put down all your normal defenses.”

Pollan, professor of science and environmental journalism at UC Berkeley, is best known for his books on food, especially The Omnivore’s Dilemma.

He sat down with English, a former Mother Jones editor, to discuss the book for the School of Journalism’s On Mic podcast. Listen here:

Source: UC Berkeley

The post Listen: Michael Pollan on psychedelics, death, and depression appeared first on Futurity.

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