The Atlantic

Here’s Why White Women Are Abandoning the GOP

The party’s endorsement of Kavanaugh—and its general dismissal of the #MeToo movement—won’t do it any favors in November.
Source: Lucy Nicholson / Reuters

Shortly after the 2016 election, Tina Fey took to task the white women who had helped elect Donald Trump, providing him with 52 percent of their support. Fey particularly focused her remarks on college-educated white women, 44 percent of whom voted for Trump, chastising them for wanting to “go back to watching HGTV” and forget about the election. “You can’t look away,” Fey implored. “Because it doesn’t affect you this minute, but it’s going to affect you eventually.”

New evidence suggests many of these women may now agree with Fey. In the wake of sexual-assault allegations against the poll found that President Trump’s net support among Republican women had .

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