Foreign Policy Digital

Chinese Film Studios Are Blacklisting Americans

As the trade war escalates, producers are killing projects and sacking actors.

The launch party for Over the Sea I Come to You, held at a five-star hotel in Beijing in mid-May, went off without a hitch. The new show, a big-budget production filmed in the United States about overseas Chinese students and starring the veteran actor Sun Honglei alongside numerous American co-stars, had been in production since 2016 and was expected to be a rare exception to the cheap cookie-cutter fare of Chinese TV.

At the media event in the Grand Hyatt Beijing, cast and crew chatted with staff from among the five major media companies set to broadcast the show and speculated whether it could be picked up by Amazon, Netflix, on May 17 before the first episode was even broadcast—and with it, perhaps, the global aspirations of many in the Chinese TV industry.

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