SAIL

The Great Schooner Race

I arrived in Rockland, Maine, on an early afternoon in July with a backpack, my camera and little else. Though traveling to an unfamiliar place to race with a crew of strangers has been a common theme in my sailing career, I had no idea what to expect from the massive wood and steel windjammers taking part in the 42nd Annual Great Schooner Race. Fiberglass is more my scene.

Fortunately, I wasn’t left to figure it out on my own. Marti Mayne, the affable and deeply knowledgeable events manager for the Maine Windjammer Association greeted me as soon as I’d stepped out of my car and led me down to a lobster boat captained by Mike McHenry. McHenry also happens to be the former owner of the windjammer —the boat that was my destination that evening. Between the two of them,

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Sail

Sail4 min readScience
Ask Sail
Q: I am noticing more and more cruising boats carrying high-tech membrane sails, and I was wondering why that is. —Carter Dickens, Houston, TX It’s all about the engineering. Specifically, membrane sails are highly engineered, so you can end up with
Sail10 min read
Sailing Master
Images trigger memory. Preparing to interview the golden boy of American sailing, I thought I would find a picture that would show Ken Read at the peak of his sailing career, his heyday, to share and have a warm and fuzzy start to our conversation. I
Sail6 min read
The Legacy
On this idyllic California summer morning, Soncy, a classic 40ft Rhodes-designed sloop built in 1957, is on her way to Santa Catalina Island. On board are owner John Clark Jr., his 10-year-old son, Ian, and me. As we motor out of New-port Harbor whil