The New York Times

We're All Afraid to Talk About Money. Here's How to Break the Taboo.

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

We’re All Afraid to Talk About Money. Here’s How to Break the Taboo.

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By Kristin Wong

“I want to get my own place. How much is your rent?” a friend once asked. He immediately put his hand over his mouth.

“Sorry,” he said. “That’s so rude.”

Many of us grow up learning that money is one of a few topics — like politics, sex and religion — that you should avoid in polite company. You don’t brag about your net worth. You don’t share your salary with colleagues. You try not to ask your friends about their rent, even if it helps put your budget in perspective.

We’re discouraged from talking about money at every turn, but if you want to fix your

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