The New York Times

Mayor Pete and the Queering of the American Soul

HIS RISE IS A SIGN THAT MORE LGBT PEOPLE ARE FINDING SPIRITUAL HOMES IN HOUSES OF FAITH.

“I like Mayor Pete because the way he talks about being openly gay shows strength of character.”

I heard this comment not at a political rally or an informal gathering of the like-minded, but in church. At my church, to be precise, during coffee hour following the weekly service. When the congregants sitting around the table in our church basement heard this opinion about the Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg, they all nodded in agreement.

Buttigieg’s ability to articulate his sexual orientation through the lens of faith has. The fact that the first openly gay major presidential candidate is also a Christian is indeed remarkable, a milestone in the visibility of LGBT people of faith. Yet it is also the result of a process that has been taking place in American religion for decades.

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