NPR

Report Warns Of 'Dangerous Complacency' In The Fight Against HIV

Treatment has been a success but prevention is another story, according to a report in The Lancet. And the stigma of seeking help persists.
A nurse tests an HIV-positive patient at a clinic in Bangalore, India. Source: Manjunath Kiran

In the early 2000s — the beginning of the third decade of the AIDS epidemic--the world came together in an unprecedented global health effort to provide life-saving AIDS drugs to people even in the poorest corners of the world. It has been an overwhelming public health success story. In 2000, fewer than a million of the then 34.3 million people with AIDS were being treated with AIDS drugs, and almost all of them lived in wealthy countries. Today, 20.9 million of the 36.7 million people with AIDS receive treatment, according to UNAIDS, most of them living in the poor countries where the disease is most prevalent.

In the view of the public health community, reducing the prices on AIDS drugs and setting

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