Fortune

CALCULATING QUANTUM COMPUTING’S FUTURE

Companies—and countries—are battling for leadership in this nascent technology that promises faster data crunching than ever before.

IN 1982, NOBEL PRIZE–WINNING physicist Richard Feynman conceived of an ultrapowerful calculator that relies on microscopic particles to operate. He called his idea a “quantum” computer, referring to the laws that govern nature at a subatomic level.

Today, some of the technology industry’s biggest companies, such as IBM, Google, Intel, Microsoft, and China’s Alibaba, have latched onto the idea. They, along with upstarts

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Fortune

Fortune12 min read
About Face
MARK ZUCKERBERG’S DORM-ROOM CREATION is worth half a trillion dollars, has 2.3 billion regular users, and dominates its corner of the online advertising industry because its ads are so effective. Now Facebook is under attack from regulators, competit
Fortune32 min readSociety
Death By A Thousand Clicks
THE U.S. GOVERNMENT CLAIMED that turning American medical charts into electronic records would make health care better, safer, and cheaper. Ten years and $36 billion later, the system is an unholy mess. Inside a digital revolution gone wrong.
Fortune4 min read
Is 42 The Answer?
A billionaire disrupter of the French telecom market had a radical idea: Build a computer programming school that has no books, no teachers, and no classes. Oh, and make it free. Six years in, has it worked?