NPR

'The Problem Of Democracy' Looks At Personality's Role In U.S. Leadership

A new book focuses on how the Adams father-son duo spent years abroad making a case for our young country — yet both saw themselves rejected in favor of more charismatic and populist rivals.
The Problem of Democracy: The Presidents Adams Confront the Cult of Personality, by Nancy Isenberg and Andrew Berstein Source: Viking

Most job openings — at least in theory — go to the more qualified applicant. That isn't always the case with the presidency of the United States, as scores of presidential losers have discovered.

Given the choice, Americans tend to gravitate toward the fresher, more exciting face. Charisma and change can hold more value than on-the-job training, relationships with world leaders or understanding of congressional dynamics.

It's a weird way to hire the most

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