TIME

WORLDS APART

For decades, American foreign policy has rested on a consensus view about the U.S. role in the world. In an international order in which there is a single unrivaled superpower, foreign policy experts widely agree that American soldiers and taxpayer dollars are essential for preserving global stability. But that assumption is not necessarily shared by the ▶ American public, according to the findings of a new study, Worlds Apart: U.S. Foreign Policy and American Public Opinion, conducted by the Eurasia Group Foundation (EGF), an organization I serve as board president. No matter what party they claim allegiance to, Americans favor a foreign policy that resists entanglements abroad, the survey found—a view not limited to conservative libertarians on the right and liberal pacifists on the

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