Los Angeles Times

America's psychologists want you to understand how racism holds our country back

The nation's psychologists want us to talk about race. Not in the hushed confines of a therapist's office, but in classrooms, church basements and workplaces.

If that feels like a daunting task, don't worry. The mental health experts have launched a video series to get you started.

The first installment debuted online this year. In 18 minutes, it outlines the myriad ways that the stress of racial discrimination insinuates itself into the lives of people of color. It also lays out the toll of race-related stress on physical and mental health. By sharing stories from a variety of perspectives, the video aims to make people more open-minded and empathetic as they embark on these difficult but necessary discussions.

Future installments will drill down on the effects of stereotyping, implicit bias and the subtle forms of disrespect termed microaggressions.

None of these topics is controversial among psychologists, who have

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