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Vol. 156 No. 12 December 2012
Top Plants: Six Innovative
Renewable Plants
BUYERS GUI DE 2013
Is Shale Gas Shallow?
Distributed Solar Rules
Chinas Renewables Strategy
A compact powerhouse for reliable generation of electricity and heat. The newly developed 6-cylinder
220 kW gas engine sets standards that are nothing short of revolutionary. Its combination of four-valve
technology and new combustion chamber geometry boosts specic performance, optimises cost
efciency and also reduces emissions. The novel engine concept features an overhead camshaft
cylinder head that additionally increase the life and service friendliness of the engine. Find out more
about MAN Power at www.man-engines.com
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MAN Engines
A Division of MAN Truck & Bus
NEW POWER BOOST.
EXPERIENCE THE PREMIERE OF A NEW GAS ENGINE.
11234 200x273 motiv191c_e.indd 1 05.11.12 11:11
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POWER www.powermag.com 1
ON THE COVER
The 30-MW Alamosa Solar Project in southern Colorados San Luis Valley uses 504 dual-axis
concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) solar trackers, each topped with a CPV solar cell panel as-
sembly mounted on a support column. The largest solar plant of its type in the world is pro-
jected to produce about 76,000 MWh each year. Courtesy: Daniel OConnor Photography
COVER STORY: RENEWABLE TOP PLANTS
26 Alamosa Solar Project, San Luis Valley, Colorado
Currently the largest concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) installation in the world, this
pioneering plant is built for high performance and future flexibility. Industry watch-
ers hope it will also pave the way for the financing of future CPV systems.
28 Coca-Cola/Mas Energy Trigeneration Facility, Atlanta, Georgia
Its the first U.S. trigeneration plant fueled by landfill gas. And although its fun to
have bragging rights to such titles, the long-term energy cost reduction for this Co-
ca-Cola plant is what makes it a winner for the long haul.
32 Gujarat Solar Park, State of Gujarat, India
This renewable power development is on target to reach nearly 1 GW of capacity
when it is completed next year. A major key to its success is providing shared com-
mon infrastructure for multiple projects and owners.
34 Stillwater Solar-Geothermal Hybrid Plant, Churchill County, Nevada
Pairing generation technologies has become a trend, but this is the first facility to
partner geothermal with solar power. The combination enhances thermal efficiency,
stabilizes production, and reduces investment risk.
38 Three Gorges Dam, Yangtze River, Hubei Province, China
After nearly two decades of construction, controversy, challenges, and innovations,
the worlds largest hydroelectric plant has been completed and is providing clean
power to a country still struggling to keep up with demand.
42 Walney Offshore Windfarms, Irish Sea, UK
Boasting the largest wind turbine foundations ever made and the largest offshore
capacity at the time of installation, this pair of wind farms is helping the UK meet its
aggressive goals for renewable power.
SPECIAL REPORTS
RENEWABLES
44 Distributed Solar Challenges Utilities, Markets, and Regulation
Rooftop solar installations may represent minute generation amounts in the U.S.,
but utilities are finding that, especially as these and other distributed resources grow
in number, they are creating increasingly significant operational changes that distri-
bution companies and regulators must adapt to.
A compact powerhouse for reliable generation of electricity and heat. The newly developed 6-cylinder
220 kW gas engine sets standards that are nothing short of revolutionary. Its combination of four-valve
technology and new combustion chamber geometry boosts specic performance, optimises cost
efciency and also reduces emissions. The novel engine concept features an overhead camshaft
cylinder head that additionally increase the life and service friendliness of the engine. Find out more
about MAN Power at www.man-engines.com
MAN Engines
A Division of MAN Truck & Bus
NEW POWER BOOST.
EXPERIENCE THE PREMIERE OF A NEW GAS ENGINE.
11234 200x273 motiv191c_e.indd 1 05.11.12 11:11
Established 1882 Vol. 156 No. 12 December 2012
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December 2012 2
POWER IN CHINA
54 Renewable Energy Development Thrives During Chinas 12th Five-Year Plan
Renewable energy is now an important part of Chinas national energy development
strategy. However, significant challenges remain before the nation can reach its renew-
able energy goals, explain the authors from North China Electric Power University.
THE FUTURE OF NATURAL GAS
66 Is Shale Gas Shallow or the Real Deal?
The majority of recent power industry business decisions have been predicated on the
assumption of huge U.S. natural gas reserves. There are, however, dissenting voices.
FEATURES
NUCLEAR FUEL
69 MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility: Turning Swords into Plowshares
The Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility at the DOEs Savannah River Site
should be producing fuel assemblies for U.S. power plants by 2018. We look at the fa-
cility and the process of turning weapons-grade fissionable materials into fuel stock.
MERCURY EMISSIONS
73 Mercury Regulations Up in the Air
The history of federal regulation of mercury from power plants suggests that nothing
is ever truly settledwhich can be unsettling for power generators.
PLANT DESIGN
78 LIDAR and 3D Modeling Produce Precise Designs
Laser scanning techniques used in conjunction with 3D modeling can do more than
make the design and construction of retrofit jobs faster, easier, and cheaper. They can
also facilitate better designs and provide valuable templates for future projects.
CLEAN COAL
83 China Leads the Global Race to Cleaner Coal
Truly clean coal generationfree of all environmental pollutants, including greenhouse
gasesis still in the future. But among those traveling the road to cleaner coal power,
China is in the lead, thanks to prioritizing the most efficient available technologies.
DEPARTMENTS
SPEAKING OF POWER
6 Under Siege
GLOBAL MONITOR
8 Vanadium Flow Battery Juices Onion Plant
10 THE BIG PICTURE: A Renewables Quest
11 Largest Wastewater Treatment Fuel Cell Plant Goes Online
12 Of Giant Turbines and Rotor Blades
13 Modernization of Century-Old Hydro Facility Yields Rich History
14 14-MW Solar PV Plant Completed at Naval Station
16 POWER Digest
FOCUS ON O&M
18 Conference Report: 12th ICS Cyber Security Conference
20 Users Return to Fogging on Frame 7FAs
LEGAL & REGULATORY
24 CleanPowerSF: Political Correctness Trumps Energy Policy
By Steven F. Greenwald and Jeffrey P. Gray, Davis Wright Tremaine
86 NEW PRODUCTS
COMMENTARY
160 Navigating a Sea of New Regulations
By Thomas Higgins, PE, PhD, CH2M HILL
Flightless Birds and Flying Elephants
The Devil Flies Nukes Flatulence in
Space. You guessed it: Weve got more
installments of Kennedy Maizes history of
nuclear power in the U.S. for you. Look for
the web-exclusive Too Dumb to Meter,
Part 6 under the Features heading on our
homepage, www.powermag.com, during
the month of December or in our Archives
any time.
And remember to check our Whats
New? segment on the homepage regularly
for just-posted news stories covering all
fuels and technologies.
Get More POWER on the Web
78
12
20
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December 2012 4
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December 2012 6
SPEAKING OF POWER
A
s I write this column on Election
Day 2012, the polls are still open
and both presidential candidates
are predicting victory. The next dozen
hours or so will prove only one candidate
correct. Regardless of the outcome, wind
power remains a loser.
The Production Tax Credit (PTC) for wind
power expires at the end of this year un-
less Congress takes affirmative action to
renew the law. This expire-renew cycle has
occurred seven times since the PTC was
first put into effect in 1992. However,
unique events are in play this year that
signal waning support for its renewal.
Opinions Differ
There is increased squabbling within en-
vironmental groups, particularly the Sierra
Club, about the consequential environmen-
tal damage caused by wind power. Aviary
mortality is the clinical term used to de-
scribe the bird annihilation caused by wind
turbines. One Sierra Club area representa-
tive uses the metaphor Cuisinarts of the
air to describe wind turbines. At last count
77 organizations were petitioning the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service to toughen the
rules for siting, permitting, and operating
large-scale wind projects. Rules proposed
by the Fish and Wildlife Service for wind
turbine installations were deemed unwork-
able by the American Wind Energy Asso-
ciation (AWEA), which continues to dismiss
bird kills as a serious problem.
Internal friction burst into flames re-
cently when Exelon (a member of the AWEA
board) went public with its view that the
PTC was no longer necessary and should be
allowed to expire. Exelon argued that the
PTC was distorting competitive wholesale
energy markets and was causing harm to
other clean energy sources, such as nu-
clear energy. Exelon was quickly voted off
the island at an emergency board meet-
ing that excluded Exelon. Opposing points
of view are clearly not valued by AWEA.
The root cause of the market and eco-
nomic distortions described by Exelon is
the PTC. The PTC pays the owner approxi-
mately $22/MWh for energy (not firm ca-
pacity) sold into a market. In some regions
wind farm owners bid into the electricity
market at a zero or negative power cost
up to the value of the PTC in order to stay
first in the production queue. The market
distortion is particularly prevalent during
periods of low power demand and excess
electricity supply, where these artificially
low power prices force baseload plants to
operate at less-efficient part load.
The economic distortion is exacerbated
in states with a renewable portfolio stan-
dard (RPS), where mandated power pur-
chase agreements pay two to three times
the marginal power cost. Not only does the
PTC enable priority operation, but it also
ensures that we all pay a premium for that
power. The cost is buried in the govern-
ment-approved utility rate structures. Also,
75% of the wind turbine installations since
2006 have been in only 11 states. The PTC
has had the effect of shifting the cost of
wind power development from a small num-
ber of states to taxpayers nationwide.
Forgotten Mandate
Forgotten by many proponents is the jus-
tification for the PTC in the first place: to
reduce CO
2
emissions. When the PTC was
originally enacted, this justification was
blindly accepted by many states without
independently confirming CO
2
reduction
claims. The result was RPSs designed to
encourage wind by exercising a states
political muscle over electricity markets.
(See THE BIG PICTURE: A Renewables
Quest, p. 10 for an infographic of U.S.
and global RPS standards.) Ironically, not
one state RPS has a written requirement
to reduce CO
2
. Intuition is not a substitute
for empirical studies.
Over the past few years a large number
of studies have been conducted in the U.S.
and the European Union that conclude the
fossil-fueled equipment used to balance
the grid (chase wind because of its lim-
ited and unpredictable supply), and the
loss in efficiency of baseload plants forced
to operate off design, produce about zero
net change in CO
2
emissions. Some studies
predict a little more, some a little less. I
also find it interesting that many utilities
with large amounts of wind generation
steadfastly refuse to release operating
data for analysis. I suspect to do so would
mean the release of empirical data to build
the oppositions case for insignificant CO
2

reduction and poor operating economics.
I was unable to find one study of existing
wind energy installations that found the
CO
2
reductions predicted by AWEA.
The number of grassroots organiza-
tions opposed to government-mandated
and -supported utility-scale wind power
projects is growing rapidly. The Indus-
trial Wind Action Group maintains a grow-
ing list of organizations (more than 150
at last count) on its website (windaction
.org) that have been formed to oppose
new wind power parks and to bring reason
to the public debate about the true value
of the electricity produced by wind power.
Follow the Money
AWEA, as the industrys principal lobby-
ist, has failed to state a compelling rea-
son why the PTC should be renewed for a
mature technology with minimal environ-
mental benefits. This is particularly telling
when support from environmental groups
is splintered and the number of opposi-
tion groups is growing, getting better or-
ganized, and loudly telling Washington of
their concerns.
At its core, the PTC is public support
of a few wind farm developers, owners,
and equipment manufacturers wishing to
sustain profits produced by a generous tax
subsidy. In my mind, thats no reason to
renew the PTC.
Dr. Robert Peltier, PE is POWERs
editor-in-chief.
Under Siege
Regardless of the outcome, wind
power remains a loser.
Peace of mind for your power plant.
www.etaproeficiency.com e-mail: etapro@gpstrategies.com 800.803.6737 716.799.1080
Ofices in: North America Latin America Europe Asia Africa
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APR.
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implemented by engineers with deep domain expertise. Performance. Using localized empirical
models integrated with first principle models, EtaPRO detects anomalies and quantifies their effect
preventing a potentially catastrophic event. Impact. Learn how you can reduce forced outages,
protect your plant, and reduce emissions at www.etaproefficiency.com.
2012 GP Strategies Corporation. All rights reserved. GP Strategies and GP Strategies with logo design are trademarks of GP Strategies
Corporation. All other trademarks are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
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Peace of mind for your power plant.
www.etaproeficiency.com e-mail: etapro@gpstrategies.com 800.803.6737 716.799.1080
Ofices in: North America Latin America Europe Asia Africa
Protect your equipment from unplanned outages with EtaPRO

APR.
Knowledge. Performance. Impact.
Knowledge. Count on GP Strategies to protect your processes and equipment with a unique
combination of Advanced Pattern Recognition (APR) and Thermodynamic modeling technologies
implemented by engineers with deep domain expertise. Performance. Using localized empirical
models integrated with first principle models, EtaPRO detects anomalies and quantifies their effect
preventing a potentially catastrophic event. Impact. Learn how you can reduce forced outages,
protect your plant, and reduce emissions at www.etaproefficiency.com.
2012 GP Strategies Corporation. All rights reserved. GP Strategies and GP Strategies with logo design are trademarks of GP Strategies
Corporation. All other trademarks are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
Bleed: 8.5 x 11.375 Trim: 8.25 x 11.125
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December 2012 8
Vanadium Flow Battery
Juices Onion Plant
An emerging flow battery technology got
a major boost earlier this year when Gills
Onions, one of the largest fresh-cut onion
processing plants in the worldbegan op-
erating a 3.6-MWh vanadium redox battery
(VRB) energy storage system (ESS). The 14-
acre processing facility in Oxnard, Calif.,
was already converting 100% of its daily
onion wasteup to 300,000 pounds
into a combination of renewable energy
and cattle feed using an advanced energy
recovery system (AERS) that extracts juice
from onion peels and treats it in a high-
rate anaerobic reactor to produce biogas
that powers two 300-kW fuel cells. But
Gills Onions thought it necessary to add
energy storage to its AERS to improve the
efficiency of the system and further reduce
electric costs, citing their main motivation
as wanting to shift electricity generation
from off-peak to on-peak periods while
warding off pricey demand spikes.
Encouraged by state cash rebates for
certain types of energy storage, Gills On-
ions says it opted for the VRB-ESS that
consists of three 200-kW modules with
enough electrolyte to provide six hours
of storage capacity (Figure 1). Not only
can the VRB change from fully charging
to fully discharging in seconds so that the
full 600 kW are available 24 hours a day,
Gills Onions says the system also can pulse
an additional 50%to 750 kWfor 10
minutes each hour, providing additional
capacity for motor starts or other spikes.
The project was built and is owned
and operated by Prudent Energy Corp.
subsidiary Prudent Energy Services. The
Bethesda, Md.based company gets an
undisclosed share of the energy savings
resulting from the project in return, cal-
culated as avoided charges, costs, and
fees that would otherwise be paid by
Gills to the local utility.
As Prudent Energy describes it, the VRB-
ESS consists of cell stacks, allowing modu-
lar systems to be assembled in large parallel
and series configurationswith no special
site requirements other than a substantial
footprint. The cell stacks themselves are
10-kW sealed devices that consist of many
cells, each of which contains two half-cells
separated by a membrane. Electrochemical
reactions occur in the half cells on inert
carbon felt electrodes, creating a current
used to charge or discharge the battery.
When charged electrolyte fluids [from sep-
arate storage tanks] pass through the cell
stack, different ionic forms of vanadium re-
act, resulting in a balancing electron flow
into an external DC circuitthus complet-
ing an electrochemical path for discharge,
the company says. Forcing current into
the stack from an external source recharges
electrolyte in the stack, with fluids then
pumped back into the reservoirs. This
re-dox process is reversible, allowing the
battery to be charged and discharged re-
peatedly, the company explains.
In its most basic sense, the system
stores energy chemically in different forms
of a single elementvanadium, which the
company has dubbed a miracle metal
in a proprietary electrolytic mixture. The
minerals marvels lie in its unique attri-
butes, particularly as a chemical catalyst
for electrolytes, the company says. It is
a transition metal, which means it has the
typical properties of metals, but in addi-
tion, high melting and boiling points, and
high density, it explains. And, as Prudent
Energy highlights: Vanadium forms sta-
ble, concentrated electrolytic solutions in
four neighboring oxidations states.
A selling point extolled by Gills Onions
is the life of the system. The technology
reportedly can produce more than 10,000
full-depth charge/discharge cycles with
no degradation in performance. Mean-
while, the electrolyte never degrades and
can be fully recycled.
VFB solutions have long been recog-
nized for their edge over lithium-ion bat-
tery storage, primarily because VFBs have
a practical advantage with their storage
duration limit of 10 hourscompared to a
1- to 2-hour range for lithium-ion storage
systems (though lithium-ion wins in terms
of round-trip efficiency).
Prudents energy storage system isnt
unique. Several companiesincluding
U.S.-based Ashlawn Energy, Austria-based
Cellstrom GmbH, and Thailand-based Celle-
niumhave entered the fray, competing for
global VFB market share. VFBs are already
being used in the European Union, China,
Japan, South Korea, and Australiathough
most are in the 100-kWh range. Billed as
the largest of its kind, the 3.6-MWh Gills
Onions installation compares only with an-
other Prudent Energy project completed in
March 2011 involving a 1-MWh VFB at the
China Electric Power Research Institute in
Zhangbei, Hebei Province.
Meanwhile, industry analysts foresee
tremendous growth of VFBs in the short
term. A March 2012 study by Lux Research
predicts that VFBs could capture about
17% of the energy grid storage market
by 2017assuming that developers can
reach a target of $750/kWh for a fully
installed system by then. The most sig-
nificant factor that could determine the
technologys success is availability and
pricing of vanadium, which is already see-
ing heightened demand for its traditional
use: strengthening steel.
Vanadium is not scarce, says Prudent
Energy, claiming that it not only can be
mined naturally as an ore but can also be
recovered as a by-product of steel manu-
facturing, coal-fired power generation,
and oil shale production. But analysts pre-
dict a supply shortage, driven by increas-
ing consumption by China, which produces
40% of the worlds vanadium supply (oth-
erwise dominated by Russia and South Af-
rica), as a result of a new rule that only
vanadium-containing reinforced steel bars
can be used for infrastructure and other
construction projects. Increased demand
for the mineral pegged to its use in flow
batteries will strain global supplies.
Compounding pricing concerns is the
quirk that, unlike many commodities, va-
nadium does not trade on the open mar-
ket; deals are negotiated privately and
tend to surge when steel demand is high
and plunge during economic downturns.
This price volatility is a major deterrent
for battery producers, which require large
amounts of high-purity (greater than
98.4%) vanadium, analysts point out.
1. Storing onion juice. One of the
worlds largest vanadium flow battery energy
storage systems began operation earlier this
year at Gills Onions, an Oxnard, Calif., fresh-
cut onions processing plant. The tennis court
sized system consists of cell stack modules
that are connected in parallel configurations. It
stores electricity during lower-cost nighttime
hours and allows the Gills facility to rely on the
flow battery to generate 600 kW for as long as
six hours during higher-cost peak hours. Cour-
tesy: Gills Onions
TWO GREAT
COMPANIES.
ONE BRIGHT
FUTURE.
How do you create a global company built
for the future? By combining two powerful
histories in pursuit of a bold visionto help
companies around the world contribute to
healthier, safer environments.
Building on the achievements of Pentair and Tycos Flow Control
businesses, comprised of Valves & Controls, Thermal Controls
and Water & Environmental Systems, the new Pentair delivers
exceptional depth and expertise in filtration and processing, flow
management, equipment protection and thermal management.
From water to power
From energy to construction
From food service to residential
Were 30,000 employees strong, combining inventive thinking
with disciplined execution to deploy solutions that help better
manage and utilize precious resources and ensure operational
success for our customers worldwide. Pentair stands ready
to solve a full range of residential, commercial, municipal and
industrial needs.
PENTAIR.COM
TWO GREAT
COMPANIES.
ONE BRIGHT
FUTURE.
How do you create a global company built
for the future? By combining two powerful
histories in pursuit of a bold visionto help
companies around the world contribute to
healthier, safer environments.
Building on the achievements of Pentair and Tycos Flow Control
businesses, comprised of Valves & Controls, Thermal Controls
and Water & Environmental Systems, the new Pentair delivers
exceptional depth and expertise in filtration and processing, flow
management, equipment protection and thermal management.
From water to power
From energy to construction
From food service to residential
Were 30,000 employees strong, combining inventive thinking
with disciplined execution to deploy solutions that help better
manage and utilize precious resources and ensure operational
success for our customers worldwide. Pentair stands ready
to solve a full range of residential, commercial, municipal and
industrial needs.
PENTAIR.COM
CIRCLE 5 ON READER SERVICE CARD
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 10
THE BIG PICTURE: A Renewables Quest
ARIZ.
CALIF.
COLO.
MAINE
VT.
N.H.
MASS.
N.Y.
PA.
N.J.
DEL.
MD.
VA.
W.VA.
OHIO
MICH.
WISC.
ILL.
IND.
MINN.
IOWA
MO.
N.D.
S.D.
KAN.
OKLA.
TEXAS
N.M.
MONT.
WASH.
ORE.
NEV.
UTAH
N.C.
HAWAII
Conventional hydro*
(*may not be eligible toward RPS)
Other renewables
(Eligible renewables vary;
includes wind, CSP, PV,
biomass, geothermal, landll
gas, and marine power)
CONN.
27%
by
2020
0.6%
1.8%
30%
by
2020
24.8%
by
2025
3.6%
5.7%
22.1%
by
2020
1.1%
2.8%
16%
by
2019
1.3%
20.4%
by
2021
1.5%
%%%
25%
by
2026
1.3%
20%
by
2022
0.9%
1.6%
17.1%
28.8%
R.I.
15%
by
2025
0.9%
2.3% 12.5%
by
2021
1.7%
1.4%
FLA.
S.C.
GA.
ALA.
MISS.
TENN.
KY.
ARK.
LA.
1%
1.2%
5.9 GW
by
2015
5.2%
0.8%
6.5%
15%
by
2015
20%
by
2020
0.9%
4.4%
7.3% 20%
by
2020
30%
by
2020
4.2%
6.6%
15%
by
2025
5.9%
1.2%
33%
by
2020
25%
by
2025
6.6%
7.8%
IDAHO
WYO.
NEB.
20%
by
2025
2.7%
2.2%
25%
by
2025
15%
by
2020
15%
by
2015
56.4%
2.9%
10%
by
2015
10%
by
2015
25%
by
2025
1.9%
9.3%
~10%
by
2025
3.6%
2.5% 10%
by
2015

1.5%
2.2%
0.2%
0.7%
25%
by
2025
12.5%
by
2024
20%
by
2017
13.4%
7.8%
29%
by
2015
12.5%
2.2%
~18%
by
2021
0.4%
1.4%
25%
by
2025
1.9%
10%
by
2025
111111111
15%
by
2021
104
MW

11.4% 1111111111
40%
by
2030
1.3%
10.2%
Other
renewables

Hydro
Required to meet
RPS/goal
Note: Figures represent percentage of states total generation
(MWh) in July 2012
0.3%
1.2%
555
0.3%
0.7%
50.6%
14.4%
5
11111
7.9%
8.4% 88888
84.5%
5%
73.2%
14.1%
17.2%
15%
AROUND THE WORLD
As of October 2012, 29 states had mandatory renewable portfolio standards (dark green), while eight states had volun-
tary goals (light green). Heres how each was faring as of July 2012. (The outer circle represents 100% of the
target/goal; blue and yellow segments show the percentage of total generation by source.) Sources: EIA Electric Power
Monthly, DSIREUSA Copy and artwork by Sonal Patel, senior writer
Worldwide, the share of renewables in power generation slightly exceeded 20% in 2011. The outer circle represents
100% of the goal; dark purple represents the renewables percentage of total electricity consumption in 2011
(including hydro). Sources: REN21, IRENA, Enerdata, Danish Energy Agency
AUSTRALIA
(45 TWh by 2020)
6.9%
20%
by
2020
BRAZIL
88.2%
70%
by
2020
CHINA
(*as share of primary energy)
10.3%
15%
by
2020*
40.7%
DENMARK
100%
by
2035
EGYPT
10.2%
20%
by
2020
FINLAND
(*as share of primary energy)
28.8%
GERMANY
22.3%
INDONESIA
15.5%
17%
by
2025
JAPAN
10.3%
MEXICO
16%
76.1%
NEW ZEALAND
47.4%
55.3%
by
2020
PORTUGAL
29.3%
SPAIN
55.3%
SWEDEN
10%
UK
30%
by
2040
38%
by
2020*
35%
by
2020
35%
by
2025
15%
by
2020
62.8%
by
2020
40%
by
2020
90%
by
2025
December 2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 11
Largest Wastewater
Treatment Fuel Cell Plant
Goes Online
In October, Canadian biogas power produc-
er Anaergia opened a 2.8-MW fuel cell sys-
tem powered by cleaned and conditioned
wastewater biosolids at a municipal water
treatment facility in Ontario, Calif. The
RP-1 Water Recycling Facility treats up to
44 million gallons a day of wastewater,
and the new renewable energy facility in-
stalled onsite will offset about 60% of the
grid power previously used by the facility
to treat wastewater, Anaergia said.
Power from the DFC3000 stationary fuel
cell power plant recently purchased from
FuelCell Energy is being sold to the waste-
water treatment facilitys owner, Inland
Empire Utilities Agency (IEUA), a munici-
pal water district located in western San
Bernardino County, under a 20-year power
purchase agreement. Environmental rules
prohibit the utility from releasing methane-
rich biogas generated by the wastewater
treatment process directly into the atmo-
sphere. Because flaring the gas emits pol-
lutants, IEUA has been using digester gas
to provide a fuel for cogeneration engines
that provide energy to other processes
within the facility.
The fuel cell plant requires only mini-
mal cleaning of the biogas, says its man-
ufacturer FuelCell Energy. Biogas contains
humidity, sulfur and CO
2
. Prior to being
used as a fuel source for the Direct Fuel-
Cell, the humidity and sulfur must be re-
moved, but the DFC technology does not
require the removal of the CO
2
. This is a
cost advantage as pipeline quality biogas,
also termed directed biogas, must have
the CO
2
removed prior to being injected
in the gas pipeline, which is an energy-
intensive process and adds cost.
Essentially, the fuel cell plant uses an
electrochemical process to efficiently gener-
ate electricity and heat suitable for generat-
ing steam. According to FuelCell Energy, fuel
cells are highly efficient and can achieve
efficiencies up to 90% when byproduct heat
is utilized. The byproduct heat from this
power plant will be used to help create the
renewable biogas by heating the anaerobic
digesters that produce the biogas. High
efficiency decreases energy costs and pro-
vides more electrical output from the same
amount of biogas than less efficient alterna-
tives, the company says.
The IEUA lauds the project as a major
development that will bring it closer to its
goal of going Gridless by 2020, allowing
it to operate completely off the grid during
peak energy usage periods.
A renewable mode of generation promot-
ed less fiercely than solar, wind, and hydro,
fuel cell power plants have been gathering
2. Fuel cell frenzy. A 60-MW fuel cell
park (shown in this rendering) is under de-
velopment by POSCO Energy along with
partners Korea Hydro Nuclear Power Co. and
Samchully Gas Co. The fuel cell park will con-
sist of a series of FuelCell Energy DFC3000
power plants located in an industrial complex
in Whasung City. Electricity generated by the
fuel cells starting in 2013 will be supplied to
the grid and assists the partners with compli-
ance under the South Korean Renewable Port-
folio Standard. Courtesy: FuelCell Energy
Scan the QR Code for more information
877-4SI-POWER
or go to
www.structint.com/power
Structural Integrity works hard and believes in our expertise to help nuclear, fossil and
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|
December 2012 12
clout over the past decade. Cost and tech-
nology are still hurdles, and the industry,
hard-hit by the economic downturn, has
struggled to achieve pricing parity with
other technologies. Meanwhile, current fed-
eral tax credits provided to fuel cell makers
($3,000/kW or 30% of the capital cost) are
set to expire in 2016.
Around the world, however, fuel cell
power is making strides. South Korea leads
the charge in many respects: The nations
capital, Seoul City, has plans to support in-
stallation of 230 MW of stationary fuel cell
power plantspart of its plan to replace
the capacity of one nuclear power plant
a project that could see 29 fuel cell parks
totaling 190 MW and 102 commercial build-
ing installations totaling 40 MW by 2014.
This November, FuelCell Energy an-
nounced it had received an order for 121.8
MW of fuel cell kits and other services from
its South Korean partner POSCO. POSCO
and FuelCell are already under contract to
build the worlds largest fuel cell parka
58.8-MW project located in Whasung City,
Gyeonggi Province, South Koreastarting
in early 2013 (Figure 2). The projectco-
owned by Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co.
Ltd., Samchully Co., and other financial
investorsstems from an ambitious re-
newable portfolio standard adopted by the
country in 2012. The heat generated by the
fuel cell power plants will be supplied to a
district heating system for local use.
Of Giant Turbines and
Rotor Blades
Offshore wind turbine technology experi-
enced a brief gust in October as Siemens
Energy began field testing of its new
154-meter (m) rotor for the 6-MW offshore
wind turbine, and Norwegian technology
company Sway Turbine unveiled a 10-MW
offshore turbine.
Siemens began field testing of what it
claims is the worlds largest rotor blade,
the 154-m B75, in sterild, Denmark, on its
SWT-6.0-154 direct-drive wind turbine (Fig-
ure 3). The first Siemens 6-MW turbine was
installed in May 2011 at the Hvsore test
site in Denmark, but due to height restric-
tions, a 120-m rotor was used on the proto-
type. The serial version of the 6-MW turbine
will use the 154-m rotor and is expected to
become the new benchmark in the offshore
wind industry, Siemens said.
The company has so far procured an
agreement with Denmarks DONG Energy for
300 of the 6-MW turbines for use in projects
off the coast of the UK. Siemens is expected
to install two more SWT-6.0 prototypes in
the UK Gunfleet Sands project, marking the
first time that the Siemens 6-MW wind tur-
bine will be tested offshore. Both turbines
for that project will be equipped with the
120-m rotor.
In October, meanwhile, Sway Turbine
unveiled its much-awaited ST10, a 10-MW
model that offers an estimated 1520%
reduction in turbine cost compared to cur-
rent state of the art, conventional design
offshore wind turbines, and a considerable
reduction in cost per kWh produced on wind
park level, the company said in a recent
presentation.
To meet the challenges of scaling up the
turbine, Sway said it embarked on several
unusual design solutions (Figure 4). De-
signed for harsh conditions, basic specifica-
tions include a 164-m rotor diameter with
three rotor blade supports, a 13 m/s rated
wind speed, and 12 rpm nominal speed. The
turbine does not have a rotor hub; it instead
features an open generator, which looks like
a bicycle wheel. Each of the three pitching
blades is mounted to an A-frame blade
support structure that straddles the genera-
tor. The support structure legs terminate on
two independent hubs, which also function
as the hubs for the generator rotor. The out-
er rim of the generator rotor is connected
to the blade support structure, providing the
means of transferring torque between the
turbine rotor and the generator. Designed to
operate upwind on a fixed tower, the turbine
has a design life of 20 years.
According to the company, the new
combination of components results in a
system that has a significant decrease in
weight over conventional designs, and a
net lower cost of energy. Sway Turbine is
now in the process of identifying the best
industrial partner to bring the product to
the market, it said.
3. Size matters. Siemens began field testing of what it claims is the worlds largest rotor
blade, the 154-meter B75, on its SWT-6.0-154 direct-drive wind turbine in sterild, Denmark,
this October. Courtesy: Siemens
4. A turbine titan. Norwegian company Sway Turbine in October unveiled details about
its 10-MW wind turbine, a machine that features a 164-m rotor diameter with three rotor blade
supports. The turbine does not have a rotor hub; it instead features an open generator, which
looks like a bicycle wheel. Courtesy: Sway Turbine
December 2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 13
The two project developments are especially welcome af-
ter a period in which production of new offshore turbines has
lapsed. After brisk progress that saw as many as 1,503 fully
grid-connected offshore wind turbinesa total of more than 4
GWinstalled worldwide as of June 2012, development of new
offshore wind farms has been caught in headwinds, reportedly
owing to a crunch on investment in the sector. After receiving
the major order in July for 300 6-MW turbines from Denmarks
DONG Energy, Siemens hasnt taken another order.
Meanwhile, neither Denmarks Vestas nor Repower Systems, a
German subsidiary of Indias Suzlon, has reportedly had an order
since October 2011, reported the Financial Times in November.
At the same time, the Danish government moved to push back
power production from two offshore wind farms with a joint ca-
pacity of 1 GW by one year, to 2018, and DONG Energy shelved a
project for 96 turbines on a North Sea wind farm off the coast of
Germany, cancelling an order for 97 Siemens turbines.
The European Wind Energy Association told POWER that the
pipeline of future deals [for offshore wind power] continues to
be strong, with further transactions standing a good chance of
closing before the end of the year. New projects include the com-
pleted Walney project in the UK (see p. 42) as well as Butendiek in
Germany, and others anticipated in 2013, such as the Gode Wind
and Nordergrunde in Germany.
Modernization of Century-Old Hydro
Facility Yields Rich History
When the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility was built in
the steep, forested mountains between Boulder and Nederland,
Colo., in 1910, it was the highest head hydroelectric facility
in the western U.S. It consisted of two 5-MW turbine genera-
tors, both of which were upgraded in the 1930s to double the
plants capacity. The units ran until 2000, when one generator
failed and was never replaced.
The second unit was recently replaced with a 5-MW turbine
generator to modernize the century-old hydroelectric facil-
5. An artifact. The City of Boulder, Colo., preserved equipment,
like this turbine that is more than 100 years old, when it modernized
the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Plant earlier this year. Courtesy: City
of Boulder
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CHA-115 RARE2012with2SnipesPowerMagNov2012:Layout 1 10/3/12 4:45 PM Page 1
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04_PWR_120112_GM&BP.indd 13 11/15/12 11:47:44 AM
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 14
ity and keep it operational for 50 more years. Its developers
say that though it is smaller, it produces 30% more power
because it is more efficient.
For the City of Boulder, refurbishing the plant also has deep,
historical significance. The city contracted URS Corp. and Na-
tive Cultural Services to complete detailed records of the histor-
ical equipment prior to removal in order to preserve the design,
construction, and operational history of the original facility.
As well as preparing a narrative history of the project, the city
has preserved historical equipment in place for educational and
display purposes (Figures 5 and 6). The research has yielded
several interesting facts about the facility, including that it was
the first structure in which acetylene welding in conjunction
with the ball-peen welding procedure was useda method that
significantly advanced penstock technology.
The project is one of seven hydropower projects selected by
the Department of Energy (DOE) for a total of up to $30.6 mil-
lion in funding through the 2009 American Recovery and Re-
investment Act. These were cost-shared projects that upgraded
existing hydropower facilities without requiring significant civil
works modifications to dams. Like the Boulder project, several
call for upgrading antiquated turbines: replacing 1940s and
1960s vintage turbines with stainless steel turbines and run-
ners at four Alabama Power Co. hydro plants on the Coosa River,
for example, or replacing four 90-year-old Francis turbines with
stainless steel turbines (and increasing annual generation by
23%) at Alcoas Tapoco Cheoah plant in Robbinsville, N.C. The
Boulder project received $1.18 million from the DOE toward an
estimated project cost of $5.155 million.
This project, though small, has garnered wide attention, in-
cluding a mention from the National Hydropower Association.
The industry group said in October that similar upgrades could
add nearly 9 GW of capacity across the country.
14-MW Solar PV Plant Completed at
Naval Station
The U.S. Navy in late October saw the completion of its largest
solar generation system, a 13.78-MW (DC) solar photovoltaic
6. A new lease on life. Modernization of the Boulder Canyon
Hydroelectric Facility left one failed 10-MW turbine in place and re-
placed the other 10-MW turbine with a new, highly efficient 5-MW tur-
bine that has increased generation by 30%. Courtesy: City of Boulder
Note on the Oconee Top Plant
Some of our readers may have been confused by the word-
ing of a press release about our November issues nuclear
Top Plants, the table of contents blurb about Dukes Oconee
plant, or a sentence in the cover story about that plant.
In the interest of brevity, it seems we sacrificed clarity.
We did not mean to imply that this was the first of any
digital control systems upgrades in the U.S. In fact, POWER
has written about such upgrades at Oconee and elsewhere
in the past. The award this year was for a specific safety-
related system digital upgrade.
Derek Halverson, a Nuclear Regulatory Commission spokes-
man, told POWER on November 8 that what Oconee installed
was the first complete integrated digital reactor protection
and engineered safeguards system of any U.S. commercial
nuclear power plant. Halverson further clarified: Many NRC-
licensed plants have at least partially upgraded their control
systems, both safety related and non-safety related, from
analog to digital technology. For example, many plants have
installed digital technology in at least a small portion of their
safety-related I&C systems, even if only to support operator
indications. However, there are still safety-related I&C sys-
tems at Oconee and the other NRC licensed nuclear power
plants that remain analog.
CIRCLE 8 ON READER SERVICE CARD
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04_PWR_120112_GM&BP.indd 15 11/15/12 11:49:36 AM
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 16
(PV) power system at Naval Air Weapons
Station China Lake (NAWS China Lake)
in California. The plant, which is report-
edly generating more than 30% of China
Lakes annual energy load, is uniquely
the first federal agency project to be fi-
nanced through a 20-year solar power
purchase agreement (PPA) and could be-
come a template for future large-scale
solar projects.
The project is owned by a MetLife
Inc. subsidiary, but it was built and will
be operated and maintained by Califor-
nia firm SunPower. NAWS China Lake is
reportedly buying power from the in-
stallation at up to 30% below the rate
available through 10-year PPAs, which
provides the Navy with a long-term
hedge against rising power prices and
required no initial capital investment,
the San Joseheadquartered company
said. The PPA, secured under a long-term
energy procurement authority requires
no obligations from the Navy.
The plant features SunPowers Oasis
power plant (Figure 7), a modular solar
power block that is engineered to optimize
land use. Each power block integrates the
SunPower T0 Tracker with SunPowers high-
efficiency solar panels, pre-manufactured
system cabling, the Oasis smart inverter,
and the Oasis operating system.
POWER Digest
Georgia Power Completes 2,500-MW
Coal-to-Gas Conversion. Southern
Co. subsidiary Georgia Power on Oct.
28 put online the third and final 840-
MW natural gas combined cycle unit at
Plant McDonough-Atkinson in Smyrna,
Ga. The first gas plant went online in
December 2011 and the second on April
26. Bringing the plants capacity to
2,500 MW, the three units are capable
of producing more than five times the
electricity of the coal units that were
replaced, the company claims. Georgia
Power retired the two coal units at Plant
McDonough-Atkinson on Sept. 30, 2011,
and Feb. 29, 2012. Removal of the his-
toric stack at the plant has begun and
will be complete by June 2013.
GDF Suez Starts Operations at 860-
MW Singapore Gas Plant. GDF Suez
on Oct. 29 began commercial operation
of two combined cycle gas turbine units,
each with a capacity of 430 MW. The two
new units are part of Senoko Energys
Repowering Project, announced in 2008,
which aims to convert two 30-year-old
oil-fired units into combined cycle units.
Senoko Energy is the largest power gen-
eration company in Singapore, operat-
ing a 3,300-MW portfolio and providing
around 25% of the countrys electricity
needs. Electricity demand growth in Sin-
gapore has averaged 4% per annum over
the past 10 years.
Vattenfall Powers Up 675-MW
Coal Unit in Germany. Swedish util-
ity Vattenfall started up a new 675-MW
coal-fired unit at its 1971-built Boxberg
power plant in the German eastern state
of Saxony on Oct. 11. The new Boxberg
R block brings the Boxberg plants to-
tal power capacity to 2,575 MW. Vat-
tenfall says the new unit uses advanced
technology that incorporates materials
research, boiler, and turbine technol-
ogy. It will need up to 30% less coal
than power plants on a worldwide aver-
age and feature an efficiency of close to
44%. The plant receives lignite from the
nearby Nochten and Reichwalde open-
cast (pit) mine.
Bruce Power Completes Refur-
bishment Program in Ontario. Bruce
Power has completed a refurbishment
program at its Bruce Power nuclear
plant, starting commercial operations of
Bruce Power Unit 1 on Oct. 22 and put-
ting the Bruce Power Unit 2 online on
Nov. 2. Bruce Power, owned by Canadian
companies TransCanada and Cameco,
Bruce Power employees, and the Power
Workers Union, among others, began
its revitalization program at the nu-
clear plant in Tiverton, Ontario, almost a
decade ago. Bruce Power consists of two
generating stations (Bruce A & B) with
each station housing four CANDU reac-
tors. Completion of the project, one of
Canadas largest infrastructure projects,
means that all eight operating units will
be capable of providing more than 6,200
MW, or about 25% of Ontarios power. It
also makes the facility one of the worlds
largest nuclear stations.
Tri-Fuel Plant Takes Shape in Jor-
dan. A Wrtsil-led consortium that
includes South Koreas Lotte Engineer-
ing & Construction on Oct. 11 signed
a $552 million contract with Jordanian
utility Amman Asia Electric Power Co.
for the supply of a 573-MW power plant
to Jordan. The plant, to be built in Al
Manakher near the countrys capital,
Amman, will be capable of using natural
gas, heavy fuel oil, and light fuel oil.
It will be powered by 38 Wrtsil 50DF
multi-fuel engines and fitted with a NO
x

control system for emissions abatement.
The plant will be delivered in three
phases, the first of which will be com-
pleted in February 2014 and the final by
September 2014.
Navys Plan to Deploy Marine
Power Takes Shape. A plan to develop
a utility-scale marine energy project
that will enable the U.S. Naval Facili-
ties Engineering Command (NAVFAC) to
harness the power of ocean currents is
making strides. Contracts have already
been awarded to privately held marine
service providers Eclipse Group Inc.,
which will lead underwater construction
efforts, and Triton Energy Systems,
which will spearhead underwater gen-
eration engineering efforts. In October,
industrial manufacturer Eaton Corp.
said it had won a contract to support
the projects land-based engineering,
including development of high-voltage
electrical distribution. For the project,
Eaton has been designated as an Eclipse
qualified partner on a Naval Sea Systems
Command (NAVSEA) SEAPORT-E five year
contract with a possible capacity in ex-
cess of $19 billion.
Sonal Patel is POWERs senior writer.
7. Model solar. The U.S. Navys largest solar installationa 13.78-MW solar photovoltaic pow-
er system at Naval Air Weapons Station China Lakewas completed in October. The plant features
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December2012 18
Conference Report: 12th ICS Cyber
Security Conference
The 12th ICS Cyber Security Conference was held at Old Domin-
ion Universitys Virginia Modeling Analysis and Simulation Center
(VMASC) October 2225, 2012. There were approximately 150 at-
tendees from multiple industries, universities, government, and ven-
dors as well as consultants from the U.S., South America, Europe,
and Asia. The conference used the remote video conferencing capa-
bilities available at VMASC to enable a few speakers to participate
from as far away as Europe and Asia.
The conference addressed multiple aspects of the vulnerabilities
that affect industrial control systems (ICSs). These are the program-
mable logic controllers (PLCs), distributed control systems (DCSs),
SCADA, and other systems that make our modern world function
smoothly every minute of every day by controlling physical processes
in power and water utilities, oil and gas pipelines, chemical and
manufacturing plants, transportation, and defense. These are the
same types of systems that were compromised by Stuxnet.
Conference participants studied case histories and discussed the
progress of standardization and interoperability. No press represen-
tatives were allowed into the conference, and a non-attribution
policy was rigorously enforced, hence the lack of names and affilia-
tions in this report.
No Consistent Definition
Showing the diversity of interests of those working on cyber se-
curity threats, conference participants could not agree on a single
definition of what constitutes a cyber incident, particularly an un-
intentional incident. One very useful outcome of the conference was
developing a better appreciation of the breadth and depth of critical
infrastructure protection (CIP) security required, the wide range of
skills required to solve cyber security problems, and the importance
of sharing information, particularly about unintentional incidents.
ICS cyber incidents caused without intentfailures stemming from
the processing, storage, or transmission of datacan have disas-
trous consequences and serve as roadmaps for ICS system hacks.
(For more on ICS protection failures and their consequences, see
Ensuring the Cybersecurity of Plant Industrial Control Systems in
the June 2012 issue of POWER, available at www.powermag.com.)
Another key conference finding was that there are few (being
generous) technologies actually developed for ICS that are not recy-
cled IT solutions. One emerging technology solution was discussed
that could be a game changer because it improves control system
performance and appears not to be susceptible to cyber threats.
However, it is still in the research and development phase, and de-
tails were sparse. Additionally, progress is being made on device
authentication at the protocol level, and some chipmakers are trans-
ferring their know-how to control systems for authenticating end
devices. Protecting product information is becoming much more
common these days (see sidebar).
Many Are Unaware
An international survey performed for CIGRE (the International
Council on Large Electric Systems) identified the lack of cyber under-
standing by the control and protective relay community as another
area of work that is currently lagging. This is particularly important
as CIGRE did not address the impact of the Aurora testa cyber at-
tack on power generating equipment staged by the U.S. Department
Legal Fears Stifle Public Discussion of
Cyber Security Threats
Discussions about technologies used and responses by firms en-
gaged in securing their cyber systems went in an unexpected
direction at one point during the 12th ICS Cyber Security Con-
ference. In fact, three events that came to light at the event
demonstrate what appear to be parochial responses to reported
vulnerabilities. Intentionally inhibiting the free interaction and
flow of information between cyber security professionals, particu-
larly by vendors and the federal government, will only slow future
advances in state-of-the-art ICS security.
In the first situation, two presentations focusing on a nuclear
plants potential cyber security vulnerabilities were abruptly can-
celled when an equipment supplier threatened to sue the plant
owner. The subject of both talks was the results of a security re-
view conducted for a foreign nuclear utility, an above-and-beyond
review not required by regulators, but one that the utility volun-
tarily pursued. One presentation was to be by utility representa-
tives and the other was to be by a representative of the utility that
conducted the review. The result of the review identified new and
previously unknown vulnerabilities. Even though the utility had ap-
proved the presentations, the vendor complained it would violate
their nondisclosure agreement.
What the conference participants did learn was that this interna-
tional utilitys assessment and analysis program is more comprehen-
sive than what existing U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)
guidance requires. This raises questions concerning the adequacy
of NRC cyber security guidance and therefore the adequacy of cyber
security programs at all U.S. nuclear plants. It should be mentioned
that representatives of the NRC attended the conference.
In the second case, a firm engaged in cyber security that, ac-
cording to an Oct. 29 Reuters report, uncovered thousands of
pieces of control equipment exposed to online attacks did not tell
U.S. authorities where they were installed because it feared being
sued by the equipment owners. This quashing of important infor-
mation sharing based on the fear of lawsuits brought by vendors is
having significant repercussions across many industries.
Finally, attendees learned that the U.S. government has kept a
technique it discovered for attacking electricity generation equip-
ment secret for five years, according to the same Reuters report,
leaving known vulnerabilities of many electricity generators with-
out protection. Ironically, U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta,
also in October, said that terrorists could use cyber attacks to con-
taminate the water supply in major cities or shut down the power
grid across large parts of the country.
The U.S. government is also adding to the difficulty of devising
responses to new threats by routinely classifying critical informa-
tion as secret and by failing to develop appropriate cyber security
regulations for utilities, according to Kevin McDonald, executive
vice president at security service provider Alvaka Networks in Irvine,
Calif., who says, If we dont do something as a community, really
bad things are going to happen and people are going to die.
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December2012 20
of Homeland Security (DHS) in 2007 at the Idaho National Labora-
tory (INL)even though it concerned a protective relay issue.
The conference included the first public discussions of the Aurora
vulnerability, including a discussion of the facts surrounding the INL
test. Somewhat disconcerting was the fact that more than five years
after the Aurora test, very few of the critical infrastructure attendees
understood the technical issues surrounding the test and why its
results directly apply to their facilities. (See http://bit.ly/VAnxat for
a description and video of the Aurora test plus a technical discussion
of its importance to cyber security.)
This lack of awareness was demonstrated by one question from
the floor. The individual asked why the electric industry should care
about every substation since there are so many substationslosing
some should not be cause for concern. The answer is that exploit-
ing the Aurora vulnerability effectively makes the substation an at-
tacker. Consequently, any unsecured (for Aurora) substation can be
a threat to any commercial or industrial facility with rotating equip-
ment served by that substation, including power plants, refineries,
ships, hospitals, data centers, and the like. Because so few utilities
are addressing Aurora, a representative from the Department of De-
fense questioned if they should take matters into their own hands by
installing mitigation at their facilities, effectively protecting them-
selves from their own utilities!
Information Sharing Is Vital
There are pockets of end users who are willing to share ICS informa-
tion with their peers in industry. Utility control system engineers
from two different utilities discussed their actual recent ICS cyber
case histories. In both instances, the cause was unclear, making
solutions difficult to identify. In one case, the utility lost view and
control of the plant and was unable to restore the view even with
the vendor on site. In the other, the utility experienced several in-
stances of complete loss of control and view with plants at power!
Another utility discussed its legacy control system cyber security
test bed. The utility made a plea to establish an informal informa-
tion-sharing program to share industry practices. This involves shar-
ing of real information, not literature searches of solutions.
There was discussion of a project using Shodan (a cyber secu-
rity search engine) with selected key words that found more than
500,000 Internet-facing control system devices all the way to device
IP addresses. This information was recently provided to the DHS and
resulted in a nationwide vulnerability notice in late October. Even
today, the researcher is concerned about his liability because he
found the actual Internet addresses. The researcher provided this
example of the lack of understanding about ICS vulnerabilities: He
contacted a water utility when he found it had ICSs that were re-
motely accessible to anyone with an Internet connection, but the
end user appeared to not understand the importance of the informa-
tion and essentially ignored the warning.
A water utility described a disgruntled insider compromise. It
took an inordinately long period of time to get the FBI to respond.
When the FBI finally responded, they took the utilitys hard drive,
and the replacement hard drive did not work. Fortunately, the utility
had mirrored hard drives and was thus able to continue operation
despite the loss of the one hard drive.
Real-World Demonstrations
There were two ICS hacking demos that proved the differences
between a knowledgeable attacker and hacker with minimal ICS
understanding. The knowledgeable attacker showed with less than
$60 of Radio Shack equipment that he was able to compromise
Zigbee wireless networks. The second demonstration was by a mal-
ware researcher with minimal understanding of ICSs. By simply
starting with a vulnerability notification about the technology on
which the SCADA system was built, he was able to take control of
the vendors SCADA software.
On the post-conference press call, I was asked what I considered
the most important need for ICS cyber security. I believe it is se-
nior management buy-inthat is, understanding the possibility and
consequences of an incident, the talent required to mitigate it, and
prioritizing resources for ICS cyber security.
The 12th ICS Cyber Security Conference provided attendees
with a valuable venue for information sharing about ICS practic-
es and incident descriptions, plus networking opportunities that
cant be replicated. For information about the 2013 conference,
visit www.icscybersecurityconference.com.
Contributed by Joe Weiss, PE, CISM, CRISC, ISA Fellow, and
IEEE Senior Member. Weiss is the principal of Applied Control Solu-
tions and the author of Protecting Industrial Control Systems from
Electronic Threats, published by Momentum Press. Follow Weiss
Unfettered Blog at community.controlglobal.com/unfettered for the
inside story on the latest cybersecurity news.
Users Return to Fogging on Frame 7FAs
It has been a decade since an R0 compressor blade was liberated on
one of the eight Frame 9FA combustion turbines at CLP Power Hong
Kongs Black Point Power Station. This catastrophic failure eventual-
ly led to GEs recommendation that operators severely limit or cease
using online water wash (OLWW), inlet fogging, wet compression,
and evaporative coolers on F-Class turbines.
Now fogging is making a comeback on the GE 7FA. With greater
understanding of the underlying issues, and new blade designs from
GE and other aftermarket suppliers that are less prone to erosion,
7FA operators are once again starting up their foggers as a means of
achieving a low-cost performance boost.
Fogging is one of the least expensive ways to get extra power
out of your machine, says Jim Sellers, director of operations for the
West Region at Entegra Power Group LLC, which recently restarted
fogging on two 7FAs at its Gila River Plant after a several-year break
(Figure 1). Fogging helps the turbine to maintain a good heat rate
and does not have the permanent pressure loss that an evaporative
cooler causes.
Shutting Off the Water
Although the earliest instances of using water to cool turbines date
back to pointing a hose at the inlet, fogging took off in the 1990s
with the use of high-pressure fogging systems. With turbine manu-
facturers even starting to offer it as an option on new units, it was
widely accepted as a safe and cost-effective way to get more power
1. Fogging for power. Fogging nozzles, such as the one shown
in the inset, are mounted in the air inlet into the combustion turbine.
The evaporative effect of the fog is to reduce the air inlet temperature.
Courtesy: Mee Industries
December2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 21
for less fuel, especially on hot summer days
when electricity prices were highest and
fogging produced its greatest benefits.
Then came the Hong Kong incident and
GEs repeated efforts to identify the cause
and a permanent solution. GE inspected all
the 9FAs and determined that CLPs daily use
of OLWW had led to R0 blade erosion and
subsequent failure. In the summer of 2001,
GE issued the first of a series of Technical
Information Letters (TIL) covering the topic.
TIL 1303, Compressor Rotor R-0 Blade Erosion,
described what GE found in Hong Kong and
recommended that blades be inspected af-
ter 100 hours of OLWW. Next came TIL 1323
in which GE advocated using only the outer
OLWW manifold and lowering the water pres-
sure to 40 psig because The erosion appears
to be caused by water stratification on the
bell mouth struts wall, which then impacts
the root of the R0 blade.
Later, GE extended the restriction to in-
clude use of fogging and evaporative coolers,
but following additional study, field experi-
ence, and an R0 blade redesign, GE eased its
fogging restrictions, although clearance for
operation of third-party fogging systems
was so limited that most operators con-
tinued not to use them. Not everyone was
convinced. Blade erosion is not a problem
for properly designed fogging systems, says
John Kraft, president of Caldwell Energy.
It has gotten blown out of proportion by
the 7FA issues, but I have never had any
problem on a 7FA. Bottom line: With the
introduction of R0 blade designs that are
less prone to cracking that can be caused by
erosion, operation of OLWW and fogging was
no longer restricted.
Other turbine manufacturers were still
allowing OLWW and fogging on their units
without problem, so further research was
done on how to improve the lifespan of the
GE R0 blades. The U.S. Department of Energy
funded work by MDS Coating Technologies
Corp. into use of nanotech coatings to re-
duce blade wear. Preliminary tests showed
that the coatings reduced the amount of
fluid erosion on turbine blades by at least
a factor of 10.
Fogging at Gila River
Entegra is one of the companies that in-
stalled new R0 blades so it could reinstate
inlet fogging. The company, headquartered
in Tampa, Florida, operates several plants,
including the Gila River Power Station in Gila
Bend, Arizona, about 70 miles southwest of
Phoenix. The 2,200-MW Gila River plant con-
sists of four combined cycle power blocks,
each with two Frame 7FA combustion tur-
bines (CTs), two Alstom heat recovery steam
generators with supplemental duct firing,
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December2012 22
and a GE single-case, single-flow, axial ex-
haust steam turbine.
At Gila River, Entegra currently owns and
operates two of the four power blocks. The
other two are owned by Sundevil Power Hold-
ings LLC. All the CTs burn natural gas deliv-
ered through a 30-inch-diameter pipeline
connected to both the El Paso and TransWest-
ern natural gas mainlines. The site connects
to the grid via two 500 kV lines and one 230
kV line. One of the Entegra units, Block 4
is under contract to Arizona Public Service
(APS), the states largest electric utility.
All eight CTs originally included GE-sup-
plied fogging units. Fogging did produce a
significant power boost, about 15 MW to 20
MW per CT, along with a better heat rate.
However, in addition to blade erosion prob-
lems, the fogging units proved unreliable
and were shut down after a few years. The
fogging skids had lots of pump failures and
had very small filters at the pump discharge
that needed changing almost daily, says
Sellers of Entegra. It was just an incredibly
high-maintenance arrangement.
One of the biggest problem areas with fog-
ging was caused by a mismatch between the
pump size and the amount of water needed
by the nozzle array for fogging. The pumps
did not have variable-speed drives to adjust
output to water demand but would recircu-
late the excess water. As long as it was in
recirculation mode, the recirculation valve
would continuously cavitate, would self-de-
struct, and need to be replaced, says Sellers.
It was just a maintenance headache.
Bob Stone, the Gila River plant manager,
says that the GE fogging units went through
three revisions before they were eventu-
ally secured from use. Because the water
was constantly recirculating, it would over-
heat. Each of the fogging nozzles contained
a plastic filter, and the water would reach
temperatures where it would melt the filter
into the nozzle, so it would have to be re-
placed (Figure 2).
Blade Upgrade
The final revision to the system included
changing the piping to bring the water
temperature down to avoid melting plastic
parts, but by that time blade erosion issues
required shutting the foggers down anyway.
The R0 blade that GE was using at the
time was prone to a crack initiated from
erosion pits, says Sellers. Most operators
did not want to risk a cracked R0 blade that
could wipe out the whole compressor sec-
tion, so they stopped fogging for fear of los-
ing R0 blades.
The R0 blades at Gila River were show-
ing the same erosion problems that GE had
found on other 7FAs, and repeated reblend-
ing of the blades was not an option.
Some 7FA users will rotate the R0 blades
and send them out to be reblended, says
Stone. The first year, we had GE do an in
situ blending on all eight units, but it gets
to a point where you cant do the resurfac-
ing. Since we did not have spare sets, we
decided not to fog.
That changed, however, in 2011. By that
time, GE and others had come out with ero-
sion-resistant blade designs and users were
eager to restart their fogging systems. In the
case of APS, fogging was needed to ensure
Block 4 met performance guarantees. Rather
than going with the new GE blades, how-
ever, Entegra went with blades from Power
Systems Manufacturing (PSM). PSM used a
different material than GE, which would be
more erosion tolerant and would not lead to
cracking, says Sellers. GE had redesigned
its blade, but continued to use the same
material. Granted, they beefed it up, but we
werent sure it could still crack again.
Back to Fogging
With the new PSM R0 blades in place, last
year Entegra decided to restart fogging on
Block 4. The block is under contract with
performance guarantees for output and heat
rate, Sellers says. With the decommis-
sioning of the foggers, we were right at the
threshold of missing the performance guar-
antee and possibly suffering a penalty, so we
needed to get that performance back.
Rather than restarting the troublesome
GE foggers, however, they went with a Mee-
Fog system from Mee Industries. From the
research we did, Mee was the biggest fogger
company out there and had the most expe-
rience, so we figured they would have the
more reliable system design, Sellers says.
According to Thomas Mee, CEO of Mee
Industries, There are about 80 MeeFog sys-
tems in use on GE F-class gas turbines and
a total of more than 850 MeeFog systems
have been installed on gas turbines around
the world.
After pouring the slabs and running the
piping, installing the skids and nozzle arrays
took about two weeks during the spring out-
age. The MeeFog design used 11 pumps on
two skids to provide cooling for both CTs. The
pumps come on one at a time, depending on
the amount of fogging required at that time,
but the control system cycles through the
pumps to ensure that they all have the same
number of operating hours. Since the Mark V
plant control system had been set up for the
GE foggers, the control engineer had to add
logic on the control panel for the operators
to turn the foggers on and off (Figure 3).
In the first summer, the fogging units op-
erated about 900 hours, and Stone reports
that the MeeFog units operated smoothly
without the need for the daily attention
that the earlier foggers required. Sellers has
no concerns about blade erosion issues with
this new setup due to the fact that the sys-
tem only provides tiny droplets, so the root
cause of blade erosion is minimized. Be-
cause of the difference in the blade mate-
rial, we arent worried about the R0 blades
cracking and breaking off, says Sellers.
After successfully testing the new blades
and fogging system in Arizona, Entegra will
look at repeating those actions on its other
units, depending on the market conditions
and economics at each site.
Contributed by Joe Zwers, a Glendale,
California-based freelance writer specializing
in power and high tech.
2. Quick power increase. Nozzles
mounted in the duct produce billions of tiny
fog droplets that quickly evaporate and cool
the incoming air down to near the wet bulb
temperature. Interest in fog cooling is strong
because the reduction in air inlet temperature
increases the power output of the combus-
tion turbine for relatively little cost. Courtesy:
Mee Industries
3. Control the flow. Water flow control
skids used with combustion turbine fogging
systems can be preassembled and tested in
the manufacturers shop to reduce the cost of
field installation. Courtesy: Mee Industries

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|
December 2012 24
Steven F. Greenwald Jeffrey P. Gray
CleanPowerSF:
Political Correctness
Trumps Energy Policy
I
n 2002, California enacted legislation authorizing municipalities
to establish Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) programs. In
September 2012, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors adopted
CleanPowerSF to be the CCA program available for city residents.
Its supporters describe CleanPowerSF as a 100% renewable energy
alternative. Supervisor David Campos exalted that CleanPowerSF
will stimulate the local economy, create jobs and most impor-
tantly secure our independent, clean energy future.
CleanPowerSF represents yet another Balkanizing, politically mo-
tivated misadventure in energy policy. The global complexities and
challenging tradeoffs driving energy realities demand that energy
policy be developed on a regional basis and respect the fundamentals
of economics and physics. CleanPowerSF is premised on San Francisco
being an energy island, political rhetoric, and exploitation of the
unpopularity of the local utility, Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG&E).
Background
As part of its deregulation experiment, in 1998, California offered
electric consumers a direct access option to select among energy
providers. The local utility would remain the wires company, de-
livering the electricity, but consumers could choose an alternative
commodity supplier. Direct access providers competed by promis-
ing better rates and preferable products (renewable and nuclear-
free supply). In response to its energy crisis in 2001, California
suspended the entering of any new direct access arrangements.
However, by the next year, the legislature decided that Cali-
fornians should retain some opportunity to replace the local util-
ity and be able to select from a more preferred supply portfolio.
The resulting CCA program replicates direct access, but with the
distinction that a municipal entity (in this case, CleanPowerSF)
serves as an intermediary between the power provider and the cus-
tomer. CCA can be categorized as muni-lightthe city procures
the electric commodity, but without ownership or operation of any
transmission or distribution facilities.
Promised Beneits Are Illusory and Unachievable
CleanPowerSF will create jobsthe positions necessary to admin-
ister the program. It may also stimulate the local economy: Law-
yers and consultants will thrive.
In other respects, Supervisor Campos vision for CleanPowerSF is
illusory and destined to be an expensive failure. The promise of 100%
renewable power is neither achievable nor necessary. Desired in-
creases in the amount of intermittent wind and solar sources require
some amount of natural gas generation to back up the system.
Moreover, any notion that CleanPowerSF will secure for San
Francisco electric consumers energy independence is misguided.
The independence CleanPowerSF offers is simply the ability to
say no to PG&Es portfolio. CleanPowerSF does not make San
Francisco independent from the California grid; the city remains
subject to blackouts caused by regional supply shortages, transmis-
sion outages, or any malfunction of PG&Es distribution facilities.
Local initiatives designed to achieve energy independence should
better focus on rooftop solar installations and energy efficiency.
One possible attraction of CleanPowerSF is to enable customers,
on an energy accounting basis, theoretically to bar PG&E from
delivering nuclear power into their homes. But even if all of San
Francisco opts for CleanPowerSF, PG&E will continue to maximize
its nuclear generation and that nuclear power will flow over its
wires and physically into San Francisco homes.
CleanPowerSFs marketing will likely depict PG&E as an energy
Neanderthal blocking greater renewable development. This thesis
ignores utility economics: PG&E is financially indifferent whether
it purchases wind or natural gas power; its economic interest is
to increase ratebase by owning generation. Conversely, PG&E is
agnostic whether increases in its ratebase reflect expenditures for
solar or nuclear facilities.
Besides economics, resource availability, and physics, the inhibit-
ing factors in the development of renewable resources in California
are permitting and regulatory policies that extend development, in-
crease costs, disqualify viable sites, and delay construction of nec-
essary transmission lines. CleanPowerSF offers no solutions to these
impediments. It is unlikely to purchase renewable power better at a
lower cost than PG&E, and there is no basis to suggest it can devel-
op renewable resources better than experienced and well-financed
private entities. Moreover, California law already obligates PG&E to
achieve 33% renewables, and Governor Jerry Brown would support
an increase to 40%. The business case that CleanPowerSF will ac-
celerate renewable development has not been made.
Real Costs Outweigh Psychic Beneits
The energy independence CleanPowerSF promises is not without cost.
Appreciable amounts have already been incurred to create the pro-
grams legal infrastructure. CleanPowerSF has been authorized almost
$20 million to commence business; $6 million is to study options to
produce solar power, generate local power, and deploy energy effi-
ciency strategies. The logic that local studies will generate options
more viable than comparable studies conducted by state, federal, and
private entities can only be rationalized as local politics.
CleanPowerSF acknowledges its inability to decrease costs for
customers. The price to participate in CleanPowerSF will be a
monthly increase ranging between just under $10 and almost $80,
depending on the customers consumption level.
This nation has sought to achieve energy independence since
the first oil embargo. The lessons of the past half-century should
be that political gimmicksthe proverbial rearranging the deck
chairs on the Titanicdo increase costs, but they advance nei-
ther energy reliability nor independence. CleanPowerSF may enable
some San Franciscans to feel better, but it will not create mean-
ingful green jobs, will not advance development of renewable
power, and will not promote real energy independence.
Steven F. Greenwald (stevegreenwald@dwt.com) and
Jeffrey P. Gray (jeffgray@dwt.com) are partners in Davis Wright
Tremaines Energy Practice Group. Davis Wright Tremaine does
not represent Pacific Gas and Electric Co.
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CIRCLE 14 ON READER SERVICE CARD
www.powermag.com POWER
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December 2012 26
Alamosa Solar Project,
San Luis Valley, Colorado
Owner/operator: Cogentrix of Alamosa LLC
T
he Alamosa Solar Projects site on 225
acres in southern Colorados San Luis
Valley was chosen specifically for its
outstanding sunlight characteristics, which
are necessary for concentrating photovoltaic
(CPV) technologies. Among the positive at-
tributes of the location are its high elevation
(7,800 feet above sea level)which means
there is less atmosphere for the rays to pass
through and, hence, greater insolationand
the presence of an existing 115-kV transmis-
sion line for interconnection.
The Alamosa Solar Project consists of 504
dual-axis, pedestal-mounted trackers sup-
porting modules that produce approximately
60 kW each, providing enough power for
about 6,500 Colorado homes. The facility,
commissioned in May, provides electricity to
customers of Xcel Energys subsidiary, Pub-
lic Service Company of Colorado.
The project is projected to generate ap-
proximately 76,000 MWh per year, which
displaces approximately 249 million cubic
feet of natural gas that would have been used
by a comparable conventional natural gas
fired power plant. This eliminates the genera-
tion of approximately 43,250 tons per year
of carbon dioxide (CO
2
) emissions, based on
the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys
estimate of 1,135 pounds of CO
2
generated
per MWh. In addition, the CPV facility has
very minimal water needs.
Facility Overview
J.E. (Jef) Freeman, Jr., vice president of devel-
opment at Cogentrix Energy Power Manage-
ment, the projects developer, told POWER
in September that a hydraulic system rotates
and tilts the assemblies throughout the day so
the surface of each panel maintains an opti-
mal angle with the sun.
Another functional benefit of this design
is that the CPV system makes efficient use
of the available land, Freeman said. One
MW of rated capacity is installed on 7 acres,
compared to the approximately 8 to 10 acres
typically needed for other solar technologies.
The CPV technology is also easier to permit
and install, with no special grading, water
use, or other site treatment, minimizing the
impact on the local natural environment.
The CPV solar trackers are Amonix 7700
models, each featuring the companys pro-
prietary module assembly mounted on a sup-
port column, Each tracker assembly is 70
feet wide by 50 feet high and contains 7,560
Fresnel lenses that concentrate sunlight ap-
proximately 500 times onto multi-junction
solar cells manufactured by Boeing-Spec-
trolab. A hydraulic system supplied by Hawe
Hydraulics North America rotates and tilts
the assembly throughout the day so the sur-
face of each panel maintains an optimal angle
with the sun. Each tracker has its own invert-
er (manufactured by Solectria Renewables)
that converts DC power output from the solar
cells to AC power. As an added bonus, the as-
semblys modular design will easily accom-
modate future cell technology updates.
Major contractors for the project were
Mortenson Construction (general contrac-
tor/construction manager), Stantec (lead
design firm), and Ampirical Solutions
(electrical switchyard engineering, pro-
curement, and construction contractor).
As the largest solar plant of its type in the world, the 30-MW Alamosa Solar
Project is currently enjoying its place in the sun. The innovative project consists
of 504 concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) solar trackers, each featuring a CPV so-
lar cell panel assembly mounted on a support column. The modular design of
the assembly allows the project to easily accommodate future improvements
in cell technology.
By Angela Neville, JD
TOP PLANTS
Courtesy: Daniel OConnor Photography
TOP PLANTS
December 2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 27
The Alamosa Solar Project has a number
of interesting design features, according to
Freeman:
Each 70-foot by 50-foot tracker assembly
moves around a pivot point that is approxi-
mately 20 feet above site grade (Figure 1).
Approximately 16,000 cubic feet of con-
crete, requiring more than 1,800 batch
trucks, was used for site construction.
The facility has more than 28 miles of
grounding cable throughout the site and
more than 52 miles of underground elec-
tric cable for transferring power from the
field to the transmission grid.
The advanced Ethernet network on site
connects more than 2,500 unique devices,
utilizing over 20 miles of fiber optic cable
and 548 network switches.
Currently, the Alamosa Solar Project has a
site staff of five; an additional lens-cleaning
staff of typically four workers is under con-
tract and employed when needed.
Dealing with Project Obstacles
The biggest challenge was the project scale
itself, Freeman said. Each tracker assem-
bly contains 7,560 Fresnel lenses and multi-
junction solar cells. For the total project, this
equates to approximately 3.8 million of each
of these components.
An additional hurdle for the project was
the physical location. The high desert plateau
required the engineering designers to account
for extreme temperature variations (from 45F
to over 95F), a frost line of 42 inches below
the site grade, a relatively high water table, and
the presence of invasive rodents. Freeman said
that overcoming these challenges required
that the selection of materials and equipment
met the functional needs of the project while
also tolerating extreme conditions.
The project also had to take into account
strong seasonal winds that scour the San Luis
Valley floor, Freeman said. Winds have histori-
cally blown from the San Juan Mountains to
the west, across the valley floor, and up against
the Sangre de Cristo Mountains to the east. The
Great Sand Dunes National Park and Reserve is
along the eastern range and largely results from
the valley sediment being deposited there.
To protect the equipment from wind
damage, each tracker assembly has its own
anemometer to measure wind speed to en-
able the assemblies to be moved into a flat,
face-up, stowed position when winds are
over 28 mph, Freeman explained. Addition-
ally, a centralized control system provides
backup wind speed measurements from three
meteorological stations on site and will put
the entire field into stow position when wind
speeds exceed 30 mph.
The project encountered some challeng-
es related to obtaining state and Alamosa
County variances and permits. For example,
to obtain the necessary water rights for po-
table and lens-cleaning water, the project
team had to work closely with county con-
servancy officials to develop a program of
water augmentation for the San Luis Valley
groundwater system.
Another challenge was due to the fact that
the projects solar tracker assemblies have a
maximum height of over 50 feet, which ex-
ceeds county height limitations, Freeman said.
Once again the project team worked with the
county, through the state-delegated 1041 Permit
process, to successfully secure all needed per-
mits for construction, inclusive of a height vari-
ance to enable the project to move forward.
Securing Financial Backing
The Alamosa project will be vital to the
eventual commercialization of CPV technol-
ogy by representing the first utility-scale im-
plementation, Freeman said. The first hurdle
for the project team was to find financing.
Because the project is the first of its kind,
conventional financing was not available.
Traditional financial institutions required at
least two years of operating performance data
in order to adequately gauge the risk profile
of the project before they would offer financ-
ing terms for review.
The project team ultimately secured a low-
interest loan from the Federal Finance Bank
under the U.S. Department of Energys Loan
Guarantee Program. In order to meet commer-
cial operation deadlines, the project went into
construction well in advance of securing the
loan, which required significant upfront equity
from the project developer until it was refund-
ed from loan proceeds once financing finally
closed. Construction was completed in approx-
imately 12 months, and the facility successfully
achieved commercial operation in April.
A Model for Future Solar Energy
Projects
The ultimate success of the Alamosa Solar
Project may have a significant impact on the
financing of similar projects in the future. In
order for the conventional commercial lend-
ing community to get comfortable with risks
associated with innovative projects, an operat-
ing track record is needed. Freeman added that
the Alamosa Solar project is well on its way to
establishing such an operating track record.
By their very nature, pioneering projects
such as the Alamosa Solar Project often
encounter equipment supply, construction,
and operational obstacles. Each occurred at
some point during construction and startup
of the Alamosa project. It was imperative
to have quality ownership, engineering,
construction, and operational personnel in-
volved to ensure the projects ultimate suc-
cess, Freeman explained.
The combination of engineering talent at
Cogentrix with the complementary talent at
Stantec and Mortenson enabled the Alamosa
Solar Project to address all challenges and
become what is now the largest facility of
its type in the world, Freeman said. As a
result, it is the ideal role model for similar
projects going forward.
Angela Neville, JD is POWERs
senior editor.
1. Preparing for sunny days. The Alamosa Solar Project consists of 504 concentrating
photovoltaic solar trackers. A solar panel support column is shown with the drive assembly be-
ing positioned at the top. Each tracker has its own inverter that converts DC power output from
the solar cells into AC power. Courtesy: Daniel OConnor Photography
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 28
Coca-Cola/Mas Energy
Trigeneration Facility,
Atlanta, Georgia
Owner/operator: Mas Energy
By taking a waste product and converting it into a fuel source, the 6.5-MW Co-
ca-Cola/Mas Energy Facility became the first U.S. operational trigeneration proj-
ect fueled by landfill gas. Since March, the new system has provided electricity,
steam, and chilled water to the adjacent Coca-Cola Syrup Plant, satisfying most of
the plants energy requirements and reducing its long-term energy costs.
By Angela Neville, JD
I
ts the real thing. The Coca-Cola/Mas
Energy Trigeneration Facility in Atlanta
is a genuine renewable energy leader
that uses treated landfill gas as an energy
source for its operations. Using a trigenera-
tion or CCHP (combined cooling, heat, and
power) system, the new facility is projected
to generate at least 48 million kWh of on-
site renewable energy annually. The project
also provides Coca-Cola (the offtaker or
energy user) with the additional economic
benefit of leveling its energy costs over an
extended period of time.
Landfill gas from Republic Services
Hickory Ridge Landfill in nearby Conley,
Ga., is the primary fuel source for the trigen-
eration plant. We anticipate that the plant
will use landfill gas as its primary fuel source
for the life of the project, Jason Byars, vice
president of business & project development
at Mas Energy, told POWER in October.
The plant also was designed and installed
with the ability to blend natural gas or use
it as a backup fuel when landfill gas is inter-
rupted to ensure relatively constant fuel input
to the plant.
The new facility is gaining attention. For
example, the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agencys Green Power Partnership recently
recognized the Coca-Cola Co. as the third-
largest on-site green power generator in the
U.S., and the trigeneration facility was a key
factor in that ranking.
Operational Overview
The system achieved commercial operation
on March 31, 2012, after approximately 15
months of construction and related activi-
ties. This is the first trigen plant built at the
offtakers site. A significant challenge during
the construction phase was coordinating all
the construction activities so as not to inter-
fere with or interrupt the offtakers existing
operations. Coordination of tie-ins to existing
site utilities and the controls modifications
required to integrate new systems into the
existing schemes had to be done with careful
attention to detail, Byars said.
The trigeneration plant has three GE Jen-
bacher J616 reciprocating engine generators,
each rated at 2,175 kW for a gross output of
6,525 kW. The engines use selective catalytic
reduction (urea) and selective noncatalytic
reduction control technologies to mitigate the
plants total emissions and thereby keep them
below major source thresholds. Fuel gas con-
ditioning equipment (used at the landfill site)
was provided by Venture Engineering for
removal of siloxane (a chemical potentially
harmful to the engines and post-combustion
emissions control devices), as were polishing
skids. Unison Solutions provided the com-
pression and dehydration equipment. The si-
Courtesy: Mas Energy
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|
December 2012 30
loxane regeneration skid was purchased from
Abutec.
The engines exhaust into individual heat
recovery steam generators (HRSGs) that
can each produce up to 3,500 lb/hr of steam
at 125 psig, for a total rated steam output
of 10,500 lb/hr. The HRSGs have bypass
dampers that enable full electrical output to
be achieved even when the offtakers ther-
mal requirements are relatively low. When
in full steam-generation mode, the HRSGs
steam is dispatched to the offtakers facility,
where it is primarily used to drive a 1,065-
ton steam turbinedriven York YST MaxE
chiller. The steam can also be used to offset
steam production from the offtakers facility
boilers via a 125-to-15 psig reducing station.
The condensed steam (condensate) produced
from each point of use is sent to the facilitys
existing feedwater deaerator before being re-
turned to the HRSGs.
Byars explained that the project is unique
because it involves landfill treatment and
combustion at two different sites intercon-
nected via a dedicated 6-mile pipeline. He
said that this project configuration added
significant complexity to the scheme required
to automate, monitor, and control the sys-
tem. Approximately 2,200 scfm of landfill
gas is first processed at the landfill via dehy-
dration, compression, and siloxane removal
equipment (Figure 1). Then it is transported
to the offtakers facility via the pipeline oper-
ated and maintained by AGL Resources.
The trigeneration plants generators oper-
ate in parallel with the Georgia Power dis-
tribution grid. And because the project has
obtained Qualifying Facility status, the
offtaker is able sell any excess electricity
generated by the trigeneration plant and not
consumed by the offtakers facility back to
Georgia Power at avoided cost or better. As a
result, Georgia Power gets the benefit of in-
cluding some incremental renewable genera-
tion in their system fleet, Byars said.
Preparing Landfill Gas for Fuel Use
In order to protect the integrity of the post-
combustion environmental controls installed
at the offtakers site, it was necessary to de-
sign and install landfill gas conditioning and
cleaning systems at the landfill. Prior to de-
velopment of this project, all of the gas pro-
duced at the landfill (approximately 2,200
scfm) was combusted via an open flare. Now
it is delivered from the landfills collection
system to the treatment system at the land-
fill. The landfills existing flare has remained
in service and is available for use when op-
eration of the trigeneration plant is upset or
curtailed.
After it is collected in the landfill col-
lection system, the landfill gas is cooled in
a heat exchanger to prevent condensation in
the oil system. The gas is then compressed to
approximately 50 psig and cooled in a gas-
to-air heat exchanger. It then flows through
a glycol chiller and is cooled to 40F. Next, it
passes through a moisture knock-out pot and
reenters a regenerative heat exchanger, where
it is reheated to 80F. At this point, the landfill
gas passes to a siloxane removal skid.
The siloxane removal skid comprises two
trains of siloxane removal beds and carbon
polishers, each train capable of processing
100% of the landfill gas flow. Only one train
operates at any given time while the other side
is either in regeneration or standby mode. An
auxiliary flare was permitted and installed
to accommodate the siloxane removal skid
regeneration process. The siloxane removal
skid is generally in regeneration mode for six
hours each day, during which it regenerates
the off-line bed.
Byars explained that during regeneration,
a blower and electric heater mix approxi-
mately 1,000 scfm of heated ambient air with
a slipstream of approximately 120 scfm of
landfill gas, which flows in reverse through
the regenerating bed before being routed to
the auxiliary flare. The two siloxane removal
beds operate on an alternating 24-hour ad-
sorption/desorption cycle.
After being in the siloxane removal bed,
the gas then flows through a carbon polisher
that further removes trace levels of siloxane.
The siloxane removal skids outlet connects
to the inlet of the dedicated landfill gas pipe-
line, which transports the gas to the trigen-
eration plant site at the Coca-Cola facility.
Lining up Project Funding
Mas Energy used a combination of debt
and equity to fund construction of the proj-
ect. One related challenge was the sourcing
of debt for a relatively small project such as
this. Ultimately, project financing was pro-
vided via a bond issuance through the Fulton
County Development Authority, Byars said.
During the planning phase, Mas Energy
which develops, owns, and operates energy
systems around the worldspent several
weeks analyzing its air permitting options for
the trigeneration plant. From one perspective,
the permitting process could have taken sev-
eral months given that the new plant would
be a major source of air emissions and the
greater Atlanta region is a severe non-attain-
ment area for ozone. From another perspec-
tive, the project stood to benefit substantially
from the U.S. Treasurys Section 1603 grant
program as more fully described in the
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of
2009, provided that it achieved commercial
operation prior to the end of 2011 (a deadline
since extended by an act of Congress).
To expedite the permitting process and
give the project the best chance of achieving
commercial operation prior to the deadline,
Mas Energy elected to install post-combus-
tion treatment at the plant and permit the
project as a synthetic minor source. By
working collaboratively with regulators, we
were able to shorten what could have been a
several months process to one that took ap-
proximately 100 days from the date of the air
permit application by Mas Energy to the date
of air permit issuance by the Georgia Envi-
ronmental Protection Division, Byars said.
Angela Neville, JD is POWERs
senior editor.
1. The big squeeze. The gas-conditioning skid dehumidifies and compresses the landfill
gas prior to removal of siloxanes. The treated landfill gas is then used as fuel at the Coca-Cola/
Mas Energy Trigeneration Facility. Courtesy: Mas Energy
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December 2012 32
T
his project has the ability to tackle
both energy security and water se-
curity, thus leaving behind a green
footprint for future generations, said Gujarat
Chief Minister Narendra Modi in April at the
dedication of the 214-MW Charanka Solar
Park, one of the solar parks that is part of the
Gujarat Solar Park group. The new Charanka
park is larger than the 200-MW Golmud Solar
Park in China, which previously had been clas-
sified as Asias largest solar energy facility.
In April, several Gujarat Solar Park fa-
cilities that were already operational and
had a combined total of 605 MW received
certificates of completion. In June, the proj-
ects solar parks reached a combined total of
689.8 MW. The entire group of solar parks
is predicted to avoid 8 million tons of carbon
dioxide emissions and save 900,000 tons of
natural gas annually, according to the Guja-
rat government.
Indias Electric Power Sector
With a population of approximately 1.2
billion (July 2012 estimate), India is the
second most populous nation in the world,
behind China. Indias electric power sector
had an installed capacity of 207.85 GW as
of September 2012, the worlds fifth larg-
est, according to a recent report issued by
the Central Electricity Authority, Ministry
of Power, Government of India. Captive
power plants (those used for in-house power
generation, typically by industrial entities)
generate an additional 31.5 GW. Thermal
power plants constitute 66% of the installed
capacity, hydroelectric about 19%, and the
rest is a combination of wind, small hydro,
biomass, waste-to-electricity, nuclear, and
solar. India generated 855 TWh of electric-
ity during the 20112012 fiscal year.
The worlds fourth-largest energy con-
sumer after the U.S., China, and Russia,
India currently suffers from a major elec-
tricity generation shortage. The Interna-
tional Energy Agency (IEA) estimates that
the country needs to invest at least $135
billion to provide its population with uni-
versal electrical access. In December 2011,
more than 300 million Indian citizens had
no access to electricity. More than one-third
of Indias rural population lacked electric-
ity, as did 6% of the urban population. Of
those who did have access to electricity, the
supply was often intermittent and unreli-
ablesometimes subject to blackouts such
as the massive grid collapses that occurred
in July. Fortunately, Gujarat, which actu-
ally enjoys an electricity surplus, was re-
inforced by the Western Grid and escaped
those summer blackouts.
At an energy summit held in India in
March, IEA Executive Director Maria van
der Hoeven said, Sufficient power provi-
sion is key to sustaining economic growth
and development. The rapid growth of
emerging economies like India therefore
require significant power demand increases.
According to our analysis, in India, electric-
ity demand is projected to more than triple
to over 3,200 TWh by 2035. This would im-
ply that over 650 GW of new capacity will
have to be built. The technologies and fuel
sources that India adopts as it adds this ad-
ditional capacity may significantly impact
global resource usage and have potentially
negative environmental effects, according to
the IEA.
Van der Hoeven made the following pre-
dictions for Indias electric power sector be-
tween 2012 and 2035:
Courtesy: IANS/Daily News
TOP PLANTS
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December 2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 33
Natural gas is expected to be the second-
largest source of fuel for power genera-
tion, but still modest compared to coal.
Coal use in the power sector will almost
triple over the forecast period.
Nuclear power generation will grow al-
most 10-fold.
The most impressive increase will take
place with renewable energy sources as
their contribution increases 20-fold over
the projection period.
Achieving such growth rates will not be
easy, according to the IEA. Indeed, while
coal will remain Indias generation back-
bone during the whole period, coals ability
to keep pace with such enormous power de-
mand increases is uncertain. This is largely
due to logistical challenges and constraints
on domestic coal production and the rising
price of imported coal. Diversifying into gas
and other alternatives is therefore not mere-
ly a matter of protecting the environment
but also of promoting energy security.
Gujarats Policies Promoting
Solar Energy
India has solar irradiation that ranges from 4
to 7 kWh/square meter/day across the coun-
try, with western and southern regions hav-
ing higher insolation. (For comparison, the
average Phoenix, Ariz., insolation ranges
from 6 to 7 kWh/square meter/day during
the summer.) Located in Indias western
part, Gujarat is one of the most industrial-
ized Indian states. It has annual power gen-
eration capacity of more than 14,000 MW
with 2,000 MW of surplus power, according
to government sources. Its not surprising
that Gujarat, with its plentiful solar resourc-
es, is heavily promoting solar park develop-
ment (Figure 1).
As part of the national solar energy ini-
tiative, the Gujarat government launched its
Solar Power Policy in 2009. The state utility,
Gujarat Urja Vikas Nigam Ltd., entered into
long-term power purchase agreements with
84 solar power project investors to commis-
sion approximately 968.5 MW of generation
capacity by the end of 2013, with the possi-
bility of signing on additional companies in
the future. The solar parks are being placed
in sparsely populated flat areas in the north-
ern part of the state.
The projects range in size from 1 MW
to 40 MW. For example, the Charanka So-
lar Park consists of a group of 17 thin-film
photovoltaic (PV) power systems located
on a 4,900-acre site in Patan, a Gujarat dis-
trict. A total of 17 national and international
companies contributed power systems to the
grid-connected park. When fully built out
by the end of 2014, the park will host 500
MW of solar power systems. The Charanka
park, estimated to cost approximately $280
million, was built in 16 monthsfaster than
a conventional fossil-fueled plant.
The governmental development of solar
parks has at least two main advantages:
It streamlines the project development
timeline by letting government agencies
undertake land acquisition and neces-
sary permits.
It provides dedicated common infrastruc-
ture for setting up solar power generation
plants funded by individual companies.
This approach has promoted the accelerated
installation of private-sector solar power gen-
eration capacity and thereby cut many costs
that would be faced by stand-alone projects.
Common solar park infrastructure includes
site preparation and leveling, water availabil-
ity, access roads, and security services.
In parallel with the central governments
initiative, the Gujarat Electricity Regulatory
Commission announced a feed-in tariff to
mainstream solar power generation, which
will be applied to solar power generation
plants in the park. Gujarat Power Corp. Ltd.
is the agency that has been responsible for
developing the Gujarat Solar Park and leas-
ing land to project developers. Gujarat En-
ergy Transmission Corp. Ltd. is responsible
for developing the transmission capabilities
for the park. The Asian Development Bank
has provided some support for the project.
Renewable Energy Education
Initiatives
While we want to make Gujarat a solar hub,
we also want our youth to conduct pioneer-
ing research and provide effective energy so-
lutions for future generations, Modi said in
April at the Charanka Solar Park dedication
ceremony. In 2008, Pandit Deendayal Petro-
leum University, located in Gujarat, launched
its School of Solar Energy, which was a first-
of-its-kind training facility in India. The gov-
ernment also is actively supporting research
by Gujarat Energy Research & Management
Institute and other solar energy groups.
Will we be able to manage so many so-
lar power plants without having a skilled lo-
cal workforce? Absolutely not! Modi said.
Major training initiatives through industrial
training institutes (ITIs) will take research and
training in this field to another level. Six solar
photovoltaic ITI labs have been established
and students are already signing up to learn.
Sunny Forecast for Solar Energy
Under its Solar Power Policy, the state gov-
ernment has signed memoranda of under-
standing for future projects to be developed
in Anand, Banaskantha, Jamnangar, Juna-
gadh, Kutch, Porbandar, Rajkot, Surat, and
Surendranagar.
By 2013, India aims for solar power to
account for 3% of total national capacity,
according to Gujarat Solar Park sources. In
addition, the nation wants renewable sourc-
es of energy to rise from the current 6% of
all capacity to a whopping 15% by 2020.
Angela Neville, JD is POWERs
senior editor.
1. Going for a record. Known as one the most business-friendly states in India, Gujarat
has launched the Gujarat Solar Park project, which is destined to be worlds largest solar-pow-
ered generation installation when it is completed in 2013. The park provides dedicated common
infrastructure for PV-powered projects owned and operated by individual companies. Courtesy:
IANS/Daily News
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 34
Stillwater Solar-Geothermal
Hybrid Plant, Churchill County,
Nevada
Owner/operator: Enel Green Power North America
The Stillwater hybrid facility is the worlds first renewable energy project that
pairs geothermal powers baseload generation capacity with solar powers peak
capacity. Inaugurated in May, the 26-MW solar plant is integrated with the ad-
jacent 33-MW geothermal plant, which began operations in 2009, and provides
energy to run the geothermal plants auxiliary loads.
By Angela Neville, JD
C
ombining the best of two renewable
energy technologies, the Stillwater hy-
brid facility balances the continuous
generation capacity of geothermal energy
with the peak capacity of solar energy. The
new solar plants photovoltaic (PV) panels
cover 240 acres next to a geothermal plant in
Churchill County, Nevada.
The Stillwater geothermal project, which
received $40 million in tax support under the
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of
2009, harnessed innovative technologies to add
solar energy to the facility and now provides
59 MW of combined capacity to power about
45,000 local homes. NV Energy has a contract
to buy all the power generated by the plant.
As the first of its kind in the world, this
project demonstrates how we can tap renew-
able energy sources to provide clean power
for American families and businesses and
deploy every available source of American
energy, Steven Chu, secretary of the U.S.
Department of Energy, said in May. Sup-
ported in part by the Recovery Act, the Fallon
facility is expanding domestic renewable en-
ergy sources and helping to build the infra-
structure we need to stay competitive in the
global race for clean energy technologies.
How Geothermal Power Works
Geothermal energy is the only nonhydro re-
newable energy source able to provide basel-
oad power because it relies on the continuous
flow of heat from underground water sources
rather than depending on the availability of
wind or sun. In many geothermal reservoirs,
however, the water temperatures are moderate
(below 400F) and not hot enough to produce
steam with the force needed to efficiently
turn a turbine. Nonetheless, such moderate
temperature reservoirs can generate electric-
ity using a binary system.
Francesco Venturini, Enel Green Power
North Americas (EGP NA) president and
CEO, told POWER in October about the Still-
water geothermal plants medium enthalpy
binary system. He explained that the facility
uses the system because of the moderate tem-
perature of the nearby geothermal reservoir.
The plants binary system uses two fluids: hot
water from underground wells heats isobutane
and causes it to flash into vapor, which then
turns the turbines to generate electricity.
In addition, the facility uses proprietary
technology that increases efficiency by mini-
mizing the parasitic loadenergy losses that
occur from operating the various pumps and
fans required in the power generation cycle.
The plant has a closed-loop system that con-
tinually replenishes the geothermal resource.
Once the geothermal fluid has passed through
the plant, it is pumped back into the ground.
Therefore, there are zero intentional emis-
sions from the process and virtually nothing
is emitted to the atmosphere.
Venturini added that his company has
strong expertise in the geothermal energy
sector. EGP NA is the first company in the
world to produce electricity from geothermal
sources dating back to 1904 in Larderello,
Italy. The company has over 700 MW of geo-
thermal capacity in full operation and uses in-
novative operational and drilling techniques
to optimize its projects output, he said.
An Electric Combination: Geother-
mal and Solar Technologies
Adding the solar component to the Stillwa-
Courtesy: Enel Green Power North America
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|
December 2012 36
ter facility was something that occurred to
EGP NA management after building the geo-
thermal component, Venturini said. He also
explained his companys goals related to de-
veloping new synergies between geothermal
and solar energy.
Having succeeded in proving the concept
in a commercial-scale application, EGP NA
Green Powers Stillwater Solar project paves
the way to address key drawbacks for both
geothermal and solar technologies: resource
risk/parasitic load and generation intermit-
tency, respectively, Venturini said. The geo-
thermal plant also provides auxiliary power to
the solar plant when there is no sunlight, thus
eliminating the need for backfeeding power
from the utility, according to Venturini.
Currently, a number of utilities use renew-
able energy sources like solar power during
hours of peak consumer demand and combine
it with a baseload coal or natural gas plant to
ensure a steady power supply. In contrast, the
Stillwater facility combines two renewable
energy technologies to produce electricity at
the same location and thereby increases the
generation of zero-emission electricity.
Combining geothermal and solar energy
at the Stillwater plant also makes it possible
to use the same infrastructure, further reduc-
ing environmental impacts. That integra-
tion includes the control system, electrical
protection and island mode capability, fire
detection/protection schemes, electrical in-
terconnection, and the use of a common op-
erations and maintenance staff.
It has to be said that since this geother-
mal-solar project is a first of its kind, it met
the regular challenges of everything new in
terms of combining two advanced technolo-
gies, as well as challenges of a regulatory and
administrative nature, Venturini said.
This innovative hybrid power plant dem-
onstrates that the strengths of these different
renewable technologies combine to create a
better whole. Together, they:
Enhance the thermal efficiency in the geo-
thermal unit when it is lowest, typically
during the hottest and sunniest times of
the day or year.
Stabilize production during the day, en-
abling a more load-following production
profile.
Reduce investment risk due to the uncertainty
of the geothermal resource and compensate
for geothermal reservoir temperature deple-
tion without reducing production.
Plant Profile
The solar power component at the Stillwa-
ter facility consists of more than 89,000
polycrystalline premium photovoltaic (PV)
CNPV-295P modules on fixed mounts
(Figure 1). They were manufactured by
CNPV Solar Power SA, an integrated man-
ufacturer of solar PV products. Las Vegas
based Bombard Renewable Energy was the
general contractor for the solar project.
The benefit of adding solar to the Stillwater
facilitys production capacity has been con-
firmed in generation measurements to date.
Average daily generation in the peak hours
is significantly enhanced by the PV system,
while the geothermal plant begins to reach
optimal generation levels when solar genera-
tion ramps down, Venturini explained.
From a source point of view, there were
no development difficulties, as the geother-
mal plant (operational since 2009) was al-
ready positioned in an area with good solar
irradiation levels, so EGP NA just had to
install the PV facility and connect it to the
grid, Venturini said. It also helped that Enel
Green Power was finishing construction of its
pilot project in Italy integrating a solar ther-
mal system to boost efficiency of a combined
cycle natural gas power plant.
EGP NA employs approximately 50 staff
members in the state of Nevada. The com-
pany has roughly 30 employees who operate
and maintain the Stillwater Solar Geothermal
Hybrid Plant and EGP NAs Salt Wells Geo-
thermal Plant (which also became operational
in Nevada in 2009).
Venturini noted that the projects success
derives from a number of factors:
The hard work and commitment of the en-
gineers and staff at EGP NA.
The collaboration with and support of NV
Energy, state and local government agen-
cies, and the local communitiesall of
which were essential in completing the
project.
Federal and state energy policies support-
ing renewable energy that were critical in
EGP NAs decision to commit to this suc-
cessful investment.
Looking Ahead
The Stillwater hybrid plant is already being
recognized as a trendsetter in the renewable
energy sector that will probably encourage
future hybrid projects. On June 28, 2012,
the Geothermal Energy Association (GEA)
recognized the Stillwater Solar-Geothermal
Hybrid Project for advancing geothermal
technology. The GEA singled out the Still-
water facility for being the first hybrid power
plant of its kind. The association pointed out
that this technology may help to allow fu-
ture projects that would otherwise have been
unfeasible as stand-alone geothermal or solar
projects to be more economically and tech-
nologically viable.
In his remarks at the dedication ceremony
for the Stillwater Solar Plant in May, Nevada
Governor Brian Sandoval praised EGP NA
for its innovation and leadership and looked
forward to future growth in the Nevada renew-
able energy sector. Clean energy is a key sec-
tor for Nevada. It provides energy from local
sources, drives innovation, and most impor-
tantly, brings high-quality jobs and economic
growth to the local communities. Enel Green
Powers first-of-a-kind solar geothermal hy-
brid project is a living example of these ben-
efits and I support the further growth of this
industry in Nevada, Sandoval said.
Angela Neville, JD is POWERs
senior editor.
1. Some like it hot. The Stillwater facility integrates 26 MW of photovoltaic solar generat-
ing capacity with 33 MW of baseload geothermal power. In the geothermal plants binary sys-
tem, hot water from underground wells heats isobutane and causes it to flash into vapor, which
then turns the turbines to generate electricity. Courtesy: Enel Green Power North America
CIRCLE 18 ON READER SERVICE CARD
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|
December 2012 38
Three Gorges Dam, Yangtze River,
Hubei Province, China
Owner/operator: China Yangtze Power Co., Ltd.
After nine years of construction, installation, and testing, the Three Gorges Dam
is now complete. On May 23, 2012, the last main generator finished its final test,
increasing the facilitys capacity to 22.5 GW and making it the worlds largest ca-
pacity hydroelectric power plant.
By Angela Neville, JD
I
ts fitting that the Three Gorges Dam
(TGD) achieved full commercial op-
eration in 2012, the Year of the Dragon,
based on the Chinese zodiac. The dragon sign
represents accelerated risk-taking and break-
ing through outmoded paradigms. Through
hard work and tenacity, the pioneering TGD
developers and their staff overcame many
obstacles to create an immense hydroelectric
facility. Since the TGD was started almost a
decade ago, it has set several world records in
hydropower construction and achieved a se-
ries of technology breakthroughs, thanks to
continuous scientific and technical advances.
Located in the Xilingxia Gorge area, one
of the three gorges of the Yangtze River, the
dam controls a drainage area of 1 million
square kilometers (km
2
), with an average an-
nual runoff of 451 billion cubic meters (m
3
).
The TGD is made of 14.86 million m
3
of
concrete, is the biggest structure of its type in
the world, and is visible to astronauts in the
International Space Station.
The Projects Construction History
As the legal entity in charge of the TGD,
the China Three Gorges Corp. (CTGC) has
had full responsibility for the TGDs financ-
ing, construction, and operation, according
to CTGC sources. The CTGC was set up
as a state-authorized investment institution,
which was allowed to use Chinese state
funding for the project. In September 2002,
the CTGC established the subsidiary China
Yangtze Power Co., Ltd. (CYPC), which
was assigned to manage both the TGD and
the Gezhouba hydropower plants. The $30
billion cost of the TGD project will be re-
paid by revenues received from the sale of
electricity.
On Dec. 14, 1994, TGD construction
formally started. On Nov. 8, 1997, the river
closure was completed as part of Phase 1.
In 1998, Phase II construction of the TGD
went in full swing, and six years later, on
June 1, 2003, the TGDs reservoir started
storing water. Next, on June 16, 2003, the
TGDs double-lane five-step shiplock was
put into service. Then on July 10, 2003, the
first 700-MW generator was connected to
the grid and began to generate electricity.
The last unit entered service in May 2011.
Facility Highlights
Now fully operational, the TGD has a total of
34 generators: 32 main generators, each with
a capacity of 700 MW, and two plant power
generators, each with capacity of 50 MW, for
a total capacity of 22.5 GW. Of those 32 main
generators, 14 are installed in the north side
of the dam, 12 in the south side, and the re-
maining six in the underground power plant
in a mountain south of the dam.
The first units were manufactured through
two joint ventures (JVs) followed by units
manufactured by Chinese companies based
on extensive technology transfer require-
ments. The first JV consists of Alstom, ABB
Group, Kvaerner (which supplied eight
units), and the Chinese company Harbin
Electric Machinery Co. Ltd. (HEC). The
other JV includes Voith, General Electric,
and Siemens (abbreviated as VGS and which
supplied six units) plus the Chinese company
Dongfang Electrical Machinery Co. Ltd. The
technology transfer agreements were signed
together with the equipment supply con-
tracts. For example, as part of their agree-
ment, HEC produced 14 units in all (eight
Courtesy: Le Grand Portage
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|
December 2012 40
on the projects left bank, four on right bank,
and two underground), with the final two
units produced almost completely in China.
CTGC later contracted with Alstom for the
supply of four additional units.
The TGD uses Francis turbines with a
diameter that is 9.7 m or 10.4 m (VGS de-
sign/Alstom design) and a rotation speed
of 75 revolutions per minute. The turbine
generators rated power is 778 MVA, with
a maximum of 840 MVA and a power fac-
tor of 0.9. Most of the TGDs generators
are water-cooled. Some newer ones are
air-cooled, which are simpler in design and
easier to maintain.
Several technology breakthroughs were
made during generator installations: auto-
matic welding on the large stator assembly,
lamination stacking of a large stator in the
field, welding and measurement of rotor
roundness, and controlling the roundness of
rotor rim and plate.
The speed of the units installation was
impressive. For example, in 2003, the proj-
ect team installed and put into operation six
700-MW units, which set a new world record
for yearly installation of large-size turbine
generators. Monitoring data showed that all
the units that had been put into operation
worked steadily and met the design require-
ment of various technical parameters.
During the annual dry season that occurs
from November to May, power output is lim-
ited by the rivers flow rate. On the flip side,
when there is enough water flow, power out-
put is limited by plant generating capacity.
The TGD reached its design-maximum res-
ervoir water level of 175 m for the first time
on Oct. 26, 2010, when generation capacity
of 84.7 TWh was realized.
By Aug. 16, 2011, the plant had gener-
ated approximately 500 TWh of electricity.
Now that the TGD is fully operational, an-
nual generation is projected to be more than
100 TWh. Currently, the facilitys electricity
is sent to Central China, East China, Guang-
dong, and Chongqing with a maximum trans-
mission range of 1,000 km. Nine provinces
and two cities consume power generated by
the TGD (Figure 1).
Originally, the TGD was intended to meet
10% of Chinas power needs. However, de-
mand has increased more quickly than the
Chinese government initially projected. For
example, the TGD supported only about
1.7% of the countrys electricity demand in
2011, when demand reached 4,692.8 TWh.
Environmental Effects
Compared to coal-fired power stations pro-
ducing the equivalent level of generation, the
TGD will avoid creating the following pollut-
ant amounts, according to CTGC sources:
100 million tons of carbon dioxide
Two million tons of sulfur dioxide
0.37 million tons of nitrogen oxide
Large quantities of wastewater and solid
waste such as coal ash
The TGD will improve Chinas air quality
by not creating contaminants that cause acid
rain and greenhouse effects in East and Cen-
tral China. In addition, hydropower saves the
energy needed to mine, wash, and transport
coal from northern China.
Despite such accomplishments, some crit-
ics assert that the huge hydroelectric facility
is having the following negative impacts on
the environment:
Wastewater collection increased. More
than one billion tons of wastewater are
released annually into the Yangtze River,
which in the past was moved downstream
before the river was dammed and the res-
ervoir was created. Now the water in the
reservoir appears stagnant and polluted.
Decrease in forest cover. The Three
Gorges, especially in the Yangtze Basin
upstream from the Three Gorges Dam,
currently has 10% forestation, down from
20% in the 1950s.
Loss of wildlife. The region provides habi-
tats for hundreds of freshwater and terres-
trial animal species. Some of the species
that have been negatively impacted by
the TGD include Chinese (Baiji) river
dolphins, Siberian cranes, and Yangtze
sturgeon. Freshwater fish are especially
affected by dams due to changes in the
water temperature and flow regime. Many
fish are injured in the turbine blades of
hydroelectric plants as well.
Increased erosion and sedimentation.
At current levels, 80% of the land in the
area is experiencing erosion, depositing
about 40 million tons of sediment into
the Yangtze River annually because the
flow is slower above the dam. Much of
the sediment will now settle there instead
of flowing downstream, and there will be
less sediment downstream.
Controlling Floods
The Three Gorges Dam project is designed
to adjust the Yangtze Rivers upstream flood,
which will ensure successful flood control of
the Jingjiang section, CTGC sources say. The
projects goal is to prevent 10-year floods
and control 100-year floods of the Yangtze
River. Even in the rare case of a 1,000-year
flood, mass damages or injuries can be pre-
vented, according to the CTGC.
At the same time, serious problems
such as environmental degradation and dis-
ease epidemics related to floods or flood
diversionwill also be avoided. Thus, the
project will protect 1.5 million hectares of
farmland and towns and 15 million people
from flood damage in the Jianghan Plain and
the Dongting Lake area.
Angela Neville, JD is POWERs
senior editor.
1. Dealing with a deluge. On July 24, 2012, flood water was released from the Three
Gorges Dam, the 22.5-GW hydropower project on the Yangtze River in central China. Because of
heavy rains in the upper reaches of the river, the facility experienced its largest flood peak during
2012 with a peak flow of 70,000 cubic meters of water per second. Courtesy: Xinhuanet
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December 2012 42
Walney Offshore Windfarms,
Irish Sea, UK
Owners/operator: DONG Energy and Partners/DONG Energy



















Officially commissioned in February 2012, the two Walney
Offshore WindfarmsWalney 1 and Walney 2together have
102 wind turbines with a total capacity of 367.2 MW. With
their combined capacity, the windfarms qualify as one of the
worlds largest offshore wind energy facilities and provide
clean electricity to approximately 320,000 UK households.
By Angela Neville, JD
L
ong a seafaring nation, the United
Kingdom (UK) is now in the forefront
of nations embracing offshore wind
power. In fact, the scale of offshore wind
power currently being planned by the UK
renewable energy industry is larger than in
any other country.
When commissioned in February 2012,
the 367-MW Walney Offshore Windfarms
(Walney 1 and Walney 2) became the
worlds largest offshore wind energy instal-
lation. Then in September 2012, construc-
tion of the even larger 500-MW Greater
Gabbard Offshore Wind Farm off the Suf-
folk Coast was completed. Upping the ante,
the 630-MW London Array offshore wind
project is currently under construction.
Looking farther down the road, other UK
offshore wind farms in the pipeline will be
even larger; these include Dogger Bank at
9,000 MW, Norfolk Bank at 7,200 MW,
and Irish Sea at 4,200 MW.
Constructed in two phases during 2010
and 2011, the Walney Offshore Windfarms
are located approximately 15 kilometers (km)
off Walney Island in the Irish Sea. DONG
Energy (50.1%), Scottish and Southern En-
ergy (25.1%), and OPW (24.8%), a company
jointly owned by Dutch pension administrator
PGGM and Ampre Equity Fund (managed
by Triodos Investment Management), are be-
hind Walney (UK) Offshore Windfarms Ltd.
DONG Energy served as the lead partner in
the Walney Offshore Windfarms construc-
tion phase and is also the operator.
Construction Overview
The Walney facility was constructed accord-
ing to the multi-contract model, working in
close cooperation with all the contractors and
suppliers, Jens Hansen, project manager with
DONG Energy, told POWER in September.
The project also optimized the installation
time through parallel installation (Figure 1).
We installed the largest wind turbine foun-
dations ever madealmost 70 meters (m) long
and weighing more than 800 tonnes. In addi-
tion, our project was one of the first wind farms
to use the new Siemens 120-m rotor diameter
turbine with blade improvements, Hansen said.
The entire Walney facility has a combined to-
tal of 102 3.6-MW Siemens wind turbines.
The offshore logistics for Walney 2 was
a big challenge, but due to good planning
it was all done according to the plan, said
Hansen. He explained that by approaching
the Walney project via a multi-contracting
strategy, project managers were able to miti-
gate and handle risks and uncertainties quick-
ly. Consequently, project management had a
high awareness of the dangers and potential
upsides in the project and thereby increased
their ability to do parallel installation with
controlled risk exposure.
DONG Energy coordinated all the ac-
tivities in the multi-contracting project. A
Courtesy: DONG Energy
TOP PLANTS
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December 2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 43
number of subcontractors performed the
following duties:
Seajacks from the UK installed the wind
turbines.
Geosea and Ballast Nedam handled the
foundation installation.
VSMC and Prysmian installed the cables.
Scaldis installed the offshore substation.
Tideway handled the scour protection.
Facility Operations
The Walney Offshore Windfarms are located
in the Irish Sea, which is characterized by
high tides and waves, and windy weather.
The difference between high tide and low
tide is approximately 8 m. The wind speed is
estimated to average approximately 9.3 m/s
at 80 m. Even though the wind farms cover
an area of roughly 73 km
2
, they are located
far enough from the coast that their visual
impact is minimal.
Each of the 102 turbines generates elec-
tricity at a voltage of 33 kV. Offshore sub-
stations collect electricity from the wind
turbines and step up the voltage to 132 kV
for the local grid. The Walney 1 offshore
substation is connected to the national grid
by a 44-km-long buried export cable at the
substation in Heysham, whereas the Wal-
ney 2 offshore substation is connected to
the national grid at Cleveleys near Black-
pool, via a 43-km-long buried export ca-
ble, Hansen explained.
The Operation and Maintenance (O&M)
Base in the new purpose-built premises at
Barrows Ramsden Docks consists of an
office for administration, welfare, and ca-
tering for personnel and a warehouse for
storing equipment for maintenance of the
offshore wind farms. Two new purpose-
built service vessels and a new service
pontoon are in place to enable the transport
of service technicians to and from the wind
farms. From the O&M Base, turbine opera-
tions can be monitored 24 hours a day and
a local crew of approximately 60 people
will ensure that the Walney Offshore Wind-
farms are in operation for the next 25 years,
according to Hansen.
The wind conditions are very good and
the area also has very good grid connection
possibilities; hence, we have other wind farms
in the area and therefore gain a certain syner-
gy, Hansen said. When we have more activ-
ities in the area, DONG Energy as a company
gains a better opportunity to work with the
local community (like we have done with the
Walney Fun Run) and to be an attractive em-
ployer for the skilled labor in the area.
Monitoring for Possible
Environmental Impacts
The marine environment and bird life in
and around the facility were carefully
studied before the wind farms construc-
tion was authorized. During the two years
of construction, additional work was done
to ensure that construction activities re-
mained within acceptable limits for noise
and other disturbances, according to Mike
Robson, senior environmental advisor on
the Walney facility team. In fact, as Hansen
explained, During the Walney Offshore
Windfarms construction, we were not al-
lowed to install the monopole foundation
during the period from February until April
7 due to the spawning season for the sole.
Wind farm personnel are now conducting
post-construction environmental surveys.
Now that the wind farms are completed,
a series of surveys will be carried out dur-
ing the next few years to keep an eye on any
possible impact the wind farms may have,
Robson said. Only minor impacts are ex-
pected on the seabed sediments and the
marine fauna, including fish and shellfish,
encountered in and around the wind farms.
Starting in late April 2012, survey ves-
sels began taking samples to study marine
organisms in and on the seabed, and a spe-
cially chartered fishing vessel is taking
trial catches of fish using a scientific beam
trawl. Also in 2012, a series of bird surveys
will be made from a boat to count birds in
and around the wind farms.
The surveys results will be presented
to scientific advisors at the Centre for
Environment, Fisheries, and Aquaculture
Science, an executive agency of the UKs
Department for Environment, Food, and
Rural Affairs. The surveys will help to
improve our knowledge of the sea and its
resources in the Walney Offshore Wind-
farms area, Robson said.
Powering the Future
With their projected annual production of
approximately 1,400 GWh, the Walney
Offshore Windfarms are set up to benefit
from the UK Renewables Obligation Cer-
tificate regime, which will create value for
the facility owners, explained Hansen.
He noted that the wind farms also ben-
efit the local economy: They will create
jobs and business opportunities. A lot of
persons have had direct and, maybe more
importantly, indirect benefits from the wind
farms construction activities and will also
benefit for many years to come from their
operations.
Currently, the UK offshore wind energy
sector appears to have the wind at its back.
In 2011, Renewable UK, a leading UK re-
newable energy association, conducted a
study of deployment trends that analyzed
the existing pipeline of future UK offshore
wind projects. The study projects that by
2016 there will be about 8 GW of installed
capacity and a total of approximately 18
GW by 2020.
In terms of its contribution to net UK
electricity production, offshore wind en-
ergy supplied around 1.5% in 2011. This
amount will grow to between 7% and 8%
by 2016 and to approximately 17% by
2020, according to Renewable UK.
Angela Neville, JD is POWERs
senior editor.
1. Uplifting work. During construction of the Walney Offshore Windfarms, which was
handled in two phasesWalney 1 and Walney 2crane barges, jack-up vessels, and tugs
worked out of ports in the East Irish Sea, primarily Barrow and Mostyn Harbors. Courtesy:
DONG Energy
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 44
RENEWABLES
Distributed Solar Challenges
Utilities, Markets, and Regulation
Electricity produced from solar energy is being added to the gridbefore and
after the meterin greater amounts each year. The uniqueness of this re-
source is pushing utilities, developers, users, and regulators to develop
new and innovative interconnection rules and to rewrite some old rules
that balance the costs and rewards among stakeholders.
By David Wagman
T
he amount of installed solar generating
capacity in the U.S. is almost laughably
small.
According to a report released in mid-Sep-
tember by the Solar Energy Industries Asso-
ciation (SEIA), the U.S. solar industry added
742 MW of new capacity in the second quarter
of 2012, its second-best quarter ever. Utility
installations hit 477 MW during the quarter.
And eight states posted utility solar installa-
tions of 10 MW or more: California, Arizona,
Nevada, Texas, Illinois, North Carolina, New
Mexico, and New Jersey. In total, the U.S. now
has 5,700 MW of installed solar capacity.
Remember, however, that the U.S. had
319,000 MW of installed coal capacity and
413,000 MW of natural gas capacity in 2011.
For many utilities, the 742 MW of solar capac-
ity added between April and June is less than a
single good-sized power plant. Solars growth
still may be exponential, but that growth is
from such a small number that it cant hold a
candle to the installed fossil base.
But in much the same way as a handful of
fleas can drive a dog mad, distributed forms
of generation in general are causing anxiety
for many big-dog utilities from their nose
to their tail. Voltage fluctuations, ramping
episodes, and unpredictable availability
and output are common challenges facing
system operators tasked with dispatching
distributed resources alongside traditional
forms of generation. Roof-mounted, cus-
tomer-owned solar also poses something of
an existential threat to incumbent utilities
by slicing away part of their load and a por-
tion of their revenue.
Companies such as SolarCity and Light-
house Solar operate on business models that
typically dont involve incumbent utilities;
but should a cloudy day cut a residential roof-
top solar systems output to zero, those same
utilities are expected to keep the lights on.
Faced with a reduction in load and revenues
caused in part by distributed solar, efforts are
under way in some places to rethink utility
business models to address problems such as
how best to compensate utilities for provid-
ing what amounts to a safety net to back up
growing amounts of distributed generation
(DG). And, given the power industrys his-
tory of regulation, reform of the regulatory
model also may be necessary to integrate still
more distributed generation into the grid.
For example, Georgia state legislators this
year let die a proposal that challenged Georgia
Powers monopoly on the sale of power to and
from utilities by allowing companies to lease
rooftop space for solar panels and then sell the
electricity to the property owner. Current law
allows power to be sold only to utilities, and
only utilities can sell to retail customers. The
bill is expected to be revived in 2013.
And in Texas, Pedernales Electric Coop-
erative finalized agreements in October for
two DG pilot programs with NRG SolarLife
and CommunitySun to bring additional solar
resources to members of one of the nations
largest co-ops. NRG SolarLife offers resi-
dential solar array leasing, and Communi-
tySun offers a SolarCondo concept in which
participants buy shares in a large-scale
solar facility. Pilot programs are still in de-
velopment; Pedernales plans to introduce the
SolarLife pilot early next year.
Some utilities say solar sucks and oth-
ers are constructive, said Angiolo Laviziano,
CEO of Mainstream Energy/REC Solar dur-
ing a Department of Energysponsored so-
lar conference in Denver last June. Culture
clash is one problem. Some solar companies
believe they are in business to change the
world, not simply generate electricity, Lavi-
ziano said. [Solar companies] dont under-
stand that utilities are not structured that way.
We show up and speak different languages.
Jared Schoch, managing director of utility
sales at SunEdison, said the solar industry gen-
erally lacks an understanding of most utilities
business models. Solar guys dont understand
that right now [solar energy] costs too much.
Two challenges for the solar industry are to
show that solar provides value for utility inves-
tors and that it can offer reliable service.
But Patrick Dinkel, vice president of Power
Marketing, Resource Planning and Acquisi-
tions for Arizona Public Service, told the DOE
conference that distributed solar photovoltaic
(PV) installations are now a part of his util-
itys generation portfolio. Although he saw no
legitimate long-term conflicts as a result of
integrating more PV into the utilitys system,
he said work still must be done when it comes
to utility business models and regulation.
Learning New Tricks
That notion was echoed by others in the in-
dustry. Often, technology is the smaller part
of the problem, said Karl Rbago in a recent
interview with POWER. Rbago, a consultant
and former Texas state utility regulator, DOE
official, and executive with Austin Energy,
said he agrees that although renewable inte-
gration issues have been debated for decades,
the topic remains timely. And indications are
that the flea-irritated electric industry dog
may be learning a few new tricks.
Those tricks include new approaches to
address operational, business, and regulatory
challenges posed by DG. Its worth starting
with a look at how Public Service Electric &
Gas (PSE&G) in New Jersey has coped op-
erationally with large amounts of distributed
solar generation resources.
New Jersey ranks medium in terms of so-
lar resource quality but high when it comes
to incentives and public policies aimed at
promoting solar generation and expanding
solar jobs in the state. Although the Beach
Boys may never write a song praising New
Jerseys sun, for the last couple of years the
state has ranked second only to California in
terms of new solar generation connections.
As recently as the first quarter of 2012, New
Jersey ranked first in the nation for new solar
December 2012
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POWER www.powermag.com 45
RENEWABLES
connections, with projects brought online by
15 different developers, including PSE&G.
Indeed, since July 2009, PSE&G has in-
vested $515 million to develop around 80
MW of solar energy resource, spending the
equivalent of around $6,400/kW. That total
includes 40 MW of capacity installed on va-
cant lots and brownfield industrial sites and
40 MW of capacity from around 150,000 5
x 2.5-foot, 235-W panels attached to utility
poles across the companys service territory
(Figure 1). Finding a U.S. utility with more
distributed solar generation may be difficult.
But for all this distributed capacity, the ill
effects on operations are almost nil for the
11,000-MW, summer-peaking utility.
We are seeing no real impacts, said Bill
Labos, PSE&G director of asset reliability.
Currently, PSE&G has about 358 MW of so-
lar installed in its service territory, including
80 MW of utility-owned capacity; the rest
consists of customer- and developer-owned
capacity. Indeed, the utility expects little im-
pact on its system until as much as 500 MW
of solar are installed, a threshold the util-
ity could approach in the next several years
following its request to state regulators this
summer for permission to add another 137
MW of solar capacity.
One reason for PSE&Gs ease in adding so-
lar resourcesand a key reason why utilities
elsewhere may have integration problems
is that the utilitys distribution feeders have
enough stiffness to accommodate the volt-
age fluctuations common with an intermittent
solar resource. Labos said many of the utilitys
feeders are 3 to 5 miles long and stiff enough
to accommodate anywhere from 2 MW to 5
MW of distributed solar with little trouble.
The exceptions that prove the rule lie in
rural southern New Jersey. There, solar farms
larger than 5 MW are on feeder circuits that
average 7 miles in length. In some places,
high voltage fluctuationsthe bane of grid
operators elsewhere in the countryare
large enough that the utility is taking advan-
tage of advanced inverter technology, which
can absorb volt-amps reactive (VAR). Invert-
ers on the tail end of long feeders are set up to
absorb VARs, thereby balancing the current
flows and correcting the circuit voltage pro-
file. Inverters are relatively straightforward
1. Pole-mounted PV panels. Since
mid-2009, PSE&G has invested $515 million
to develop around 80 MW of solar energy
resource, spending about $6,400/kW. The
total includes 40 MW of capacity from some
150,000 5 x 2.5-foot, 235-W panels attached
to utility poles. Courtesy: PSE&G
2. Roof-top generation. Workers for
Lighthouse Solar install microcrystalline PV
modules on a residential rooftop last Decem-
ber. Projects such as these can present an ex-
istential challenge to incumbent utilities and
are sparking a rethinking of existing business
models. Source: Dennis Schroeder, National
Renewable Energy Laboratory
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December 2012 46
RENEWABLES
pieces of equipment that convert DC output
from a wind farm or a solar array to AC for
distribution to a load or to the grid. Recent
technology advancements enable increas-
ingly smart inverters to play starring roles
in efforts to integrate ever-larger amounts of
solar into the grid.
For now, however, a principal factor
limiting efforts to integrate an intermittent
distributed resource such as solar or wind
is voltage on a distribution feeder, said Jeff
Smith, a senior project manager with the
Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)
in an interview with POWER.
Some distribution feeders are short
and fat and others are long and skinny, he
said. Identifying which can best accommo-
date distributed solar can be difficult, since
no two distribution systems are alike. As a
rule of thumb, connecting an intermittent
resource near a substation has less impact
in terms of voltage fluctuations than con-
necting it miles away. Work by EPRI, util-
ity partners, and the vendor community is
intended to enhance inverter capabilities to
bolster grid support and voltage control.
Solving for X and Y
For years, the equation that grid operators
had to solve in order to balance supply
and demand included a constantly varying
load met by a generally stable and known
amount of generation, most of it fossil,
hydro, or nuclear. The accelerating addi-
tion of intermittent resources from renew-
able energy over the past decade tacked a
big unknownvariabilityonto the gen-
eration side of the equation.
Now, instead of dealing with one un-
known variable involving demand, grid
operators regularly face a second unknown
variable, this time involving generation
resources. Thats because intermittent re-
sources differ from conventional and fossil-
fired resources in a fundamental way: Their
fuel source (wind and sunlight) cannot be
controlled or (for now, anyway) stored in
a practical and cost-effective manner (Fig-
ure 2). The challenge is particularly acute
in areas where DG resources make a sig-
nificant contribution to the generation mix,
including New Jersey, parts of California,
Colorado, and the Texas and Midwest grid
operating regions.
A further complication is that fuel avail-
ability for variable resources often does
not match electricity demand in terms of
time of use or geographic location. For
example, peak availability of wind power
often occurs during periods of relatively
low electricity demand. And on hot, sultry
summer days when consumers in general
and grid operators in particular would kill
for a breeze, wind production often drops
to near zero.
Yet another complication is that the out-
put of variable resources often is character-
ized by steep ramps that can be caused
by clouds moving across a solar array or
the passing of a weather front that chang-
es how much wind is blowing. Managing
Date FERC Order No. Action
1980s NA California wind farms work to minimize power system disruptions should a
wind power plant problem arise.
1996 888 Requires open access to transmission.
July 2003 2003 Large generator interconnection procedures for resources greater than 20 MW.
Aug. 2003 NA Northeast blackout. Aftermath prompts wind industry to pursue grid code,
recognizing wind plants have a role to play in grid stability.
Mar. 2004 2003-A Acknowledges different approach may be appropriate for generators relying
on newer technology, not traditional synchronous technology.
Sept. 2004 NA American Wind Energy Association submits grid code to FERC that includes
low-voltage ridethrough requirement.
2005 661 and 661-A Adopts interconnection standards applicable to large wind generators.
2007 890 Adopts transmission planning principles, ancillary service scheduling to ad-
dress generator imbalances, new conditional firm transmission product.
Jan. 2010 Notice of Inquiry Opens inquiry to explore extent to which barriers may exist that impede reli-
able and efficient integration of variable energy resources.
July 2011 1000 Addresses how public utility transmission providers plan for and allocate
costs of new projects on a regional and interregional basis.
June 22, 2012 764 "Integration of Variable Energy Resources" rule amends Open Access Trans-
mission Tariff to offer intra-hourly transmission scheduling and requires
meteorological and forced outage data to be provided to public utility trans-
mission providers for forecasting purposes.
FERC actions on variable energy resource integration. Source: FERC
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POWER www.powermag.com 47
RENEWABLES
these ramps can challenge system opera-
tors, particularly if down ramps occur as
demand increases, and vice versa. These
challenges can be intensified if the rest
of the bulk power system lacks sufficient
generating resources that can be dispatched
quickly, whether that takes the form of a
pumped hydro facility or a fast-start gas-
fired machine.
Aidan Tuohy, senior project engineer
with EPRI, told POWER that multiple is-
sues must be addressed to successfully in-
tegrate large amounts of distributed energy
resources.
First is the need for system flexibil-
ity as intermittent resources such as wind
and solar ramp up and down. Flexibility
to accommodate these fluctuations can be
accomplished by dispatching generation
resources such as combined cycle and com-
bustion turbine units, pumped hydro stor-
age resources, and even battery storage.
Second, forecasting tools are necessary
to help system operators anticipate the
amount of intermittent resource that may
be available. Although accurate day-ahead
forecasts can be difficult for solar and wind
resources, even an hours-ahead forecast can
help operators more efficiently utilize the
generation system. For example, the Elec-
tric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT),
among other balancing authorities, has inte-
grated forecasting methods into its market
operations, and accurate forecasting is prov-
ing important for Xcel Energys Colorado
operations, where more than 50% of over-
all generation has been provided by wind a
number of times.
Third, grid stability issues have grown
in importance over the past 20 years as
diminishing amounts of inertia from con-
ventional power plants have impeded
somewhat the grids ability to offer fre-
quency response. Tuohy speculated that the
grids frequency response ability has been
declining and could be due in part to mar-
ket design issues in which generators are
sometimes disincentivized from providing
frequency response services. The problem
may be exacerbated as inverter-based ener-
gy from solar and wind resources displaces
system inertia provided by conventional
power plants. Thats because while large
conventional generators spin at 60 Hz,
inverter-based power sources dont. While
wind can provide what Tuohy called emu-
lated inertia, the result is a decline in the
systems naturally occurring inertia, which
may be a factor in grid stability.
Fourth, because most distributed PV
systems are connected to the grid using
standards spelled out under IEEE 1547
guidelines to prevent islanding, it can be
difficult to control system ride-throughs
when voltages drop. Tuohy said efforts are
under way to reconcile IEEE standard with
bulk system needs.
Fifth, wind resources in particular can
increase conventional generator cycling,
which can have long-term effects on opera-
tions and maintenance costs, outages, and
lifetime efficiency.
Market Rules and Regulations
Operational issues are only one part of the
story. Its sometimes easy to forget just how
regulated and controlled the electric power
market is. Both state and federal regulators
guide power market functions through pol-
icy mandates and incentives. Deregulation
took hold in around half of the states during
its high water mark in the late 1990s and led
to a patchwork quilt of regulatory structures.
Public policy makerswhether elected or
appointedapply a sometimes bewildering
array of incentives, directives, and Band-
Aids to achieve a variety of goals.
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RENEWABLES
Many policy actions in recent years have
focused on creating, supporting, and nur-
turing opportunities for renewable energy.
The table highlights policy initiatives un-
dertaken by the Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission (FERC) since the 1980s to
open transmission markets, cope with in-
termittent resources, and facilitate renew-
able energys integration into the grid.
Many federal and state policies seek to
remedy the fact that wind and solar projects
can be at an economic disadvantage with
conventional generation resources, at least
initially. In states where renewable resources
are valued as a matter of public policy, the
effort has been to pursue business and market
reforms intended to open market opportuni-
ties for renewable energy. Those efforts are
by no means simple.
Revising Net Metering
Take net metering, for example, which al-
lows solar system owners to roll their meters
backward as they generate electricity and sell
excess output into the grid. Solar generation
owners are paid retail rates for the electricity
they feed into the grid. But they also may end
up at the end of the month with a zero balance
on their utility bill. In other words, net meter-
ing can enable solar owners to avoid paying
the underlying cost of transmission and dis-
tribution that they themselves used to send
self-generated power to the grid. Not surpris-
ingly, many utilitiesand perhaps even a few
customersfind the arrangement inequitable.
Former Austin Energy executive Rbago
said that one flaw behind net metering is that it
is directly tied to consumption; its an incen-
tive not to conserve energy. Austin Energys
experience shows that many solar customers
respond by using more energy on the mistaken
assumption that their consumption is free
once a solar system is installed.
The Texas-based utility earlier this year
introduced what it hopes will be a fix to the
problem: a distributed PV value calculator
known as the Value of Solar rate. Beginning
this fall, solar owners in Austin will be billed
the same 1.8 cents to 11.4 cents per kWh that
non-solar customers are billed, plus the same
$10 monthly customer charge. Solar owners
also will be credited with 12.8 cents for every
kilowatt-hour they send to the utility. If the
rate works, it may ensure the utilitys ability
to recover the cost of providing ancillary and
partial requirements services to solar custom-
ers, enable those costs to be more equitably
spread among customers, and reassure solar
owners that they will continue to receive a fi-
nancial incentive for their investment.
Rethinking Dispatch Markets
Region-wide market reforms also are proving
critical to integrating large amounts of DG
into the generation mix. Both the Southwest
Power Pool and the California Independent
System Operator (CAISO) have proposed
creating an energy imbalance market (EIM)
in the Western Interconnect that would com-
press dispatch market intervals from 1 hour at
present to 5 minutes. The market would pay
generators for making power available on this
more rapid timetable. Creating an effective
EIM would require increasing the regions
footprint to include a larger number of gen-
erating units with the flexibility to respond
rapidly to changing loads and intermittent re-
sources. Putting such a market mechanism in
place would require significant upgrades so
that power producers could communicate with
a centralized dispatch authority, said Thomas
Veselka, a researcher with Argonne National
Laboratory, who is working on the initiative.
Moving to larger balancing areas for dis-
patch purposes means that even more re-
sources are available, lessening the overall
variability effects of an individual wind farm
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December 2012 50
RENEWABLES
or solar array, said Charlie Smith, execu-
tive director of the Utility Wind Integration
Group. Moving to this sort of model is not
cost-free, however, as transmission improve-
ments to tie together far-flung generating
units likely will be required. Transmission
is the critical issue, Smith said. You cant
have well-functioning markets with conges-
tion, which results from inadequate trans-
mission resources. Whats more, efforts to
move to a sub-hourly and even 5-minute mar-
ket will likely require enhanced communica-
tion capabilities between regional dispatch
authorities and generating resources.
CAISO views market rules as critical to de-
veloping products and services that incentivize
efforts to balance the bulk power system as re-
newable resources are added. The system in
California and across the entire industry is very
much in flux, said Mark Rothleder, executive
director of Market Analysis and Development
for CAISO. In an interview with POWER,
Rothleder outlined market mechanisms critical
to keeping Californias grid in balance.
First, CAISO introduced incentives intend-
ed to compensate entities that provide ramp-
ing services, a condition that Rothleder said
poses significant challenges for CAISO.
The idea is to allow resources to bid into the
market to provide both up and down ramping
services as loads and resources change.
Second, because CAISO expects too much
generation to be available at times, it set a bid
floor equal to $30. That negative price floor
has proven inadequate given that wind and
solar resources often operate with tax credits
and power purchase agreements that make it
economically rational for them to continue to
produce power even after prices go negative.
To correct that, CAISO wants the bid floor
reduced to $150 to incentivize a price-based
reduction in supply.
If the system is in an over-generating
condition and at a point where we still have
too much energy, we want an incentive for re-
newable resources to offer bids to back down
to the minimum, Rothleder said.
Revising Rule 21
Grid-balancing authorities and regional dis-
patch areas are not the only places where
reform is under way to cope with increasing
amounts of DG resources. State utility regu-
lators also play an important role.
For example, the California Public Utilities
Commission (CPUC) in September approved
a deal involving the states major utilities and
renewable energy advocates that is aimed at
streamlining the process for connecting DG
resources to the grid. The CPUCs action will
make it easier for small amounts of distrib-
uted resourcessuch as rooftop solar PV
systemsto connect. The agreement also
revises upward the amount of DG that can be
connected to a specific power line segment
without the need for supplemental studies.
The agreement revises the CPUCs 13-year-
old Rule 21, itself a landmark. Rule 21 set a
threshold for instances where the amount of
DG on a line section exceeds 15% of that
lines annual peak load. The so-called 15%
threshold was later adopted by FERC and by
most states as a model for developing inter-
connection rules. The CPUCs action revised
Californias standard to allow aggregate in-
terconnected DG capacity equal to 100% of
minimum load on a distribution line section.
The settlement agreement was filed with
the CPUC on March 16 and involved 14 par-
ties, including Pacific Gas and Electric Co.,
San Diego Gas & Electric Co., Southern Cali-
fornia Edison, Sierra Club, and the SEIA. The
SEIAs vice president of regulatory affairs,
Don Adamson, told POWER his organization
filed a motion in February with FERC (Docket
No. RM 12-10), urging it to replace the federal
15% threshold with a standard equal to 100%
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December 2012 52
RENEWABLES
of minimum daylight load. SEIA said that so-
lar developers believed for years that the 15%
screen for fast-track interconnection was more
restrictive than necessary to maintain distribu-
tion system safety and reliability. This view
was supported by a January 2012 report, titled
Updating Interconnection Screens for PV
System Integration, by the National Renew-
able Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Lab-
oratory, and EPRI. The report suggests that an
alternative fast-track screennamely 100%
of minimum daytime loadcan be used when
the 15% threshold is crossed.
SEIA said that should FERC adopt its pro-
posed revision, the amount of solar wholesale
DG capacity eligible for fast-track intercon-
nection would roughly double and make in-
terconnection faster and less costly for many
solar projects.
Three Models
Traditional cost-of-service regulation re-
mains a mainstay of public utility commis-
sions in states that retain full regulatory
authority over electric service. But that regu-
latory model may be impeding utilities from
meeting some of the challenges posed by
DG, said Ron Binz, a former Colorado pub-
lic utility regulator and consultant at work on
the Utilities 2020 project with funding from
the Energy Foundation. He said critical con-
cerns include the loss of load and revenue by
incumbent utilities as a result of DG, similar
to what Austin Energy faced. Utilities have
to decide in the face of some percentage of
profitable customers going away how to ad-
just to that, Binz said.
Three models are gaining attention as a
way to cope with the challenges posed by
DGs ascendency.
The first is a model based on efforts in the
United Kingdom to regulate utility prices
without considering the utilitys underlying
rate of return or profitability. By contrast,
the typical U.S. regulatory model seeks to
set prices that may be charged along with an
allowable rate of return. In the UK model,
regulators set a price ceiling and then allow
the utility to figure out how to maximize its
profitability. Binz said this model has the ad-
vantage of encouraging utilities to embrace
operating efficiencies and pursue business
decisions that improve the bottom line. Cus-
tomers benefit because the price they pay for
electricity cant rise above a certain ceiling.
The approach is intended to help utilities be
more entrepreneuriala potential benefit
when it comes to working with customers
with rooftop solar, for example. Both Nation-
al Grid and Mid-American Energy have ex-
perience with the UK model through various
business units, and Binz said their reaction so
far has been positive.
The second approach, known as the Iowa
Model, involves Mid-American and spanned
the years from 1995 to 2012. Under a regula-
tory experiment, the utility went 17 years with-
out changing the price of electricity (which
included no fuel clauses, no adjustment mech-
anisms, and no formal rate case). The model
set up a system in which Mid-American oper-
ated like a price-capped company. Prices re-
mained steady, but the utilitys earnings were
ignored by regulators. This approach relies on
the utility turning inward to generate income
growth andaccording to Binzresulted in
rates of return for the utility in the high teens.
Binz called the third model the Grand
Bargain and said that under this approach,
regulators tell the utility and intervenors
(everyone from industrial power users to
consumer advocacy groups) to work out a
multi-year deal that achieves specific goals.
From the outset, regulators specify that not
everyone needs to agree with the final bargain
for it to be approved. This approach takes a
lot more work than typically is done, Binz
said, but it can lead to a positive outcome for
most if not all of the involved parties.
Regulatory reform often requires statu-
tory changes by state legislatures. But Binz
said the three models he outlined can be em-
ployed by most regulatory authorities under
legal structures already in place.
Tackling Tough Issues
Distributed generationand distributed so-
lar in particularis making inroads into the
generation mix. Even if its total installed
capacity remains flea-like compared with
big dogs coal and natural gas, distributed
solars impact is magnified by the multiple
operational, business, and regulatory chal-
lenges it poses.
Though utilities such as PSE&G and Aus-
tin Energy have done a good job accepting
DG into their systems, market and regulatory
challenges remain to be solved in many parts
of the country, and efforts are under way
to tackle even the thorniest of those issues.
More difficult could be closing the cultural
gap that exists between incumbent utilities
and solar advocates. As Mainstream Energys
Laviziano noted, utilities and solar advocates
often speak different languages.
Many utilities continue to approach DG
warily, an understandable reaction given the size
of their infrastructure investment, their cautious
nature as engineering-based businesses, and
their responsibility to keep the lights on. They
seek concrete proof that the bulk generation and
distribution systems will remain intact. After all,
all utilities are from Missouri, said Rbago.
Their approach is show me first.
David Wagman is
executive editor of POWER.
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www.powermag.com POWER
|
December2012 54
POWER IN CHINA
Renewable Energy Development
Thrives During Chinas 12th
Five-Year Plan
Chinas 12th Five-Year Plan calls for expanding the use of renewable energy in
all forms throughout the country. From solar and wind to biomass gas and
briquettes, China has a true all of the above renewable energy policy.
By Zeng Ming, L Chunquan, Ma Mingjuan, Peng Lilin, Yan Binjie, Li Na, and Xue Song, North China Electric Power
University, Beijing
R
enewable energy, in all its forms, is an
important part of Chinas sustainable
electricity system development. Accel-
erating the development and use of renewable
energy has become an effective and efficient
way for China to respond to the increasingly
serious problems of increasing energy supply
while minimizing environmental impact.
This article examines the renewable energy
portion of Chinas 12th Five-Year Plan, from
development to implementation over the pe-
riod 2011 to 2015 and provides an update on
renewable energy accomplishments made dur-
ing the 11th Five-Year Plan (20062010). For
each renewable technology, practical sugges-
tions are provided that would further strength-
en the plans goal of bringing electricity to all
while reducing Chinas use of fossil fuels.
Chinas Renewable Program
Renewable energy plays an important part in
Chinas overall energy plan. Its use has many
favorable outcomes, such as wide resource
distribution, high exploitation potential, re-
duced environmental impact, and sustainable
use. Chinas rapid economic and social de-
velopment has made energy demand growth,
resource depletion, and environment pollu-
tion increasingly serious. The development
and use of renewable energy has become an
important means for China to guarantee its
energy security and to strengthen environ-
mental protection. Therefore, accelerating
the development and use of renewable energy
is a necessary way for China to simultane-
ously address the serious problems of energy
supply and environmental protection.
The renewable energy goals set for the
12th Five-Year Plan are substantial, as was
discussed in an earlier article (Chinas 12th
Five-Year Plan Pushes Power Industry in New
Directions, January 2012, available in the
POWER archives at www.powermag.com).
Renewable energy development is key to
China achieving its goal of 11.4% of primary
energy consumption from non-fossil sources
in 2015 and 15% in 2020. Its also necessary
to speed up renewable energy policy changes
and to promote the sustainable development
of its renewable energy industry. The current
plan builds on the success of the 11th Five-
Year Plan, during which the 2005 Renewable
Energy Law was made effective, renewable
energy markets were established, renewable
resource evaluations were completed, and
many renewable projects began construction
(Table 1). Today, many renewable energy
technologies have been commercialized, and
the markets for their use are quickly expand-
ing. Chinas renewable energy industry has
now entered the next stage of development:
comprehensive, fast, and large scale.
Technology and Market Challenges
Renewable energy, in its many forms, is now
an important part of Chinas national energy
development strategy. However, significant
challenges remain before China can reach its
renewable energy goals.
Technical and economic problems of re-
newable energy development are still Chinas
most fundamental problems. In recent years,
renewable energy technology has improved
rapidly, but most renewable energy industries
Energy source
11th Five-Year
Plan (2005)
11th Five-Year Plan
target (end of 2010)
11th Five-Year
Plan (actual)
Average annual
growth (%)
Generation (GW)
Hydropower 117.93 190.00 216.06 13.0
Small hydropower 38.50 50.00 58.40 8.7
Wind power 1.26 10.00 31.00 89.7
Photovoltaic 0.07 0.30 0.80 62.8
Biomass 2.00 5.50 5.50 22.4
Gas supply
Biogas (10
9
m
3
) 80 190 140 31.8
Rural biogas users
(10
5
households )
1.8 4 4 17.3
Heating
Solar water heaters (105 m
2
) 8,000 15,000 16,800 16
Geothermal systems 200 400 460 18.1
Fuel (10
5
tons)
Ethanol 102 200 180 12
Biodiesel 5 20 50 58.5
Total utilization
(million tons of coal/year)
16,600 NA 28,600 11.5
NA = not applicable.
Table 1. Major indicators of renewable energy development during the
11th Five-Year Plan. Source: State Council (www.gov.cn)
DetailedDesignEPCCM
StudiesOwner&Bank
Engineering
UtilitiesIPPsIndustry
UniversitiesOEMs
Banks/Investors
BiomassSolar(Thermal&PV)Simple&CombinedCycle
WindFluidizedBed/PC/StokerBoilersBiofuelsMSW
GasiicationLandillGasPyrolysisPlantImprovements
AirPollutionControlCHP/CogenerationEnergySavings
Engine-GeneratorsFacilities/Buildings&Systems
FiveBiomassPowerplantsNowinDetailedDesign
OwnersEngineerNowfora900MWCombined
CycleRepoweringProject
PrelimDesignNowfora1.2MGPDIndustrial
WastewaterDesalinationPlant
CompletedDesignandStartupofa300MW
CombinedCycleRepoweringProject
CompletedDesignandStartupofaConcentrating
SolarThermalPowerTowerProject
OwnersEngineerNowfora4xLM6000Simple
CyclePowerPlant
VariousPowerPlantServiceProjects
Chairman/CEO President/COO VPEngineering Mgr.Civil/Structural Mgr.Electrical
Mgr.
Mechanical
Sr.ProjectMgr.
Sr.
ProjectMgr. Sr.ProjectMgr. Sr.ProjectMgr. ChiefMech.Eng.
Mgr.Bus.Develop.
For career opportunities e-mail a resume in conidence to: recruitment@bibb-eac.com
Bus.Dev.LA
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14_PWR_120112_SR_ChinaRenewables.indd 55 11/15/12 1:48:09 PM
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December2012 56
POWER IN CHINA
are still in a growth phase, except hydropower
and solar water heaters. The growing markets
have experienced uneven distribution of prod-
ucts and many manufacturing disruptions. The
cost of development and use of the products
also remains high. Renewable energy still lacks
competitiveness under current market circum-
stances, so it is necessary for China to rely on
policy support to sustain development.
Furthermore, management systems and
market mechanisms are having difficulty
adapting to full-scale development of renew-
able energy. The operational characteristics
of large, conventional energy resources are
much different than those of relatively small
and distributed renewable energy resources
now operating. Also, the effect of intermit-
tent operation of renewable energy sources
has become more apparent as the use of re-
newable sources grows. Consequently, China
has found it necessary to establish new power
management systems, market mechanisms,
and technical support systems to handle large
amounts of renewable electricity.
Additionally, China is working to develop
a system of basic research, technological in-
novation, and competitivenessalthough that
effort is still in process. A large gap remains
between China and developed countries when
it comes to key technologies for renewable
energy. However, China is constantly improv-
ing the training of those who will work in the
countrys renewable energy industry.
Renewable Goals During the 12th
Five-Year Plan
According to the 12th Five-Year Plan, renew-
able energy use of all forms will expand con-
siderably. In addition, the plan promotes the
fusion of renewable energy and conventional
energy systems, invests in technology inno-
vation and core technologies, and establishes
a strong, fully functioning renewable energy
industry (Table 2).
The measure chosen to track accomplish-
ments is equivalent tons standard coal usage
that is offset by renewables. For example, by
2015, annual utilization of renewable energy
resources is expected to reach 0.47 billion
tons standard coal, of which 0.4 billion tons
are commercialized renewable resources or
about 9.5% of Chinas energy consumption.
Renewable energy generation is expected
to reach over 20% of total generation by
2015. New installed renewable energy capac-
ity is planned to be 1,600 GW, of which 610
GW will be from conventional hydropower,
700 GW from wind power, and 75 GW from
biological mass-energy (biomass).
By 2015, annual renewable energy resourc-
es to replace fossil energy for heating and civil
fuels (fuels used to heat and/or power govern-
ment and other buildings) will be equivalent
to about 100 million tons standard coal. Ex-
pansion in the use of solar thermal energy,
promoting the direct use of medium- and
low-temperature geothermal energy and heat
pump technology, increasing the use of bio-
mass briquettes, expanding the use of biomass
combined heat and power generation, and
speeding up the development of biogas and
other biomass gases are all very important for
China to achieve its renewable energy goals.
China must expand its power grid hardware
and management systems to handle the power
produced by large-scale renewable projects.
While that work continues, the 12th Five-Year
Plan adds more, including the construction
of 30 new energy microgrid demonstration
projects, 100 new energy demonstration cit-
ies, and 200 green energy demonstration
counties (each discussed in more detail later
in this article). These projects will integrate
diverse renewable energy technologies, such
as distributed power generation and renewable
energy heating and fuel utilization. The target
penetration of distributed renewable energy in
rural areas is above 50%.
Large-scale renewable projects and the
policy systems required to support renewable
energy development remain a large part of the
renewable energy portion of the 12th Five-Year
Plan. In fact, the plan calls out eight specific
renewable energy categories for development.
Each is described in the following sections.
Hydropower Flourishes
By 2020, the total installed hydropower capacity
in China will reach 420 GW, with conventional
hydropower at 350 GW and pumped-storage
power stations at 70 GW, according to the Na-
tional Energy Administration.
The key goals for developing new hydropow-
er should include close government coordina-
tion to improve the well-being of those relocated
to make way for a new hydropower project, as
well as the stated goals of environment protec-
tion, local economic and social development,
and strengthening hydropower planning.
During the 12th Five-Year period, the total
installed capacity of all hydropower projects
is planned to increase by 160 GW, with 40
GW of new pumped-storage power stations.
Of that 160-GW increase, 74 GW will be new
hydropower installationsof which small hy-
dropower plants would provide 10 GW plus 13
GW of pumped-storage capacity. By 2015, total
installed hydropower capacity will reach 290
GW, 260 GW of which will be from conven-
Energy source
Installed
capacity (GW)
Annual
production (MWh)
Equivalant coal use
(million tons of coal/year)
Generation
Hydropower 260 910 29,580
Grid 100 190 6,180
Solar power 21 25 810
All biological mass-energy:
Agricultural and biomass energy 8 48 1,500
Methane power generation 2 12 370
Garbage power 3 18 560
Gas supply
Biogas user (10
5
households) 5,000 215 1,700
Industrial organic wastewater biogas 1,000 5 50
Heating and cooling:
Solar water heater (10
5
m
2
) 40,000 4,550
Solar cooker (10
5
sets) 200 NA
Geothermal systems
Heating and cooling (10
5
m
2
) 58,000 1,500
Hot water supply (10
5
sets) 120 NA
Fuel (10
5
tons)
Biomass fuel 1,000 500
Ethanol 400 350
Biodiesel 100 150
Total 47,800
NA = not applicable.
Table 2. Major renewable energy development is planned during the
12th Five-Year Plan. Significant reduction in the amounts of equivalent fossil fuels result.
Source: State Council
December2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 57
POWER IN CHINA
tional hydropower and 30 GW from pumped-
storage power stations. By then the installed
capacity of existing conventional hydropower
projects will account for 48% of national tech-
nically exploitable capacity (TEC), according
to the National Energy Administration.
By 2015, conventional hydropower capac-
ity installation in the western region alone
will reach 167 GW, accounting for 64% of
Chinas total installed capacity, with a devel-
opment level of 38% TEC. In central China,
conventional hydropower capacity installa-
tion will reach 59 GW, accounting for 23%
TEC, and in eastern China it will reach 34
GW, accounting for 13% TEC. At the same
time, the National Energy Administration
predicts the national installed capacity of
pumped-storage power stations will reach 40
GW, mainly distributed in eastern and cen-
tral parts of China, of which 20.7 GW will be
from eastern regions, 8 GW from the central
areas, and 1.3 GW from western areas.
River Basin Hydropower. The central
government must strengthen preliminary
work such as river hydropower planning
and continue to support the demonstration
of Longtou reservoirs construction in the
middle reaches of the Jinsha River, and con-
duct strategic planning for developing hydro-
power in southeastern Tibet. The government
CIRCLE 31 ON READER SERVICE CARD
1. Many hydro plants. This map shows the location of Chinas 13 largest hydropower
plants. Source: China Electricity Council (www.cec.org.cn)
Northeast China
18,690 MW
North-Mainstream of the
Yellow River 6,408 MW
Upstream of the Yellow River
20,032 MW
Yalong River
25,310 MW
Jinsa River
58,580 MW
Nu River
21,420 MW
Mainstream of the Lancang River
25,605 MW
Nanpan River-Honghe River
14,313 MW
Fujian-Zhejiang-
Jiangxi area
10,925 MW
Western Hunan
5,902 MW
Upstream of the
Yangtze River
33,197 MW
Dadu River
24,596 MW
Wu River
10,795 MW
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December2012 58
POWER IN CHINA
should put priority on the Three Rivers
(Jinsha, Lancang, and Nujiang) and the basic
research work on the West-East electricity
transmission project. Priority should be given
to continuing hydropower planning work on
the Yalong River Up Reaches and Brahmapu-
tra River Lower Reaches and the completion of
hydropower planning for the Jinsha River Up
Reaches, Lancang River Up Reaches, Yellow
River Up Reaches, Brahmaputra River Middle
Reaches, Nujiang River and Tongtianhe River,
among others.
Large Hydropower. It is necessary to
accelerate the construction of large hydro-
power stations by concentrating on those
regions with abundant hydropower resources
and on better construction conditions, such
as the middle and lower reaches of the Jin-
sha River, Yalong River, and Dadu River; the
middle and lower reaches of Lancang River;
Yellow River Up Reaches; and Brahmaputra
River Middle Reachesamong others. The
government must continue to implement ca-
pacity enlargement and upgrade hydropower
resources in central and eastern regions.
The distribution of Chinas 13 largest hy-
dropower projects is shown in Figure 1.
Small Hydropower. The central govern-
ment must strengthen the comprehensive
management of small and medium-sized river
basin projects, promote hydropower capac-
ity enlargement and efficiency increases, and
improve the development and utilization of
small hydropower in poor areas with abundant
resources. By 2015, the construction of small
hydropower projects in large provinces worth
3 GW and small hydropower in five small
provinces worth 5 GW will be completed.
Pumped Storage. In accordance with
the principle of integrated planning, rational
distribution, the construction of pumped-
storage power stations will be accelerated
moderately. In regions where the proportion
of new energy (that is, non-hydro renewable)
systems is high, the government should con-
struct pumped-storage power stations to in-
crease the flexibility and reliability of power
system operation.
In eastern coastal areas that import most
of their electricity, the government should ra-
tionally arrange a number of pumped-storage
power stations to ensure the security and sta-
bility of the electrical network. Chinas ma-
jor hydropower stations and pumped-storage
projects under construction during the 12th
Five-Year Plan are shown in Tables 3 and 4.
Wind Power Increases
By 2015, the cumulative grid-connected
wind power capacity will reach 100 GW, and
the annual generated energy will surpass 190
billion kWh. Offshore wind power capacity
will reach 5 GW, according to the National
Development and Reform Commission. A
complete wind power equipment manufac-
turing industry that will compete in the in-
ternational market also will be formed. By
2020, the cumulative grid-connected wind
power capacity will reach 200 GW, and the
Major basins Major projects (selected)
Jinsha River Baihetan, Wudongde, Longpan, Liyuan, Ahai, Longkaikou, Ludila, Guanyinyan,Yebatan,
Lawa, Suwalong, Changbo, Xulong, and others
Lancang River Cege, Kagong, Rumei, Guxue, Gushui, Wunonglong, Heidi, Tuoba, Huangdeng, Dahuaq-
iao, Miaowei, Nuozhadu, Ganlanba, and others
Dadu River Shuangjiangkou, Jinchuan, Anning, Badi, Danba, Houziyan, Huangjinping, Yingliang-
bao, Zhentouba, Shaping, Angu, and others
Upper reaches of the
Yellow River Mentang, Ningmute, Maerdang, Cihaxia, Yangqu, Banduo, and others
Yalong River Lianghekou, Yagen, Mengdigo, Yangfanggou, Kala, and others
Nujiang River main-
stream Songta, Maji, Yabiluo, Liuku, Saige, and others
Middle reaches of the
Yarlung Zangbo River Dagu, Jiepi, Jiacha, and others
Other rivers Small South Sea of Yangtze River, Xunyang of Hanjiang River, Xinji, Xiaoxuan of Block-
ing River, Songhua River, Wujiang River White Horse, Red River Longtan 2, Palong-
zangbu Zhong Yu, and others
Table 3. Hydro plans. China will have started or will continue construction of many ma-
jor hydropower stations and pumped-storage projects during the 12th Five-Year Plan. Source:
China Electricity Council
Regional power grid Region Major projects Installed capacity (MW)
Northeast Power Grid Heilongjiang Huanggou 1,200
Jilin Dunhua 1,400
Liaoning Hengren 800
North China Power Grid
Hebei
Fengning 1 1,800
Fengning 2 1,800
Shandong Wendeng 1,800
Northwest Power Grid Ningxia Zhongning 600
Xinjiang Fukang 1,200
Gansu Sunan 1,200
Shanxi Zhenan 1,400
East China Power Grid
Jiangsu
Mashan 700
Jurong 1,350
Zhejiang
Ninghai 1,400
Tianhuangping 2 2,100
Anhui Jixi 1,800
Fujian Xiamen 1,400
Central China Power Grid
Henan
Tianchi 1,200
Wuyue 800
Chongqing Panlong 1,200
Hubei Shangjinshan 1,200
West Inner Mongolia Power Grid Inner Mongolia Xilinhot 800
Southern Power Grid
Guangdong
Shenzhen 1,200
Meizhou 1,200
Yangjiang 1,200
Hainan Qiongzhong 600
Total 31,350
Table 4. Pumped storage. China has many major pumped-storage projects under con-
struction during the 12th Five-Year Plan. Source: China Electricity Council
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December2012 60
POWER IN CHINA
annual generated energy will surpass 390 bil-
lion kWh. Offshore wind will reach 30 GW.
By 2020, wind power will have become an
essential part of Chinas power system.
The government should continue to pro-
mote the large-scale development of wind
power, although development must be equal-
ly split between centralized and decentralized
projects. Wind power resource distribution,
power transmission, and electricity consump-
tion must be carefully coordinated. At the
same time, it is necessary to optimize wind
power development and distribution, estab-
lish suitable dispatching and operating meth-
ods to improve utilization efficiency, enhance
the global competitiveness of equipment, and
improve the wind power service system. The
development pace of wind power will in-
crease during the 12th Five-Year Plan.
By 2015, several concentrated develop-
ment areas with a capacity of more than 5
GW will be completed, such as Jiuquan,
Zhangjiakou, Ulanqab, Xilin Gol, Tongliao,
Chifeng, and Baicheng. There will also be
a couple of concentrated development areas
with a capacity of more than 2 GW, such
as Chengde, Bayannur, Baotou, Xingan,
Matsubara, Tangshan, Minqin, Daqing, and
Qiqihar. Chinas eight planned wind power
sites with a capacity of more than 10 GW are
shown in Figure 2.
The central government should strengthen
the wind energy resource assessment of in-
land areas, except the Three-North region,
as well as development and construction in
those areas. It should also accelerate wind
power development in regions with richer
resources and better grid access conditions,
such as Shanxi, Liaoning, Ningxia, and Yun-
nan, among others, and encourage construct-
ing small and medium-sized wind power
projects connected to the grid, as local con-
ditions allow. This allows local wind energy
resources to be consumed locally, which re-
duces the new grid capacity needed.
Transformer substations with voltages
below 110 kV are widely distributed and
near load centers. The central government
will connect wind turbines with appropriate
capacity to the nearby grid but should also
explore the option of combining wind power
with other distributed energy sources to sat-
isfy local electricity needs.
The government should accelerate the re-
source assessment of offshore wind energy,
geological surveys, construction, and other
work preparations. It should also actively
coordinate the relationship between offshore
wind power construction and marine envi-
ronmental protection. Offshore wind power
should be focused on coastal provinces such
as Jiangsu, Shanghai, Hebei, Shandong,
Liaoning, Guangdong, Fujian, Zhejiang,
Guangxi, Hainan, among others. Overall
planning and construction should be sensi-
tive to local conditions. Also, the government
should explore the development of offshore
wind power demonstration projects in deep-
er waters or waters distant from shore. The
distribution of wind power development and
construction is shown in Table 5.
Solar Energy Spreads
By 2015, the annual utilization of solar energy
will be equal to 500,000 tons standard coal.
The installed capacity of solar power genera-
tion will reach 21 GW, of which 10 GW will
be from photovoltaic (PV) power plants, 1
GW from solar thermal power generation, and
10 GW from grid and off-grid distributed PV
Category
Development
region
New capacity
(GW)
2015 target
(GW)
2020 target
(GW)
The area of large-scale projects Hebei 7.2 11 16
Mengdong 4.2 8 20
Mengxi 6.7 13 38
Gansu 9.5 11 20
Xinjiang 9.0 10 20
Jilin 4.0 6 15
Jiangsu coast 4.5 6 10
Shandong coast 6.0 8 15
Heilongjiang 4.0 6 15
Subtotal 55.1 79 169
Other major development regions Shanxi 4.5 5 8
Liaoning 2.7 6 8
Ningxia 2.3 3 4
Other provinces 4.2 7 11
Subtotal 13.7 21 31
Total 68.8 100 200
Table 5. Rapidly rising wind. China has many very large wind projects under develop-
ment or under construction during the 12th Five-Year Plan. Source: National Development and
Reform Commission
2. Many large wind projects. China is planning eight wind power sites with a total
capacity of more than 10 GW that will be constructed by 2015. Source: National Development
and Reform Commission (www.sdpc.gov.cn)
Big wind power base
in Xinjiang, Hami
Big wind power base
in Gansu, Jiuquan
Big wind power base
in Mengdong
Big wind power
base in Jinlin
Big wind power
base in Shandong
Big wind power
base in Jiangsu
Big wind power
base in Hebei
Big wind power
base in Mengxi
December2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 61
POWER IN CHINA
systems (Table 6). The total cumulative area
used for solar thermal generation will be 400
million square meters. By 2020, the installed
capacity of solar power generation will reach
50 GW, and the total cumulative area for solar
thermal will be 800 million square meters, ac-
cording to the National Development and Re-
form Commission.
The government should begin solar ther-
mal power industrial demonstrations. The
government should also promote the diversi-
fied utilization of solar energy and encourage
construction of PV power plants in regions
with rich solar resources and excess land that
has no other use.
Solar energy plants (perhaps combined
with wind power plants) should be combined
with hydropower development to simplify
grid access, such as in Qinghai, Gansu, Xin-
jiang, and other regions.
Distributed PV. The government should
support the construction of distributed PV
power plants to solve electricity shortages in
remote areas. In addition, the central govern-
ment should speed up the use of solar wa-
ter heaters and expand their use in civil and
public buildings in urban and rural areas, and
promote the building of solar houses and use
of solar cookers in rural areas.
Distributed PV power systems in areas
with abundant solar resources could be con-
structed as a microgrid system with other
new energy supplies, such as biomass en-
ergy, and energy storage technologies. The
government should promote household PV
systems or small PV power stations in remote
areas without electricity or in power-shortage
areas. It also should encourage the use of
distributed PV power for communications,
transportation, and lighting.
Solar Thermal. The government should
construct demonstration projects of solar
thermal power generation and improve sys-
tem integration of high-temperature solar
collector tubes, condensers, and other key
technologies and equipment manufacturing
capacity. The government should choose
suitable locations in regions such as In-
ner Mongolia Erdos Heights, the flat desert
along the Yellow River, the Hexi Corridor in
Gansu Province, the Turpan Basin and Tarim
Basin region, Lhasa Tibet, Qinghai, Ningxia,
and similar locations.
Biomass Energy Multiplies
According to the National Development
and Reform Commission, by 2015, annual
biomass energy utilization in China will be
equivalent to 50 million tons of standard coal.
The installed capacity of biomass power will
reach 13 GW, annual biogas utilization will
be 22 billion cubic meters, 10 million tons of
biomass briquettes will be used, 350 million
to 400 million tons of biomass alcohol will
be used, and 1 million tons of biodiesel and
aviation biofuel will be used.
Various types of biomass resources should
be coordinated to maximize efficiency of use.
Based on local economic conditions, the best
biomass technology and market-oriented ap-
proaches to development should be selected.
Biomass technology used also should promote
rural economic development, improve farm-
ers income, and improve the environment.
In regions producing grain and cotton, the
government should optimize the distribu-
tion of the construction of biomass power
generation projects using crops, straw, food
processing residues, cane bagasse, and so
on as fuel. In major forested areas, logging
slash, bucking residues, processing residues,
tending thinning resources, and fast-growing
forest resources should be combined with
forestry ecological construction. The govern-
ment also should encourage biomass-fueled
poly-generation projects that can produce
gas, liquid fuels, chemical products, power
generation, and space heating.
Biomass Gas. The government should
take full advantage of rural straw, solid waste,
forestry residues, and livestock waste by ac-
tively promoting the construction of small-,
medium-, and large-scale biogas and bio-
mass gasification gas projects. It also should
encourage biomass gas (biogas) purification
and compression to commercialize the use of
biomass gas. By 2015, the number of users
supplied by biomass concentrated gas is tar-
geted to reach 300 million.
Biomass Briquettes. Central heating us-
ing biomass briquettes should be promoted in
urban areas and biomass briquettes should be
widely used in rural areas as a clean cooking
and heating fuel. A system involving biomass
briquettes production supply, transportation,
storage, and use should be established in both
urban and rural areas.
Biomass Liquid Fuel. The central gov-
ernment should develop marginal land, such
as saline land, grassland, and mountain
slopes, to construct non-grain biomass re-
source supply bases followed by develop-
ment of bio-liquid fuel.
Rural Renewable Energy Develops
By 2015, the number of national biogas users
will be up to 50 million, and more than 50%
of suitable farmers will get access to biogas.
Meanwhile, the coverage area for solar water
heater use in rural areas will be more than
80 million square meters, and the number of
solar cookers will be up to 2 million units.
Most importantly, everyone will have access
to electricity.
The government should be focused on
meeting the unique energy needs of rural
areas for cooking, heating, production, and
essential electricity uses. Rural renewable
energy development is an important part of
new rural construction.
Electricity for Rural Areas. The gov-
ernment should promote the construction of
power generation centers in regions without
electricity: Inner Mongolia, Yunnan, Sichuan,
Tibet, Qinghai, Xinjiang, and other provinc-
es (or autonomous regions). In remote areas
where the grid is difficult to extend in a short
amount of time, it is urgent to take advantage
of local renewable energy resources, accord-
ing to local conditions, such as by construct-
ing small hydropower, small wind power
generation, solar PV systems, and so on. In
this way, all administrative villages will have
access to electricity and the problem of elec-
tricity shortage will be solved.
Rural Clean Energy Development. For-
estry residues, livestock waste, rural garbage,
Power
generation
category
Power generation
(MW)
Key areas of work 2015 2020
Solar power plants
(total)
1,100 2,300 Photovoltaic (PV) and solar thermal power systems.
PV power
facilities
1,000 2,000 Construct solar power generation facilities in Qinghai, Gansu, Xin-
jiang and other regions to explore the complementary operation of
solar power stations with the hydropower and wind power.
Solar thermal
power facilities
100 300 Carry out solar thermal power industrial demonstrations in the re-
gions with rich solar resource, water resource, and available land.
Distributed PV
power
1,000 2,700 Construct grid-connected PV power systems in roof concentrated
areas such as the industrial park, Economic Development Zone,
large public facilities. Solve power shortage in Tibet, Qinghai,
Gansu, Shaanxi, Xinjiang, Yunnan, Sichuan, and other remote ar-
eas and islands. Expand applications in city lighting engineering.
Total 2,100 5,000
Table 6. Solar systems. Solar power systems of all types will greatly expand during
Chinas 12th Five-Year Plan. Source: China Electricity Council
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December2012 62
POWER IN CHINA
and other renewable energy resources should
be used, according to local conditions, to
construct household biogas, small and medi-
um-sized biogas plants, and larger biomass
gasification projects. The central govern-
ment should promote biomass briquettes to
provide clean biomass fuels for farmers and
advance clean energy consumption in rural
households for cooking and heating.
Geothermal Energy Gains
The National Development and Reform
Commission predicts that by 2015, the total
amount of various types of geothermal ener-
gy development will reach 100 MW and uti-
lization will amount to the equivalent of 15
million tons standard coal. Buildings heated
and cooled using shallow geothermal energy
(heat pump technology) will amount to 500
million square meters.
The government should accelerate the
geothermal resources survey, strengthen the
planning and management of geothermal de-
velopment, and increase the amount of geo-
thermal energy development and utilization.
The direct use of geothermal energy should
be encouraged, particularly the development
of shallow geothermal energy used in build-
ing heating and cooling.
Geothermal Power Generation. The
government should construct several mega-
watt-class geothermal power stations along
the Qinghai-Tibet Railway in southwestern
Yunnan and other high-temperature resource
regions to provide power to meet the needs
of western development. Small and medium-
sized distributed geothermal power genera-
tion projects should be developed along the
eastern coast and the northern piedmonts of
Tianshan and other medium- and low-tem-
perature resource regions.
Shallow Geothermal Energy Use.
The central government should encour-
age the accelerated development of shallow
geothermal energy heating in the northeast,
northwest, and other extremely cold regions.
Shallow geothermal energy heating and
cooling should be encouraged in hot summer
and cold winter regions, such as the Huang-
Huai-Hai River Basin, Fen River Basin, and
Weihe Basin; middle and lower reaches of
the Yangtze River, Chengdu, and Chongqing;
and regions such as Guangdong, Guangxi,
southeastern Fujian and Hainan, as well as
the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau.
Marine Energy Industry Launches
The government should actively carry out the
construction of marine energy demonstration
projects, promote the technical progress of
marine energy use, and invest in improve-
ments to the marine energy equipment indus-
try. These improvements are required for the
marine energy industry to grow.
The government should construct inde-
pendent demonstration power stations near
islands with electricity demand, where there
are rich marine energy resources, and locate
them near where offshore wind projects are
planned to reduce electricity transmission
problems. The government also should invest
in energy storage technologies to solve the
electricity supply problems of some islands
with power shortages.
Tidal energy technology and equipment
is available. Therefore, one or two 10-MW-
class tidal power stations should be installed
in qualified areas, as well as several tidal cur-
rent energy grid-connected demonstration
power stations. By 2015, various types of
marine energy power plants with a total ca-
pacity of 50 MW could be completed, laying
the foundation for future development.
Demonstration Projects Required
Some technologies are in the early develop-
ment stage and are deserving of further full-
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CIRCLE 33 ON READER SERVICE CARD
December2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 63
POWER IN CHINA
scale testing. The following are suggestions
about which technologies should be given
field trials.
Renewable Demonstration Counties.
By 2015, 200 green energy demonstration
counties and 1,000 solar model villages
should be completed. In regions with rich
renewable energy resources, the central gov-
ernment should establish renewable energy
demonstration counties, where full-scale
renewable technologies of all types work
together. In addition, the government should
support the development of small and me-
dium-sized renewable energy facilities for
small towns to meet their specific electricity,
gas, heating, and other energy needs.
New Energy Model City. By 2015, 100
new energy demonstration cities and 1,000
new energy demonstration parks should be
completed. The government should support
the promotion of the comprehensive applica-
tion of solar energy, biomass, geothermal,
and other new energy technologies in cities
and industrial parks. The government should
also accelerate the applications of renewable
energy in buildings, form new energy utiliza-
tion areas, and replace coal-fired and other
old technology energy systems.
The program should be focused on pub-
lic institutions, schools, hospitals, hotels,
concentrated residential areas, solar water
heating systems, distributed PV power gen-
eration, ground source heat pump technol-
ogy, and biomass briquette use. In addition,
the government should support carrying out
a wide range of new energy technology dem-
onstrations as part of this new construction
and renovation of various industrial parks, to
meet electricity, heating, cooling, and other
energy needs.
New Energy Microgrid Demonstration
Projects. By 2015, 30 new energy microgrid
demonstration projects should be completed,
supported by smart grid and energy storage
technologies in which the new energy tech-
nologies discussed in previous sections of
this article play an important role.
Policy Outlook
The following policies and measures should
be taken during the 12th Five-Year Plan pe-
riod in order to fully meet these technology
development and construction tasks and to
meet the target of a fully developed renew-
able energy industry:
Develop an appraisal system for renew-
able energy development. In accordance
with the requirements established by the
Renewable Energy Law, a comprehensive
project appraisal system must be devel-
oped that will help guide the development
of future renewable energy projects. The
criteria should consider the regions re-
newable energy needs, as each region is
very different in the types of renewable
energy available, distribution infrastruc-
ture, and energy use patterns.
Establish a quota system for renewable
energy power. The demand for non-
hydro renewable energy will require each
province, region, and municipality to set
power development, electricity market,
grid structure, and power transmission
system goals. Governments at all levels
will assume administrative management
responsibility for the task, while power
grid enterprises will remain responsible
for their systems in their service areas.
Introduce renewable energy subsidies and
financial and tax policies. China needs to
further improve renewable energy subsi-
dies and its financial and tax policies to
support renewable energy development.
For example, the government should im-
plement a credit policy that will promote
clean energy development and improve
the loan support mechanism for small-
scale renewable energy projects.
Final Thoughts
Generally speaking, there are more advan-
tages than disadvantages to the environment
and society with the development and utiliza-
tion of renewable energy. China places con-
siderable importance on its renewable energy
development program, which also benefits
the countrys sustainable development and
environment-friendly policies. Simultane-
ously, renewable energy is an important part
of an emerging strategic industry, and pro-
moting renewable energy development will
bring comprehensive economic and social
benefits.
Zeng Ming, L Chunquan
(mamingjuan2009@163.com), Ma Mingjuan,
Peng Lilin, Yan Binjie, Li Na, and Xue Song,
North China Electric Power University, Bei-
jing, China. The Energy Foundation supported
the work described in this article
(G-1006-12630).
By 2015, 100 new energy demonstration
cities and 1,000 new energy demonstra-
tion parks should be completed.
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|
December 2012 66
THE FUTURE OF NATURAL GAS
Is Shale Gas Shallow or the
Real Deal?
The de facto U.S. energy policy is to burn more gas, much of it produced us-
ing fracking technology. Huge volumes of low-priced natural gas have
caused coal plant shutdowns, slowed renewable development, and un-
dercut new nuclear plant development. Using more gas has also sent the
nations carbon dioxide emissions into a downward spiral. Is the glut of
natural gas too good to be true?
By Kennedy Maize
N
ow that an abundance of natural gas
has become a seeming fact of everyday
life, its time for the contrarian view to
appear. Is the optimism over shale gas cock-
eyed and bound for a crash? Or is the methane
ebullience an accurate reflection of new en-
ergy realities? There are no simple answers.
Recently, an arcane dispute among geolo-
gists became public, revealing an important
rift over views about the future of natural gas.
The geological flap raises questions about just
how durable the shale gas boom will be and
whether a long regime of low-cost gas can
continue to fuel a dash to gas among electric
generators that is clobbering coal, wrecking
renewables, and negating the long-awaited
nuclear renaissance. Unlike the earlier dis-
putes over environmental issues related to hy-
draulic fracturing or fracking, which largely
proved marginal and manageable, the current
kerfuffle is over the performance of the wells
themselves in delivering natural gas. Experi-
enced geologists are wrangling over the rate
at which wells in shale formations, created by
horizontal drilling and fracking the gas-rich
strata, run out of methane.
Some experts argue that shale gas wells
decline rapidly, producing copious amounts of
natural gas early and then quickly drying out,
suggesting that the current glut of gas will de-
cline just as steeply as it rose (Figure 1). Oth-
ers respond that shale gas wells decline rates
are nothing special and that fears of the gas
running out are overblown. There is so much
gas available, they argue, and the horizontal
wells deliver for so long, that low-cost fossil
fuel is guaranteed far into the future.
Gas Skeptic
One major voice on the skeptical side of the
emerging debate is that of Arthur Berman, a
Houston-based petroleum geologist who is
also a leading figure in the Peak Oil posse,
a group of analysts who argue the U.S. has
reached the bottom of its crude oil bucket and
the rest of the world will soon follow. Ber-
man writes frequently for The Oil Drum, a
leading peak oil publication. Looking at U.S.
shale gas, Berman says he sees a precipitous
production decline coming as the need to
drill new gas wells to replace rapidly declin-
ing production vastly outpaces the capacity
of industry to deploy the rigs needed to drill.
In an interview with POWER, Berman ar-
gued that the boom in drilling shale gas wells
has obscured a long-term decline in conven-
tional gas supply. But a coming rapid decline in
shale production, he said, will soon reveal the
overall limits to the gas boom, and volatility and
upward pressure could return to natural gas pric-
es. Its not a problem for today or tomorrow,
Berman said, but it is coming. Once we work
through the current oversupply, if capital is not
forthcoming, prices will spike. The gas supply
bubble will burst.
Because of the current gas glut, with long
prices in the range of $3 per million cubic feet
(mcf), drilling shale gas wells has tanked, noted
Berman. Chesapeake Energy, the most bullish of
the shale gas players, is selling assets and shift-
ing rigs to drilling for oil because the company
just cant make money on $3 gas. I can see a
time not too many months away when we could
see gas supply in rather serious decline, Ber-
1. Steep well decline rates. Average production profiles for shale gas wells in major
U.S. shale plays by years of operation. Source: Fig 54 EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2012, released
June 25, 2012
M
i
l
l
i
o
n

c
u
b
i
c

f
e
e
t

p
e
r

y
e
a
r
1,800
1,600
1,400
1,200
1,000
800
600
400
200
0
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Years
Marcellus Haynesville Eagle Ford Fayetteville Woodford
December 2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 67
THE FUTURE OF NATURAL GAS
man said, noting that there is plenty of gas, but
it takes a long time to shift momentum back to
gas drilling. At a 2010 meeting in Washington,
as low gas prices were resulting in a decline in
new drilling, Berman commented, Shale plays
are marginally commercial at best.
Greatly complicating the supply equation,
said Berman, is the nature of shale gas wells.
Shale wells decline 30 to 40% per year, he
said. Conventional wells decline 20 to 25%.
What most dont grasp is how many wells it
takes just to keep supply flat.
In the Barnett Shale in Texas, where Berman
is most familiar with the geology, he calculates
that the annual decline in the gas resource is 1.7
bcf/day. In order to add to the net Barnett pro-
duction, Berman says, companies would have
to drill 3,880 wells, at a cost of $12 billion.
We are setting ourselves up for a poten-
tial reduction in supply and price will go up,
said Berman. I dont know how much it will
go up, and there is a check-and-balance with
coal. There will be gas-coal switching if pric-
es do go much higher than now.
Meet Dr. Marcellus
Nobody knows the Marcellus Shalepoten-
tially the second-largest natural gas field in
the worldbetter than Terry Engelder (Fig-
ure 2). The energetic Penn State geology
professor has been studying the massive
black shale formation that stretches across
Appalachia for 35 years.
As a young structural geologist (Texas
A&M PhD 73) working at Columbia Uni-
versitys Lamont-Doherty Geological Ob-
servatory in New York in the mid-1970s,
Engelder came to the attention of the U.S.
Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The
nuclear agency was looking at earthquake
risks at U.S. atomic power plants. With an
NRC grant in hand, Engelder began studying
earth stresses and fracture development in
rock strata in the Mid-Atlantic region.
In 1978, Engelder recalled in an inter-
view with POWER, he organized a field ex-
pedition to the Indian Point reactor site,
some 40 miles north of New York City on
the Hudson River. Among the rock units we
studied were the black shales of the Appa-
lachian basin, he said, because they were
so beautifully fractured. In the mid-1980s,
having returned to his undergraduate alma
mater, Penn State (BS 68), Engelder began
detailed examinations of Devonian shales,
publishing a number of important papers
on stresses and fractures in shale forma-
tions, including natural hydraulic fractures.
In the 1990s, Engelder said, he realized
that the natural fractures he was seeing in
the dense Devonian black shales (Figure
3) were driven by very high pressures from
methane during the formation of the sedi-
mentary rocks. Thats what makes the Mar-
cellus what it is, he said. Engelder added
that he soon was following what petroleum
pioneer George Mitchell was doing in the
Barnett Shale in Texas. Engelder also fol-
lowed the work of Range Resources, a Texas
oil and gas company with Pennsylvania
connections, which drilled its first Marcel-
lus well in 2004. By 2007, Range Resources
combined two known technologies, hydrau-
lic fracturing and horizontal drilling, in the
Marcellus and got results that tracked what
Devon Energy, which had acquired George
Mitchells company, was getting in the Bar-
nett formation in Texas.
In the fall of 2007, Engelder recalled,
I asked myself, Just how much gas is there,
anyway? He worked with Gary Lash, then a
geoscientist at the State University of New
York Fredonia and now at Lehigh Univer-
sity, to make the first estimate of the gas
resources in the Marcellus Shale. It was
almost an out-of-body experience to realize
that there may be something here that was
a real game changer in terms of Americas
energy portfolio, Engelder told the Pitts-
burgh Post-Gazette in an article last year.
In January 2008, Penn State put out
a press release disclosing the estimates
of Engelder and Lash. The numbers were
mind-boggling: conservatively at 168
trillion cubic feet (tcf) and optimistically
as high as 516 tcf. The U.S. could recover
50 tcf a year from just the Marcellus for-
mation, compared to total U.S. gas pro-
duction of 30 tcf.
The shale gas boom was on. A sign of
how the shale revolution gripped the U.S.
was the April 11, 2011, cover of Time mag-
azine, featuring a photo of a shard of Mar-
cellus shale and a headline reading This
Rock Could Power the World. One of Terry
Engelders prized possessions is a copy of
that issue, with the cover autographed by
some of the giants in the shale gas boom
(Figure 4). In its December 2011 issue, For-
eign Policy magazine named Engelder, Lash,
and Mitchell among its top 100 global
thinkers. The citation read, For upending
the geopolitics of energy.
2. Terry Engelder. Courtesy: Depart-
ment of Geosciences, Penn State
3. Broken shale. Shale is cracked us-
ing principally water plus chemicals and
additives to release trapped natural gas.
Courtesy: Terry Engelder
4. Shale gas giants. Signatures,
clockwise from top left: Terry Engelder, for-
mer Texas Gov. Clayton Williams, current
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett, former
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge, Chesapeake
Energy executive Aubrey McClendon, nat-
ural gas guru T. Boone Pickens, geologist
Gary Lash, fracking pioneer George Mitch-
ell. Courtesy: Terry Engelder
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 68
THE FUTURE OF NATURAL GAS
Bullish on Gas
But Penn State geologist Terry Engelder, the
major domo of Marcellus Shale (see sidebar),
doesnt share Bermans pessimism about gas
supply and prices, or Bermans assessment of
the production decline of shale gas wells. All
wells decline, Engelder said in an interview.
What distinguishes shale wells from conven-
tional reservoirs is the percentage of gas deliv-
ered over a long period of time. Shale wells,
Engelder said, start producing at very high
volumes, decrease considerably during the
first year, but continue producing much longer
than conventional gas wells, because the tight
rock formations slow the release of the gas.
With shale gas, Engelder said, You have
a steeper decline curve initially, but a much
longer period of production. Thats a func-
tion of the tight shale reservoirs, with inher-
ent low permeability, he said. The gas takes
longer to get to the well head but remains
economic over a longer period of time.
Here is where it can get pretty wonky. En-
gelder notes that the dispute with Berman and
others in his camp who say shale wells decline
too rapidly is a matter of hyperbolic production
curves versus exponential curves. Engelder is
in the hyperbolic school and Berman is one of
the exponential advocates. If a wells decline
is hyperbolic, Engelder explained, you get a
decreasing rate of decline year after year. The
best data for eastern shale wells available, he
said, shows a general hyperbolic decline over
a 40-year period, versus a 25-year lifespan for
conventional gas wells.
The advocates of exponential decline
including Berman and retired Canadian ge-
ologist J. David Hughesargue that shale
wells decline quickly after their initial high
production, then level out quickly. Hughes
puts the issue in the classic terms of resource
depletion that environmentalists frequently
use: [O]il and gas are finite resources that
are being consumed at unprecedented and
growing rates, and the U.S. is the worst of-
fender and is highly vulnerable to future en-
ergy price and supply shocks.
The shape of the decline curve for hori-
zontal gas wells can be very important for the
economics of the well, notes an article (De-
bate Over Shale Gas Decline Flares Up) in
the Oct. 10, 2010, Financial Times: [I]f the
pessimists/exponentials are right, then the ul-
timately recovered gas reserves from, say, the
Haynesville deposits in Louisiana and Texas
could be closer to 2 billion cubic feet (bcf) for
the average well, rather than the 6 bcf some
operators project. This implies a market price
two or three times the current level in order for
producers to see a profit.
Balancing Opinions
Could Berman and Engelder both be right?
Art Berman and I agree on a lot, Engelder
told POWER. Where we get into a difference
of opinion is whether horizontal wells convert
from hyperbolic to exponential. When that
happens, you would get the same decline rate
year after year, and the well would drain more
rapidly. The physical reason for hyperbolic
decline, said Engelder, is that the wells do not
interfere with each other, so the impermeabil-
ity of the shale formations governs the decline
rate. When the drainage area of the well reach-
es out to adjacent wells, and the well is not just
draining virgin territory, he said, the decline
rate might switch to exponential.
Thats not in the future for most of the giant
black shale Marcellus formation, Engelder
says. Drillers in the Mid-Atlantic region are
well positioned to ramp up production rap-
idly and cheaply should natural gas prices go
up even slightly. In Pennsylvania alone, says
Engelder, more than a thousand wells have
been drilled but not put into production. Of
the wells in production, many are on drilling
pads designed for six to eight wells each, but
only two or three are producing. With this in-
frastructure in place, it only takes a day or
two to start drilling again.
So Engelder sees little chance of the kind of
price spikes that characterized the bursting of
the conventional gas bubble of the 1980s and
1990s. The reality is that the supply of gas
in North America is so large it will take years
for the price to recover, he said. Producers
and consumers both want stability, although
consumers prefer lower prices and the indus-
try higher. Engelder says the industry can live
with $4 gas, while many are losing money or
shutting in production at $3/mcf.
Today, Engelder and the optimists appear
to be winning the argument over the future
role of shale gas. Berman, Hughes, and the
pessimists are a distinct minority among ge-
ologists. Skip Horvath, who for many years
has run the Natural Gas Supply Association,
representing the largest gas producers in
Washington, says, Art Berman clearly has
the best intentions. Hes just out of step with
the rest of the geological community. (Read
Meet the Man the Shale Gas Industry Hates
at http://tinyurl.com/Art-Berman.)
Engelder is even more charitable. Ber-
man is not beloved by industry, he says,
but he has things well worth thinking about
in evaluating shale gas.
Ultimately, the questions about shale gas
supply and demand offer a good illustration
of the basics of mineral resources economics,
notes British science writer Matt Ridley in a
paper titled The Shale Gas Shock (www
.marcellus.psu.edu/resources/PDFs/shalegas_
GWPF.pdf). Taking square aim at Berman and
his concern about investors losing money on
shale gas plays, Ridley comments: It is quite
possible that investment in shale gas firms
will indeed prove risky as their very success
drives gas prices down. But that will only hap-
pen if volumes of gas produced are high; and
it does not mean that exploration and drilling
will cease, for if they did, prices would rise
again and exploitation would resume. After
all, this has been the experience of the coal in-
dustry, the oil industry, and many other indus-
tries throughout history: success drives down
prices, leading to business failures, but over
the long term this does not prevent continuing
expansion of production because low prices
stimulate expanding consumption.
New World Order
Devonian shale, and its now-accessible sup-
plies of natural gas and crude oil, has been a
revolutionary force in the U.S., and one that
may be duplicated in Europe. While other
factorsa slowly growing U.S. economy
and a plethora of new Environmental Protec-
tion Agency rules regulating coal generation
are twoare contributors, cheap methane
is driving fundamental changes in the way
America uses energy. The U.S. carbon foot-
print is making a smaller impact on the glob-
al environment, while bigger feet in China,
India, and even Europe have emerged. Gas
is pushing out coal, nuclear, and solar and
wind power, purely on the basis of the cost of
generating electricity. U.S. oil imports have
declined substantially. The U.S. may soon be
exporting significant amounts of natural gas
to consumers in Europe and Japan.
Wall Street Journal columnist John Bussey
wrote in the Sept. 20 edition, During Ameri-
cas Age of Imperialism, Henry Cabot Lodge
famously said that commerce follows the
flag. Send over U.S. gunships, and U.S. busi-
ness will be right behind. These days it may
be the reverse. Americas shale oil and gas
revolutionone of the biggest commercial
bonanzas in generationsis itself shaking
up the world order. As oil and gas flood into
U.S. pipelines, relationships that defined how
energy moved around the globe are shifting.
How far that will go is open to debate.
Kennedy Maize is a POWER
contributing editor and executive
editor of MANAGING POWER.
The dispute . . . is a matter of hyperbolic
production curves versus exponential curves.
December 2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 69
NUCLEAR FUEL
MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility:
Turning Swords into Plowshares
The U.S. Department of Energy contracted Shaw AREVA MOX Services LLC
to design, construct, and operate a Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication
Facility (MFFF) at its Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The MFFF will
convert depleted uranium and excess weapons-grade plutonium stock-
piles, equivalent to approximately 17,000 nuclear weapons, into MOX fuel
assemblies that will be used in U.S. nuclear power plants by 2018.
By James M. Hylko
T
he bilateral Strategic Arms Reduction
Treaty (START) signed in July 1991
was an agreement to dismantle 80% of
U.S. and then-USSR strategic nuclear weap-
ons in existence. START may have signaled
the end of the Cold War, but it also ushered in
a new problem: potential uncontrolled access
to large stockpiles of surplus weapons-grade
(WG), highly enriched uranium (HEU) and
plutonium. The challenge was how to safely
dispose of these surplus nuclear materials to
prevent their future use in nuclear weapons.
In 1992, General Brent Scowcroft, then
the national security advisor to President
George H.W. Bush, requested that the Na-
tional Academy of Sciences (NAS) rec-
ommend disposition options to reduce the
potential loss by theft of these materials,
particularly the plutonium. (See the sidebar
for important differences between each of
the nuclear materials. The early work asso-
ciated with the megatons-to-megawatts
program focusing on uranium is described
in DOE Project Converts Weapons-Grade
Uranium to Fuel for Browns Ferry in the
December 2006 issue of POWER, available
in our archives at www.powermag.com.)
The outcome of the NAS study was that
excess WG plutonium should be as difficult
to acquire for a nuclear weapon as the reac-
tor grade (RG) plutonium in spent fuel from
civilian nuclear reactors. The MOX option,
selected by the NAS as the best disposition al-
ternative, blends WG plutonium from disman-
tled nuclear weapons with depleted uranium
(a byproduct of uranium enrichment) to create
mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for irradiation in a
commercial nuclear reactor. The plutonium
becomes part of the spent fuel, thus no longer
making it usable for a nuclear weapon.
Nuclear Agreement
The current inventories of surplus WG
plutonium to be processed are based on
the Plutonium Management and Disposi-
tion Agreement (PMDA) originally signed
in 2000 by the U.S. and Russia, and reaf-
firmed in 2007 and 2010. The PMDA com-
mits each country to dispose of no less than
34 metric tons (~75,000 pounds) of excess
WG plutonium and irradiate it as MOX
fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. The
combined amount, 68 metric tons, repre-
sents enough material for approximately
17,000 nuclear weapons. To implement this
agreement in the U.S., the Department of
Energys (DOE) National Nuclear Security
Administration (NNSA), under the Office
of Fissile Materials Disposition, contract-
ed the construction of a Mixed Oxide Fuel
Fabrication Facility (MFFF).
POWER recently discussed the proj-
ect and timetable with Kelly Trice, presi-
dent and chief operating officer of Shaw
AREVA MOX Services LLC, which is
responsible for the design, licensing, and
construction of the MFFF. He described
the 17-acre MFFF as a plutonium process-
ing and fuel fabrication plant designed to
convert surplus WG plutonium inventories
and depleted uranium into MOX fuel as-
semblies. It is the first facility of its kind
in the U.S.
Trice pointed out that the completed
MOX fuel assemblies will look like stan-
dard pressurized water reactor (PWR) and
boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assem-
blies. He indicated that of the 34 metric
tons of plutonium coming from the U.S., 10
metric tons of plutonium oxide are already
available for processing and the remaining
24 metric tons from the weapons programs
will arrive later in the program.
Following irradiation in a reactor, the re-
sulting spent fuel contains WG plutonium
in a nonproliferent form. No reprocessing
or subsequent reuse of the MOX spent fuel
is planned. Once the fuel cycle use is com-
pleted, the MOX spent fuel will be perma-
nently stored in a geologic repository. The
MFFF will be shuttered when the plutoni-
um disposition goals are met.
DOE and NRC Licenses Required
The contract to build the MFFF at the
DOEs Savannah River Site (SRS) near
Aiken, S.C., was awarded in March 1999
to Shaw AREVA MOX Services LLC. The
DOE looked at many sites, but the SRSs
existing security infrastructure and experi-
ence with handling plutonium gave it an
edge in the selection process.
Licensing of the MFFF is following a
two-step process. The first step required
submitting a Construction Authorization
Request to build at the SRS in February
2001. The Nuclear Regulatory Commis-
sion (NRC) issued the construction au-
thorization on Mar. 30, 2005. The second
stage requires NRC staff review of the li-
cense application submitted on Sept. 27,
2006. The license would authorize the pos-
session and use of byproduct and special
nuclear material. The NRC review verifies
that the structures, systems, and compo-
nents are constructed, installed, and can be
operated properly.
MFFF construction officially started on
Aug. 1, 2007 (Figure 1). Overall, the con-
crete structure at the main plant is about
88% complete and 12 of 18 buildings are
finished. The Waste Solidification Build-
ing, expected to be completed in 2013, is
forecasted to treat 150,000 gallons of waste
and solidify approximately 600,000 gal-
lons of low-level radioactive waste streams
from the MFFF for ultimate disposal.
In addition to the 2,400 personnel on
site, an additional 800 people are employed
in 42 states by suppliers to the construc-
tion project. Trice noted that both large
and small businesses are benefiting from
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 70
NUCLEAR FUEL
the construction activities. We actually do
about 58% of our subcontracts with small
businesses. To date, we have subcontract-
ed about $900 million in small business
awards.
Trice proudly acknowledged the teams
achievement of a new safety milestone over
the summer. We have also just crossed
11.5 million safe work hours without a lost
work day accident, which is a significant
accomplishment for a project of this size,
complexity, and importance.
Cold-startup testing is scheduled to
begin in 2016, followed by fabrication of
the first fuel assemblies slated to begin in
2018. The MFFF will be licensed for 20
years and is expected to operate into the
2030s.
Building Fuel Assemblies
The MFFF is composed of two main pro-
cess operations: the aqueous polishing
process to remove impurities, such as am-
ericium and gallium, and the MOX process,
which converts the plutonium and depleted
uranium into fuel pellets, fuel rods, and
fuel assemblies (Figure 2).
The process will begin with incoming
plutonium and depleted uranium received
in their respective shipping containers and
inventoried according to the MFFF mate-
rial control and accounting and radiation
protection programs. The material would
then be moved to the aqueous polishing
(AP) area.
Aqueous Polishing Process. Before
combining the surplus WG plutonium with
depleted uranium to produce ceramic pel-
lets for MOX fuel rods, the plutonium ox-
ide will be purified using an AP process,
equivalent to the process the French nucle-
ar industry has successfully used for over
30 years. The AP process removes impu-
rities such as gallium, americium, alumi-
num, and fluorides and consists of three
major steps: dissolution, purification, and
conversion.
Plutonium oxide is dissolved in nitric
acid in the first step. Next, a solvent ex-
traction process removes impurities and
purifies the material. Then plutonium is
separated from the uranium. The solid and
liquid materials removed are recycled to
reduce waste volume. The final step con-
verts the purified plutonium stream back
to an oxide powder by precipitation and
calcination. The oxide powder is then ho-
mogenized, sampled, and stored in cans for
future production of MOX fuel pellets.
MOX Process. The MOX process is a
mechanical process and consists of four
major steps: powder master blend, pellet
production, fuel rod production, and fuel
assembly production.
In producing the powder master blend,
polished plutonium oxide is mixed with de-
pleted uranium oxide and recycled powder/
pellet material. This mixture is micronized
in a ball mill and mixed with additional de-
pleted uranium oxide and recycled material
to produce a final blend with the required
plutonium content. A lubricant and pore-
former are added to control density.
Next, the final powder blend is pressed
to form green pellets, which are then sin-
tered in a furnace to obtain the required ce-
ramic qualities. The sintering step removes
organic products dispersed in the pellets
and the previously introduced pore-former.
The sintered pellets are ground to a speci-
fied diameter and then inspected to verify
dimensions, density, markings, and appear-
The Differences Between Radioactive Materials
Several pairs of radioactive substances are
discussed in this article. Here is a primer
on their different properties.
Highly Enriched Uranium and Plutoni-
um. There are important differences between
highly enriched uranium (HEU) and pluto-
nium. HEU can be diluted with other, more
abundant, naturally occurring uranium iso-
topes to make low-enriched uranium (LEU),
which cannot sustain the fast-neutron chain
reaction needed for a nuclear explosion. LEU
fuel is used in most of the worlds nuclear
reactors. In contrast, plutonium cannot
be diluted with other plutonium isotopes
to make it unusable for weapons. Re-en-
riching LEU for weapons requires complex
enrichment technology, while separating
plutonium from other elements and mix-
ing it with fresh reactor fuel requires only
straightforward chemical processing.
Weapons-Grade and Reactor-Grade
Plutonium. There is substantial worldwide
experience with the use and behavior of
reactor-grade (RG) plutonium, as it is cre-
ated during the fission process. U.S. re-
actors were not specifically designed to
use weapons-grade (WG) plutonium (see
the table). The primary difference is the
percentage of the plutonium isotopes: WG
plutonium contains more plutonium-239,
while RG plutonium has more plutoni-
um-240. Weapons-grade plutonium is more
fissionable, but RG is more radioactive.
MOX and Low-Enriched Uranium. MOX
fuel and LEU fuel behave much the same in
reactors. MOX fuel assemblies and LEU fuel
assemblies are essentially identical with
respect to mechanical design. Both MOX
fuel pellets and LEU fuel pellets consist of
sintered ceramic pellets that are predomi-
nantly U-238 dioxide, and the respective
material properties are very similar.
However, the microstructures of the
two types of fuel pellets differ. LEU fuel
is a homogeneous mixture of U-238 diox-
ide and U-235 dioxide, whereas MOX fuel
is more heterogeneous, with very small
plutonium-rich particles in a matrix of
depleted uranium oxide. The nuclear char-
acteristics of MOX and LEU fuel are also
different due to the nuclear cross-section
differences between uranium and pluto-
nium. Also, the decay heat from MOX is
slightly lower than that of LEU fuel, which
provides a safety benefit.
Fundamentally, MOX fuel is very similar
to LEU fuel. MOX fuel has been demonstrat-
ed to perform well in commercial nuclear
power reactors. Fuel assembly, core, and
plant design practices can effectively ac-
commodate the minor differences that do
exist between the MOX and LEU fuel types.
Plutonium
form
Weapons-grade
plutonium
(weight %)
Reactor-grade
plutonium
(weight %)
Pu-238 0 14
Pu-239 9295 5060
Pu-240 57 2427
Pu-241 00.5 611
Pu-242 00.05 510
Plutonium isotopic composition
comparison. Source: American Nuclear
Society
1. Complex construction project.
The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility at
the DOEs Savannah River Site near Aiken,
S.C., recently entered its sixth year of con-
struction. Courtesy: Shaw AREVA MOX Ser-
vices LLC
December 2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 71
NUCLEAR FUEL
ance. The MFFF will produce upwards of
70,000 pellets each day.
The fuel rods are then assembled in glove-
boxes by arranging the pellets in a long tray
and inserting the pellets into a zirconium alloy
tube (the fuel rod), loaded to an adjusted pel-
let column length, pressurized with helium,
welded, and then decontaminated. Each fuel
rod contains approximately 360 pellets. The de-
contaminated rods are then removed from the
gloveboxes and placed on racks for inspection.
In the final step, fuel assemblies are
manufactured by inserting the individual
rods into a metallic structure referred to as
the fuel assembly skeleton. A typical MOX
PWR fuel assembly contains 264 fuel rods
in a 17 x 17 array, is 13 feet in length, and
weighs about 1,500 pounds. Each MOX
fuel assembly is subjected to a final inspec-
tion prior to storage and shipment.
The MOX fuel fabrication facility will
have the flexibility to produce fuel for
PWRs and BWRs as well as for the new-
generation reactors.
Fresh MOX fuel assemblies will be
stored in the assembly storage vault. The
assemblies will be transferred to the ship-
ping and receiving area and loaded into an
NRC-approved MOX transportation pack-
age and then loaded onto a secure trans-
port vehicle for shipment to a commercial
nuclear reactor.
Using Recycled Fuel
There are two types of fuel for nuclear
plants: uranium oxide (the most common)
and MOX, a mixture of uranium and pluto-
nium. Plutonium has more available energy
than uraniumanalogous to adding a gal-
lon or two of premium gasoline to a cars
tank of regular fuel (see sidebar).
In the U.S., there was substantial devel-
opment work on MOX fuel technology in
the 1960s and 1970s. That work culminat-
ed in a series of MOX fuel demonstration
programs at five reactors: the San Onofre
and Ginna PWRs and the Dresden, Quad
Cities, and Big Rock Point BWRs. In each
program, lead test assemblies were used to
study the performance of MOX fuel rods.
After several operating cycles, the MOX
fuel had performed acceptably and similar
to the co-resident uranium fuel.
The U.S. nuclear industry was poised
to begin large-scale reprocessing of spent
nuclear fuel and associated re-use of the
separated RG plutonium. However, fearing
worldwide nonproliferation consequences
of separating large quantities of plutonium,
the U.S. government decided against repro-
cessing spent nuclear fuel and stopped the
development and deployment of U.S. MOX
fuel technology. A more detailed history of
U.S. attempts at reprocessing and recycling
used fuel can be found in the August 2008
article, How to Solve the Used Nuclear
Fuel Storage Problem, available at www
.powermag.com.
Other countries continued their large-
scale development and reprocessing of
spent fuel. In the early 1980s, nuclear re-
actors in Germany began using substan-
tial quantities of reprocessed plutonium
in the form of MOX fuel. Other European
reactors followed in France, Belgium,
and Switzerland. International safeguards
implemented in the MOX fabrication pro-
cess have ensured that no proliferation
has occurred from this process for nearly
40 years.
The MELOX facility in France has been
operating since the mid-1990s and pro-
duces nearly all the commercial MOX fuel
assemblies in the world. In fact, MELOX
increased production in April 2007 to keep
2. Pair of processes. The MFFF will house two main process operations: aqueous polishing and the MOX process. Source: Shaw AREVA
MOX Services LLC
Powder master
blend & final blend
production
Pellet
production
Rod
production
Fuel rod
assembling

Dissolution
PuO
2

conversion
Purification
cycle
PuO
2
Ga, Am, U
impurities
MOX fuel
assemblies
Polished
PuO
2
Aqueous polishing
MOX Process
There are two types of fuel for
nuclear plants: uranium oxide
(the most common) and MOX, a
mixture of uranium and plutonium.
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 72
NUCLEAR FUEL
in step with market needs for MOX fuel.
The mixture of uranium oxides and pluto-
nium is obtained from recycling used fuel
at AREVA NCs La Hague plant, which
currently handles nearly half of the worlds
light water reactor spent nuclear fuel repro-
cessing capacity.
In the U.S., from June 2005 through
May 2008, four MOX fuel test assemblies
containing WG plutonium were tested at
the Catawba nuclear plant located in Rock
Hill, S.C. Nondestructive and destructive
hot cell examinations of five fuel rods veri-
fied that the MOX fuel behaved as predict-
ed on the basis of experience with uranium
dioxide fuel and MOX fuel with recycled
RG plutonium.
Trice noted that the MFFF is a general
reproduction of Frances La Hague and
MELOX plants. In addition, the Catawba
experience has been translated into MFFF
design features. The processing technol-
ogy is generally similar, but the scale of the
MOX plant is much different. We operate
about half of the production capacity of the
plants in France. Also, we are using weap-
ons grade plutonium as opposed to reactor
grade plutonium. We use pieces of machin-
ery that are similar to La Hague, but not
exactly the same because we are not repro-
cessing spent nuclear fuel. At La Hague,
they take reactor fuel, chop it up, dissolve
it, extract the plutonium, then reprocess it
into plutonium oxide, and then ship the ox-
ide to the MELOX plant.
Trice emphasized that although the
two French facilities were designed and
constructed according to French building
codes, the MFFF design meets all U.S.
regulatory requirements. It will also be a
hardened facility, similar to a nuclear reac-
tor. Security will be equal to the security
measures currently in place at SRS.
Finding Customers for MOX Fuel
The Master Services Agreement, a result
of the successful Catawba fuel-testing pro-
gram, is a very promising contract that
would open up a third of the U.S. reactor
fleet as potential users of MOX fuel, ac-
cording to Trice. Several utilities have
expressed interest, and that will create
a substantial demand for the MOX fuel.
In the future, reactor licensees approved
to use MOX fuel are still expected to run
test assemblies for at least two operating
cycles to gain operational experience and
confirm computer models to predict fuel
performance.
The NRC expects no significant interim
storage differences between used MOX fuel
and used uranium fuel. After the MOX fuel
has been in a reactor for two operating cycles,
it can be stored in fuel pools or dry-storage
casks located at each reactor site. In the U.S.,
the used fuel will remain in interim storage
until a permanent geological repository is
available. If a repository is licensed, the used
MOX fuel assemblies would be packaged
into special containers and shipped directly
to the repository by truck or rail using NRC-
approved shipping packages.
Trice concluded that operation of the
MFFF and disposing of surplus U.S. weap-
ons-grade plutonium will demonstrate that
the U.S. is living up to its nonproliferation
commitments in a transparent and irrevers-
ible manner. In addition to these critical
nonproliferation benefits, the U.S. MOX
strategy will support additional DOE mis-
sions by consolidating materials, thereby
reducing security and storage costs of sur-
plus plutonium, estimated to be hundreds
of millions of dollars annually, while gen-
erating clean energy.
James M. Hylko (jhylko1@msn.com)
is a POWER contributing editor.
THE BALANCE OF POWER
C
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AcidGasExperts.com
To learn how Breen can help with your
balancing act, call 412.431.4499 or visit
www.breenes.com today.
Operating a power generation
plant is a balancing act.
Compliance issues, managing
emissions, Balance-of-Plant
impacts from emissions
control... and the bottom line.
At Breen, we understand
this balancing act. Were the
leader in bringing newideas and
technologies to bear on the issues
that give plant managers
sleepless nights.
An innovator in acid gas
management, Breen balances
the concerns of compliance,
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No matter the issues, Breen
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Some of Breens solutions
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BREEN BOP - Power Mag Ad 4-10:Layout 1 4/11/12 8:38 AM Page 1
CIRCLE 34 ON READER SERVICE CARD
December 2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 73
MERCURY EMISSIONS
Mercury Regulations Up in the Air
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency efforts to regulate mercury emissions
from coal- and oil-fired power plants have spanned nearly two decades. In
February of this year the agency promulgated the Mercury and Air Toxics
Standards, but changes to the standards continue.
By Brandon Bell PE, KBR Power & Industrial
T
he Mercury and Air Toxics Standards
(MATS) formally impose limitations on
mercury, filterable particulate matter, and
hydrogen chloride emissions from electric gen-
erating units (EGUs) firing coal (including in-
tegrated gasification combined cycle, or IGCC,
facilities), solid oil, and liquid oil. In addition
to a variety of available control technologies to
meet MATS, new technologies that allow mea-
surement of more minute quantities of mercury
will be necessary to ensure compliance.
Regulatory History
The basis for MATS dates back to two studies
funded by the Environmental Protection Agen-
cy (EPA) and required by the Clean Air Act
(CAA). In 1995, as directed by Congress, the
National Institute of Environmental Sciences
(NIEHS) issued a report detailing the threshold
of mercury exposure below which adverse hu-
man health effects are not expected to occur.
Several years later, the National Academy of
Sciences (NAS) was commissioned to perform
an independent evaluation of the health impacts
from methyl mercury. The results of this study
were finalized and released by 2000, thus satis-
fying the CAA Section 112 (n)(1) requirement
to evaluate the hazards to public health from
mercury emissions.
In total, the expected number of units that
will be affected by this regulation is large. There
are approximately 1,100 coal-fired units and
300 oil-fired units that would need to meet com-
pliance by three years from the finalization of
this rule. Each facility may request a one-year
compliance extension, which states may grant
on a case-by-case basis.
However, a recent judicial ruling regarding
another key regulation, that found the EPA over-
stepped its bounds, could lead to further scru-
tiny of the MATS regulation. The decision by
the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Co-
lumbia Circuit on Aug. 21, 2012 (EME Homer
City Generation v. EPA, D.C.C. No. 11-1302)
dealt a significant blow to the Cross State Air
Pollution Rule (CSAPR), as it was vacated and
determined that the EPA had regulated beyond
its statutory authority. The court determined the
EPA overstepped its bounds in two key ways.
First, under the good neighbor policy, the
EPA has the authority to require upwind states
to reduce their emissions that affect a down-
wind states nonattainment. It was determined
that CSAPR required upwind states to reduce
their emissions by more than the amount that ul-
timately affected downwind states. Second, the
court found that states should have been allowed
to reduce their own emissions through a state
implementation plan (SIP). Instead, the EPA
did not give the states this option and enacted
a federal implementation plan (FIP) to reduce
emissions on a state level.
A great deal of effort was made by the EPA
to ensure CSAPR would be upheld under legal
review. MATS may succumb to a similar fate,
as multiple parties have filed for review of the
rule by the courts. It should be noted that EPA
regulations have a history of litigation, with
a mixed record of courts upholding them or
rejecting them. At press time, the EPA and in-
tervenors, including Calpine and Exelon, had
petitioned for a rehearing of the courts Aug.
21 split decision against CSAPR. The court
has ordered 20-page responses to the petition
for rehearing be filed with the court by Oct.
29. The court has no timeline within which to
decide to reject the petition, rehear the case
with another three-judge panel, or hear the
case en banc with all eight judges.
Costs are expected to increase considerably
for implementing the MATS regulation. Accord-
ing to the EPAs Regulatory Impact Analysis
(RIA), the incremental cost of compliance with
MATS in 2015 will be $9.6 billion per year. As
part of the RIA, the EPA estimated that capital
costs to meet both CSAPR and MATS would
have been $84 billion. Recent cost estimates
by some major utilities suggest that the cost to
comply may be lower than originally estimated.
Even with the vacating of CSAPR and positive
estimates from utilities, final compliance costs
are a moving target, leaving the number of po-
tential plant closures up in the air.
Mired in Litigation
As a result of the NIEHS and NAS analyses, the
EPA concluded in December 2000 that regulat-
ing hazardous air pollution emissionsspecifi-
cally mercurywas appropriate and necessary.
That determination triggered a series of legal
actions that were individually resolved over the
following decade. This process led to the even-
tual promulgation of MATS.
After the initial determination that regulat-
ing mercury was appropriate and necessary,
the Utility Air Regulatory Group (UARG)
and Edison Electric Institute (EEI) chal-
lenged this determination in court (UARG v.
EPA, 2001 WL 936363, No. 01-1071, D.C.
Cir. July 26, 2001). The case was dismissed
on jurisdictional grounds.
Mercury regulation was still deemed appro-
National Institute of
Environmental Sciences
study commissioned
u
National Academy of
Science study commis-
sioned
u
EPA decision to regu-
late mercury
u
EPA promulgates
Clean Air Mercury Rule
(CAMR)
u
CAMR vacated u
Mercury and Air Toxics
Standards promulgated
u
1
9
9
5
1
9
9
6
1
9
9
7
1
9
9
8
1
9
9
9
2
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
2
0
0
2
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
4
2
0
0
5
2
0
0
6
2
0
0
7
2
0
0
8
2
0
0
9
2
0
1
0
2
0
1
1
2
0
1
2
1. History review. Milestones in the regulation of mercury. Source: EPA
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 74
MERCURY EMISSIONS
priate and necessary and, consequently, the EPA
was required to set rules for EGUs as a result
of the agency adding them as a source category,
as described in Section 112 of the CAA. As re-
quired by the CAA, the deadline for the mercu-
ry rules revision was Dec. 20, 2002. However,
the EPA failed to meet that deadline. As a re-
sult, several environmental groups filed suit to
compel the EPA to issue emission standards for
EGUs (Izaak Walton League v. Leavitt, D.D.C.
No. 04-0694). The deadline for the standard to
be issued then became Mar. 15, 2005.
Instead of issuing a rule for Section 112 of the
CAA for EGUs, the EPA subsequently issued
an action on Mar. 29, 2005, that delisted EGUs
from Section 112 regulation. Shortly after the
delisting action, the EPA issued the Clean Air
Mercury Rule (CAMR), on May 18, 2005. That
rule was meant to regulate mercury emissions
from new and existing coal-fired EGUs under
Section 111 of the CAA. Again, environmental
groups and states took issue with the EPAs de-
listing without following requirements outlined
in Section 112.
The result of that legal challenge (New Jersey
v. EPA, 517 F.3d, D.C. Cir. 2008) reversed both
actions taken by the EPA in 2005: The delist-
ing action in March and the subsequent CAMR
issuance in May. In striking down CAMR,
the court simply postponed but did not negate
implementation of mercury regulations. Fur-
thermore, reversal of the delisting action further
confirmed the EPAs obligation to finalize emis-
sion standards under Section 112 of the CAA.
In order to ensure an emission standard
was issued in a timely manner, environmental
groups once again filed suit to seek enforceable
deadlines on the EPA (American Nurses Asso-
ciation v. EPA, DDC No. 08-2198). The result
of this suit set a deadline of Nov. 16, 2011, for
a finalized air toxics standard. Pursuant to this
settlement, the EPA signed the promulgated
MATS rule on Dec. 16, 2011, and published it
in the Federal Register on Feb. 16, 2012.
True to the history of this regulation, litigation
resumed as soon as MATS was signed. White
Stallion, the National Mining Association, the
National Black Chamber of Commerce, and the
Institute for Liberty all filed suit the same day
as MATS was finalized. These suits have not
been resolved and have been consolidated into
a single action.
Reconsideration of MATS
In June 2012, Senator James Inhofe (R-Okla.)
introduced a motion in Congress that would
have overturned the MATS regulation. This
motion (Senate Joint Resolution 37), put forth
under the Congressional Review Act, could
have sent the regulation back to the EPA to be
rewritten under congressional review. However,
when brought before the Senate on June 19, the
resolution was narrowly defeated.
Although not required by Congress,
the EPA took action on July 20 to review
MATS. The EPA issued a letter acknowl-
edging that a number of petitions had been
received specifically addressing measure-
ment issues associated with mercury for
new sources. In addition to addressing
measurement problems with mercury, the
data set used to set new source standards
for particulate matter and hydrochloric
acid will be revisited to ensure variability
calculations were applied correctly.
The issues to be reviewed will be mostly
technical in nature and are not expected to affect
the rules legality. An expedited review process
has been initiated. However, final reconsidera-
tion of the rulemaking will not be complete until
March 2013. In the meantime, a stay of three
months was given by the EPA for the effective
date of the new source emission standards.
MACT Floor
Once a source category is listed by the EPA un-
der Section 112 of the CAA, the agency must
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POWER www.powermag.com 75
MERCURY EMISSIONS
establish technology-based emission standards,
known as maximum achievable control tech-
nology (MACT). These standards are based on
technology currently available. Due to the vari-
ability in performance between older units and
new units, the MACT analysis may set different
standards for existing and new sources.
When determining what is considered to
be MACT, the EPA must calculate something
called the MACT Floor. For existing units, the
MACT Floor is determined by analyzing a set a
data containing the average emissions for a par-
ticular pollutant. Using this set of data, the EPA
then determines what level of emissions can be
met by the best performing 12% of the data set.
This emission target is the MACT Floor,
and that target becomes the minimum value
that all other existing units must conform to. In
the event that there are fewer than 30 sources
for which data is available, the EPA will isolate
the best five performing units and set that as the
MACT Floor.
When determining the MACT Floor for a
new source, the approach is different. In that
case, the MACT Floor would be set by the
emission control achieved in practice by the
best controlled similar source.
Unfortunately, determining what the MACT
Floor is doesnt necessarily set what the fi-
nal MACT limits will be. Upon defining the
MACT Floor, the EPA must then consider a
more stringent beyond-the-floor option that
pushes control technology to perform at levels
below the MACT Floor emission level. As a
result of previous litigation (Cement Kiln Recy-
cling Coal v. EPA, 255 F.3d 855, 857-58, D.C.
Cir. 2001), this analysis must also take into ac-
count costs, energy, nonair quality health, and
environmental impacts.
In the case of the MATS regulation, the EPA
chose to set mercury emission limits for most
units at the MACT Floor limit. However, some
units will be required to reach below-the-floor
limits. In the case of existing units that utilize a
low-rank virgin coal for power generation, the
EPA determined that the MACT Floor emis-
sion limitation was 11 pounds per trillion Btu.
The agency also determined that, based on the
availability of activated carbon injection (ACI)
systems, the incremental cost of further reduc-
tion is reasonable.
From this conclusion, the EPA decided that
a limit 64% below the MACT Floor was appro-
priate, resulting in a limitation of 4 pounds per
trillion Btu for existing units using low-rank vir-
gin coal. This means that those units will now be
required to perform at the same level as a new
unit. And although new units have been granted
a stay of effective dates while the EPA reevalu-
ates technical issues associated with mercury,
existing units are required to maintain the origi-
nal compliance dates (Tables 1 and 2).
Measurement Techniques
The promulgation of MATS created more than
just the issue of how to control these pollutants.
It also addressed the issue of how to measure
the pollutants being emitted. As mentioned
previously, the EPA has already acknowledged
potential problems with measuring low emis-
sion levels for pollutants such as mercury, and
therefore granted a stay for new units. Multiple
options exist for measuring mercury, and each
unit will have to be individually evaluated to
determine which option will obtain the desired
level of accuracy.
Typically, a continuous emission monitor-
ing system (CEMS) for mercury or a sorbent
trap system meeting the EPAs Performance
Standard 12B is required. Maintenance of a
mercury CEMS system is very labor-intensive,
with high operating costs, particularly for cali-
bration gases for maintaining system accuracy.
Also, each new mercury measurement system
requires initial certifications, initial linearity
checks, daily calculations, weekly integrity
checks, and quarterly linearity checks. An an-
nual Relative Accuracy Test Audit (RATA) is
necessary to maintain certification.
A sorbent trap is an extraction system
that directly measures vapor phase mercury
emissions. With this method, a grab sample
is taken from the stack and pulled onto the
sorbent trap. The sorbent captures (traps)
the mercury in the flue gas while an analyzer
will measure the amount of mercury in the
sorbent. Calibration gases are not required
for operation. However, the traps are typical-
ly set up for a seven-day continuous run and
therefore must be replaced weekly. Initial and
annual RATA verification are also required
for certification of this type of system.
For both systems, additional flue gas mea-
surements must be made to ensure accuracy.
Oxygen, carbon dioxide, moisture, and gas flow
measurements of the unit are needed to support
these systems. Although most large combustion
sources currently measure these parameters for
combustion control and other boiler functions,
some smaller units do not measure some of
these parameters on a continuous basis.
A special exception is allowed for EGUs that
have been determined to qualify as low-emis-
sion mercury sources. In these cases, the EGU
will only be required to perform periodic, once-
a-quarter monitoring of mercury utilizing EPA
Test Method 30B. To qualify as a low-emission
Subcategory
Filterable particulate
matter Hydrogen chloride Mercury
Existing: Unit not
low-rank virgin coal
3.0 E-2 lb/MMBtu
(3.0 E-1 lb/MWh)
2.0 E-3 lb/MMBtu
(2.0 E-2 lb/MWh)
1.2 E0 lb/TBtu
(1.3 E-2 lb/GWh)
Existing: Unit designed
for low-rank virgin coal
3.0 E-2 lb/MMBtu
(3.0 E-1 lb/MWh)
2.0 E-3 lb/MMBtu
(2.0 E-2 lb/MWh)
1.1 E+1 lb/TBtu
(1.2 E-1 lb/GWh)
Existing: IGCC
4.0 E-2 lb/MMBtu
(4.0 E-1 lb/MWh)
5.0 E-4 lb/MMBtu
(5.0 E-3 lb/MWh)
4.0 E+0 lb/TBtu
(4.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
Existing: Solid oil-derived
8.0 E-3 lb/MMBtu
(9.0 E-2 lb/MWh)
5.0 E-3 lb/MMBtu
(8.0 E-2 lb/MWh)
2.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
New: Unit not low-rank
virgin coal
7.0 E-3 lb/MWh 4.0 E-4 lb/MWh 2.0 E-4 lb/GWh
New: Unit designed for
low-rank virgin coal
7.0 E-3 lb/MWh 4.0 E-4 lb/MWh 4.0 E-2 lb/GWh
New: IGCC
7.0 E-3 lb/MWh
9.0 E-2 lb/MWh
2.0 E-3 lb/MWh 3.0 E-3 lb/GWh
New: Solid oil-derived 2.0 E-2 lb/MWh 4.0 E-4 lb/MWh 2.0 E-3 lb/GWh
Table 1. Emissions limitations for coal and solid oil-derived fuels.
Source: EPA
Note: E = exponent
Subcategory
Filterable
particulate matter Hydrogen chloride Mercury
Existing: Liquid oil,
continental
3.0 E-2 lb/MMBtu
(3.0 E-1 lb/MWh)
2.0 E-3 lb/MMBtu
(1.0 E-2 lb/MWh)
4.0 E-4 lb/MMBtu
(4.0 E-3 lb/MWh)
Existing: Liquid oil,
non-continental
3.0 E-2 lb/MMBtu
(3.0 E-1 lb/MWh)
2.0 E-4 lb/MMBtu
(2.0 E-3 lb/MWh)
6.0 E-5 lb/MMBtu
(5.0 E-4 lb/MWh)
New: Liquid oil,
continental
7.0 E-2 lb/MWh 4.0 E-4 lb/MWh 4.0 E-4 lb/MWh
New: Liquid oil,
non-continental
2.0 E-1 lb/MWh 2.0 E-3 lb/MWh 5.0 E-4 lb/MWh
Table 2. Emissions limitations for liquid oil fuels. Source: EPA
Note: E = exponent
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 76
MERCURY EMISSIONS
source and move to periodic monitoring, a units
mercury emissions must be less than or equal to
29 pounds per year for at least three years.
Measurement of hydrochloric acid (HCl)
for existing units will depend primarily on
the current configuration of the unit. If the
facility is operating an existing flue gas des-
ulfurization (FGD) system, then the plants
existing Part 75 CEMS system will suffice for
HCl compliance. If no existing FGD system
is in place or if the facility is new, then two
options may be chosen for HCl monitoring.
Either a CEMS system for HCl measurement
or quarterly monitoring by EPA Test Method
26/26A may be used.
For the measurement of filterable particu-
late matter (PM), many more options exist.
Typically, either a PM-CEMS or PMContin-
uous Parametric Monitoring System (CPMS)
is used for measurement of filterable particu-
late emissions. For units that operate with
flue gas temperatures greater than the dew
point temperature, several measurement tech-
niques exist. PM emissions may be measured
using an optical system that will measure
either the opacity or dynamic opacity (scin-
tillation). An alternative technology relies on
scattered light that reflects off particles in the
flue gas. In this technique, a receiver mea-
sures the amount of light scatter from a light
source and equates that to a particulate load-
ing. Non-light-based measuring systems are
also available that utilize the electrification
of a probe to measure PM emissions.
For those units that operate below the
dew point limit in the stack, there are still
options for PM measurement. These tech-
niques are not in situ. Rather, they require
the extraction of flue gas from the stack.
Common measurement techniques for ex-
traction methods include beta absorption
and extractive light scattering.
Control of Pollutants
Control of these pollutants is just as complex
as the measurement techniques (see sidebar).
The control of mercury emissions is particu-
larly difficult, as primary control techniques
adsorb mercury onto a sorbent, which is then
captured by a particulate control device.
Mercury, after the combustion process, ex-
ists in three states: an elemental state, a par-
ticulate state, and a divalent state. Mercurys
state is critical to its mitigation, as mercury
in a particulate or divalent form has the great-
est potential to be removed from the flue gas
stream. Mercury existing in an elemental
state is a very stable molecule. It must be
forcibly oxidized to promote capture, or else
it will typically pass through the boiler and
emission control devices.
ACI systems are currently the best-de-
veloped technology for mercury reduction.
Depending on fuel characteristics (such as
the amount of halides present) and combus-
tion characteristics (such as the amount of
unburned carbon in fly ash), the proportions
of mercury present in a divalent or elemental
state in the flue gas will vary. An ACI system
must be specifically engineered to meet re-
moval rates required by regulations. This in-
cludes varying the porosity of the sorbent or
adding halides to aid in the adsorption of mer-
cury. It must also be noted that the addition of
activated carbon will affect the quality of the
fly ash. This leads to the potential of fly ash no
longer being marketable, which has additional
economic impacts on a facility.
Hydrogen chloride is a substance that can
be removed by several techniques that will
break down the acid gas into a neutral sub-
stance. Depending on the level of fuel-bound
chlorides, calcium-based sorbents such as
limestone and hydrated lime have the poten-
tial to remove the desired amount of hydro-
gen chloride. These sorbents are typically
used in sulfur dioxide scrubbing systems;
however, they can also be injected directly
into the furnace. If additional removal rates
are required, then sodium-based sorbents
such as trona or sodium bicarbonate may be
injected from upstream of the economizer to
the outlet of the air preheater.
Filterable PM may be a more problematic
pollutant to control with a plants existing
equipment. Removal rates for some facilities
will be pushed upward of 99.99%, and the
addition of various sorbents for mercury and
HCl mitigation will only increase particulate
loading. For plants utilizing electrostatic pre-
cipitators (ESP), the removal rates required
may push this technology beyond its limits.
If the existing ESP is unable to handle the
removal rates, then options to convert the
ESP to a pulse jet fabric filter may be inves-
tigated. If this is not a feasible option, then
an expensive option of decommissioning the
ESP and replacing it with a pulse jet fabric
filter would be required.
Alternate Emission Limitations
The EPA has developed equivalent emission
standards as alternative limitations that a
facility may opt to meet. As a substitute for
meeting HCl emission levels, for example,
Other POWER Resources
Available
For more information on technologies
for mercury removal, check out the
following articles from our archives at
www.powermag.com:
EMO Technology Promises Improved
Mercury Removal, October 2012
Debate Heats Up over New Mercury
and Air Toxics Rule, February 2012
Colstrips Cure for Mercury, February
2012
An SCR Can Provide Mercury Co-Ben-
efits, October 2011
Advanced SCR Catalysts Tune Oxi-
dized Mercury Removal, August
2010
Determining AQCS Mercury Removal
Co-Benefits, July 2010
Field Experience with Mercury Moni-
tors, August 2007
If your interest lies with the regulatory
history of MATS, POWERnews reported on
developments as they occurred. Search us-
ing keywords POWERnews and MATS.
2. Remove acid gases. A spray dryer
absorber is often installed to control acid
gases such as sulfur dioxide and hydrochloric
acid. Courtesy: KBR Power & Industrial
ACI systems are currently the
best-developed technology for
mercury reduction.
December 2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 77
MERCURY EMISSIONS
the EPA has produced an equivalent emis-
sion standard for sulfur dioxide. If a facil-
ity cannot meet the filterable PM emission
standards, then the EPA has also developed
equivalent standards for total non-mercury
metals and individual non-mercury metals.
Individual non-mercury metals include the
following hazardous air pollutants: antimony,
arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, co-
balt, lead, manganese, nickel, and selenium.
If a facility were to elect to meet an al-
ternative emission limitation based on total
nonmercury metals or individual nonmer-
cury metals, some measurement or base-
loaded emission issues may need to be
addressed. For new units looking to utilize
coal or those that might consider switch-
ing fuels, it is common to utilize the EPAs
Compilation of Air Pollutant Emission Fac-
tors, or AP-42, to determine emission rates
of nonmercury metals. This set of data, pub-
lished since 1972, has been developed from
source test data, material balance studies,
and engineering estimates (Tables 3 and 4).
In order to meet the prescribed regula-
tions, direct measurement of nonmercury
metals will be necessary. EPA Test Method
29 is required to measure either total non-
mercury metals or individual nonmercury
metals. If direct measurement shows that
nonmercury metal emissions are higher than
EPA estimation equations, very little can be
done to mitigate this problem. Upgrades to
filterable particulate control devices will be
required to achieve higher efficiency rates
that drive down the nonmercury metal emis-
sion rates. The result is no more of an eco-
nomic advantage than if the facility were to
have chosen a filterable particulate emission
limitation to begin with.
Looking Forward
As the compliance date for the MATS
regulation continues to creep closer, fa-
cilities using coal, solid oil-derived fuel,
or oil must start taking affirmative action
to comply. A significant amount of capital
investment followed by years of additional
operating expenditures will be required to
remain operational. Understanding how
this affects the future of coal-powered gen-
eration is difficult, and multiple plant clo-
sures will most likely occur as a result of
this regulation.
Confusion is added to the compliance
timeline as the EPA issued a stay on the ef-
fective dates for new facilities while hold-
ing steady on the effective dates of some
existing facilities with equivalent emission
limitations.
Measurement techniques are extensive
and require sensitivity not previously ob-
tainable. Litigation continues, which may
further change what has been promulgated.
The recent vacating of CSAPR leads to
questions about the future of MATS, al-
though how the court rules on the EPAs pe-
tition is anyones guess. Further appeals are
also possible.
All of these circumstances make it dif-
ficult to predict if the final rule is truly
final. What is certain is that there are no
easy off-the-shelf solutions. While the court
juggles CSAPR, it is critical for facilities to
evaluate their operations and start down the
path toward MATS compliance.
Brandon Bell, PE (brandon.bell@
kbr.com) is a principal mechanical engineer
with KBR Power and Industrial, Chicago.
Subcategory/
pollutant
Coal-fired
EGUs IGCC
Liquid oil,
continental
Liquid oil,
non-continental
Solid
oil-derived
SO
2
2.0 E-1 lb/MMBtu
(1.5 E0 lb/MWh)
NA NA NA
3.0 E-1 lb/MMBtu
(2.0 E0 lb/GWh)
Total non-
mercury metals
5.0 E-5 lb/MMBtu
(5.0 E-1 lb/GWh)
6.0 E-5 lb/MMBtu
(5.0 E-1 lb/GWh)
8.0 E-4 lb/MMBtu
(8.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
6.0 E-4 lb/MMBtu
(7.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
4.0 E-5 lb/MMBtu
(6.0 E-1 lb/GWh)
Antimony, Sb
8.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(8.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
1.4 E0 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
1.3 E+1 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-1 lb/GWh)
2.2 E0 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
8.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(8.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
Arsenic, As
1.1 E0 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
1.5 E0 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
2.8 E0 lb/TBtu
(3.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
4.3 E0 lb/TBtu
(8.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
3.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(5.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
Beryllium, Be
2.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
1.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(1.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
2.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
6.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(3.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
6.0 E-2 lb/TBtu
(6.0 E-4 lb/GWh)
Cadmium, Cd
3.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(3.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
1.5 E-1 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
3.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
3.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(3.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
3.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(4.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
Chromium, Cr
2.8 E0 lb/TBtu
(3.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
2.9 E0 lb/TBtu
(3.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
5.5 E0 lb/TBtu
(6.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
3.1 E+1 lb/TBtu
(3.0 E-1 lb/GWh)
8.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
Cobalt, Co
8.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(8.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
1.2 E0 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
2.1 E+1 lb/TBtu
(3.0 E-1 lb/GWh)
1.1 E+2 lb/TBtu
(1.4 E0 lb/GWh)
1.1 E0 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
Lead, Pb
1.2 E0 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
1.9 E+2 lb/TBtu
(1.8 E0 lb/GWh)
8.1 E0 lb/TBtu
(8.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
4.9 E0 lb/TBtu
(8.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
8.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
Manganese,
Mn
4.0 E0 lb/TBtu
(5.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
2.5 E0 lb/TBtu
(3.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
2.2 E+1 lb/TBtu
(3.0 E-1 lb/GWh)
2.0 E+1 lb/TBtu
(3.0 E-1 lb/GWh)
2.3 E0 lb/TBtu
(4.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
Mercury, Hg NA NA
2.0 E-1 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-3 lb/GWh)
4.0 E-2 lb/TBtu
(4.0 E-4 lb/GWh)
NA
Nickel, Ni
3.5 E0 lb/TBtu
(4.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
6.5 E0 lb/TBtu
(7.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
1.1 E+2 lb/TBtu
(1.1 E0 lb/GWh)
4.7 E+-2 lb/TBtu
(4.1 E0 lb/GWh)
9.0 E0 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-1 lb/GWh)
Selenium, Se
5.0 E0 lb/TBtu
(6.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
2.2 E+1 lb/TBtu
(3.0 E-1 lb/GWh)
3.3 E0 lb/TBtu
(4.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
9.8 E0 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-1 lb/GWh)
1.2 E0 lb/TBtu
(2.0 E-2 lb/GWh)
Table 3. Alternate emission limitations for existing EGUs. Source: EPA
Note: E = exponent
Subcategory/
pollutant
Coal-fired
EGUs IGCC
Liquid oil,
Continental
Liquid oil, non-
Continental
Solid oil-
derived
SO
2
4.0 E-1 lb/MWh 4.0 E-1 lb/MWh N/A N/A 4.0 E-1 lb/MWh
Total non-mercury
metals
6.0 E-2 lb/GWh 4.0 E-1 lb/GWh 2.0 E-4 lb/MWh 7.0 E-3 lb/MWh 6.0 E-1 lb/GWh
Antimony, Sb 8.0 E-3 lb/GWh 2.0 E-2 lb/GWh 1.0 E-2 lb/MWh 8.0 E-3 lb/MWh 8.0 E-3 lb/GWh
Arsenic, As 3.0 E-3 lb/GWh 2.0 E-2 lb/GWh 3.0 E-3 lb/MWh 6.0 E-2 lb/MWh 3.0 E-3 lb/GWh
Beryllium, Be 6.0 E-4 lb/GWh 1.0 E-3 lb/GWh 5.0 E-4 lb/MWh 2.0 E-3 lb/MWh 6.0 E-4 lb/GWh
Cadmium, Cd 4.0 E-4 lb/GWh 2.0 E-3 lb/GWh 2.0 E-4 lb/MWh 2.0 E-3 lb/MWh 7.0 E-4 lb/GWh
Chromium, Cr 7.0 E-3 lb/GWh 4.0 E-2 lb/GWh 2.0 E-2 lb/MWh 2.0 E-2 lb/MWh 6.0 E-3 lb/GWh
Cobalt, Co 2.0 E-3 lb/GWh 4.0 E-3 lb/GWh 3.0 E-2 lb/MWh 3.0 E-1 lb/MWh 2.0 E-3 lb/GWh
Lead, Pb 2.0 E-3 lb/GWh 9.0 E-3 lb/GWh 8.0 E-3 lb/MWh 3.0 E-2 lb/MWh 2.0 E-2 lb/GWh
Manganese, Mn 4.0 E-3 lb/GWh 2.0 E-2 lb/GWh 2.0 E-2 lb/MWh 1.0 E-1 lb/MWh 7.0 E-3 lb/GWh
Mercury, Hg NA NA 1.0 E-4 lb/MWh 4.0 E-4 lb/MWh 2.0 E-3 lb/GWh
Nickel, Ni 4.0 E-2 lb/GWh 7.0 E-2 lb/GWh 9.0 E-2 lb/MWh 4.1 E0 lb/MWh 4.0 E-2 lb/GWh
Selenium, Se 6.0 E-3 lb/GWh 3.0 E-1 lb/GWh 2.0 E-2 lb/MWh 2.0 E-2 lb/MWh 6.0 E-3 lb/GWh
Table 4. Alternate emission limitations for new EGUs. Source: EPA
Note: E = exponent
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 78
PLANT DESIGN
LIDAR and 3D Modeling Produce
Precise Designs
Retrofit projects are often very time-consuming, both for the engineers who
must take numerous field measurements to produce drawings and for
the contractor that must fabricate each assembly on site. A more cost-
effective approach is to begin with a highly accurate set of as-built 3D
models produced by laser scanning technology.
By Jason Hart, PE and John Bremer, PE, JQ
P
ower plant retrofit or renovation
projects can be tricky. Locating new
equipment or structures at an existing
site usually means preparing a design that
will fit in a highly congested area in a way
that will not clash with any existing struc-
tures, piping, or equipment. Nor can the
added equipment or structure be located in
areas that are inaccessible. In the past, de-
signers have addressed this design complex-
ity in one of two ways.
The first option was to take extensive
field notes based on tape measurements.
With extensive field notes taken by hand,
the designer took responsibility for the
complete design, particularly with respect
to surrounding obstructions. The contrac-
tor would build to the drawings, and when
(not if) problems were encountered during
construction, the contractor would request a
change order for more money and time to
complete the project.
The second approach was to alert the
contractor, in the drawings, that there
were constraints that must be field veri-
fied. However, leaving key dimensions
to be field verified requires the contractor
to redesign the project, particularly struc-
tural steel and piping, because each piece
must be hand-fit and welded in place. This
approach will also significantly drive up
field labor costs. Contractors, who are
justifiably concerned about assuming ad-
ditional cost and schedule risk, will price
work accordingly.
LIDAR Sees All
Today, there is a better way. Light Detec-
tion and Ranging (LIDAR) is an optical
remote-sensing technology that measures
the distance to an object by illuminating the
object using pulses from a laser to produce
three-dimensional (3D) geometric informa-
tion about the object. The term laser scan
is frequently used instead of LIDAR.
LIDAR is particularly useful in power
plant renovation projects because it brings
the power plant design back to the office
rather than requiring work in the field. The
laser scan accurately locates existing pipes,
conduit, equipment, structures, and other
obstructions and appurtenances that affect
the design of new structural framing, re-
gardless of complexity, as will be described
in the following case study.
In the office, the designer can take the
point cloud produced by the LIDAR scan-
ner and import it into a modeling program
to produce 3D models of objects of inter-
est. The designer is then able to model the
new structures, equipment, and piping as
required to work with existing as-built
conditions. Clash conditions are easily
detected and resolved in the model, not in
the field. The model of the new and exist-
ing as-built conditions is then used to pro-
duce 2D design drawings suitable for steel
fabricators.The assemblies can then be
constructed from bolted, shop-fabricated
steel members instead of field-cut welded
members. The switch to using prefabricat-
ed pieces leads to more predictable instal-
lation costs and schedules, which means
that projects can be competitively bid by
regional contractors.
In sum, incorporating LIDAR into the
design process saves time and money for
engineering, makes field work safer, and re-
duces cost and schedule risk for the owner
and contractor.
Limestone Mills Platform
Case Study
LIDAR was used in the design of a series of
platforms to access the limestone mills at a
recently constructed fluidized bed combus-
tion lignite plant in central Texas. Limestone
is pulverized in the mills and injected into
the furnace along with the crushed lignite.
As the lignite burns, the limestone absorbs
sulfur dioxide as part of the combustion pro-
cess, which reduces the downstream sulfur
dioxide content.
Moisture in the limestone can clog the
feed chute of a limestone mill. The project
began when plant operators requested plat-
forms from which the feed chute at each mill
could be cleaned. The platform also needed
to be large enough to allow access around
the outside of the mill housing to service a
large access door.
The plant uses six limestone mills; the
west mill is shown in Figure 1 in its as
found configuration.
This was one of the first steel platform ex-
pansion projects to be constructed from bolt-
ed, shop-fabricated steel members instead of
field-cut welded members at the plant. The
limestone mill platforms were optimized to
fit within the space and around the surround-
ing equipment, pipes, conduits, and valves.
1. Original equipment. This is one of
the six limestone mills before platforms were
constructed. Courtesy: JQ
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www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 80
PLANT DESIGN
Neither the LIDAR scanning process nor the
assembly of the platforms required an outage
or interrupted any plant processes.
LIDAR, combined with 3D modeling, is
a much improved variation of the traditional
option one outlined earlier. The designer still
takes responsibility for locating the existing
pipe, equipment, and other details, but the
design is based on more complete and ac-
curate dimensions. In general, LIDAR scans
are accurate to plus or minus 0.25 inch and
are often more accurate than that. This sub-
stantially reduces the likelihood of a change
order or construction delay due to interfer-
ences encountered in the field during steel
erection.
The LIDAR Design Process
There are typically seven steps in the design
process when using LIDAR. Below, we de-
scribe those steps and illustrate how LIDAR
was successfully used in the platform design
for this case study.
1. Perform the LIDAR High-Density
Scans. Scanning is a line-of-sight process,
so anything that cannot be seen from the van-
tage point of the scanner is not scanned. Mov-
ing the scanner to a new location and making
another scan, where the object is visible,
will fill in the resulting shadows. Scanning
resolution is the density of points that can be
measured and varies based on distance of the
object from the scanner. An operator adjusts
the resolution because resolution affects the
speed of the scan. Typical resolution settings
at 100 meters are: 20 x 20 cm, 10 x 10 cm, 5 x
5 cm (the most common), or 2 x 2 cm.
A target placed on the objects of inter-
est determines the location and orientation
of the scans relative to each other. Back in
the office, the scans are registered relative
to each other using the targets. As long as
a scanner can see at least three targets in
each scan, the scans can be registered to
each other to obtain a point cloud of the vol-
ume of interest.
2. Easy targets. The laser scanner or LI-
DAR is mounted on a tripod adjacent to a plant
motor with a temporary targetthe white
and blue sticker on the control panel cover
that is used to properly align, or register the
scans. Courtesy: JQ
3. Collected cloud data. This is the
point cloud for the limestone mill shown in
Figure 1without color information from the
integrated digital camera. Courtesy: JQ
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Edition: 2012
December 2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 81
PLANT DESIGN
Figure 2 shows a LIDAR unit mounted on a standard surveyors
tripod. The unit has two windowsone on the side and one on the
topthrough which it sends and receives the laser beam. LIDAR has
an integral camera to take digital photos that are used to assign color
to points from the scans. The handle can be removed to allow the
scanner to scan directly above if the area above the scanner is in-
cluded in the volume of interest.
Data describing the space near the mills was obtained with a LIDAR
scanner in two days by technicians working safely away from oper-
ating equipment. Each scan takes 5 to 15 minutes, depending on the
resolution and whether photos are taken. For this project, 25 scans were
obtained for the six limestone mills.
2. Process the Scan Data. Back in office, the registered point
cloud file is created and the file is colorized.
In the limestone mill project, once the scans were registered into a
single point cloud, designers could measure existing conditions and
check for interferences entirely in computer-assisted design (CAD)
software, eliminating the need for several trips to the plant to record
myriad field measurements. The point cloud captured encumbrances
that were not recorded on as-built drawings and which interfered with
the layout of the new platforms.
Figure 3 shows the raw, uncolorized scan of the limestone mill,
and Figure 4 shows the same scan after photos from the scanner were
used to assign colors to the points. The color makes it easierin some
cases much easierfor the designer to discern objects in the scan.
3. Import and Post-Process Data. Next, the point cloud file is
imported into a 3D CAD file using third-party software. Then post-
processing of the registered point cloud file takes place so that extra-
neous points are eliminated. The range of the scanner can be limited
in the field, but limiting the range does not speed up the scan, so the
scanner is usually left to scan everything.
The point cloud can also be divided into levels or specific areas
of interest. This reduces the point cloud file size.
Finally, undesirable elements, such as scaffolding, vehicles, and
people are removed.
4. Model Existing Equipment, Structures, Pipes, and Con-
duits. As the designer goes through the point cloud to lay out a new
structural model, he or she can cut slices through the point cloud and
eliminate some of the clutter. The designer can see the structural ele-
ments, railings, and equipment. As the designer zooms in with the
point cloud file, objects become much clearer.
In addition to large pieces of equipment, the point cloud is used to
model elements such as pipes, ducts, and conduits, including hang-
ers, valves, concrete pedestals, and structural steel members. Even the
flange width, beam depth, and flange thickness of existing structural
members can be measured from the point cloud.
5. Lay Out and Design the New Structure(s). Once the 3D
model of the as-built configuration is completed, the same 3D
CAD file can be used to design the new elements, with particular
attention paid to existing elements to avoid interferences. Most of
the new structure is modeled with the point cloud turned off, but
the designer occasionally toggles the point cloud back on to make
sure the structure doesnt clash with existing piping, structures,
or equipment.
Figure 5 shows the 3D model of the new platforms and the point
cloud of the existing plant. In general, every valve, instrument sen-
sor or gauge, small-diameter tubing, and flexible electrical cabling
is not modeled, but these items are accounted for when the structure
is laid out around the items in the point cloud. Figure 6 shows cable
trays and pipes that the new platforms were designed around. Figure
7 is a detailed view of the platforms 3D model, including a swing-
ing hatch that affected the location of railing.
5. Perfect fit. The 3D model of the new platforms is superimposed
on existing equipment, structure, pipes, and electrical conduit pro-
duced from the colorized point cloud. Courtesy: JQ
6. Infinite views. The 3D model can be manipulated in any direc-
tion and at any zoom during design. Shown are the new platforms built
around the model of the existing plant equipment generated from the
point cloud. Courtesy: JQ
4. Colorized cloud data. The point cloud shown in Figure 3 now
includes color information provided by the integrated digital camera.
Courtesy: JQ
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 82
PLANT DESIGN
6. Do a Reality Check. Provide views of the model to plant staff
to review and confirm that the work will meet operational needs. In
some projects, a virtual walk-through of the project is possible where
equipment operators and maintainers can explore the design as they
would after construction. Changes can be made in the software model
much faster and cheaper than after the structural steel is installed.
7. Complete the Design Documentation. The final step is to
cut sections through the model to start laying out the 2D drawings.
After this point the production process is no different than the tradi-
tional 2D drawing production process, and the end result is a set of
2D construction drawings.
The comprehensiveness and detail of the information allowed the
platform designers to quickly and accurately complete their work.
With high-quality drawings, the fabricator was able to rapidly pre-
fabricate parts. Simplifying the steel connections and reducing the
amount of time the contractor was mobilized on site reduced the risk
of impacting plant operations. There were no construction change
orders on the project, and a last-minute addition to the scope of
work that doubled the size of the platforms was designed in less
than a week because no additional field measurements were re-
quired (Figure 8).
Future Uses of 3D Models
Contractors have commented that when bidding on platforms proj-
ects based on LIDAR field measurements, they are confident that
the drawings are going to accurately reflect the existing conditions
and show the level of detail needed for the job. Lower contractor
bid prices reflect the improved drawing quality. In fact, some con-
tractors have taken the 3D CAD files created by the engineer and
imported the files into detailing software to prepare shop drawings,
further reducing the time required for manual re-entry of geometric
and material information.
As more contractors adopt 3D modeling into their standard pro-
cedures, the 2D drawing creation step may no longer be necessary,
because 3D models can then be turned over to the contractor to pre-
pare shop drawings.
The 3D model of the completed project is also beneficial to the
owner because the images are easier to understand by those with-
out a technical or plant operations background. Plant engineers have
commented on how the images from a 3D model, when shown to
operators at the design phase, have elicited much more feedback than
previously, leading to the optimum platform being constructed for the
operators needs. An asset management engineer at the plant in the
case study said, The 3D models are terrific. We get a lot more feed-
back from operators compared to when wed review drawings.
The 3D models also serve as documentation of the final as-built
configuration. And, after construction, the models from past proj-
ects have the added advantage of helping to visualize future projects
in the same area.
Jason Hart, PE (jhart@jqeng.com), is the principal and John
Bremer, PE is the engineering technical lead for JQs Industrial
Facilities group.
7. User input required. Plant operators were particularly inter-
ested in the elevated platform arrangement. This view of the 3D model
shows all the necessary details, including the swinging access door on
the mill. Courtesy: JQ
8. Completed project. The completed platforms around the
limestone mill that was shown in Figure 1. Courtesy: JQ
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CIRCLE 36 ON READER SERVICE CARD


December 2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 83
CLEAN COAL
China Leads the Global Race to
Cleaner Coal
Coal used for power generation has been the cornerstone of economic de-
velopment, social progress, and a higher quality of life around the globe
and is now fueling the 21st-century economic miracle rapidly unfolding in
China. Meanwhile, China is leading the world in coal-fired plant efficiency
and the deployment of clean coal technologies.
By Jude Clemente, San Diego State University
O
ver the past 20 years, coal has in-
creased its share of Chinas total
power generation from 72% to 80%,
providing electricity for the first time to
more than 500 million people. Chinas
electrification rate is now 99%, compared
to less than 60% in 1990, while annual
per capita consumption has soared from
500 kWh to 2,900 kWh. China more than
tripled its share of global coal-based gen-
eration from 11% in 1990 (471 TWh) to
37% in 2011 (3,170 TWh). The economic
benefits for the Asian nation are obvious.
For example, the World Banks Human
Development Indicators show that around
85% of the global population that rose out
of poverty since 1990 was Chinese.
As the world strives to eliminate energy
poverty while simultaneously meeting rising
demand, Chinas unprecedented progress
has set an example. Consider projections of
future generation sources made by the In-
ternational Energy Agencys (IEAs) World
Energy Model and the U.S. Energy Infor-
mation Administrations (EIAs) National
Energy Modeling System (Figure 1). The
bulk of new demand will occur in the de-
veloping world, where massive amounts of
affordable and reliable power are required
to lift hundreds of millions into the modern
age. In short, the world will continue to use
coal, and consumption will significantly
expand for decades to come.
Clean coal technologies will be the means
to meet both burgeoning global energy de-
mand and climate policy goals. Some are
expected to be deployable at scale in the
early-2020s, while the evolving technology
of carbon capture and storage (CCS) and
near-zero emissions are expected to follow
shortly thereafter. Until that time, highly
efficient and large supercritical (SC) and
ultrasupercritical (USC) coal plants can
meet immediate needs while significantly
reducing emissions intensity.
In fact, efficient plants are a prerequisite
for retrofitting with CCS, because the cap-
turing, transporting, and storing of a plants
carbon dioxide (CO
2
) consumes energy.
The teaming of higher efficiency coal-fired
technologies and CCS will unlock the full
value of coal. In this race, China enjoys a
global lead.
Chinas Clean Coal Technology
Plans and Achievements
U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu re-
ports that advanced coal-based power
plants are one of the seven energy arenas in
which China is outpacing the U.S. Here are
some of the ways in which China is leading
the race.
Initiated in 2007, Chinas dual programs
of Large Substituting for Small (LSS) and
Energy Conservation Power Generation
(ECPG) are expected to result in the de-
commissioning of over 114 GW of small,
inefficient plants and the addition of 112
GW of more efficient SC units. In short,
Chinas future growth in generation capac-
ity centers on evolving from 300-MW and
600-MW subcritical boilers to larger and
more efficient SC and USC boilers ranging
in size from 600 MW to 1,000 MW. These
advanced plants produce almost 40% fewer
emissions than many existing coal plants,
thereby making them cleaner. The rule of
thumb is that a 1% increase in plant effi-
ciency reduces emissionssuch as CO
2
,
SO
2
, NO
x
, and particulatesby approxi-
mately 2%.
According to the IEA, the average oper-
ating efficiency of the worlds existing coal
plant fleet is under 29%. New SC plants,
however, can achieve overall thermal effi-
ciencies in the 44% range, and USC units
can reach 46% to 48%. China has deployed
some of the worlds most efficient coal
power stations, such as Shanghai Waigai-
qiao Unit 3, which has a peak efficiency of
over 46%.
China is also rapidly proceeding with
GreenGen, a $1 billion initiative in Tianjin
to advance near-zero-emissions coal-based
electricity with hydrogen production and
1. Different projections. Reference scenarios for incremental sources of electricity for
China through 2030 differ but agree that coal will remain a major player. The International En-
ergy Agencys World Energy Outlook 2011 numbers are shown on the left, and U.S. Energy
Information Administrations International Energy Outlook 2011 numbers are shown on the right.
Sources: IEA, EIA
Other; 15%
Coal; 45%
Hydro; 10%
Nuclear; 8%
Gas; 22%
Other; 11%
Coal; 30%
Hydro; 16%
Nuclear; 18%
Gas; 25%
December 2012
|
POWER www.powermag.com 85
CLEAN COAL
had come online by November 2007. New
units incorporate high-efficiency dust re-
moval and desulfurization, and Yuhuan Units
1 and 2 are touted as the worlds cleanest,
most efficient and most advanced PC units,
with an efficiency rating of 46%.
Rapid deployment is required because
China has limited availability of good sites
for large-scale power plants, and USC PC
units allow power generation companies,
which are aggressively competing against
each other, to expand their total capacity and
utilize their sites more efficiently. In fact, all
five of Chinas largest power generation com-
panies now have their own USC PC units.
As a pioneer in efficient boiler technol-
ogy, the Babcock & Wilcox Co. (B&W)
announced in September 2010 that B&W
Beijing Co. will build two 1,000-MW USC
coal-fired boilers for a large power plant
project in Zhejiang province. The two Spiral
Wound Universal Pressure (SWUP) boilers
will use one of B&Ws most advanced and
efficient coal-fired boiler designs.
The SWUP is engineered for both base-
load and variable pressure load-cycling
operation, as well as on-off cycling opera-
tion. The SWUP is unique in that the tubes
in the furnace, from the lower furnace inlet
headers to a location near the furnace arch,
are wound around the furnace circumfer-
ence rather than being vertical. This lets the
fluid in the tubes pass through the various
heat flux zones around the furnace, provid-
ing a more uniform outlet enthalpy. B&Ws
spiral furnaces utilize multi-lead ribbed tub-
ing to allow once-through operation at lower
minimum loads. (See Design Features of
Advanced Ultrasupercritical Plants, Parts I,
II, and III in the March, May, and July 2012
issues of COAL POWER, available at www
.coalpowermag.com.) Contract activities for
the Zhejiang project are under way, and de-
livery is scheduled for late 2012.
Emerson Process Management will install
its Ovation expert control system at two new
1,000-MW USC coal-fired generating units
now under construction in Chinas Anhui
province. According to the company, the
Ovation is now being used to automate and
control processes and equipment at more than
half the 1,000-MW units in China, including
a number of USC plants. For both new units,
the Ovation system will perform data acqui-
sition, as well as monitor and control all ma-
jor plant components, including the boiler,
turbine, and generator. Unifying boiler and
turbine operations offers many operational
benefits, namely improved unit stability, re-
sponsiveness, thermal efficiencies, tighter
control of operations, and a leaner view of
key plant and turbine parameters. The sys-
tem will also manage each units modulat-
ing control system, sequence control system,
electrical control system, furnace safety su-
pervisory system, feedwater turbine control
system, and flue gas desulfurization system.
Looking forward, Chinas coal-based elec-
tricity will be increasingly clean. LSS and
ECPG help ensure that only modern units
get access to the power grid. The National
Development and Reform Commission uses
policy instruments and economic incentives
to prioritize the scheduling of cleaner and
larger coal plants.
For example, in order to build a new 600-
MW station, 420 MW of old capacity must
be closed, and for a 1,000-MW new unit, at
least 600 MW must be shuttered. Over the
next decade, new power plants with a unit
capacity of 600 MW and above will all be re-
quired to be advanced, roughly half of which
will be USC. By 2030, subcritical units are
expected to account for only 30% of Chinas
total thermal generation capacity, against
more than 80% in 2007 (see table). The av-
erage efficiency of Chinas coal-fired power
plants is expected to increase from around
30% today to above 40% in 2030.
Follow the Leader
China has leveraged coal to virtually eliminate
abject electricity deprivation. The countrys
commitment to higher plant efficiency means
more power, less fuel consumption, and a cor-
responding reduction in emissions intensity.
This model is being repeated in the other
emerging giant, India, where power genera-
tion needs are staggering: 280 million Indians
lack electricity, 600 million cook with wood
or dung, and 900 million have no refrigera-
tion. Indias Ultra Mega Power Projects will
deploy larger and more efficient coal-fired
SC units to narrow the gap between Indias
low per capita power use (600 kWh/year) and
that of the West (7,000+ kWh/year).
From 2009 to 2030, the IEA projects that
India will increase its coal-based generation
capacity from 92 GW to 290 GWmore
than gas, nuclear, wind, and solar combined.
Advanced coal power stations have lower
operating costs due to their higher efficiency.
Indeed, the United Nations (UN) finds that
the capital cost of a SC plant is more or less
the same as that of a subcritical plant, espe-
cially as economies of scale take hold.
Some 1,300 million people today lack
access to electricity, the sine qua non of
modern civilization. Unfortunately, the
IEA projects that this number will only be
reduced by a shameful and unacceptable
20%, to 1,036 million, by 2030. The effects
of electricity deprivation are devastating.
The UN reports that 25,000 children die
each daymany from preventable causes
that electricity helped eliminate in the West
almost a century ago. Importantly, all eight
of the UN Millennium Development Goals
require access to electricity.
As they look toward the future, many in
the global scientific and engineering com-
munity have turned their creative gaze to the
safe management of CO
2
. Meanwhile, poli-
cies to achieve sustainability should look
for ways to promote technological advance-
ments that will offer us the ability to con-
tinue using our vast reserves of coal more
efficiently and cleanly.
Jude Clemente (judeclemente21@
msn.com) is an energy analyst in the
Department of Homeland Security, San
Diego State University and a principal at
JTC Energy Research Associates.
Generation capacity 2007 (GW) 2020 (GW) 2030 (GW) Expected capacity growth (GW)
Total generation capacity 713 1,500 2,0002,300 1,437
Coal-fired 524 1,040 1,200 676
Subcritical 464 700 440 24
Supercritical 50 200220 300330 265
Ultrasupercritical 10 8090 270280 265
IGCC 0 44 170 170
Gas-fired and oil-fired 40 60 200 160
Total thermal capacity 564 1,100 1,400 836
Coal rising. The number and capacity of Chinas advanced coal-based power plants is ex-
pected to grow significantly. Source: IEA, 2009
Looking forward, Chinas coal-based
electricity will be increasingly clean.
www.powermag.com POWER
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December 2012 84
CLEAN COAL
CCS. The first phase of GreenGen came
online at the end of 2011, and commercial
operations are set to begin in 2016.
Chinas 12th Five-Year Plan (20112015)
aims to cut carbon intensity, the ratio be-
tween changes in CO
2
emissions and gross
domestic product, by 17% (see Chinas
12th Five-Year Plan Pushes Power Industry
in New Directions, January 2012, available
in the POWER archives at www.powermag
.com). The nation is now installing some of
the largest, most advanced coal units in the
world using SC and USC steam conditions
and modern SO
2
/NO
x
and dust control sys-
tems. According to the Asian Development
Bank, This has resulted in a significant
reduction in coal consumption, greenhouse
gas and other pollutant emissions, and im-
pressive improvement in energy efficiency.
More than 500 small, inefficient ther-
mal generating units, with the combined
generating capacity of 14.4 GW, were
decommissioned in the first year of LSS
alone, and 43 million tons of coal and a
corresponding 60 million tons of CO
2
were
saved in the first two years. From 2006 to
2011, the nationwide average coal con-
sumption for power generation plummeted
from approximately 366 grams of coal
equivalent (gce)/kWh to 330 gce/kWh,
suggesting that the 320 gce/kWh goal for
2020 will easily be achieved (Figure 2).
Over 80% of Chinas orders for ther-
mal power capacity are for 600-MW SC or
1,000-MW USC units, and the country now
represents some 90% of the global market
for advanced coal combustion power gen-
eration systems and associated environ-
mental control systems.
Pulverized coal (PC) combustion is one of
the most mature generation options, which
has led Chinese policymakers to favor the
most advanced PC technologies: SC and USC
plants. For example, all four of the 1,000-MW
coal-fired USC pressure boilers at Yuhuan
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2. The impact of increased future coal-fired power efficiency in China
is significant. Sources: J. Mao, How Does China Reduce CO
2
Emissions from Coal Fired
Power Generation? The World Bank, 2009 Energy Week, Washington DC; Z. Xiliang, Science
Advance Relative to Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Some Observations from China,
International Seminars on Planetary Emergencies, 2010; and International Energy Agency
2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
3,200
3,000
2,800
2,600
2,400
2,200
2,000
370
360
350
340
330
320
310
C
o
a
l
-
f
i
r
e
d

p
o
w
e
r

g
e
n
e
r
a
t
i
o
n

(
T
W
h
)
C
o
a
l

c
o
n
s
u
m
p
t
i
o
n

(
g
c
e
/
k
W
h
)

Coal-fired power generation

Coal consumption
2,357 TWh
3,125 TWh
Note: gce = grams of coal equivalent.
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2012 86
NEW PRODUCTS
TO POWER YOUR BUSINESS
Pipe Clamp for Vibration Sensing
Fauske & Associates LLC (FAI) recently patented a specialized
pipe clamp to seat vibration-sensing equipment. A beam
attached to the clamp protrudes through the pipe insulation.
The beam is partially hollow and vented to promote cooling
so that accelerometers can be installed on the tip of the
beam outside the high-temperature and/or radiation area for
accurate vibration level monitoring. The FAI pipe clamp has
a natural frequency of about 1 kHz. All pipe vibrations below
this frequency will be accurately recorded or slightly amplied
at frequencies closer to 1 kHz, and the frequency of 1 kHz is
sufciently large and above expected pipe vibration frequencies,
which are typically in the range of 10 Hz to 500 Hz, the Illinois-
based company says. The dynamics of the pipe clamp have
reportedly been dened by a deterministic approach as well
as experimental data, which provide additional condence and
renement of the theoretical analysis. (www.fauske.com)
Electric Screen Vibrators
Martin Engineering introduced a new family of
electric screen vibrators for regular duty and
hazardous environments. Designed to deliver
up to 16,500 pounds of centrifugal force for
efcient material separation, Martin screen
vibrators are built to withstand the rigors of
industrial applications and continuous use,
and can run 24/7, as needed.
With a traditional screen vibrator, the
drive functions as the energy source. The
energy is transferred via a structural bridge
to the vibratory box, which is isolated by
the springs. In the new Martin design, the
energy source is an integral part of the
structural tube that can be mounted to
the sides or top of a vibratory box, making
it much easier for designers to engineer
and manufacture new kinds of vibratory
screens. The new vibrators can be used with
a variable-frequency drive in ordinary and
hazardous atmospheres. Explosion-proof
models are ETL/cETL/ATEX/IECexcertied
for hazardous duty. (www.martin-eng.com)
Rotary Peristaltic Pump
The new portable, nonmetallic Flex-I-Liner rotary peristaltic pump from
Vanton Pump and Equipment Corp. evacuates drums and totes containing
acids, caustics, salts, chlorides, and reagent grade chemicals, without
corrosion of the pump or contamination of the uid. The self-priming
design has no seals to leak or valves to clog and can run dry for extended
periods without damage. Compact in size, with an integral handle, it ts
on drum lids without protruding and has sufcient lift characteristics to
operate from the oor, skid, or stand. Only two nonmetallic parts contact
uid: a thermoplastic body block and an elastomeric exible liner that can
be replaced in the eld without special tools.
A rotor mounted on an eccentric shaft oscillates within the exible
liner, imparting a progressive squeegee action on the uid trapped in the
channel between the liner and the body block. Flanges on the exible liner
are pressed to the side of the body block by concentric grooves on the
bracket assembly and the cover plate, isolating the uid to the channel.
The wide choice of thermoplastics and elastomers in which these pumps
are available permits their use over the full pH range and for an extensive
list of corrosive, volatile, and viscous uids. The pump is suitable for ows
from 0.33 gallons per minute (gpm) to 40 gpm and pressures to 45 psig at
temperatures to 250F. (www.vanton.com)
Inclusion in New Products does not imply
endorsement by POWER magazine.
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POWER www.powermag.com 87
2013 2013 2013
BUYERS GUIDE
COMPANY
DIRECTORY
2G - CENERGY Power Systems
Technologies Inc., 151 College
Dr. - 15, Orange Park, FL 32065
Phone: 904-579-3217
Fax: 904-406-8727
Email: mturwitt@2g-cenergy.com
www.2g-cenergy.com
360training.com and LKItraining.
com, 13801 N. Mopac Blvd., Ste.
100, Austin, TX 78731
Phone: 888-318-3552
Email: kirk.
vandervort@360training.com
www.360training.com/corporate-
solutions/power/
3Degrees, 38 Keyes Ave., Ste.
300, San Francisco, CA 94129
Phone: 415-449-0500
Fax: 415-680-1561
Email: info@3degreesinc.com
www.3degreesinc.com
4-STAR Hose & Supply, 10704
Composite Dr., Dallas, TX 75220
Phone: 214-351-6085
Email: info@4starhose.com
www.4starhose.com
A
A&D Constructors, Inc., 707
Schrader Ave., Evansville, IN
47712
Phone: 812-428-3708
Fax: 812-425-8630
Email: information@adconstruc-
tors.com
www.adconstructors.com
A.J. Weller Corporation, P.O. Box
17566, Shreveport, LA 71138
Phone: 318-925-1010
Fax: 318-925-8818
Email: robinr@ajweller.com
www.ajweller.com
AABA-American Association of
Boiler Assessment, 795 Green-
briar Rd., Mount Washington, KY
40047
Phone: 502-562-0022
Email: lweber@aa-ba.org
www.aa-ba.org
Aalborg CSP A/S, Hjulmagervej
55, Aalborg, 9000, Denmark
Phone: +45 88 16 88 36
Email: info@aalborgcsp.com
www.AalborgCSP.com
AB Technology Group, 431 State
St. Box 1491, Ogdensburg, NY
13669
Phone: 610-906-3549
Email: info@abthermal.com
www.firesleeveandtape.com
ABB Inc., 29801 Euclid Ave.,
Wickliffe, OH 44092
Phone: 440-585-7076
Fax: 440-585-7054
Email: helen.m.germ@us.abb.com
www.abb.com
ABB Switzerland Ltd, Excitation
Systems, Austrasse, Turgi, 5300,
Switzerland
Phone: +41 58 589 24 86
Fax: +41 58 589 23 33
Email: pes@ch.abb.com
www.abb.com/unitrol
ABC - Diesel, Wiedauwkaai 44,
Gent, 9000, Belgium
Phone: +329-267-0033
Fax: +329-267-0067
Email: ph@abcdiesel.be
www.abcdiesel.be
Abengoa, 16401 Swingley Ridge
Rd., Ste. 700, Chesterfield, MO
63017
Phone: 480- 705-0028
Fax: 480-705-0029
Email: meranda.ory@abener.
abengoa.com
www.abener.com
Abresist Kalenborn Corporation,
5541 North State Rd. 13, Urbana,
IN 46990
Phone: 800-348-0717
Fax: 219-774-8188
Email: scott@abresist.com
www.abresist.com
The POWER Buyers Guide consists of a Company Directory
(below), a Product Directory (p. 129), and a Service Directory
(p. 146). In the Product and Service Directories, categories also
have subcategories. The Company Directory lists manufacturers
and service providers complete contact information.
HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE
Suppose you want to contact one or more manufacturers of
circuit breaker test equipment. Turn to the Product Directory page
that lists test equipment. There youll find subcategories listed,
including one for circuit breakers (30).
From the companies listed below the test equipment
subcategories, select those with (30) after their names. Then
consult the Company Directory for their contact information.
Listings in boldface type indicate companies that are advertisers
in this issue. Their ads appear on the pages noted.
SEARCH ONLINE, TOO
Visit www.powermag.com and click on the Buyers Guide button
to search by company or keyword in the online
POWER Buyers Guide.
This print directory includes companies that updated their information in our online Buyers Guide within the past year
(through early November). To ensure current information listings at ELECTRIC POWER, visit www.powermag.com and click
on Buyers Guide to update your listing by March 2013.
The deadline for updates that will appear in next years print Buyers Guide will be October 18, 2013. To edit or update a
listing, click on the Buyers Guide button on the powermag.com site any time before then.
IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR VENDORS
COMPANY
DIRECTORY
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AcousticEye, P.O. Box B 205,
Leusden, 03830, Netherlands
Phone: +31 (0)207084784
Email: info@acousticeye.com
www.acousticeye.com
ACR Systems Inc., 210 -12960
84th Ave., Surrey, BC V3W 1K7,
Canada
Phone: 604-862-9571
Fax: 604-591-2252
Email: gordon@acrsystems.com
www.acrsystems.com
Acromag, Inc., 30765 S. Wixom
Rd., Wixom, MI 48393
Phone: 248-295-0880
Fax: 248-624-9234
Email: sales@acromag.com
www.acromag.com
Active3D Inc., 2125 Davis Blvd.,
Fort Myers, FL 33905
Phone: 313-608-8822
Fax: 435-608-8825
Email: marc@active3dinc.com
www.active3dinc.com
ADA Carbon Solutions
1460 W. Canal Court, Suite 100
Littleton, CO 80120 USA
Phone: 303-962-1989
E-mail: devon.santistevan@
ada-cs.com
www.ada-cs.com
ADA Environmental Solutions,
9135 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Ste. 200,
Highlands Ranch, CO 80129
Phone: 303-734-1727
Fax: 303-734-0330
Email: contactus@adaes.com
www.adaes.com
Advance Products & Systems, P.O.
Box 60399, Lafayette, LA 70596
Phone: 337-233-6116
Fax: 337-232-3860
Email: sales@apsonline.com
www.apsonline.com
Advanced Acoustic Technologies,
LLC, 3022 Shepperd Rd., Monk-
ton, MD 21111
Phone: 410-472-3000
Email: mail@soniccleaning.com
www.soniccleaning.com
Advanced Combustion Technology
Inc., 8525 Freeland St., Houston,
TX 77061
Phone: 713-910-8800
Fax: 713-910-8889
Email: act@act-texas.com
www.act-texas.com
Advanced Detection Systems,
LLC, 1440 East 357th St., East-
lake, OH 44095
Phone: 440-951-6687
Fax: 440-951-6641
Email: jai@spectruminfrared.com
www.spectruminfrared.com
Advanced Filtration Concepts,
7111 Telegraph Rd., Los Angeles,
CA 90640,
Phone: 323-832-8316, x12
Fax: 323-832-8318
Email: Tmoyer@advfiltration.com
www.ADVfiltration.com
Advanced Flexible Systems Inc.,
P.O. Box 14156, Charleston, SC
29422
Phone: 843-795-6800
Fax: 843-795-6889
Email: ttaylor@afsjoints.com
www.afsjoints.com
Advanced Industrial Systems Inc.,
P.O. Box 373, 1550 Confederation
Line, Sarnia, ON N7T 7J2 Canada
Phone: 877-902-8822
Fax: 519-336-0049
Email: ko@theaisteam.com
www.theaisteam.com
Advanced Inspection Technolo-
gies Inc., 7777 N. Wickham Rd.,
#12-557, Melbourne, FL 32940
Phone: 321-610-8977
Fax: 321-574-3814
Email: paul@aitproducts.com
www.aitproducts.com
Advanced Specialty Gases, 135
Catron Dr., Reno, NV 89512
Phone: 775-356-5500
Fax: 775-356-5571
Email: asg@advancedspecialty-
gases.com
www.advancedspecialtygases.com
Advanta Energy Corp., 2500 Old
Crow Canyon Rd., Ste. 526, San
Ramon, CA 94583
Phone: 925-831-8001
Email: gallen@AdvantaEnergy.
com
www.AdvantaEnergy.com
AE&E - Von Roll Inc., 302
Research Dr., Ste. 300, Norcross,
GA 30092
Phone: 770-613-9788
Fax: 770-613-9860
Email: info@aee-vonroll.com
www.aee-vonroll.com
AE&E Austria GmbH & Co KG,
Waagner- Biro-Platz 1, Raaba/
Graz, 08074, Austria
Phone: +43-316-501-0
Fax: +43-316-501-482
Email: info@aee-austria.at
www.aee-group.com
Aeris Corp, P.O. Box 2026, Ka-
lamazoo, MI 49003
Phone: 269-207-7360
Fax: 269-375-4479
Email: jdurlach@aeriscorpora-
tion.com
www.aeriscorporation.com
Aerofin, 4621 Murray Place 10,
Lynchburg, VA 24502
Phone: 434-845-7081
Fax: 434-528-6242
Email: gdivers@aerofin.com
www.aerofin.com
AeroGo, Inc., 1170 Andover Park
West, Tukwila, WA 98188
Phone: 206-575-3344
Fax: 206-575-3505
Email: kiliz.b@aerogo.com
www.aerogo.com
Aerotek Energy Services, 7301
Pkwy. Dr., Hanover, MD 21076
Phone: 410-694-5483
Email: tmendoza@aerotek.com
www.aerotek.com
Aggreko, LLC, 4540 Kendrick
Plaza #100, Houston, TX 77032
Phone: 337- 636-4421
Email: jessica.plummer@aggreko.
com
www.aggreko.com
AGT Services Inc., 24 Sam Strat-
ton Rd., Amsterdam, NY 12010
Phone: 518-843-1112
Fax: 518-843-8389
Email: brian@AGTservices.com
www.agtservices.com
AIMS LLC, 1616 S 31st Ave.,
Phoenix, AZ 85009
Phone: 602-237-0292
Fax: 602-237-0294
Email: chris@azindustrialclean-
ing.com
www.azindustrialcleaning.com
Air - Cure Inc., 8501 Evergreen
Blvd., Minneapolis, MN 55433
Phone: 763-717-0707
Fax: 763-717-0394
Email: audra.schmidt@aircure.com
www.aircure.com
Air Engineering Inc., 2075 S.
170th St., New Berlin, WI 53151
Phone: 800-558-4318
Email: parts@airengineering.com
www.airengineering.com
Air Instruments & Measurements
LLC, 15404 E. Valley Blvd., City
of Industry, CA 91746
Phone: 626-330-4700
Fax: 626-330-4776
Email: aimanalysis@earthlink.net
www.aimanalysis.com
Air Systems Limited, 139, Velach-
ery Rd., Chennai, Tamilnadu,
00015 India
Phone: +919884050000
Fax: +914424988499
Email: nitin@asplparts.com
www.asplparts.com
Airfloat, LLC, 2230 Brush College
Rd., Decatur, IL 62526
Phone: 217-423-6001
Fax: 217-422-1049
Email: tabbott@airfloat.com
www.airfloat.com
Airflow Sciences Corporation,
12190 Hubbard St., Livonia, MI
48150
Phone: 734-525-0300
Fax: 734-525-0303
Email: power@airflowsciences.
com
www.airflowsciences.com
Airoflex Equipment, 6001 49th
St. South, Muscatine, IA 52761
Phone: 563-264-8066
Fax: 563-263-0919
Email: sales@airoflexequipment.
com
www.airoflexequipment.com
AirTek Construction, Inc., 700
Hudson St., Troy, AL 36081
Phone: 410-609-2495
Fax: 410-609-2496
Email: paulb@airtek-troy.com
www.airtek-troy.com
Airtrol, Inc., 920 S. Hwy. Dr.,
Fenton, MO 63026
Phone: 636-326-4600
Fax: 636-326-4610
Email: cthompson@airtrol.com
www.airtrol.com
Aitech Defense Systems, 19756
Prairie St., Chatsworth, CA 91311
Phone: 888-248-3248
Fax: 818-718-9787
Email: dpatterson@rugged.com
www.rugged.com
Albemarle Environmental
Division, 451 Florida Street,
Baton Rouge, LA 70801
Phone: 225-388-7402
Email: mercury@albemarle.com
www.albemarle.com/mercury
See our ad on p. 47
Albert Products, P.O. Box 1245,
Springfield, IL 62705
Phone: 217-529-9600
Fax: 217-529-8919
Email: buckets@carhoe.com
www.carhoe.com
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COMPANY
DIRECTORY
Alcatel-Lucent, 3, Ave. Octave
Greard, Paris, 75007 France
Phone: +33 (0)1 40 76 10 10
Fax: +33 (0)1 40 76 10 10
Email: kamal.y.Ballout@alcatel-
lucent.com
www.alcatel-lucent.com/smart-grid
Alchemy Consultants, Inc., 9144
Highland Ridge Way, Tampa, FL
33647
Phone: 813-994-1654
Fax: 813-994-6095
Email: aci1@tampabay.rr.com
Alcon Solenoid Valves, 369 Frank-
lin St., Buffalo, NY 14202
Phone: 716-855-2500
Fax: 716-855-1400
Email: marketing@alconsole-
noids.com
www.alconsolenoids.com
Alden, 30 Shrewsbury St.,
Holden, MA 01520
Phone: 508 829 6000
Email: info@aldenlab.com
www.aldenlab.com
ALEASOFT, VILADOMAT 1, 1 1,
Barcelona, 08015, Spain
Phone: +34 93 289 20 29
Email: info@aleasoft.com
www.aleasoft.com
Alfa Laval, Maskinvej 5, Sborg,
DK-2860, Denmark
Phone: +45 39 53 60 00
Fax: +45 39 53 65 56
Email: susanne.rosentoft@
alfalaval.com
www.alfalaval.com
ALGAE-X International (AXI),
5400-1 Division Dr., Ft. Myers,
Fort Myers, FL 33905
Phone: 239-690-9589
Email: pgeorge@algae-x.net
www.algae-x.net
Alignment Supplies, Inc., 1681
Lance Pointe Rd., Ste. 2, Mau-
mee, OH 43537
Phone: 800-997-4467
Fax: 419-887-5893
Email: pberberian@alignment-
supplies.com
www.alignmentsupplies.com
Alimak Hek, Inc., 1100 Boston
Ave., Bridgeport, CT 06610
Phone: 203-367-7400
Fax: 203-367-9251
Email: info@alimakhek.com
www.alimakhek.com
All Erection & Crane Rental, 4700
Acorn Dr., Cleveland, OH 44131
Phone: 216- 524-6550
Fax: 216-901-8983
Email: kliptak@allcleveland.com
www.allcrane.com
Allegheny Industrial Sales Inc.,
105 N. Jamestown Rd., Moon
Township, PA 15108
Phone: 412-262-9050
Fax: 412-262-9055
Email: DLB2@allegheny-ind.com
www.allegheny-ind.com
Allegro, 1445 Ross Ave., Ste.
2200, Dallas, TX 75202
Phone: 214-237-8000
Fax: 214-526-7076
Email: info@allegrodev.com
www.allegrodev.com
Allen Gears Ltd., Atlas Works,
Station Rd., Pershore WR10 2BZ,
Worcestershire, UK
Phone: +44 1386 552211
Email: sales@allengears.com
www.allengears.com
Allen-Sherman-Hoff, 457 Cream-
ery Way, Exton, PA 19341
Phone: 484-875-1600
Fax: 484-875-2080
Email: dpi_marketing@diamond-
power.com
www.a-s-h.com
Allied Environmental Solutions,
Inc., 9730 Patuxent Woods Dr.,
Ste. 100, Columbia, MD 21046
Phone: 410-910-5100
Fax: 410-910-5101
Email: info@allied-env.com
www.allied-env.com
Allied Industrial Marketing, Inc.,
W62 N248 Washington Ave., Ste.
208, Cedarburg, WI 53012
Phone: 262-618-2403
Fax: 262-618-4303
Email: jahoudek@alliedindustri-
almarketing.com
www.alliedindustrialmarketing.
com
Allied Power Group, 10131 Mills
Rd., Houston, TX 77070
Phone: 281-444-3535
Fax: 281-444-3529
Email: info@alliedpg.com
www.alliedpg.com
Allied Union Inc., 4704 Yorkshire
St., Sugar Land, TX 77479
Phone: 281-980-1700
Email: Alliedui@gmail.com
www.alliedunion.com
Alloy Bellows and Precision
Welding, 653 Miner Rd., Highland
Hts., OH 44143
Phone: 440-684-3000 X105
Email: d.scanlon@alloybellows.com
www.alloybellows.com
Alltec Corporation, 64 Catalyst
Dr., Canton, NC 28716
Phone: 828-646-9290
Email: bchittum@allteccorp.com
www.allteccorp.com
Alstom, 3 avenue Andr Mal-
raux, 92300 Levallois-Perret,
France
Phone: +33 1 4149 2000
Fax: +33 1 4149 7925
Email: alexandra.weber@power.
alstom.com
www.alstom.com
Altec Capital Services, LLC, 33
Inverness Center Pkwy., Ste. 200,
Birmingham, AL 35242
Phone: 205-408-8077
Fax: 205-408-8113
Email: abby.wiggins@altec.com
www.alteccapital.com
ALTRAN, 2525 Route 130 South,
Cranbury, NJ 08512
Phone: 609- 409-9790
Fax: 609-409-8622
Email: tnagata@alphathree.com
www.altran.com
Alturdyne, 660 Steele St., El
Cajon, CA 92020
Phone: 619-440-5531
Fax: 619-442-0481
Email: info@alturdyne.com
www.alturdyne.com
Amarillo Gear Company, P.O. Box
1789, Amarillo, TX 79105
Phone: 806-622-1273
Fax: 806-622-3258
Email: info@amarillogear.com
www.amarillogear.com
Ambassador Heat Transfer Co,
10080 Alliance Rd., Cincinnati,
OH 45242
Phone: 513-792-9800
Fax: 513-792-9933
Email: sales@ambassadorco.com
www.ambassadorco.com
Ambitech Engineering Corpora-
tion, 1411 Opus Place, Ste. 200,
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Phone: 630-963-5800
Fax: 630-963-8099
Email: bgeegan@ambitech.com
www.ambitech.com
AMECO USA, 910 Cahoon Rd.,
Cleveland, OH 44145
Phone: 440-899-9400
Fax: 440-899-9401
Email: thomas.mclaughlin@
ameco-usa.com
www.ameco-usa.com
American Aerospace Controls,
Inc., 570 Smith St., Farmingdale,
NY 11735
Phone: 631-694-5100
Email: greg@a-a-c.com
www.a-a-c.com
American Association of Boiler
Assessors, Inc., P.O. Box 310,
Brooks, KY 40109
Phone: 502-562-0022
Email: cmceachran@aa-ba.org
www.aa-ba.org
American Boiler Manufacturers
Association (ABMA), 8221 Old
Courthouse Rd., Ste. 202, Vienna,
VA 22182
Phone: 703-356-7172
Fax: 703-356-4543
Email: cheryl@abma.com
www.abma.com
American DG Energy Inc., 45 First
Ave., Waltham, MA 02451
Phone: 781-522-6000
Fax: 781-522-6050
Email: info@americandg.com
www.americandg.com
American Efficiency Services, LLC,
15925 North Ave., Woodbine, MD
21797
Phone: 410-489-0613
Fax: 410-489-6937
Email: wscherer@americanef-
ficiency.com
www.americanefficiency.com
American Electrical Testing Co.,
Inc., 480 Neponset St., P.O. Box
267, Canton, MA 02021
Phone: 800-992-3826
Fax: 781-821-0771
Email: hbramson@99aetco.com
www.99aetco.com
American Exchanger Services,
1950 Innovation Way, Hartford,
WI 53027
Phone: 414-529-0067
Fax: 414-433-4839
Email: joe@amexservices.com
www.amexservices.com
American Fire Technologies,
2120 Capital Dr., Wilmington, NC
28405
Phone: 800-919-1288
Fax: 800-951-9191
Email: chatfield@american-
firetech.com
www.americanfiretech.com
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American Galvanizers Associa-
tion, 6881 S. Holly Cir., Ste. 108,
Centennial, CO 80112
Phone: 720-554-0900
Fax: 720-554-0909
Email: marketing@galvanizeit.org
American Industrial Supply,
351 Smith St., Perth Amboy, NJ
08862
Phone: 732-826-7600
Fax: 732-826-9182
Email: sales@ameind.com
www.ameind.com
American Polywater Corp, P.O.
Box 53, Stillwater, MN 55082
Phone: 651-430-2270
Fax: 651-430-3634
Email: freddy@polywater.com
www.polywater.com
American Pulverizer Company,
1319 Macklind Ave., St. Louis,
MO 63110,
Phone: 314-781-6100
Fax: 314-880-2293
Email: jholder@ampulverizer.com
www.ampulverizer.com
American Wind Energy Associa-
tion (AWEA), 1501 M St. NW, Ste.
1000, Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-870-0273
Fax: 202-383-2505
Email: janthony@awea.org
www.awea.org
Ameristar Biofuels, 3400 Bath
Pike, Ste. 305, Bethlehem, PA
18017
Phone: 908-878-7755
Fax: 484-893-2746
Email: rhiller@greenworkshold-
ings.com
www.ameristarbiofuels.com
Ameristar Fence Products, 1555
N. Mingo Rd., Tulsa, OK 74116
Phone: (888) 333-3422
Fax: (877) 926-3747
Email: sirwin@ameristarfence.com
www.ameristarfence.com
AMETEK Land, Inc., 150 Freeport
Rd., Blawnox, PA 15238
Phone: 412-826-4444
Fax: 412-826-4460
Email: irsales@ametek.com
www.ametek-land.com
Ametek Power Instruments, 255
N. Union St., Rochester, NY 14605
Phone: 585-263-7700
Fax: 585-262-4777
Email: power.sales@ametek.com
www.ametekpower.com
Ametek, Solidstate Controls,
875 Dearborn Dr., Columbus, OH
43085
Phone: 614-846-7500
Fax: 614-885-3990
Email: nick.yarnell@ameteksci.
com
www.solidstatecontrolsinc.com
Amiad Filtration Systems, 2220
Celsius Ave., Oxnard, CA 93103
Phone: 805-988-3323
Fax: 805-988-3313
Email: renee@amiadusa.com
www.amiad.com
Amphenol Industrial Operations,
40-60 Delaware Ave., Sidney, NY
13838
Phone: 800-678-0141
Fax: 607-563-5157
Email: cvansoest@amphenol-aio.
com
www.amphenol-industrial.com
Ampirical Solutions, LLC, 4
Sanctuary Blvd., Suite 100,
Mandeville, LA 70471
Phone: 985-789-6726
Fax: 985-809-5250
Email: dmitchell@ampirical.com
www.ampirical.com
See our ad on p. 14
AMREL/AMERICAN RELIANCE,
3445 Fletcher Ave., El Monte, CA
91731
Phone: 626-443-6818
Fax: 626-443-8600
Email: ariinfo@amrel.com
www.amrel.com
Analysts, Inc., P.O. Box 2955,
Torrance, CA 90509
Phone: 310-320-0070
Fax: 310-320-0970
Email: analystsinc@analystsinc.
com
www.analystsinc.com
Analytec Corp, 8828 S Kingston
Ave., Tulsa, OK 74137
Email: analytec@worldnet.att.net
www.analytec.com
Anchor Insulation, 435 Nar-
ragansett Park Dr., Pawtucket, RI
02861
Phone: 888-438-9612
Fax: 401-438-6480
Email: jerry.fiske@anchorinsula-
tion.com
www.anchorinsulation.com
Andax Industries LLC, 613 W.
Palmer St., Saint Marys, KS 66536
Phone: 800-999-1358
Fax: 888-443-4732
Email: customerservice@andax.com
www.andax.com
Andritz AG, Stattegger Strasse
18, Graz, A-8045, Austria
Phone: 43-316-6902-2133
Fax: 43-316-6902-406
Email: guenter.haiden@andritz.
com
www.andritz.com/pumps
Anixter, 4464 Willow Rd. #101,
Pleasanton, CA 94588
Phone: 925-469-8751
Fax: 925-469-8750
Email: matt.scheid@anixter.com
www.anixter.com
ANSALDO CALDAIE SPA, Largo
Buffoni 3, Gallarate, 21013, Italy
Phone: +390331738111
Fax: +390331738794
Email: sales@ansaldoboiler.it
www.ansaldoboiler.it
Anvil Engineered Pipe Supports,
160 Frenchtown Rd., North Kings-
town, RI 02852
Phone: 401-886-3005
Email: bstrouss@anvilintl.com
www.anvilintl.com
Anvil International, 500 W. Eldo-
rado St., Decatur, IL 62522
Phone: 217-425-7354
Fax: 217-425-7537
Email: dmcdavitt@muellercom-
pany.com
ap+m, 1811 Corporate Dr., Boyn-
ton Beach, FL 33426
Phone: 561-732-6000
Fax: 561-732-6562
Email: sales@apm4parts.com
www.apm4parts.com
APC by Schneider Electric, 132
Fairgrounds Rd., West Kingston,
RI 02892
Phone: 888-994-8867
Fax: 401-788-2698
Email: gutor.usa@apc.com
www.gutor.com
Apex Instruments, Inc., 204
Technology Park Lane, Fuquay-
Varina, NC 27526
Phone: 919-557-7300
Fax: 919-557-7110
Email: jnichols@apexinst.com
www.apexinst.com
APOYOTEC (Plantas de Energa),
P.O. Box 272, 720 Snyder Creek
Rd., Jefferson, CO 80456
Phone: 970-231-6032
Fax: 970-506-9229
Email: admin@apoyotec.com
www.apoyotec.com
Applied Bolting, 1413 Rock-
ingham Rd., Bellows Falls, VT
05101
Phone: 802-460-3100
Fax: 802-460-3104
Email: info@appliedbolting.com
www.appliedbolting.com
See our ad on p. 46
Applied Gas Turbines, a Division
of Mid America Engine, 2500
State Hwy. 160, Warrior, AL
35180
Phone: 205-647-4312
Fax: 205-590-3885
Email: sales@appliedgasturbines.
com
www.appliedgasturbines.com
APSM, 125 East Main St., Ste.
122, American Fork, UT 84003
Phone: 866-866-8730
Fax: 866-670-0223
Email: tyson@apsm.net
www.apsm.net
Aptech Engineering Services Inc.,
P.O. Box 3440, Sunnyvale, CA
94088
Phone: 408-745-7000
Fax: 408-734-0445
Email: aptech@aptecheng.com
www.aptecheng.com
Aquatech International Corpora-
tion, One Four Coins Dr., Canons-
burg, PA 15317
Phone: 724-746-5300
Fax: 724-746-5359
Email: aic@aquatech.com
www.aquatech.com
Aquatic Sciences L.P., 40 Centre
Dr., Orchard Park, NY 14127
Phone: 716-667-3507
Fax: 716-667-3509
Email: blaurens@aquaticsciences.
com
www.aquaticsciences.com
AquatiPro, 211 12th St. SW,
Loveland, CO 80537
Phone: 970-593-1342
Fax: 970-461-1485
Email: apsales@aquatipro.com
www.aquatipro.com
Aqua-Vu, 34076 County Rd. 3,
P.O. Box 368, Crosslake, MN
56442
Phone: 218-297-0744
Fax: 218-692-4881
Email: ben@aquavu.com
www.aquavu.com
Arc Machines, Inc., 10500 Orbital
Way, Pacoima, CA 91331
Phone: 818-896-9556
Email: sales@arcmachines.com
www.arcmachines.com
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Ares Technology, LLC, 126 Cor-
porate Dr. Ste. E, Simpsonville,
SC 29681
Phone: 864-399-9805
Fax: 864-399-9809
Email: jpalmer@arestechllc.com
AREVA Inc., 4800 Hampden
Lane, Ste. 1100, Bethesda, MD
24501
Phone: 434-832-3702
Fax: 434-832-3840
Email: donna.gaddybowen@
areva.com
www.us.areva.com
See our ad on p. 29
Aries Electronics, 2609 Bartram
Rd., Bristol, PA 19007
Phone: 215-781-9956
Fax: 215-781-9845
Email: frankf@arieselec.com
www.arieselec.com
Arizona Instrument LLC, 3375 N.
Delaware St., Chandler, AZ 85225
Phone: 602-470-1414
Fax: 480-804-0656
Email: sales@azic.com
www.azic.com
Armstrong-Hunt, Inc., 648
Moeller St., Granby, QC J2G 8N1,
Quebec, Canada
Phone: 450-378-2655
Fax: 450-375-3787
Email: jrsmith@armstronginter-
national.com
www.armstronginternational.com
ASB Industries, Inc., 1031 Lam-
bert St., Barberton, OH 44203
Phone: 330-753-8458
Fax: 330-753-7550
Email: cmkay@asbindustries.com
www.asbindustries.com
Asco Valve Inc., 50 Hanover Rd.,
Florham Park, NJ 07932
Phone: 973-966-2000
Fax: 973-966-2448
Email: info-valve@asco.com
www.ascovalve.com
ASGCO Complete Conveyor
Solutions, 301 Gordon St., Al-
lentown, PA 18102
Phone: 610-821-0216
Fax: 610-778-8991
Email: agibbs@asgco.com
www.asgco.com
Ashland Water Technologies, P.O.
Box 2219, Columbus, OH 43216
Phone: 614-790-4068
Fax: 614-790-3426
Email: tlhanson@ashland.com
www.ashland.com
ASI Group Ltd., 250 Martindale
Rd., St. Catharines, ON, L2R 7R8
Canada
Phone: 905-641-0941
Fax: 905-641-1825
Email: blaurens@asi-group.com
www.asi-group.com
Asia Carbon Energy, 5F, CBD In-
ternational Mansion, No.16 Yong
An Dong Li, Chaoyang District,
Beijing, P R China, Beijing,
100022, China
Phone: +86 10 65637762
Fax: +86 10 6563 7612
Email: cindy.jin@a-carbon.com
www.a-carbon.com
ASME International, 3 Park Ave.
M/S 22W3, New York, NY 10016
Phone: 212-591-7055
Fax: 212-591-7671
Email: missouria@asme.org
www.asme.org
Associated Electric Products,Inc.,
P.O. Box 6713, Longmont, CO
80501
Phone: 1-800-361-6314
Email: info@assoc-elec-prod.com
www.assoc-elec-prod.com
Aston Evaporative Services, 743
Horizon Ct, Ste. 250, Grand Junc-
tion, CO 81506
Phone: 970-242-7003
Fax: 970-256-7006
Email: kevink@astoncompanies.com
www.astoncompanies.com
Astro Arc Polysoude Inc., 24856,
Ave. Rockfeller, Valencia, CA
91355
Phone: 661-702-0141
Fax: 661-702-0632
Email: sales@astroarc.com
www.astroarc.com
ATC-Diversified Electronics, 8019
Ohio River Blvd., Newell, WV
26050
Phone: 304-387-1200
Fax: 304-387-1212
Email: jgamble@marshbellofram.
com
www.marshbellofram.com
ATCO Emissions Management,
1243 Mcknight Blvd., N.E., Cal-
gary, AB T2E 521 Canada
Phone: 519-220-0600
Fax: 519-220-0602
Email: donna.ahola@atcosl.com
www.atcosl.com
Atlantic Plant Services, 1612 Pine
Creek Way, Woodstock, GA 30188
Phone: 678-445-5380
Email: mike.simonsen@brock-
group.com
www.brockgroup.com
Atlas Business Solutions, Inc.
(ABS), 3330 Fiechtner Dr. SW,
Fargo, ND 58104
Phone: 701-235-5226 ext.117
Email: jwyganowska@abs-usa.
com
www.abs-usa.com
Atlas Copco Compressors LLC,
1800 Overview Dr., Rock Hill, SC
29730
Phone: 866-546-3588
Email: paul.humphreys@
us.atlascopco.com
www.atlascopco.us
Atlas Copco Tools and Assem-
bly Systems, 2998 Dutton Rd.,
Auburn Hills, MI 48326
Phone: 248-373-3000
Email: assembly.tools@
us.atlascopco.com
www.atlascopco.us
ATM Freight Services, 1924
Rankin Rd. Ste. 300, Houston,
TX 77073
Phone: 281-821-2002
Fax: 281-443-0938
Email: darryl@atmfreight.com
www.atmfreight.com
Atomizing Systems Inc., Bldg#1,
1 Hollywood Ave., Hohokus, NJ
07423
Phone: 201-447-1222
Fax: 201-447-6932
Email: info@coldfog.com
www.coldfog.com
AUMUND Frdertechnik GmbH,
Saalhoffer Strasse 17, Rheinberg,
47495, Germany
Phone: +492843720
Fax: +49284360270
Email: aumund@aumund.de
www.aumund.com
Automated Appointment Re-
minders, 30150 Telegraph Rd.,
Bingham Farms, MI 48025
Phone: 800-962-0126
Email: sales@voiceshot.com
www.voiceshot.com/public/
appointment-reminder.asp
Automatic Systems Inc., 9230
EaSt. 47th St., Kansas City, MO
64133
Phone: 816-356-0660
Fax: 816-356-5730
Email: brian.petrie@asi.com
www.asi.com
Automation Products, Inc. - DY-
NATROL Division, 3030 Maxroy
St.,Houston, TX 77008
Phone: 713-869-0361
Fax: 713-869-7332
Email: sales@dynatrolusa.com
www.DynatrolUSA.com
Automation Technology, Inc.,
2001 Gateway Place, Ste. 100,
San Jose, CA 95110
Phone: 408-350-7020
Fax: 408-350-7021
Email: sales@atinet.com
www.atinet.com
Automation Training Inc., 1067
East Woolley, Carlisle, IN 47838
Phone: 866-573-9849
Email: Terri@atifortraining.com
www.atifortraining.com
AVA Americas, LLC, 580-C Union
West Blvd., Matthews, NC 28104
Phone: 704-248-2767
Fax: 704-248-0366
Email: info@ava-americas.com
www.ava-americas.com
AVA-Huep GmbH u. Co. KG, Hein-
estrasse 5, Herrsching, 82211,
Germany
Phone: +49 8152-9392-0
Fax: +49 8152-939291
Email: info@ava-huep.de
www.ava-huep.com
AVO Training Institute, Inc., 4271
Bronze Way, Dallas, TX 75237
Phone: 877-594-3156
Fax: 214-331-7363
Email: avotraining@avotraining.
com
www.avotraining.com
AZZ | N L I, 7410 Pebble Dr., Fort
Worth, TX 76118
Phone: 800-448-4124
Email: gregkeller@azz.com
www.azz.com/nli
B
B&W Mechanical Handling Ltd.,
Gemini House, Cambridgeshire
Business Park, 1 Bartholomews
Walk, Ely, CB7 4EA, UK
Phone: +441353665001
Fax: +441353666734
Email: sales@bwmech.co.uk
www.bwmech.co.uk
b3o enviroTek, 695 Nashville
Pike, No. 310, Gallatin, TN 37066
Phone: 615-989-1576
Fax: 615-451-5044
Email: budr@locateunderground.
com
www.locateunderground.com
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December 2012 92
Babcock & Wilcox Company, 20
S Van Buren Ave., Barberton, OH
44203
Phone: 330-753-4511
Fax: 330-860-1886
Email: info@babcock.com
www.babcock.com
Babcock Power Environmental
Inc., 5 Neponset St., P.O. Box
15040, Worcester, MA 01615
Phone: 508-852-7100
Fax: 508-854-3800
Email: info@babcockpower.com
www.babcockpower.com
Babcock Power Inc., One Corpo-
rate Place, 55 Ferncroft Rd., Ste.
210, Danvers, MA 01923
Phone: 978-646-3300
Fax: 978-646-3301
Email: sales@babcockpower.com
www.babcockpower.com
Babcock Power Services Inc., 5
Neponset St., P.O. Box 15040,
Worcester, MA 01615
Phone: 508-852-7100
Fax: 508-852-7548
Email: info@babcockpower.com
www.babcockpower.com
Badger Daylighting, 1300 US
Hwy. 136, Pittsboro, IN 46167
Phone: 317-892-2666
Fax: 317-892-2661
Email: dhutchison@badger-corp.
com
www.badgerinc.com
Baldor Electric Company, 5711
R.S. Boreham, Jr. Street, Ft.
Smith, AR 72901
Phone: 479-646-4711
Fax: 479-648-5792
www.baldor.com
See our ad on p. 23
Balfour Beatty Rail Inc., 1845
Town Center Blvd., Ste. 200,
Fleming Island, FL 32003
Phone: 404-253-6302
Fax: 404-607-1784
Email: lcaceres@bbri.com
www.bbri.com
Band-It-Idex, Inc., 4799 Dahlia
St., Denver, CO 80216
Phone: 800-525-0758
Fax: 800-624-3925
Email: mbush@idexcorp.com
www.band-it-idex.com
Banker Steel Company, LLC, 1619
Wythe Rd., Lynchburg, VA 24501
Phone: 434-847-4575
Fax: 434-847-4533
Email: epetersen@bankersteel.com
www.bankersteel.com
Banner Engineering, 9714 Tenth
Ave. North, Minneapolis, MN
55441
Phone: 800-809-7043
Fax: 763-544-3123
Email: sensors@bannerengineer-
ing.com
www.bannerengineering.com
Bannerstone Energy, 7 Buerger
Rd., Mobile, AL 36608
Phone: 251-344-2534
Email: pstabler@bannerstoneen-
ergy.com
www.bannerstoneenergy.com
Barnhart Crane & Rigging Co.,
103-B N. Bancroft St., Fairhope,
AL 36532
Phone: 281-706-5390
Fax: 251-706-0941
Email: lriebow@barnhartcrane.com
www.barnhartcrane.com
Barry Persky & Company, Inc.,
31 Taunton Lane, Newtown, CT
06470
Phone: 203-270-6700
Fax: 203-270-6702
Email: bpersky@barrypersky.com
www.barrypersky.com
BARTEC GmbH, Max-Eyth-Str.
16, Bad Mergentheim, 97980,
Germany
Phone: +49 7931 597-0
Fax: +49 7931 597-119
Email: info@bartec.de
www.bartec.de
Basic Concepts, 1310 Harris
Bridge Rd., Anderson, SC 29621
Phone: 800-285-4203
Fax: 864-224-7063
Email: bci@basicconcepts.com
www.basicconcepts.com
Basler Electric, 12570 State
Route 143, Highland, IL 62249
Phone: 618-654 2341
Email: jakehinterser@basler.com
www.basler.com
Bauer Compressors Inc., 1328
Azalea Garden Rd., Norfolk, VA
23502
Phone: 757-855-6006
Fax: 757-857-1041
Email: sls@bauercomp.com
www.bauercomp.com
BE&K Construction Company,
LLC, 2000 International Park Dr.,
Birmingham, AL 35243
Phone: 205-972-6618
Fax: 205-972-6807
Email: bonsackr@bek.com
www.bek.com
Beamex, Inc., 2152 Northwest
Parkway, Ste. A, Marietta, GA
30067
Phone: 800-888-9892
Fax: 770-951-1928
Email: beamex.inc@beamex.com
www.beamex.com
Beaudrey A.S., 343 West Drake
Rd., Ste. 240, Fort Collins, CO
80526
Phone: 970-204-1573
Email: beaudreyas@beaudreyas.
com
www.beaudreyas.com
Bechtel, 5275 Westview Dr.,
Frederick, MD 21703
Phone: 301-228-8609
Email: powernews@bechtel.com
www.Bechtel.com
See our ad on p. 31
R
EL ECT RI C A CT UATORS
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc.,
11 Terry Dr., Newtown, PA 18940
Phone: 215-968-4600
Fax: 215-860-6383
Email: sales@haroldbeck.com
www.haroldbeck.com
Beckwith Electric Co., Inc.,
6190-118th Ave. North, Largo,
FL 33773
Phone: 727-544-2326
Fax: 727-546-0121
Email: marketing@beckwithelec-
tric.com
www.beckwithelectric.com
Bedeschi America, Inc., 3275
W. Hillsoboro Blvd., Ste. 312,
Deerfield Beach, FL 33442
Phone: 954-602-2175
Email: info@bedeschiamerica.
com
www.bedeschiamerica.com
Beetle Plastics, LLC, Ardmore
Industrial Airpark, P.O. Box 1569,
Ardmore, OK 73402
Phone: 580-389-5421
Fax: 580-389-5424
Email: sales@beeltleplastics.com
www.beetleplastics.com
Belgrave Management Ltd., Ste.
3, Poseidon Ct., Cyclops Wharf,
Docklands, London, E14 3UG, UK
Phone: +44 020 7193 8707
Fax: +44 020 8593 7690
Email: belgrave@belgraveltd.com
www.belgraveltd.com
Belt Conveyor Guarding, 3478
Penetanguishene Rd., Barrie, ON
L4M4Y8, Canada
Phone: 866-300-6668
Fax: 705-725-8835
Email: safety@conveyorguard-
ing.com
www.conveyorguarding.com
Beltran Technologies, Inc., 1133
East 35th St., Brooklyn, NY
11210
Phone: 718-338-3311
Fax: 718-253-9028
Email: beltran@earthlink.net
www.Beltrantechnologies.com
Beltservice de Mexico, Gustavo
Baz 305, Colonia La Loma,
Tlalnepantla, Edo. de MX, 54060,
Mexico
Phone: +5-5362-0434
Fax: +5-5362-0261
Email: ventasmexico@beltservice.
com
www.beltservicedemexico.com
Belyea Company Inc., 2200
Northwood Ave., Easton, PA
18045
Phone: 610-515-8775
Fax: 610-258-1230
Email: jkinney@belyeapower.com
www.belyeapower.com
Belzona Western Ltd., 10732
Maple Bend Dr. S.E., Calgary, AB
T2J1X5, Canada
Phone: 403-225-0474
Fax: 403-278-8898
Email: belzona1@telus.net
www.belzona.ca
Benetech, 2245 Sequoia Dr., Ste.
300, Aurora, IL 60506
Phone: 630-844-1300
Fax: 630-844-0064
Email: smitha@benetechusa.com
www.benetechusa.com
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December 2012
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POWER 93
COMPANY
DIRECTORY
Benjamin Company, 3575 East
Oak Lake Rd., Port Clinton, OH
43452
Phone: 419-366-0950
Fax: 419-285-2585
Email: ksb@kenben.com
www.kenben.com
Bently Pressurized Bearing Co,
1711 Orbit Way, Minden, NV
89423
Phone: 775-783-4600
Fax: 775-783-4650
Email: sales@bpb-co.com
www.bentlypressurizedbearing.com
Berthold Technologies USA, LLC,
99 Midway Ln., Oak Ridge, TN
37830
Phone: 865-483-1488
Fax: 865-425-4309
Email: Berthold-US@Berthold-
Tech.com
www.berthold-us.com
Beta Engineering, 4725 Hwy. 28
E, Pineville, LA 71360
Phone: (318) 767-5564
Email: Kevin.Smith@BetaEngi-
neering.com
www.BetaEngineering.com
Beu-Math Engineering, Inc.,
3201 W. Harrison St., Phoenix,
AZ 85009
Phone: 602-323-0436
Fax: 602-265-5431
Email: lbeugelink@beu-math.com
Beumer Kansas City LLC, 4435
Main St., Ste. 600, Kansas City,
MO 64111
Phone: 816-245-7262
Email: jackie.sessler@beumer.com
www.beumer.com
BEUMER Maschinenfabrik GmbH
& Co. KG, Oelder Str. 40, Beckum,
59269, Germany
Phone: +49 2521 24-0
Fax: +49 2521 24-280
Email: beumer@beumer.com
www.beumer.com
BHI Energy, 60 Industrial Park
Rd., Plymouth, MA 02360
Phone: 508-591-1149
Fax: 508-591-1397
Email: lauren.buckman@bhien-
ergy.com
www.bhienergy.com
See our ad on p. 21
Bianchi Industrial Services, LLC,
208 Long Branch Rd. Ste. 300,
Syracuse, NY 13209
Phone: 315-453-0001
Fax: 315-453-0033
Email: dbianchi@bianchidemo.com
www.bianchidemo.com
Bibb & Associates, 8455 Lenexa
Dr., Lenexa, KS 66214
Phone: 913-928-7234
Fax: 913-928-7734
Email: cmfeeley@bibb.com
Bibb EAC, 3131 Broadway, Kan-
sas City, Missouri 64111
Phone: 816-285-5500
Email: bobbibb@bibb-eac.com
www.bibb-eac.com
BIC Alliance, P.O. Box 1086,
Kemah, TX 77565
Phone: 281-751-9996
Fax: 281-538-9991
Email: brooke@bicalliance.com
www.bicalliance.com
BICE Engineering and Consulting,
5729 Lebanon Rd., Ste. 144 PMB
353, Frisco, TX 75034
Phone: 214-883-3675
Fax: 972-668-0563
Email: bemay@bice-eeconsult-
ing.com
www.bice-eeconsulting.com
Bierlein Companies, 2000 Bay
City Rd., Midland, MI 48642
Phone: 800-336-6626
Fax: 989-496-0144
Email: bboyle@bierlein.com
www.bierlein.com
Big Top Manufacturing, 3255 N.
US 19, Perry, FL 32347
Phone: 850-584-7786
Fax: 850-584-7713
Email: sales@bigtopshelters.com
www.bigtopshelters.com
Bigge Crane And Rigging Co.,
10700 Bigge Ave., San Leandro,
CA 94577
Phone: 510-639-4093
Fax: 510-639-4053
Email: dvalluzzi@gmail.com
www.bigge.com
Bilfinger Berger Power Services
GmbH, Duisburger Str. 375, Ober-
hausen, 46049, Germany
Phone: +49 208 4575 7740
Fax: +49 208 4575 2170
Email: andreas.goebel@bbps.
bilfinger.com
www.bbps.bilfinger.com
Binder Group Pty Ltd., 26 Miles
Rd., Kewdale, 6105, Australia
Phone: + 61 8 9353 2208
Fax: + 61 8 9353 2806
Email: leo.crohan@bindergrp.
com
www.bindergrp.com
BinMaster Level Controls, 7201
N 98th St., P.O. Box 29709
(68529), Lincoln, NE 68507
Phone: 402-434-9102
Fax: 402-434-9133
Email: info@binmaster.com
www.binmaster.com
BIOFerm Energy Systems, 617
N. Segoe Rd., Ste. 202, P.O. Box
5408, Madison, WI 53705
Phone: 608-467-5523
Fax: 608-233-7085
Email: info@biofermenergy.com
www.biofermenergy.com
BIS Both Industrial Services BV,
P.O. Box 6007, 3130 Da Vlaardin-
gen, Netherlands
Phone: +31 10 2497046
Fax: +31 10 2497047
Email: jan@bisboth.nl
www.bisboth.nl
Blac Inc., 195 Spamler Ave.,
Elmhurst, IL 60126
Phone: 630-279-6400
Fax: 630-279-1005
Email: melisa.miller@blacinc.com
Black & Veatch, 11401 Lamar
Ave., Overland Park, KS 66211
Phone: 913-458-7504
Fax: 913-458-2012
Email: jennessad@bv.com
www.bv.com
Blackline GPS, Ste. 101-1215,
13th St. SE, Calgary, Alberta T3A
3T4, Canada
Phone: 403-451-0327
Fax: 403-451-9981
www.blacklinegps.com
Blasch Precision Ceramics, 580
Broadway, Albany, NY 12204
Phone: 518-436-1263
Fax: 518-436-0098
Email: mlavicska@blaschceram-
ics.com
www.blaschceramics.com
Blome International, 1450 Hoff
Industrial Dr., OFallon, MO 63366
Phone: 636-379-9119
Fax: 636-379-0388
Email: andy@blome.com
www.blome.com
BMC P. Ltd., B-184 Okhla Indus-
trial Area, Phase-1, New Delhi,
110020, India
Phone: +91 11 26812554
Fax: +91 11 26371343
Email: jbihani@bihanigroup.com
www.bihanigroup.com
Boiler Tube Co. of America, 506
Charlotte Hwy., Post Office Box
849, Lyman, SC 29365
Phone: 864-439-4489
Fax: 864-439-8292
Email: sales@boilertubes.com
www.boilertubes.com
Boldrocchi Srl, Viale Trento e Tri-
este, 93, Biassono, 20046, Italy
Phone: 39-039-22021
www.boldrocchi.it
Boldt Construction, 2525 North
Roemer Rd., Appleton, WI 54915
Phone: 920-347-1719
Fax: 920-347-3019
Email: hveeser@exhibit-resource.
com
www.boldt.com
Bonetti Valves and Gauges, 8311
Brier Creek Pkwy., Ste. 105 - No.
257, Raleigh, NC 27617
Phone: 919-806-3880
Fax: 919-806-8774
Email: nelson@bonetti-valves.
com
www.bonetti-valves.com
BORSIG GmbH, Egellsstr. 2, Ber-
lin, WV 13507, Germany
Phone: +49 30 430101
Fax: +49 30 43012622
Email: info@borsig.de
www.borsig.de
Bowman (Birmingham) Ltd.,
Chester St., Birmingham, B6
4AP, UK
Phone: +0044-121-359 5401
Fax: +0044-121-359 7495
Email: info@ejbowman.co.uk
www.ejbowman.co.uk
Braden Mfg LLC, 5199 N Mingo
Rd., P.O. Box 1229, Tulsa, OK
74117
Phone: 918-272-5371
Fax: 918-272-7414
Email: jtrost@braden.com
www.braden.com
Brand Energy & Infrastructure
Services, 1830 Jasmine Dr., Pasa-
dena, TX 77503
Phone: 281-404-9397
Email: flatafat@aluma.com
www.beis.com
COMPANY
DIRECTORY
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December 2012 94
Brandenburg Industrial Service
Co., 501 West Lake St., Ste. 104,
Elmhurst, IL 60126
Phone: 630-956-7246
Fax: 800-849-1614
Email: salyol@brandenburg.com
www.brandenburg.com
BRAY Controls, Division of Bray
International, Inc., 13333
Westland East Blvd., Houston,
TX 77041
Phone: 281-894-5454
Fax: 281-894-0077
Email: bob.bloem@bray.com
www.bray.com
Brayman Construction, Inc., 1000
John Roebling Way, Sanxonburg,
PA 16056
Phone: 724-814-6203
Fax: 724-443-8733
Email: p_phister@brayman.com
www.brayman.com
Breen Energy Solutions, 104
Broadway Street, Carnegie, PA
15106
Phone: 412-431-4499
Email: support@BreenES.com
www.BreenES.com
See our ad on p. 72
Brown Wood Preserving Co., Inc.,
P.O. Box 30536, Pensacola, FL
32503
Phone: 850-484-7653
Fax: 850-476-9999
Email: eddiepoles@brownwood-
pensacola.com
www.brownwoodpensacola.com
BRUKS Rockwood, 5975 Shiloh
Rd. Ste. 109, Alpharetta, GA
30005
Phone: 770-849-0100
Fax: 770-495-7195
Email: kuh@bruks.com
www.bruks.com
See our ad on p. 57
BRUSH Turbogenerators, Falcon
Works, Nottingham Rd., Lough-
borough, Leicestershire, LE11
1EX, UK
Phone: +441509611511
Fax: + 441509612009
Email: salesuk@brush.eu
www.brush.eu
Buckman Laboratories Inc., Water
Technologies, 1256 N McLean
Blvd., Memphis, TN 38108
Phone: 901-272-8386
Fax: 901-276-6890
Email: agtucker@buckman.com
www.buckman.com
Buckner Companies, 4732 S.
NC Highway 54, Graham, North
Carolina 27253
Phone: 336-213-9034
Fax: 336-376-8855
Email: nickl@bucknercompanies.
com
www.bucknercompanies.com
Buell APC, 200 North Seventh
St., Ste. 2, Lebanon, PA 17046
Phone: 717-274-7110
Fax: 717-274-7342
Email: twl@fkinc.com
www.BuellAPC.com
Buffalo Pumps, 874 Oliver St.,
North Tonawanda, NY 14120
Phone: 716-693-1850
Fax: 716-693-6303
Email: tforrest@buffalopumps.com
www.buffalopumps.com
Bulldog Erectors, Inc. - Crane Di-
vision, P. O. Box 879, Newberry,
SC 29108
Phone: 910-620-1305
Fax: 803-276-6915
Email: BulldogCraneDiv@hotmail.
com
Bulwark Protective Apparel, 545
Marriott Dr. #200, Nashville, TN
37214
Phone: 615-565-5317
Fax: 615-885-2248
Email: kathryn_hutcherson@vfc.
com
www.bulwark.com
Burns & McDonnell - Energy Divi-
sion, 9400 Ward Parkway, Kansas
City, MO 64114
Phone: 816-822-3230
Fax: 816-333-3690
Email: jreid@burnsmcd.com
www.burnsmcd.com
C
C.A.M.C.O., 667 Industrial Park
Rd., Ebensburg, PA 15931
Phone: 814-472-7980
Fax: 814-472-8615
Email: j.harnish@camcoeng.com
www.camcoeng.com
C.C. Jensen, Inc. Oil Mainte-
nance, 320 Coweta Industrial
Pkwy., Ste. J, Newnan, GA 30265
Phone: 770-692-6001
Fax: 770-692-6006
Email: ccjensen@ccjensen.com
www.ccjensen.com
C.H.Robinson Worldwide, 5550
North Riverside Dr., Fort Worth,
TX 76137
Phone: 866-797-9370
Email: panirud@chrobinson.com
www.chrobinson.com
C.I.Agent Solutions, LLC, 11760
Commonwealth Dr., Louisville,
KY 40299
Phone: 502-267-0101
Fax: 502-267-0181
Email: terry@ciagent.com
www.ciagent.com
C.M.G. AND ASSOCIATES Inc.,
1757 Madison Ave., North Port,
FL 34286
Phone: 941-429-0890
Fax: 614-386-5591
Email: cmgai@earthlink.net
C.S. Osborne & Co, 125 Jersey
St., Harrison, NJ 07029
Phone: 973-483-3232
Fax: 973-484-3621
Email: cso@csosborne.com
www.csosborne.com
C.U.E., Inc., 11 Leonberg Rd.,
Cranberry Township, PA 16066
Phone: 724-772-5225
Fax: 724-772-5280
Email: andym@cue-inc.com
www.cue-inc.com
Cain Industries, Inc., W194
N11826 McCormick Dr., German-
town, WI 53022
Phone: 262-251-0051
Fax: 262-251-0118
Email: sales@cainind.com
www.cainind.com
Caldwell Energy/Caldwell Tanks,
4000 Tower Rd., Louisville, KY
40219
Phone: 502-964-3361
Fax: 502-810-0983
Email: jkraft@caldwelltanks.com
Calgon Carbon Corporation, 500
Calgon Carbon Dr., Pittsburgh,
PA 15205
Phone: 412-787-5675
Fax: 412-787-4523
Email: sheidenreich@calgoncar-
bon-us.com
www.calgoncarbon.com
Calpine Corp, 50 W San Fernando,
San Jose, CA 95113
www.calpine.com
Calvert Wire & Cable Corporation,
5091 West 164th St., Brook Park,
OH 44142
Phone: 216-433-7618
Fax: 216-433-7618
Email: jvaughan@calvert-wire.com
www.calvert-wire.com
Camarines sur Polytechnic col-
lege, peafrancia Ave. Naga City,
San Vicente, libmanan, 4407,
Philippines
Phone: 919-787-1757
Email: xylhug89@yahoo.com
Cambria Contracting, Inc., 5105
Lockport Rd., Lockport, NY 14094
Phone: 716-625-6690
Fax: 716-625-6693
Email: weichhorn@cambriacon-
tracting.com
www.cambriacontracting.com
CAMCORP, Inc., 9732 Pflumm Rd.,
Lenexa, KS 66215
Phone: 913-831-0740
Fax: 913-831-9271
Email: tracyj@camcorpinc.com
www.camcorpinc.com
Camfil Farr Power Systems, 2785
av. Francis Hughes, Laval, QC H7L
3J6, Canada
Phone: 800-976 9382
Fax: 450-629 5847
Email: gt.americas@camfilfarr.com
www.camfilfarr.com/ps/
Canadian Buffalo, 465 Laird Rd.,
Guelph, ON N1G 4W1, Canada
Phone: 519-837-1921
Fax: 519-837-2380
Email: marcel@canadianbuffalo.
com
www.canadianbuffalo.com
Canasia Power Corp., Ste. 306,
73 Simcoe St., Toronto, ON M5J
1W9, Canada
Phone: 416 363 1815
Email: canasia@istar.ca
www.canasiapower.com
Cannon Technologies, Inc., 8301
Golden Valley Rd., #300, Min-
neapolis, MN 55427
Phone: 763-595-7777
Fax: 763-595-7776
Email: info@cannontech.com
www.cannontech.com
Capstone Turbine Corporation,
21211 Nordhoff St., Chatsworth,
CA 91311
Phone: 818-734-5300
Fax: 818-734-5385
Email: marketing@capstonetur-
bine.com
www.capstoneturbine.com
Carbonxt, Inc., 4110 SW 34th St.,
Ste. 22, Gainesville, FL 32608
Phone: 727-463-1100
Fax: 561-371-9180
Email: cgross@clearcarboninno-
vations.com
www.carbonxt.com.au
Carling Technologies, 60 Johnson
Ave., Plainville, CT 06062
Phone: 860-793-9281
Email: info@carlingtech.com
www.carlingtech.com

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POWER 95
COMPANY
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CarrierClass Green Infrastructure,
400 Stenton Ave., Ste. 202,
Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462
Phone: 267-419-8496
Fax: 215-565-2746
Email: James.Innes@carrierclass-
group.com
www.ccgigogreen.com
Carzoli Engineering Sales, 1541
Ginny Ln, Woodstock, IL 60098
Phone: 815-245-0066
Fax: 815-338-4604
Email: cescarzolieng@sbcglobal.net
www.carzoli-engineering.com
Casey Industrial, Inc., 11845
Teller St., Broomfield, CO 80020
Phone: 303-460-1274
Fax: 303-465-5562
Email: tlepak@caseyind.com
www.caseyind.com
CAT PUMPS, 1681 94th Lane NE,
Minneapolis, MN 55449
Phone: 763-780-5440
Fax: 763-780-2958
Email: techsupport@catpumps.com
www.catpumps.com
Caterpillar Inc., P.O. Box 610,
N4 AC6109, Mossville, IL
61552
Phone: 800-321-7332
Fax: 309-578-2559
Email: cat_power@cat.com
www.cat-electricpower.com
CB&I, 2103 Research Forest Dr.,
The Woodlands, TX 77380
Phone: 832-513-1000
Fax: 832-513-1005
Email: info@cbi.com
www.CBI.com
CBP Engineering Corp, 185
Plumpton Ave., Washington, PA
15301
Phone: 724-229-1180
Fax: 724-229-1185
Email: Halulko@cpbengineering.com
www.cpbengineering.com
CBS ArcSafe, 2616 Sirius Rd.,
Denton, TX 76208
Phone: 940-382-4411
Fax: 940-382-9435
Email: kristin@cbsarcsafe.com
www.cbsarcsafe.com
CCC Group Inc., Air Control Sci-
ence Division, 5660 Greenwood
Plaza Blvd., Ste. 445, Greenwood
Village, CO 80111
Phone: 303-581-1070
Fax: 303-530-3208
Email: jbrowning@cccgroupinc.com
www.cccgroupinc.com
CCC Group, Inc. Engineering &
Design Div., 5660 Greenwood
Plaza Blvd., Ste. 445, Greenwood
Village, CO 80111
Phone: (303) 516-4910
Fax: (303) 530-3208
Email: jbrowning@cccgroupinc.
com
www.cccgroupinc.com
CCI (Control Component Inc.),
Severe Service Valve Solutions,
22591 Avenida Empresa, Rancho
Santa Margarita, CA 92688
Phone: 949-888-1877
Fax: 949-635-5151
Email: etodd@ccivalve.com
www.ccivalve.com
CD-adapco, 60 Broadhollow Rd.,
Melville, NY 11747
Phone: 631-549-2300
Fax: 631-549-2654
Email: info@us.cd-adapco.com
www.cd-adapco.com
CDR Systems Group, 146 South
Atlantic Ave., Ormond Beach, FL
32176
Phone: 386-615-9510
Fax: 386-615-9606
Email: sales@cdrsystems.com
www.westernpowerproducts.com
CE Power Solutions, P.O. Box 147,
Lake Hamilton, FL 33851
Phone: 863-439-2992
Fax: 863-439-2991
Email: ncampbell@cepowersol.
com
www.cepowersol.com
CEC Vibration Products Inc., 746
Arrow Grand Circle, Covina, CA
91722
Phone: 626-938-0200
Fax: 626-938-0202
Email: info@cecvp.com
www.cecvp.com
CECO Compressor Engineering
Corp, 5440 Alder Dr., Houston,
TX 77081
Phone: 713-664-7333
Fax: 713-664-6444
Email: sales@ceconet.com
www.tryceco.com
Ceilcote Products / International
Paint LLC, 640 N. Rocky River Dr.,
Berea, OH 44017
Phone: 440-234-2900
Fax: 440-234-7466
Email: larry.hess@akzonobel.com
www.ceilcotecc.com
CEMTEK Environmental, 3041
S Orange Ave., Santa Ana, CA
92707
Phone: 714-437-7100
Fax: 714-437-7177
Email: info@cemteks.com
www.cemteks.com
Centrax Limited, Shaldon Rd.,
Newton Abbot, TQ12 4SQ, UK
Phone: +44(0)1626 358 000
Fax: +44(0)1626 358 158
Email: sales@centraxgt.com
www.centraxgt.com
CERREY SA de CV, Republica
Mexicana #300 San Nicolas de
los Garza NL, , San Nicolas de los
Garza NL, 63450, Mexico
Phone: 011528183694011
Fax: 011528183694058
Email: eangulo@cerrey.com.mx
www.cerrey.com.mx
Cesare Bonetti Inc., 17, Via
Cesare Bonetti, Garbagnate Mila-
nese, I-20024, Italy
Phone: +3902 99072444
Fax: +3902 99072400
Email: expoert@bont.it
www.cesare-bonetti.it
CFM/VR-TESCO, LLC-Continental
Field Machining, 1875 Fox Lane,
Elgin, IL 60123
Phone: 800-323-1393
Fax: 847-895-7006
Email: wfinedore@globalfield.net
CGV Engineering Services Ltd.,
13 France St., Westhoughton,
Bolton, BL5 2HG, UK
Phone: +07823 322681
Fax: +01942 817285
Email: david@cgvengineeringser-
vices.co.uk
www.cgvengineeringservices.
co.uk
CH2M HILL, 303 Perimeter Center
N, Ste. 800, Atlanta, GA 30346
Phone: 770-829-6514
Fax: 770-829-6600
Email: Alan.Champagne@ch2m.
com
www.ch2m.com/power
Champion Valves, Inc., P.O. Box
12901, Wilmington, NC 28405
Phone: 910-794-5547
Fax: 910-794-5581
Email: jphillips@wafercheck.com
www.wafercheck.com
Chanute Manufacturing, 5727 S.
Lewis, Ste. 600, Tulsa, OK 74105
Phone: 918-491-9191
Email: kbrown@optimus-tulsa.net
www.chanutemfg.com
Chatham Steel Corporation, 501
W. Boundary, P.O. Box 2567
Savannah, GA 31498
Phone: 800-869-2762
Fax: 919-682-0322
Email: nuclear@chathamsteel.com
www.chathamsteel.com
See our ad on p. 17
CHEMetrics, Inc., 4295 Catlett
Rd., Calverton, VA 20138
Phone: 800-356-3072
Fax: 540-788-4856
Email: bhruska@chemetrics.com
www.chemetrics.com
Chemetron Fire Systems, 4801
Southwich Dr. 3rd Floor, Mat-
teson, IL 60442
Phone: 708-748-1503
Fax: 708-283-6500
Email: pat.brown@chemetron.com
Chesapeake Containment Sys-
tems, Inc., 352 Earls Rd., Middle
River, MD 21220
Phone: 410-335-5886
Email: rkamp@ccsliners.com
www.ccsliners.com
Chesapeake Soda Clean, Inc., 212
Najoles Rd., Bldg. D, Millersville,
MD 21108
Phone: 410-271-2652
Email: chessieclean@comcast.net
www.chesapeakesodaclean.com
Chromalloy, 3999 RCA Blvd., Palm
Beach Gardens, FL 33410
Phone: 561-935-3571
Email: andrew_farrant@sequa.com
www.chromalloy.com
Chromalox, Inc., 103 Gamma Dr.,
Pittsburgh, PA 15238
Phone: 484-369-8526
Fax: 484-369-8526
Email: david.taylor@chromalox.
com
www.chromalox.com
Chromium Corporation, 14911
Quorum Dr., Ste. 600, Dallas, TX
75254
Phone: 972-851-0487
Fax: 972-851-0461
Email: mike.taylor@chromcorp.
com
www.chromcorp.com
COMPANY
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December 2012 96
CIANBRO, 101 Cianbro Square,
P.O. Box 1000, Pittsfield, ME
04967
Phone: 207-487-3311
Email: info@cianbro.com
www.cianbro.com
CiDRA Power Generation, 50
Barnes Park North, Wallingford,
CT 06492
Phone: 203-626-3461
Fax: 203-265-7861
Email: ldefrancesco@cidra.com
www.cidra.com
CITEL SURGE PROTECTION, 1515
NW 167TH St., Ste. No 6-303,
Miami, FL 33169
Phone: 305-621-0022
Fax: 305-621-0766
Email: citel@citelprotection.com
www.citelprotection.com
Clark-Reliance Corporation,
16633 Foltz Industrial Parkway,
Strongsville, OH 44136
Phone: 440-846-7655
Fax: 440-238-8828
Email: jkolbus@clark-reliance.com
www.clark-reliance.com
CLC Lodging, 8111 E. 32nd St.
North Ste. 300, Wichita, KS
67226
Phone: 316-771-7097
Fax: 316-771-7897
Email: hwright@corplodging.com
www.corplodging.com
Clean Harbors, 42 Longwater Dr.,
Norwell, MA 02061
Phone: 781-792-5000
Fax: 337-526-3827
Email: tummings.monika@clean-
harbors.com
www.cleanharbors.com
Clear Lake Filtration, 400 Hobbs
Rd. #102, League City, TX 77573
Phone: 281-534-9112
Fax: 281-534-9269
Email: dlewis@clearlakefiltration.
com
www.clearlakefiltration.com
ClearSpan Fabric Structures, 1395
John Fitch Blvd., South Windsor,
CT 06074
Phone: 866-643-1010
Fax: 860-760-0210
Email: nkemp@clearspan.com
www.clearspan.com

ClearView Monitoring Solutions,
19 Hartum St., Har Hotzvim
Science Park, Jerusalem, 91450,
Israel
Phone: +972 2 5400920
Fax: +972 2 5400044
Email: sales@clearviewmonitor-
ing.com
www.clearviewmonitoring.com
Cleaver-Brooks, 11950 W Lake
Park Dr., Milwaukee, WI 53224
Phone: 414-359-0600
Fax: 414-359-3159
Email: info@cleaver-brooks.com
www.cleaver-brooks.com
See our ad on p. 39
Clyde Bergemann Bachmann, 416
Lewiston Junction Rd., P.O. Box
2150, Auburn, ME 04211
Phone: 207-784-1903
Fax: 207-784-1904
Email: cbauburn@us.cbpg.com
www.cbbachmann.com
Clyde Bergemann Power Group,
4015 Presidential Pkwy., Atlanta,
GA 30340
Phone: 770-557-3600
Fax: 770-557-3641
Email: info@us.cbpg.com
www.cbpg.com
CMP Coatings, Inc., 1610 Engi-
neers Rd., Belle Chasse, LA 70037
Phone: 504-392-4817
Email: sales@cmpusa.com
www.cmp.co.jp
Coal People Magazine, 629
Virginia St. West, P.O. Box 6247,
Charleston, WV 25362
Phone: 304-342-4129
Fax: 304-343-3124
Email: cpmcirc@ntelos.net
www.coalpeople.com
Coal Recovery Investments Ltd.,
8 Willowbrook, Llandogo Rd., St
Mellons, CF3 0EF, UK
Phone: +442920190222
Fax: +442920797761
Email: smerald@aol.com
www.gwarexpolska.pl
CoaLogix/SCR-Tech, 11701 Mt.
Holly Rd., Charlotte, NC 28214
Phone: 704-812-4206
Fax: 704-827-8935
Email: rs@coalogix.com
www.coalogix.com
Coen Company, Inc., 951 Mari-
ners Island Blvd., Ste. 410, San
Mateo, CA 94404
Phone: 650-522-2100
Fax: 650-522-2147
www.coen.com
Coffman Electrical Equipment
Company, 3300 Jefferson Ave. SE,
Grand Rapids, MI 49548
Phone: 616-452-8708
Fax: 616-452-1337
Email: rcoffman@steadypower.
com
www.steadypower.com
Cogen Power Inc., 36929 Mead-
owdale Dr., Solon, OH 44139
Phone: 440-498-1676
Fax: 440-498-1676
Email: jainsk@cogenpowerinc.
com
Colmac Coil Manufacturing, Inc.,
P.O. Box 571, Colville, WA 99114
Phone: 509-684-2595
Fax: 509-684-8331
Email: mail@colmaccoil.com
www.colmaccoil.com
Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc.,
10425 N. Bloss Ave., Portland,
OR 97203
Phone: 503-286-0685
Fax: 503-286-1743
Email: service@columbiasteel.com
www.columbiasteel.com
Columbian TecTank Inc., 9701
Renner Blvd., Ste. 150, Lenexa,
KS 66219
Phone: 316-421-0200
Fax: 316-421-9122
Email: sales@columbiantectank.
com
www.columbiantectank.com
Columbus McKinnon, 140 John
James Audubon, Amherst, NY
14228
Phone: 716-689-5678
Email: sales@cmworks.com
www.cmindustrial.com
Commerce Lanes, Inc., 806 Rosa
St., Celebration, FL 34747
Phone: 321-939-2961
Fax: 321-939-1151
Email: business@commercelanes.
com
Commodities Consulting &
Asset Management COMCAM,
Eigenhaardstraat 10, Middelburg,
43331HS, Netherlands
Phone: +49937531495000
Fax: +49937531495009
Email: backoffice@com-cam.com
www.com-cam.com
Commonwealth Dynamics, Inc.,
95 Court St., Portsmouth, NH
03801
Phone: 603-433-6060
Fax: 603-436-0944
Email: clcastanino@comdynam.
com
www.comdynam.com
Compact Automation Products
LLC, 105 Commerce Way, West-
minser, SC 29687
Phone: 864-647-9521
Fax: 864-647-9574
Email: marketing@compactauto-
mation.com
www.compactautomation.com
Company Wrench, 4805 Scooby
Lane, Carroll, OH 43112
Phone: 740-654-5304
Fax: 740-867-9130
www.companywrench.com
Computer Power Supply, 7313 SW
Tech Center Dr., Tigard, OR 97223
Phone: 503 684 8026
Email: caleb@cpshv.com
www.cpshv.com
ComRent International, LLC, 7640
Investment Court, Unit A, Ow-
ings, MD 20736
Phone: 410-257-3000
Fax: 410-257-2240
Email: info@comrent.com
www.comrent.com
Concepts NREC, 217 Billings Farm
Rd., White River Junction, VT
05001
Phone: 802-296-2321
Fax: 802-296-2325
Email: njain@conceptsnrec.com
www.conceptsnrec.com/Corpo-
rate/Contact-us.aspx
Conco Systems Inc., 530 Jones
St., Verona, PA 15147
Phone: 412-828-1166
Fax: 412-826-8255
Email: info@concosystems.com
www.concosystems.com
Condenser & Chiller Services,
Inc., 13488 Fifth St., Chino, CA
91710
Phone: 800- 356-1932
Fax: 909- 590-3446
Email: chiller@cyberg8t.com
www.ccs-tubes.com
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POWER 97
COMPANY
DIRECTORY
Conforma Clad Inc., 501 Park E
Blvd., New Albany, IN 47150
Phone: 812-948-2118
Fax: 812-944-3254
Email: info@conformaclad.com
www.conformaclad.com
Conomos Industrial Services,
Coulter & Station St. S, Brid-
geville, PA 15017
Phone: 412-221-1800
Fax: 412-221-4641
Email: ckucherawy@conomos.com
Conspec Controls, 6 Guttman
Blvd., Charleroi, PA 15022
Phone: 724-489-8450
Fax: 724-478-9772
Email: jeff.callihan@conspec-
controls.com
www.conspec-controls.com
Construction Business Associates,
LLC, 2310 Seven Lakes South,
West End, NC 27376
Phone: 910-400-3113
Email: PGHessler@ConstrBiz.com
www.ConstrBiz.com
Construction Techniques, Inc.,
15887 Snow Rd., Ste. 100, Cleve-
land, OH 44142
Phone: 216-267-7310
Fax: 216-267-9310
Email: bjakers@fabriform1.com
www.fabriform1.com
Contec Systems, 1566 Medical
Dr., Ste. 310, Pottstown, PA
19464
Phone: 610-326-3235 x21
Fax: 610-326-3238
Email: coreyh@contecsystems.com
www.contecsystems.com
Continental Control Systems,
3131 Indian Rd., Boulder, CO
80301
Phone: 303-444-7422
Fax: 303-444-2903
Email: sales@ccontrolsys.com
www.ccontrolsys.com
Control Plus Inc., 257 N. West
Ave., c/o Micronics Ultrasonic
Flow, Elmhurst, IL 60126
Phone: 888-274-8803
Fax: 630-279-9026
Email: bob@controlplusinc.com
www.micronicsflowmeters.com
Conval, Inc., 265 Field Rd.,
Somers, CT 06071
Phone: 860-763-3551
Fax: 860-763-3557
Email: sales@conval.com
www.Conval.com
CONVAULT Inc., 4109 E. Zeering
Rd., Denair, CA 95316
Phone: 209-632-7571
Fax: 209-632-4711
Email: info@convault.com
www.convault.com
Conveyor Services/Classic Con-
veyor Components, 120 Airport
Rd., Blairsville, PA 15717
Phone: 724-459-5261
Fax: 724-459-5605
Email: r_vachal@classicconveyor.
com
www.classicconveyor.com
Cooling Technology Institute
(CTI), 2611 FM 1960 West Rd.
#A-101, Houston, TX 77068
Phone: 713-643-0691
Fax: 713-643-0310
Email: ffoster@towerperfor-
mance.com
www.towerperformance.com
Cooling Tower Consulting, LLC,
541 Bauer Rd., Bath, PA 18014
Phone: 610-737-2778
Fax: 610-500-5082
Email: coolingtowers@verizon.net
www.coolingtowerconsultingllc.
com
Cooling Tower Depot Inc., 651
Corporate Circle, Ste. 206,
Golden, CO 80401
Phone: 720-746-1234
Fax: 720-746-1110
Email: cfuller@ctdinc.com
www.coolingtowerdepot.com
Cooling Tower Technologies Inc.,
52410 Clark Rd., White Castle,
LA 70788
Phone: (225) 545-4144
Fax: (225) 545-4151
Email: kcampesi@cemail.cc
www.crownenterprises.com
Cooper Power Systems, 505 Hwy.
169 North, Ste. 1200, Minneapo-
lis, MN 55441
Phone: 763-595-7777
Fax: 763-543-7777
Email: jlayer@cannontech.com
www.cannontech.com
Copes-Vulcan, An SPX Brand,
5602 West Rd., McKean, PA
16426
Phone: 814-476-5800
Fax: 814-476-5834
Email: cv@spx.com
www.copesvulcan.com
CORIMPEX USA, Inc., 501 Main
St., Ste. 208, Klamath Falls, OR
97601
Phone: 541-273-3030
Email: corimpex@qwest.net
www.corimpex@qwest.net
Coritech Services, 4716 Delemere,
Royal Oak, MI 48073
Phone: 248-563-7280
Email: rhance@coritech.com
www.coritech.com
Cormetech, Inc., 5000 Interna-
tional Dr., Durham, NC 27712
Phone: 919-595-8721
Fax: 919-595-8701
Email: wensellg@cormetech.com
Cornerstone Material Handling
Inc., 258 Prospect St., St.
George, ON N0E 1N0, Canada
Phone: 519-448-3344
Fax: 519-448-4514
Email: brian@cornerstonemateri-
alhandling.com
www.cornerstonematerialhan-
dling.com
Corrosion Control Inc., 494 Fair-
play St., Rutledge, GA 30663
Phone: 706-557-9624
Fax: 706-557-7923
Email: debbie@corrosioncontro-
linc.com
Corrosion Engineering, P.O. Box
5670, Mesa, AZ 85211
Phone: 480 890-0203
Fax: 480 890-0589
Email: sales@corroeng.com
www.corroeng.com
Corrosion Monitoring Services, 902
Equity Dr., West Chicago, IL 60174
Phone: 630-762-9300
Fax: 630-762-9301
Email: info@cmsinc.us
www.cmsinc.us
Corrosion Service Company
Europe Ltd., 59-60 Thames St.,
Windsor, SL4 1TX, UK
Phone: +44 (0) 1753 272119
Fax: +44 (0) 1753 272120
Email: sales@corrosionservice.co.uk
www.corrosionservice.co.uk
Corrpro Companies, Inc., 1055
West Smith Rd., Medina, OH 44256
Phone: 330-723-5082
Fax: 330-722-7606
Email: jlary@corrpro.com
www.corrpro.com
Cortec Corporation, 4119 White
Bear Parkway, St. Paul, MN 55110
Phone: 651-429-1100
Fax: 651-429-1122
Email: productinfo@cortecvci.
com
www.cortecvci.com
Cosa Instrument Corp, Process
Control Div, 84G Horseblock Rd.,
Yaphank, NY 11980
Phone: 631-345-3434
Email: cosa@cosaic.com
www.cosa-instrument.com
COSS, Certified Occupational
Safety Specialist, 8180 Siegen
Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70810
Phone: 225-766-0955
Fax: 225-766-1099
Email: bgordon@safetylca.org
CPV Manufacturing, 851 Preston
St., Philadelphia, PA 19104
Phone: 215-386-6508
Fax: 215-387-9043
Email: sales@cpvmfg.com
www.cpvmfg.com
CRC Engineering, P.C., 1261
Broadway, Ste. 608, New York,
NY 10001
Phone: 212-889-1233
Fax: 212-889-1211
Email: cnystrom@crc-eng.com
www.crc-eng.com
Croll-Reynolds Engineering Com-
pany Inc., 2400 Reservoir Ave.,
Trumbull, CT 06611
Phone: 203-371-1983
Fax: 203-371-0615
Email: creco@att.net
www.croll-reynoldsengineering.com
Crowcon Detection Instruments,
21 Kenton Lands Rd., Erlanger,
KY 41018
Phone: 800-527-6926
Fax: 859-957-1044
Email: robin.bidwell@crowcon.com
www.crowcon.com
Cryogenic Institute of New
England, Inc., 78 Chilmark St.,
Worcester, MA 01604
Phone: 800-739-7949
Fax: 508-459-7426
Email: rtaylor@nitrofreeze.com
www.nitrofreeze.com
CTI Industries, Inc., 283 Indian
River Rd., Orange, CT 06477
Phone: 203-795-0070
Fax: 203-795-7061
Email: kshugrue@cti-ind.com
COMPANY
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December 2012 98
CTI Power/Chicago Tube & Iron
Company, 421 Browns Hill Rd.,
P.O. Box 670, Oakboro, NC 28129
Phone: 704-781-2060
Fax: 704-781-2099
Email: pnance@chicagotube.com
www.cti-power.com
CU Services LLC, 725 Parkview,
Elk Grove, IL 60007
Phone: 847-439-2303
Fax: 847-439-3006
Email: rcronfel@cuservices.net
www.cuservices.net
Curran International, 4610 Vicks-
burg Lane, Dickinson, TX 77539
Phone: 281-339-9993
Fax: 281-339-9994
Email: edeely@curranintl.com
www.curranintl.com
Custom Expansion Joints, Inc.,
313 N. Stewart Rd., Liberty, MO
64068
Phone: 816-781-3507
Fax: 816-781-3520
Email: sales@cej.com
www.cej.com
CYME International T&D, 67 S
Bedford St., Ste. 201 East, Burl-
ington, MA 01803
Phone: 781-229-0269
Fax: 781-229-2336
Email: info@cyme.com
www.cyme.com
D
DAEYOUNG C & E CO., Ltd.,
GA-1-5, Gangneung Science &
Industrial Complex, Gangneung,
Gangwon, 210 340, South Korea
Phone: 82-33-650-9000
Fax: 82-33-644-4744
Email: daeyoungcne@gmail.com
www.cnedrc.com
Daniels Manufacturing Corp, 526
Thorpe Rd., Orlando, FL 32824
Phone: 407-855-6161
Email: dmc@dmctools.com
www.dmctools.com
Data Systems & Solutions LLC,
12100 Sunset Hills Rd., Ste. 310,
Reston, VA 20190
Phone: 703-889-1300
Fax: 703-889-1359
Email: info@ds-s.com
www.ds-s.com
Day & Zimmermann ECM, 1827
Freedom Road Suite 101, Lan-
caster, PA 17601
Phone: 215-299-4924
Email: david.bronczyk@dayzim.
com
www.dayzim.com
DCM Clean-Air Products, Inc.,
9605 Camp Bowie West Blvd.,
Fort Worth, TX 76116
Phone: 817-696-0044
Fax: 817-451-0615
Email: gale@dcmcleanair.com
DEFITEC (FILTRATION), Rue
Michel Verbeck, 16, Waterloo,
01410, Belgium
Phone: +32-2-354 06 10
Fax: +32-2-353 03 77
Email: bd@defitec.com
www.defitec.com
Dekker Vacuum Technologies,
Inc., 935 S. Woodland Ave.,
Michigan City, IN 46360
Phone: 219-861-0661
Email: sales@dekkervacuum.com
www.dekkervacuum.com
Delta Instrument LLC, 148 Veter-
ans Dr., Northvale, NJ 07647
Phone: 201-768-7200
Fax: 201-768-5020
Email: info@DeltaInstrument.com
www.DeltaInstrument.com
Delta Mechcons India Ltd., 3rd
Floor, Arcadian Building No. 12,
North Main Rd., Koregaon Park,
Pune, 411 001,India
Phone: +020 66077999 970 933
Email: vinit.barai@delta-india.
com
www.delta-india.net
Delta Power Services, 363 North
Sam Houston Pkwy. E., #630,
Houston, TX 77060
Phone: 281-405-6853
Fax: 281-405-6862
Email: dhammer@deltapowerser-
vices.com
www.deltapowerservices.com
Delta Unibus Division, 515 Rail-
road Ave., Northlake, IL 60164
Phone: 708-409-1200
Fax: 708-409-1211
Email: info@deltaunibus.com
www.deltaunibus.com
Delta/Unibus, Div. of Powell
Electrical Systems, 515 Railroad
Ave., Northlake, IL 60164
Phone: 708-409-1200
Fax: 708-409-1211
Email: toyya.garner@deltauni-
bus.com
www.deltaunibus.com
Design Analysis Services, 857
Bonnie Brae Lane, Bolingbrook,
IL 60440
Phone: 630-783-0384
Email: john@design-analysis.com
www.design-analysis.com
Detroit Stoker Company
Our Opportunities Are Always Growing
Detroit Stoker Company, 1510
East First St., Monroe, MI
48161
Phone: 734-241-9500
Fax: 734-241-7126
Email: sales@detroitstoker.com
www.detroitstoker.com
See our ad on p. 52
Dexter Innovative Solutions LLC,
61 East River St., Orange, MA
01364
Phone: 978-544-2751
Fax: 978 -544-8357
Email: dave@dexter-is.com
www.dexter-is.com
DFT Inc., P.O. Box 566, 140
Sheree Blvd., Exton, PA 19341
Phone: 610-363-8903
Email: jkane@dft-valves.com
www.dft-valves.com
DGH Corporation, P.O. Box 5638,
Manchester, NH 03108
Phone: 603-622-0452
Fax: 603-622-0487
Email: sales@dghcorp.com
www.dghcorp.com
Diamond Power International
Inc., 2600 E. Main St., Lancaster,
OH 43130
Phone: 800-848-5086
Fax: 740-687-4229
Email: dpi_marketing@diamond-
power.com
www.diamondpower.com
Diamond Technical Services, 9152
Route 22, Blairsville, PA 15717
Phone: 724-668-5070
Fax: 724-668-5071
www.diamondtechnicalservices.com
Diesel & Gas Turbine Worldwide,
20855 Watertown Rd., Waukesha,
WI 53186
Phone: 262-754-4100
Fax: 262-754-4175
Email: kkane@dieselpub.com
www.dieselgasturbine.com
DIS-TRAN Packaged Substations,
4725 Hwy. 28 E, Pineville, LA
71360
Phone: 318-448-0274
Fax: 318-445-7240
Email: lisa.deville@distran.com
www.distran.com
DMC Power, 2846 Saddlebrook
Way, Marietta, GA 30064
Phone: 404-617-8794
Email: dschrampfer@dmcpower.com
www.dmcpower.com
Doble Engineering Company, 85
Walnut St., Watertown, MA 02472
Phone: 617-926-4900
Fax: 617-926-0528
Email: dobleINFO@doble.com
www.doble.com
Dollinger Filtration, an SPX
Brand, 4647 SW 40th Ave., Ocala,
FL 34474
Phone: 800-344-2611
Fax: 352-873-5773
Email: dollinger.sales@dehydra-
tion.spx.com
www.dollinger-spx.com
Dongfang Electric Corp / DSI,
4030 Moorpark Ave., Ste. 216,
San Jose, CA 95117
Phone: 408-850-1416
Fax: 408-519-7091
Email: sales@dongfang-usa.com
www.dongfang-usa.com
Doosan Engineering & Services,
LLC ( A Burns & Roe - Doosan
Projects Alliance), 5 Paragon Dr.,
Montvale, NJ 07645
Phone: 201-986-4252
Fax: 201-986-4869
Email: meyna.park@doosan.com
www.doosanheavy.com
Dow Electrical & Telecommunica-
tions, Houston Dow Center, 1254
Enclave Parkway, Houston, TX
77077
Phone: 1-800-441-4DOW
www.dowinside.com
DragonWear, P.O. Box 28789,
Seattle, WA 98118
Phone: 800-873-5725
Fax: 206-723-1890
Email: info@truenorthgear.com
www.truenorthgear.com
DREHMO GmbH, Industrie Str. 1,
Wenden, 57482, Germany
Phone: +49 2762 612-311
Fax: +49 2762 612-359
Email: karl.natterer@drehmo.com
www.drehmo.com
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POWER 99
COMPANY
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Drennen Engineering, Inc., P.O.
Box 937, Windsor, CT 06095
Phone: 860-219-2502
Email: jdrennen@asherosion.com
www.asherosion.com
Dresser-Rand, COPPUS Portable
Ventilators, 299 Lincoln St.,
Worcester, MA 01605
Phone: 508-595-1700
Fax: 508-595-1780
Email: pvdinfo@dresser-rand.com
www.dresser-rand.com/products/
coppus/
Dubai Electricity and Water
Authority, P.O.Box 564, Dubai,
UAE, Dubai, 00564, United Arab
Emirates
Phone: +97143072462
Fax: +97143248111
Email: dawood.jawahar@dewa.
gov.ae
www.dewa.gov.ae
Ducon Technologies Inc., MIP
Div, 19 Engineers Ln., Farming-
dale, NY 11735
Phone: 631-694-1700
Fax: 631-420-4985
Email: michelleg@ducon.com
www.mip.ducon.com
Dueco Inc., Corporate Headquar-
ters, N4 W22610 Bluemound Rd.,
Waukesha, WI 53186
Phone: 262-547-8500
Fax: 262-547-8407
Email: info@dueco.com
www.dueco.com
DURAG GROUP, Kollaustr. 105,
Hamburg, 22453, Germany
Phone: +49 40 554218-0
Fax: + 49 584154
Email: info@durag.de
www.durag.de
Dura-Line Corporation, 11400
Parkside Dr., Ste. 300, Knoxville,
TN 37934
Phone: 865-406-7883
Email: tanya_kanczuzewski@
yahoo.com
www.duraline.com
DuraSystems Barriers, Inc., 199
Courtland Ave., Vaughan, ON L4K
4T2, Canada
Phone: 866-338-0988
Fax: 905-660-8887
Email: durasystems@durasys-
tems.com
www.durasystems.com
Duromar Inc., 706 Washington
St., Pembroke, MA 02359
Phone: 781-826-2525
Fax: 781-826-2150
Email: daniel.toft@duromar.com
www.duromar.com
Dustex Corporation, 100 Chastain
Ctr Blvd., Ste. 195, Kennesaw,
GA 30144
Phone: 770-429-5575
Fax: 770-429-5556
Email: rtdavies@dustex.com
www.dustex.com
DustMASTER Enviro Systems, 190
Simmons Ave., Pewaukee, WI
53072
Phone: 262-691-3100
Fax: 262-691-3184
Email: lmh@mixersystems.com
www.dustmaster.com
DYLANGroup, Hermanus
Boerhaavestrraat 1, P.O.Box
1208, 3260 AE, Oud-Beijerland,
Netherlands
Phone: +31 (0)186 - 64 15 55
Fax: +31 (0)186 - 61 21 57
www.dylangroup.com
Dynamic Systems Inc., 15331 NE
90Th St., Redmond, WA 98052
Phone: 425-216-1204
Fax: 425-861-3976
Email: info@click2barcode.com
www.click2barcode.com
E
E / SYSTEMS, Mack Pl., - 566, St.
Clair Sh., MI 48080
Phone: 313-882-1133
Email: intellife@hotmail.com
www.ENXEX.com
E Instruments International,
402 Middletown Blvd., Ste. 216,
Langhorne, PA 19047
Phone: 215-750-1212
Email: kkohler@e-inst.com
www.e-inst.com/
E.A.R., Inc., P.O. Box 18888,
Boulder, CO 80308
Phone: 303-447-2619
Fax: 303-447-2637
Email: info@earinc.com
www.earinc.com
E.D.I, Inc., 3415 Belmont Ter-
race, Davie, Florida, FL 33328
Phone: 954-577-2225
Fax: 954-577-2227
Email: ediequipment@me.com
www.ediequipment.com
E.H. Wachs, 600 Knightsbridge
Pkwy., Lincolnshire, IL 60069,
Phone: 847-537-8800
Fax: 847-520-1147
Email: sales@ehwachs.com
www.ehwachs.com
Eagle Eye Power Solutions, 4230
N. Oakland Ave., #176, Milwau-
kee, WI 53211
Phone: 414-962-3377
Fax: 414-962-3660
Email: kayleighd@eepowersolu-
tions.com
www.eepowersolutions.com
Eagle Technology Inc., 10500 N
Port Washington Rd., Mequon,
WI 53092
Phone: 262-241-3845
Fax: 262-241-5248
Email: sales@eaglecmms.com
www.eaglecmms.com
earth energy Solutions GROUP,
4230 Cardinal Blvd., Ponce Inlet,
FL 32127
Phone: 877-349-4820
Fax: 727-290-4048
Email: Research@EarthEnergy-
Group.com
www.EarthEnergyGroup.com
Eastern Industrial Scaffold
Services, 8221 Main St., Laurel,
MD 20724
Phone: 301-362-8804
Fax: 301-362-8805
Email: ehoffman@easternindus-
trialscaffold.com
www.easternindustrialscaffold.com
Eaton Corporation, 1000 Cher-
rington Parkway, Moon Township,
PA 15108
Phone: 412-893-3300
Fax: 908-351-7706
Email: alanecolorito@eaton.com
www.eaton.com
EchoMail Inc., 701, Concord Ave.,
Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 617-354-8585
Fax: 617-354-8899
Email: jessica.hanson@echomail.
com
www.echomail.com
EcoSys, 800 Westchester Ave.,
Ste. 710, Rye Brook, NY 10573
Phone: 914- 304-5000
Fax: 914-464-7320
Email: into@ecossys.net
www.ecosys.net
ECT Inc., 401 E Fourth St., Bldg
20, Bridgeport, PA 19405
Phone: 610-239-5120
Fax: 610-239-7863
Email: sales@ectinc.net
www.ectinc.net
Ecutel Systems, 2300 Corporate
Park Dr., Ste. 410, Herndon, VA
20171
Phone: 571-203-8300
Fax: 571-203-8310
Email: info@ecutel.com
www.ecutel.com
EdgenMurray, 18444 Highland
Rd., Baton Rouge, LA 70808
Phone: 225-756-7886
Fax: 225-756-8995
Email: info@edgenmurray.com
www.edgenmurray.com
Edwards Industrial Equipment
Corp, 49 14th Ave. SW, St. Paul,
MN 55112
Phone: 651-330-1738
Fax: 651-846-4597
Email: powerplants@mac.com
www.edwardsindustrialequip-
ment.com
Edwards Vacuum Inc., Highwood
Office Park, One Highwood Dr.,
Ste. 101, Tewksbury, MA 01876
Phone: 800-848-9800
Fax: 866-484-5218
Email: info@edwardsvacuum.cm
www.edwardsvacuum.com
EHC Field Services, Inc., P.O. Box
43, Cedartown, GA 30125
Phone: 866-308-6299
Fax: 678-246-0470
Email: sales@ehcfieldservices.com
www.turbine-flushing-equipment.
com
EITI - Electrical Industry Training
Institute USA Inc., 1465 Slater
Rd., P.O. Box 5007, Ferndale, WA
98248
Phone: 877-859-8228
Fax: 877-284-7916
Email: info@eiti.us
www.eiti.us
EK Ekcessories, 575 West 3200
South, Logan, UT 84321
Phone: 435-753-8448
Fax: 435-753-2411
Email: ek@ekusa.com
www.ekusa.com
Elecsys Corp., 846 N. Martway
Ct., Olathe, KS 66062
Phone: 913-982-5672
Email: sales@elecsysscada.com
www.elecsyscorp.com/scada/
director.html
ElectraTherm, 4750 Turbo Circle,
Reno, NV 89502
Phone: 775-398-4680
Fax: 775-398-4674
Email: cdodge@electratherm.com
www.electratherm.com
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ElectraWave Inc., 1522 Yale Ave.,
Stockton, CA 95203
Phone: 209-467-4779
Email: info@electrawavesv.com
www.electrawavesv.com
Electric Power Systems, 2495
Blvd. of the Generals, Norristown,
PA 19403
Phone: 610-630-0286
Fax: 610-539-1936
www.eps-international.com
Electro Industries/GaugeTech,
1800 Shames Dr., Westbury, NY
11590
Phone: 516-334-0870
Fax: 516-338-4741
Email: ndeibler@electroind.com
www.electroind.com
Electrochemical Devices, Inc.,
P.O. Box 31, Albion, RI 02802
Phone: 617-484-9085
Fax: 617-484-3923
Email: info@edi-cp.com
www.edi-cp.com
Electroputere S.A., DIEC, P.O. Box
231085, New York, NY 10023
Phone: 212-629-6501
Fax: 212-629-6502
Email: dieccorp@aol.com
Eliminator Slurry Pumps, 4432
Venture Ave., Duluth, MN 55811
Phone: 218-722-9904
Fax: 218-722-2826
Email: info@gpmco.com
www.eliminatorpumps.com
Ellison Consultants, 4966 Tall
Oaks Dr., Monrovia, MD 21770
Phone: 301-865-5302
Fax: 301-865-5591
Email: ellisoncon@aol.com
www.ellisoncon.com
Ellison Surface Technologies,
8093 Columbia Rd., Ste. 201,
Mason, OH 45040
Phone: 513-770-4900
Fax: 513-770-4980
Email: edolby@ellisonsurfac-
etech.com
www.ellisonsurfacetech.com
Elma Systems Division, 760
Veterans Circle, Warminster, PA
18974
Phone: 800-445-6194
Fax: 215-956-1201
Email: Valerie.andrew@elma.com
www.elma.com
Elos Fixturlaser AB, Box 7,
Mlndal, SE-431 21, Sweden
Phone: +46 31 706 28 00
Fax: +46 31 706 28 50
Email: info@fixturlaser.se
www.fixturlaser.com
Elsys Instruments, 234 Cromwell
Hill Rd., Monroe, NY 10950
Phone: 845-238-3933
Fax: 845-782-6045
Email: Klaas.Vogel@elsys-instru-
ments.com
www.elsys-instruments.com
Emerson Process Management,
Fisher, 301 S 1st Ave., Marshall-
town, IA 50158
Phone: 641-754-3011
Email: fc-valve@emerson.com
www.fisher.com
Emerson Process Management,
Power & Water Solutions, 200
Beta Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15238
Phone: 412-963-4000
Fax: 412-963-3644
Email: powerwater@emersonpro-
cess.com
www.emersonprocess-powerwater.
com
Emerson Process Management,
Rosemount Analytical, 6565-P
Davis Industrial Pkwy., Solon, OH
44139
Phone: 440-914-1261
Fax: 440-914-1262
Email: Gas.csc@emersonprocess.
com
www.raihome.com
Emerson Process Management,
Rosemount Div, 8200 Market
Blvd., Chanhassen, MN 55438
Phone: 952-906-8888
Fax: 952-949-7001
Email: Rosemount.info@emer-
sonprocess.com
www.rosemount.com
eMpasys, 309 Fellowship Rd., Mt
Lurel, NJ 08504
Phone: 856-412-8056
Fax: 814-619-7880
Email: rob@empasys.net
www.empasys.net
EMS Industrial and Service,
10800 North Main St., Richmond,
IL 60071
Phone: 815-678-2700
Fax: 815-678-3094
Email: jonathan@ems-industrial.
com
www.ems-industrial.com
Emtrade Intrnational Ltd, Unit
3 Ram Blvd., Foxhills Industrial
Estate, Scunthorpe, Lincolnshire,
DN15 8QW, UK
Phone: +44(0)1724851001
Fax: +44(0)1724851002
Email: alan.mosley@emtrade.co.uk
www.emtrade.co.uk
Encore Dredging, Inc., P.O. Box
3069, Clarksville, IN 47131
Phone: 941-876-0559
Fax: 941-876-0560
Email: info@dredgingcompany.com
www.dredgingcompany.com
Endeavour Technologies, 24th
Block, Flat Ni:406, Rain-Tree Park
(Malaysian Township), KPHB Colony,
Hyderabad, A.P 500072, India
Phone: +91 905200 2808
Fax: +91 0404261 7274
Email: kishore@endeavourtech-
nologies.co.in
www.endeavourtechnologies.co.in
Enerac, Inc., 67 Bond St., West-
bury, NY 11590
Phone: 516-997-2100
Fax: 516-997-2129
Email: sales@enerac.com
www.enerac.com
Enercon Engineering Inc., No
1 Altorfer Ln., East Peoria, IL
61611
Phone: 309-694-1418
Fax: 309-694-3703
www.enercon-eng.com
Enerfin, Inc., 5125 J.A. Bombar-
dier, St Hubert, Quebec J3Z 1G4,
Canada
Phone: 800-724-2919
Fax: 450-443-0711
Email: bmajeau@enerfin-inc.com
www.enerfin-inc.com
Energy and Process Corp, 2146- B
Flintstone Dr., Tucker, GA 30085
Phone: 770-934-3101
Fax: 770-938-8903
Email: blake.richardson@energ-
yandprocess.com
www.energyandprocess.com
Energy Associates, P.C., Montville
Office Park, 150 River Rd., Ste.
J4, Montville, NJ 07045
Phone: 973-331-8100
Email: HR@Energy-PC.com
www.Energy-PC.com
Energy Concepts Company, 627
Ridgely Ave., Annapolis, MD 21401
Phone: 410-266-6521
Fax: 410-266-6539
Email: enerconcep@aol.com
www.energy-concepts.com
Energy Equipments & Products
Company, No.9/203, RUBIN,
Premjyot Complex, Ghatkopar -
Mankhurd Link Rd., Near Indian Oil
Nagar, Mumbai, MA 400 043, India
Phone: +919820063635
Fax: +912225563635
Email: energy.epco@yahoo.com
www.energy.epco.com
Energy Products of Idaho, 3568
W. Industrial Loop, Coeur d
Alene, ID 83815
Phone: 208-765-1611
Fax: 208-765-0503
Email: epi2@energyproducts.com
www.energyproducts.com
Energy Providers Coalition for
Education (EPCE), 6021 S. Syra-
cuse Way Ste. #213, Greenwood
Village, CO 80111
Phone: 303-804-4673
Email: epce@cael.org
www.epceonline.org
Energy Storage and Power, 520
US Hwy. 22 E, Ste. 205, Bridge-
water, NJ 08807
Phone: 908-393-0526
Email: info@caespower.com
www.caespower.com
Energy Systems Products, 6830 N
Eldridge Pkwy., Ste. 102, Hous-
ton, TX 70741
Phone: (713) 937 6336
Email: bobw@espenergysystems.
com
www.espforenergy.com
Enerscan Engineering Inc., 22
Julies Walk, Halifax, NS B3M2Z7,
Canada
Phone: 902-445-4433
Fax: 902-457-3283
Email: dale@eei.ca
www.enerscanengineering.com
Enertech, a business unit of
Curtiss-Wright Flow Control
Company, 2950 Birch St., Brea,
CA 92821
Phone: 714-528-2301
Email: enertech@curtisswright.com
www.enertech.cwfc.com
Engart Inc., One White Oak Trace,
Beckley, WV 25801
Phone: 304-253-0777
Fax: 304-253-0719
Email: pparsons@engartglobal.com
www.engartamerica.com
Engineering Consultants Group,
Inc., 1236 Weathervane Lane Ste.
200, Akron, OH 44313
Phone: 330-869-9949
Fax: 330-869-9995
Email: santuccim@ecg-inc.com
www.ecg-inc.com
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POWER 101
COMPANY
DIRECTORY
Engineering Software, P.O. Box
1180, Germantown, MD 20875
Phone: 301-540-3605
Fax: 301-540-3605
Email: info@engineering-4e.com
www.engineering-4e.com
Engineers India Limited, En-
gineers India Limited, EIB 4th
Floor, Cost Engg Department, 1
Bhikaji cama Place, R.K.Puram,
New Delhi, 110066, India
Phone: +9540066619
Email: nishendra_mishra@redif-
fmail.com
www.engineersindia.com
Enidine Inc., 7 Centre Dr., Or-
chard Park, NY 14127
Phone: 716-662-1900
Fax: 716-662-1909
Email: marketing@enidine.com
www.enidine.com
ENMET Corporation, 680 Fairfield
Ct., P.O. Box 979, Ann Arbor, MI
48106
Phone: 734-761-1270
Fax: 734-761-3220
Email: info@enmet.com
www.enmet.com
ENOSERV, LLC, 5630 S Memorial,
Tulsa, OK 74145
Phone: 918-622-4530
Fax: 918-622-6569
Email: info@enoserv.com
www.enoserv.com
ENOTEC Inc., 6206 Sandy Ridge
Circle NW, North Canton, OH
44720
Phone: 330-498-0202
Fax: 330-497-9802
Email: john.stewart@dial.pipex.com
www.enotec.com
eNPure Process Systems, Inc., 54
Ingleside Ave., Cranston, RI 02905
Phone: 617-823-0860
Fax: 401-447-3976
Email: pavisco@enpureinc.com
www.enpureinc.com
Entech Design, Inc., 315 S Lo-
cust, Denton, TX 76201
Phone: 940-898-1173
Fax: 940-382-3242
Email: rminnis@entechdesign.com
www.entechdesign.com
ENV Environmental, 1466 Ripchak
Rd., Corona, CA 92879
Phone: 909-739-0738
Fax: 909-739-0738
Email: richard_booth@sbcglobal.
net
www.enverr.com
Environment One Corp., 2773
Balltown Rd., Niskayuna, NY
12309
Phone: 518- 579-3033
Fax: 518-346-6188
Email: rseiler@eone.com
www.eone.com
Environmental Energy Services,
5 Turnberry Lane, Sandy Hook,
CT 06482
Phone: 203-270-0337
Fax: 203-426-0150
Email: lcookfair@eescorp.com
www.eescorp.com
EPG - Enginuity Portable Grid,
3511 Silverside Rd., Ste. 105,
Wilmington, DE 19180
Phone: 205-647-4279
Fax: 205-590-3885
Email: info@EPGinc.us
www.EPGinc.us
epro GmbH, Joebkesweg 3, Gro-
nau, D-48599, Germany
Phone: 49 2562 709-460
Email: Alexa.Tenbrink@Emerson.
com
www.epro.de
Equipment Maintenance Services,
Inc., 2412 West Durango St.,
Phoenix, AZ 85009
Phone: 602-258-8545
Email: bert.serak@emsusa.com
www.wmsusa.com
Ergonomic Office Chairs by
United Group, Inc., 13700 Polo
Trail Dr., Lake Forest, IL 60045
Phone: 847-816-7100
Fax: 847-816-7102
Email: tkramer@unitedgp.com
www.eocUSA.com
Erickson Air-Crane Inc., 3100 Wil-
low Springs Rd., P.O. Box 3247,
Central Point, OR 97502
Phone: 541-664-5544
Fax: 541-664-9469
Email: marketing@ericksonair-
crane.com
www.ericksonaircrane.com
ERICO International Corpora-
tion, 34600 Solon Rd., Solon, OH
44139
Phone: 800-677-9089
www.erico.com
Ernst Flow Industries, 116 Main
St., Farmingdale, NJ 07727
Phone: 732-938-5641
Fax: 732-938-9463
Email: info@ernstflow.com
www.ernstflow.com
ESAB Welding & Cutting Products,
411 S. Ebenezer Rd., Florence,
SC 29501
Phone: 843-669-4411
Email: info@esabna.com
www.esabna.com
ESI Inc. of Tennessee, 1250 Rob-
erts Blvd., Kennesaw, GA 30144
Phone: 770-427-6200
Fax: 770-425-3660
Email: info@esitenn.com
www.esitenn.com
ESP/Energy Systems Products,
Inc., 6830 N Eldridge Pkwy. #506,
Houston, TX 77041
Phone: 713-937-6336
Fax: 713-937-6378
Email: bobw@espforenergy.com
www.espforenergy.com
EST Group, 2701 Township Line
Rd., Hatfield, PA 19440
Phone: 215-721-1100
Fax: 215-721-1101
Email: jmarengo@curtisswright.
com
www.estgroup.cwfc.com
E-Tech, Inc., 20701 E. 81st St.,
Ste. 3, Broken Arrow, OK 74014
Phone: 918-665-1930
Fax: 918-665-1935
Email: bhanson@e-techinc.com
www.e-techinc.com
EtherWAN Systems, 4570 E.
Eisenhower Circle, Anaheim, CA
92807
Phone: 714-779-3800
Fax: 714-779-3806
Email: info@etherwan.com
www.etherwan.com
Eutech Scientific Engineering,
Dennewartstrae 25-27, Aachen,
52068, Germany
Phone: +49-241-963-2380
Fax: +49-241-963-2389
Email: power@eutech.de
www.eutech-scientific.de
Eutectic Corporation, N94
W14355 Garwin Mace Dr.,
Menomonee Falls, WI 53051
Phone: 262-532-4677
Fax: 262-255-5542
Email: marketing@eutecticusa.com
www.eutecticusa.com
Everlasting Valve Co., 108
Somogyi Court, South Plainfield,
NJ 07080
Phone: 908-769-0700
Fax: 908-769-8697
Email: djenkins@everlasting-
valveusa.com
www.everlastingvalveusa.com
Exact Metrology, P.O. Box 7536,
Algonquin, IL 60108
Phone: 630-258-2656
Email: deans@exactmetrology.com
www.exactmetrology,com
Excelsior College, 7 Columbia
Circle, Albany, NY 12203
Phone: 518-608-8325
Fax: 518-464-8777
Email: cbrinkman@excelsior.edu
www.excelsior.edu
Exlar Corporation, 18400 West
77th St., Chanhassen, MN 55317
Phone: 952-500-6200
Email: info@exlar.com
www.exlar.com
Express Integrated Technologies
LLC, 1640 South 101st East Ave.,
Tulsa, OK 74128
Phone: 918-622-1420
Fax: 918-622-1457
Email: sales@ExpressTechTulsa.com
www.ExpressTechTulsa.com
Expro Services Inc., 501 Scott
St., Worthington, KY 41183
Phone: 606-834-9402
Email: craigsherman@charter.net
www.explosiveprofessionals.com
ExxonMobil Lubricants &
Petroleum Specialties (Mobil
Industrial Lubricants), 3225
Gallows Rd., Room 6C0631,
Fairfax, VA 22031
Phone: 703- 846-1998
Fax: 703-846-3041
Email: mike.j.zinngrabe@exxon-
mobil.com
www.mobilindustrial.com
See our ad on p. 3
E-ZLIFT Portable Conveyors,
2000 S. Cherokee St., Denver, CO
80223
Phone: 800-821-9966
Fax: 303-733-5642
Email: ez@ezliftconveyors.com
www.ezliftconveyors.com
F
F.E. Moran Special Hazard
Systems, 2265 Carlson Dr., North-
brook, IL 60062
Phone: 847-498-4800
Email: femoranshsinfo@femoran.
com
www.femoranshs.com
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December 2012 102
Faber Burner Company, 1000 East
Bald Eagle St., Lock Haven, PA
17745
Phone: 570-748-4009
Fax: 570-748-4324
Email: tprobst@faberburner.com
www.faberburner.com
Fabreeka International, Inc.,
1023 Turnpike St., P.O. Box 210,
Stoughton, MA 02072
Phone: 781-341-3655
Fax: 781-341-3983
Email: info@fabreeka.com
www.fabreeka.com
Factory Sales & Engineering,
Inc., 74378 Hwy. 25, Covington,
LA 70435
Phone: 985-867-9150
Email: cculpepper@fsela.com
www.fsela.com
Fairbanks Morse Engine, 701
White Ave., Beloit, WI 53511
Phone: 608-364-8054
Fax: 608-364-8444
Email: luke.fredrickson@fair-
banksmorse.com
www.fairbanksmorse.com
Fairbanks Morse Pump, Pentair
Water, 3601 Fairbanks Ave.,
Kansas City, KS 66106
Phone: 913-371-5000
Fax: 913-748-4025
Email: fairbanks_info@pentair-
pump.com
www.fmpump.com
FAIST Anlagenbau GmbH, Am
Mhlberg 5, Niederraunau,
Krumbach (Schwaben), 86381,
Germany
Phone: +49 8282 8880-0
Fax: +49 8282 8880-88
Email: anlagenbau@faist.de
www.faist.de
FARO, 125 Technology Park, Lake
Mary, FL 32746
Phone: 800-736-0234
Fax: 407-333-4181
Email: info@faro.com
www.faro.com
FCI-Fluid Components Interna-
tional, 1755 La Costa Meadows
Dr., San Marcos, CA 92078
Phone: 760-744-6950
Fax: 760-736-6250
Email: fcimarcom@fluidcompo-
nents.com
www.fluidcomponents.com
Fenner Dunlop Americas, 21 Lar-
edo Dr., Scottdale, GA 30079
Phone: 404-297-3115
Fax: 404-296-5165
Email: jill.schultz@fennerdunlop.
com
Fern Engineering, 55 Portside
Dr., P.O. Box 3380, Pocasset, MA
02559
Phone: 508-563-7181
Fax: 508-564-4851
Email: mail@fernengineering.com
www.fernengineering.com
Fibergrate Composite Structures,
5151 Beltline Rd., Ste. 700, Dal-
las, TX 75254
Phone: 972-250-1633
Fax: 972250-1530
Email: info@fibergrate.com
www.fibergrate.com
Field Works Inc., 1220 Armstrong
St., Algonquin, IL 60102
Phone: 847-658-8200
Fax: 847-658-4300
Email: januszb@fieldworksinc.com
www.fieldworksinc.com
Fike Corporation, 704 South 10th
St., Blue Springs, MO 64015
Phone: 816-229-3405
Fax: 816-229-4615
Email: megan.bendorf@fike.com
www.fike.com
FilterSense, 800 Cummings Ctr,
357W, Beverly, MA 01915
Phone: 978-927-4304
Fax: 978-927-4329
Email: info@filtersense.com
www.filtersense.com
Filtration & Membrane Technol-
ogy, Inc., 8342 Silvan Wind,
Houston, TX 77040
Phone: 713-870-1120
Fax: 713-422-2533
Email: fmt-houston@att.net
www.fmt-houston.com
Filtration Advantage, 178 Lily
St., San Francisco, CA 94102
Phone: 415-255-8484
Fax: 415-255-8484
Email: gcomeau@filtrationadvan-
tage.com
www.filtrationadvantage.com
Fine Tubes Ltd., Plymbridge Rd.,
Estover, Plymouth, PL6 7LG, UK
Phone: +44 (0) 1752 697216
Fax: +44 (0) 1752 733301
Email: feedback@fine-tubes.
co.uk
www.finetubes.com
Fireaway Inc., 5852 Baker Rd.,
Minnetonka, MN 55345
Phone: 952-935-9745
Fax: 952-935-9757
Email: info@statx.com
www.statx.com
Fisher Tank Company, 3131 West
4th St., Chester, PA 19013
Phone: 610-494-7200
Fax: 610-485-0157
Email: sales@fishertank.com
www.FisherTank.com
FlaktWoods, 1110 Main Place
Tower, Buffalo, NY 14202
Phone: 716-845-0500
Fax: 716-845-5055
Email: jim.t.greenzweig@flakt-
woods.com
www.flaktwoods.com
Flexco, 2525 Wisconsin Ave.,
Downers Grive, IL 60515
Phone: 630-971-6478
Fax: 630-971-1180
Email: kzientek@flexco.com
www.flexco.com
Flexco Engineered Systems Group,
401 Remington Blvd., Ste. A,
Bolingbrook, IL 60440
Phone: 815-609-7025
Email: rsouffrant@flexco.com
www.flexcoengineeredsystems.com
FLEXIM AMERICAS Corporation,
250-V Executive Dr., Edgewood,
NY 11717
Phone: 631-492-2300
Fax: 631-492-2117
Email: usinfo@flexim.com
www.flexim.com
Flight Systems Industrial
Products, 1015 Harrisburg Pike,
Carlisle, PA 17013
Phone: 717-254-3747
Fax: 717-254-3778
Email: tgasull@fsip.biz
www.fsip.biz
FlowMeters.com, 1755 East Nine
Mile Rd., P.O. Box 249, Hazel
Park, MI 48030
Phone: 248-542-9635
Fax: 248-398-4274
Email: sales@flowmeters.com
www.flowmeters.com
Flowrox Inc., 808 Barkwood Court
Ste. N, Linthicum, MD 21090
Phone: 410-636-2250
Email: todd.loudin@flowrox.com
www.flowrox.us
Flowrox Oy, Marssitie 1, Lappeen-
ranta, 53600, Finland
Phone: +358 201 113 311
Fax: +358 201 113 300
Email: info@flowrox.com
www.flowrox.com
Flowserve, 1900 S. Saunders St.,
Raleigh, NC 27603
Phone: 919-831-3200
Fax: 919-831-3369
Email: fbensinger@flowserve.com
www.Flowserve.com
Flow-Tek Inc., A subsidiary of
BRAY International Inc., 8323 N
Eldridge Pkwy., #100, Houston,
TX 77041
Phone: 832-912-2300
Fax: 832-912-2301
Email: joey.forlini@flow-tek.com
www.flow-tek.com
FLSmidth Inc., 2040 Ave. C,
Bethlehem, PA 18017
Phone: 610-264-6800
Fax: 610-264-6307
Email: info-us@flsmidth.com
www.flsmidth.com
Fluke Corporation, P.O. Box
9090, Everett, WA 98206
Phone: 800-443-5853
Fax: 425-446-5116
Email: fluke-info@fluke.com
www.fluke.com
Fluor Enterprises Inc., 100 Fluor
Daniel Dr., C403F, Greenville, SC
29607
Phone: 864-517-1863
Fax: 864-517-1319
Email: kirstin.bolt@fluor.com
www.fluor.com
FMC Technologies, Inc., P.O. Box
904, 400 Highpoint Dr., Chalfont,
PA 18914
Phone: 215-822-4300
Fax: 215-996-4513
Email: info.mhs@fmcti.com
www.fmctechnologies.com
Forney Corporation, 3405 Wiley
Post Rd., Carrollton, TX 75006
Phone: 972-458-6100
Fax: 972-458-6195
Email: sales@forneycorp.com
www.forneycorp.com
Foster Wheeler Ltd., Foster
Wheeler North America Corp, Per-
ryville Corp Park, P.O. Box 4000,
Clinton, NJ 08809
Phone: 908-730-4000
Fax: 908-730-5310
Email: powerproducts@fwc.com
www.fwc.com
FoxGuard Solutions, 105 Industri-
al Dr., Christiansburg, VA 24073
Phone: 540- 382-4234
Fax: 540-382-1801
Email: mtrump@foxguardsolu-
tions.com
www.foxguardsolutions.com
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POWER 103
COMPANY
DIRECTORY
FP Turbomachinery, Wiesen-
strasse 57, Emmendingen, 79312,
Germany
Phone: +49-7641-55346
Fax: +49-7641-55319
Email: contact@fpturbo.com
www.fpturbo.com
Frederick Cowan & Company, Inc.,
48 Kroemer Ave., Riverhead, NY
11901
Phone: 631-369-0360
Fax: 631-369-0637
Email: tlc@fcowan.com
www.fcowan.com
FreeWave Technologies, Inc.,
1880 S. Flatiron Court, Ste. F,
Boulder, CO 80301
Phone: 303-381-9276
Fax: 303-786-8393
Email: noellec@freewave.com
FrenchCreek Production, Inc., 626
13th St., Franklin, PA 16323
Phone: 814-437-1808
Fax: 814-437-2544
Email: fcpmarketing@velocity.net
www.frenchcreekproduction.com
Frenzelit North America, 4165
Old Salisbury Rd., Lexington, NC
27295
Phone: 336-956-3956
Fax: 336-956-3913
Email: fna@frenzelit.net
www.frenzelit.net
Freudenberg Filtration Technolo-
gies SE & Co. KG, Hoehnerweg
2-4, Weinheim, 69465, Germany
Phone: +49 6201 80-6264
Fax: +49 6201 88-6299
Email: viledon@freudenberg-
filter.com
www.freudenberg-filter.com
Frontier Industrial Corp., 26
Mississippi St., Ste. 400, Buffalo,
NY 14203
Phone: 716-447-7587
Fax: 716-447-7593
Email: mcarney@fic-services.com
www.fic-services.com
Fuel Purification, 1208 W Mar-
shall St., Richmond, VA 23220
Phone: 804-512-9320
Fax: 804-358-4200
Email: sales@fuelpurification.com
www.fuelpurification.com
Fuel Tech Inc., 27601 Bella Vista
Parkway, Warrenville, IL 60555
Phone: 800-666-9688
Fax: 630-845-4501
Email: info@ftek.com
www.ftek.com
Fusion Babbitting Co. Inc., 4540
W. Burnham St., Milwaukee, WI
53219
Phone: 800-613-5118
Fax: 414 645 6606
Email: mmckindley@sbcglobal.net
www.fusionbabbitting.com
G
GAI Consultants, Inc., 385 East
Waterfront Dr., Homestead, PA
15120
Phone: 412-476-2000
Email: r.houston@gaiconsultants.
com
www.gaiconsultants.com
Galco Industrial Electron-
ics, 26010 Pinehurst, Madison
Heights, MI 48071
Phone: 248-542-9090
Fax: 248-414-5974
Email: sales@galco.com
www.galco.com
Gantrex Inc., 2000 Oxford Dr.,
Ste. 400, Bethel Park, PA 15102
Phone: 800-242-6873
Fax: 412-655-3814
Email: tom.berringer@gantrex.com
www.Gantrex.com
Gardner Denver, 1800 Gardner
Expwy., Quincy, IL 62305
Phone: 217-222-5400
Fax: 217-228-8243
Email: maggie@gardnerdenver.
com
www.gardnerdenver.com
Garlock Sealing Technologies,
1666 Division St., Palmyra, NY
14522
Phone: 315-597-4811
Fax: 315-597-3039
Email: gst.info@garlock.com
www.garlock.com
Gas Corporation of America,
P.O. Box 5183, Wichita Falls, TX
76307
Phone: 940-723-6015
Email: gascorp@wf.net
www.gas-corp.com
Gas Turbine Efficiency, 300 Sun-
port Lane, Orlando, FL 32809
Phone: 407-304-5200
Fax: 407-304-5201
Email: info@gtefficiency.com
www.gtefficiency.com
Gas Turbine Maintenance LLC,
4635 Coronado Pkwy., Ste. 7,
Cape Coral, FL 33914
Phone: 239-549-7500
Fax: 239-549-0767
Email: teamgtm@turbinegenera-
tor.com
www.turbinegenerator.com
Gas Turbine World, 654 Hillside
Rd., Fairfield, CT 06824
Phone: 203-226-0003
Fax: 203-226-0061
Email: publications.grp@snet.net
www.gtwbooks.com
Gastops Ltd., 1011 Polytek St.,
Ottawa, ON K1J 9J3, Canada
Phone: 613-744-3530
Fax: 613-744-8846
Email: sales@gastops.com
www.gastops.com
GC3 Specialty Chemicals, Inc.,
733 Heights Blvd., Houston, TX
77007
Phone: 713-802-1761
Fax: 713-869-0680
Email: spress@gc3.com
www.gc3.com
GE Energy, 8800 East 63rd St.,
Raytown, MO 64113
Phone: 816-356-8400
Email: filtration@ge.com
www.GE-energy.com/filtration
GE Inspection Technologies,
721 Visions Dr., Skaneateles, NY
13152
Phone: 888-332-3848
Fax: 866-899-4184
Email: info-geit@ge.com
www.geinspectiontechnologies.
com
GEA Heat Exchangers - Cooling
Tower Solution Division, 300
Union Blvd. Ste. 350, Lakewood,
CO 80228
Phone: 303-987-4014
Fax: 303-987-0101
Email: mary.mcculley@geagroup.
com
www.geapowercooling.com
GEA Power Cooling, Inc. - Head-
quarters, 143 Union Blvd., Ste.
400, Lakewood, CO 80228
Phone: 303-987-4014
Fax: 303-987-0101
Email: mary.mcculley@geapower-
cooling.com
www.geapowercooling.com
GEA Process Engineering, 9165
Rumsey Rd., Columbia, MD 21045
Phone: 410-997-8700
Fax: 410-997-5021
Email: gea.pe.na@gea.com
www.niroinc.com
Gearhart Mckee Inc., 47 Walnut
St., Johnstown, PA 15901
Phone: 814-532-8870
Fax: 814-532-8875
Email: tgearhart@gearhartmck-
eeinc.com
www.gearhartmckeeinc.com
GEDA USA, LLC, 8777 Tallyho Rd.
Bldg 4, Houston, Texas 77061
Phone: 713-621-7272
Fax: 713-621-7279
Email: lacy.garcia@gedausa.com
www.gedausa.com.
General Equipment Co., 620
Alexander Dr. SW, Owatonna, MN
55060
Phone: 507-451-5510
Fax: 507-451-5511
Email: general@generalequip.com
www.generalequip.com
General Monitors, 26776 Simpa-
tica Circle, Lake Forest, CA 92630
Phone: 949-581-4464
Fax: 949-581-1151
Email: info@generalmonitors.com
www.generalmonitors.com
Genesis Lamp Corporation, 375
N. St. Clair St., Painesville, OH
44077
Phone: 800-685-5267
Fax: 440-354-0624
Email: mark@genesislamp.com
www.genesislamp.com
GenesisSolutions, 100 Danbury
Rd., Ste. 105, Ridgefield, CT
06877
Phone: 781-662-0053
Fax: 203-431-3643
Email: bthompson@genesissolu-
tions.com
www.genesissolutions.com
Georg Fischer, 2882 Dow Ave.,
Tustin, CA 92780
Phone: 714-731-8800
Email: us.ps@georgfischer.com
www.us.piping.georgefischer.com
Georg Fischer Piping Systems
Ltd., Ebnatstrasse 111, Schaff-
hausen, 8201, Switzerland
Phone: +0041 52 631 3909
Email: sanjay.patel@georgfischer.
com
www.piping.georgfischer.com
COMPANY
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December 2012 104
George H. Bodman Inc., P.O. Box
5758, Kingwood, TX 77325
Phone: 281-359-4006
Fax: 281-359-4225
Email: blrclgdr@aol.com
www.boilercleaningdoctor.com
Geospatial Corporation, 229
Howes Run Rd., Sarver, PA 16055
Phone: 724-353-3400
Email: info@geospatialcorpora-
tion.com
www.geospatialcorporation.com
GEOTEK, Inc./PUPI Crossarms,
1421 2nd Ave. NW, Stewartville,
MN 55976
Phone: 507-533-6076
Fax: 507-533-4784
Email: pupisales@geotekinc.com
www.geotekinc.com
GESTRA AG, Muenchener Strasse
77, Bremen, 28215, Germany
Phone: +0049 421 35030
Fax: +0049 421 3503397
Email: gestra.ag@flowserve.com
www.gestra.de
GETAC Inc., 20762 Linear Lane,
Lake Forest, CA 92630
Phone: 866-464-3822
Fax: 949-699-1440
Email: General.sales@getac.com
www.getac.com
Gilbert Electrical Systems &
Products, P.O. Box 1141, Beckley,
WV 25801
Phone: 304-252-6243
Fax: 304-252-6292
www.gilbertelectrical.com
Gill Manufacturing Ltd., 9
Kenview Blvd., Brampton, ON
L6T5G5, Canada
Phone: 905-792-0999
Fax: 905-792-0091
Email: raj@gillmanufacturing.com
www.gillmanufacturing.com
GIW Industries Inc., 5000 Wrights-
boro Rd., Grovetown, GA 30813
Phone: 706-863-1011
Fax: 706-863-5637
Email: marketing@giwindustries.
com
www.giwindustries.com
GKS Inspection Services & Laser
Design, 9401 James Ave. #132,
Bloomington, MN 55112
Phone: 952-884-9648
Fax: 952-884-9653
Email: quote@gks.com
www.gks.com/ppc_lps_gks/ter-
restrial_new.asp
Global Industrial Solutions, 219
Glider Circle, Corona, CA 92880
Phone: 951-279-9429
Fax: 951-279-6706
Email: info@globalindustrialsolu-
tions.net
www.globalindustrialsolutions.net
Global Power Supply, 5383 Hollis-
ter Ave., Ste. 220, Santa Barbara,
CA 93111
Phone: 805-683-3828
Fax: 805-683-3823
Email: mike.wolfe@globalpwr.net
www.globalpwr.net
Global Training Solutions Inc.,
P.O. Box 26067, 3163 Winston
Churchill Blvd., Mississauga, ON
L5L 5W7, Canada
Phone: 416-806-5777
Email: info@globaltrainingsolu-
tions.ca
www.globaltrainingsolutions.ca
Goodway Technologies Corp., 420
West Ave., Stamford, CT 06902
Phone: 800-243-7932
Fax: 203-359-9601
Email: mfmarks@goodway.com
www.goodway.com
Gorman-Rupp Co., 305 Bowman
St., P.O. Box 1217, Mansfield, OH
44903
Phone: 419-755-1011
Fax: 419-755-1251
Email: grsales@gormanrupp.com
www.GRpumps.com
GOTAR Technologies Inc., 1101,
Blvd. des Chutes, Quebec, QC G1E
6B4, Canada
Phone: 418-661-6691
Fax: 418-661-0086
Email: egosselin@gotar.com
www.gotar.com
GP Strategies Corporation
Energy Services Group
25 Northpointe Parkway, Am-
herst, NY 14228
Phone: +1 716.799.1080
Fax: +1 716.799.1081
Email: performance@gpstrate-
gies.com
www.gpstrategies.com
See our ad on p. 7
Graham Corp, 20 Florence Ave.,
Batavia, NY 14020
Phone: 585-343-2216
Fax: 585-343-1097
Email: equipment@graham-mfg.
com
www.graham-mfg.com
Graphite Metallizing Corp,
Graphalloy Division, 1050 Nep-
perhan Ave., Yonkers, NY 10703
Phone: 914-968-8400
Fax: 914-968-8468
Email: sales@graphalloy.com
www.graphalloy.com
Graycor, Two Mid America Plaza,
Ste. 400, Oakbrook Terrace, IL
60181
Phone: 708-206-0500
Fax: 708-206-0505
Email: cheryl_hansen@graycor.com
www.graycor.com
Great Northern Products, P.O. Box
750, Exeter, NH 03833
Phone: 888-887-4549
Email: nknox@gnpinc.com
www.gnpinc.com
Greenbank/CBP, 185 Plumpton
Ave., Washington, PA 15301
Phone: 724-229-1180
Fax: 724-229-1185
Email: halulko@cbpengineering.
com
www.cbpengineering.com
Greens Power Equipment USA
Inc., 601 Carlson Parkway, Ste.
1050, Minnetonka, MN 55305
Phone: 952-475-6333
Fax: 952-449-5101
Email: greens@greenspower.us
www.greenspower.us
Gremp Steel Company, 14100 S.
Western Ave., Posen, IL 60469
Phone: 708-489-1000
Email: sales@grempsteel.com
www.grempsteel.com
GSE Consulting, LP, 808 Travis
St., Ste. 802, Houston, TX 77002,
Phone: 713-395-1990 ext 209
Fax: 713-395-1995
Email: AndrewB@GulfStatesEn-
ergy.com
www.gseconsultinglp.com
GSE Environmental, 19103 Gundle
Rd., Houston, TX 77073
Phone: 281-230-6776
Fax: 281-230-6739
Email: marketing@gseworld.com
www.gseworld.com
GSE Systems, Inc., 1332 London-
town Blvd., Ste. 200, Sykesville,
MD 21784
Phone: 410-970-7800
Fax: 410-970-7995
Email: info@gses.com
www.gses.com
GSI - Generator Services Int,l,
Inc., 1865 Scott Futrell Dr.,
Charlotte, NC 28208
Phone: 704-399-5422
Fax: 704-399-5983
Email: ljohnson@gsionsite.com
www.gsionsite.com
GTI, Box 1269, 2 Central Ave.,
Madison, NJ 07940
Phone: 973-360-0170
Fax: 973-360-0176
Email: Erussick@gti-e.com
www.gti-e.com
GulfRim Navigation, P.O. Box
1214, Abbeville, LA 70511
Phone: 877-893-0789
Fax: 337-893-6256
Email: larry@gulfrim.com
www.gulfrim.com
H
H&L Instruments, P.O. Box 580
34 Post Rd., North Hampton, NH
03862
Phone: 603-964-1818
Fax: 603-964-8881
Email: hmoyer@hlinstruments.
com
www.hlinstruments.com
H2O Innovation USA, Inc., 6840
Shingle Creek Pkwy. Ste. 20,
Brooklyn Center, MN 55430
Phone: 763-566-8961
Fax: 763-566-8972
Email: dale.iverson@h2oinnova-
tion.com
www.h2oinnovation.com
Haberberger, Inc., 9744 Pauline
Place, Saint Louis, MO 63116
Phone: 314-631-3324
Fax: 314-631-2751
Email: stevejh@haberbergerinc.
com
www.haberbergerinc.com
Hach, P.O. Box 389, Loveland,
CO 80539
Phone: 866-450-4248
Fax: 970-669-2932
Email: orders@hach.com
www.hach.com
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POWER 105
COMPANY
DIRECTORY
Hadek Protective Systems, Foster
Plaza 5, 651 Holiday Dr., Pitts-
burgh, PA 15220
Phone: 412-204-0028
Fax: 412-204-0039
Email: sales@hadek.com
www.hadek.com
Hadek Protective Systems bv, P.O.
Box 30139, Rotterdam, NL-3001,
Netherlands
Phone: +31 10 405 1461
Fax: +31 10 405 5011
Email: sales@hadek.com
www.hadek.com
Haefely Test AG, Birsstrasse 300,
Basel, 4052, Switzerland
Phone: +41 61 373 4111
Fax: +41 61 373 49 12
Email: sales@haefely.com
www.haefely.com
Haldor Topsoe Inc., 17629 El
Camino Real, Ste. 300, Houston,
TX 77058
Phone: 281-228-5000
Fax: 281-228-5109
Email: tnw@topsoe.com
www.topsoe.com
HALFEN GmbH, Liebigstrasse 14,
Langenfeld, 40764, Germany
Phone: +49 (0) 2173/970-0
Fax: +49 (0) 2173/970-123
Email: info@halfen.com
www.halfen.com
HALFEN USA Inc., 8521 FM 1976,
P.O. Box 547, Converse, TX 78109
Phone: 800-423-9140
Fax: 888-277-1695
Email: info@halfenusa.com
www.halfenusa.com
Hallaton, Inc. Containment Lin-
ings, 1206 Sparks Rd., Sparks,
MD 21152
Phone: 410-583-7700
Fax: 410-583-7720
www.hallaton.com
Hammonds Fuel Additives, 910
Rankin Rd., Houston, TX 77073
Phone: 281-999-2900
Fax: 281-847-1857
Email: brampy@biobor.com
www.biobor.com
Hamon Custodis, Inc., 58 East
Main St., Somerville, NJ 08876
Phone: 908-333-2000
Fax: 908-333-2151
Email: info.hcusus@hamonusa.
com
www.hamoncustodis.com
Hanes Supply, Inc., 55 James E
Casey Dr., Buffalo, NY 14206
Phone: 716-826-2636
Fax: 716-826-1552
Email: gphillips@hanessupply.com
www.hanessupply.com
Hanover Technical Sales, Inc.,
P.O. Box 70, Battery Park, VA
23304
Phone: 757-357-2677
Email: hanover@visi.net
www.HanoverTechnical.com
Hansen Transmissions, Inc., P.O.
Box 320, Verona, VA 24482
Phone: 540-213-2442
Fax: 540-213-2222
Email: bsommerfield@hansen-
transmissions.com
www.hansenamericas.com
Hanson Pressure Pipe, 1003 N.
MacArrthur Blvd., Grand Prairie,
TX 75050
Phone: 972-266-7406
Fax: 972-266-7584
Email: cody.vandiver@hanson.com
www.hanson.com
Hanson Professional Services
Inc., 1525 South Sixth St.,
Springfield, IL 62703
Phone: 217-747-9367
Fax: 217-788-2503
Email: belliott@hanson-inc.com
www.hanson-inc.com
Harbor Offshore Barriers Inc.,
5720 Nicolle St., Ventura, CA
93003
Phone: 805-639-2205
Email: tpruitt@offshorebarriers.
com
www.offshorebarriers.com
HARCO, 186 Cedar St., Branford,
CT 06405
Phone: 203-483-3757
Fax: 203-481-8214
Email: rhoyt@harcolabs.com
www.harcolabs.com
Hardy Process Solutions, 9440
Carroll Park Dr. -Ste. 150, San
Diego, CA 92121
Phone: 800-821-5831
Email: hardyinfo@hardysolutions.
com
www.hardysolutions.com
Harrington Hoists, Inc., 401 West
End Ave., Manheim, PA 17545
Phone: 800-233-3010
Fax: 717-665-2861
Email: customerservice@har-
ringtonhoists.com
www.harringtonhoists.com
Hawk Measurement, 7 River St.,
Middleton, MA 01949
Phone: 978-304-3000
Fax: 978-304-1462
Email: gina.travers@hawkmea-
sure.com
www.hawkmeasure.com
Hayward Baker,Inc., 1130 An-
napolis Rd., Ste. 202, Odenton,
MD 21113
Phone: 410-551-8200
Fax: 410-551-3166
Email: trpierce@haywardbaker.com
www.haywardbaker.com
Hayward Tyler, 1 Kimpton Rd.,
Luton, LU1 3LD, UK
Phone: +01582 731144
Fax: +01582 722920
Email: marketing@haywardtyler.
com
www.haywardtyler.com
HC Controls Inc., 3271 Pleasant
Terrace, Crestview, FL 32539
Phone: 850-398-8078
Fax: 850-398-4030
Email: chris@hccontrols.com
www.hccontrols.com
Headwaters Inc., 10653 S River
Front Pkwy., Ste. 300, South
Jordan, UT 84095
Phone: 801-984-9400
Fax: 801-984-9410
Email: info@flyash.com
www.flyash.com
Heat Exchange Institute, 1300
Sumner Ave., Cleveland, OH
44115
Phone: 216-241-7333
Fax: 216-241-0105
Email: caddington@thomasamc.
com
www.heatexchange.org
Heath Consultants Inc., 9030
Monroe Rd., Houston, TX 77061
Phone: 713-844-1300
Fax: 713-844-1309
Email: customerservice@heathus.
com
www.heathus.com
Heatrex Inc., P.O. Box 515, Mead-
ville, PA 16335
Phone: 814-724-1800
Fax: 814-333-6580
Email: sales@heatrex.com
www.heatrex.com
Helmick Corporation, P. O. Box
71, Fairmont, WV 26555
Phone: 304-366-3520
Fax: 304-366-8923
Email: CustServ@HelmickCorp.
com
www.HelmickCorp.com
Heyl & Patterson, Inc., P.O. Box
36, Pittsburgh, PA 15230
Phone: 412-788-9810
Fax: 412-788-9822
Email: info@heylpatterson.com
www.heylpatterson.com
Higgott-Kane (now ATCO Struc-
tures & Logistics), 260 Holiday
Inn Dr., Unit 1, Cambridge, ON
N3C 4E8, Canada
Phone: 519-220-0600
Fax: 519-220-0602
Email: sales@higg-kane-atco.com
www.higg-kane-atco.com
Highland Technology, Inc., 18
Otis St., San Francisco, CA 94103
Phone: 415-551-1700
Fax: 415-551-5129
Email: info@highlandtechnology.
com
www.highlandtechnology.com
Highline Products, 800 South St.,
Waltham, MA 02453
Phone: 781-736-0002
Fax: 781-647-3607
Email: pault@highlineproducts.com
www.highlineproducts.com
Highpoint Sales, Inc., 21151
John Milless Dr., P.O. Box 483,
Rogers, MN 55374
Phone: 763-416-9707
Fax: 763-416-9708
Email: Sales@HighPointSales.com
www.highpointsales.com
Hiller Systems, Inc., 1242 Execu-
tive Blvd., Chesapeake, VA 23320
Phone: 757-549-9123
Fax: 757-549-1083
Email: mark.herzog@hillerva.com
www.hillersystemsinc.com
Hillscape, Inc., 869 East 725
South, Centerville, UT 84014
Phone: 801 554 3791
Email: hillscape@comcast.net
www.hillscape.us
Hinkel Equipment Rental As-
sociates, Inc., 2410 High Rd.,
Huntingdon Valley, PA 19006
Phone: 215-673-6700
Fax: 215-938-0609
Email: hinkrent@erols.com
www.hinkrent.com
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December 2012 106
Hitachi Power Systems America
Ltd., 645 Martinsville Rd.,
Basking Ridge, NJ 07920
Phone: 908-605-2800
Fax: 908-604-6211
Email: power.info@hal.hitachi.com
www.hitachipowersystems.us
See our ad on cover 3
Hitech Instruments, Great
Marlings, Butterfield, Luton, LU2
8DL, UK
Phone: +44 1582 435600
Fax: +44 1582 400901
Email: hitechsales@cooperindus-
tries.com
www.hitech-inst.co.uk
Hoffmann, Inc., 6001 49th St. S,
Muscatine, IA 52761
Phone: 563-263-4733
Fax: 563-263-0919
Email: hoffmann@hoffmanninc.com
www.hoffmanninc.com
Hoist-Co, Inc., P.O. Box 27,
Baldwin City, KS 66006
Phone: 423-332-6222
Fax: 423-332-6222
Email: tokeefe@hoistco.com
www.hoistco.com
Homrich Wrecking, 200 Matlin
Rd., Carelton, MI 48117
Phone: 734-654-9800
Fax: 734-654-9116
Email: jeffr@homrich.com
www.homrichinc.com
HOPPY Industrial Co., Ltd., 74,
Lane 255, Ren-Ai St., San-Chung
District, , New Taipei City, 241,
Taiwan
Phone: 886-2-2985-3001
Fax: 886-2-2985-5490
Email: csw@hoppy.com.tw
www.hoppy.com.tw
HORIBA, 240 Spring Hill Dr., Ste.
410, Spring, TX 77386
Phone: 877-646-7422
Email: rick.struzynski@horiba.
com
www.horiba.com/us/en/
Horiba Instruments, Inc., 17671
Armstrong Ave., Irvine, CA 92614
Phone: 949-250-4811
Fax: 949-250-0924
Email: cleanair@horiba.com
www.environ.hii.horiba.com
Horn Industrial Services, P.O. Box
1905, Owensboro, KY 42302
Phone: 270-683-6564
Fax: 270-684-4056
Email: clay.ellis@titancontract-
ing.com
www.hornindustrialservices.com
Hose Master Inc., 1233 East
222nd St., Cleveland, OH 44117
Phone: 216-481-2020
Fax: 216- 481-7557
Email: musgraveca@hosemaster.
com
www.hosemaster.com
Houston Dynamic Service, Inc.,
8150 Lawndale, Houston, TX
77012
Phone: 713-928-6200
Fax: 713-928-2903
Email: Tom@houstondynamic.com
www.houstondynamic.com
Howden North America Inc., 7079
Parklane Rd., Ste. 300, Columbia,
SC 29223
Phone: 803-741-2700
Fax: 803-757-0941
Email: sales@howdenbuffalo.com
www.howden.com
Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works
Inc., 23 Meter St., Penacook, NH
03303
Phone: 603-753-6321
Fax: 603-753-9592
Email: sales@hoytmeter.com
www.hoytmeter.com
HPC Technical Services, 500
Tallevast Rd. Ste. 101, Sarasota,
FL 34243
Phone: 941-747-7733
Fax: 941-746-5374
Email: stparker@hpcnet.com
www.hpcnet.com
HR Power, 42010 Koppernick Rd.,
Ste. 117, Canton, MI 48187
Phone: 734-416-9328
Fax: 734-416-9368
Email: sales @hrpco.com
www.hrpco.com
HTRI, 150 Venture Dr., College
Station, TX 77845
Phone: 979-690-5050
Fax: 979-690-3250
www.HTRI.net
Hubbell Power Systems, Inc., 210
North Allen, Centralia, MO 65240
Phone: 573-682-5521
Fax: 573-682-8714
Email: hpsliterature@hps.hub-
bell.com
www.hubbellpowersystems.com
Hurst Technologies Corp., 4005
Technology Dr., Ste. 1000, Angle-
ton, TX 77515
Phone: 979-849-5068
Fax: 979-849-6663
Email: bobb@hursttech.com
www.hursttech.com
HydraTight / D.L. Ricci, 5001
Moundview Dr., Red Wing, MN
55066
Phone: 651-388-8661
Fax: 651-388-0002
Email: redwing@hydratight.com
www.dlricci.com
Hydro Dyne Inc., P.O. Box 318,
225 Wetmore Ave. S.E.Massillon,
OH 44648
Phone: 330-832-5076
Fax: 330-832-8163
Email: howard@hydrodyneinc.com
www.hydrodyneinc.com
Hydro, Inc., 834 W. Madison,
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: 312-738-3000
Fax: 312-738-4182
Email: lkoziol@hydroinc.com
www.hydroinc.com
Hydropro Inc., 2631 Hwy. J,
Bourbon, MO 65441
Phone: 573-732-3318
Fax: 573-732-9408
Email: sales@hpro.com
www.hpro.com
Hypercat Advanced Catalyst
Products, 1075 Andrew Dr., Ste.
C, West Chester, PA 19380
Phone: 610-692-3490
Fax: 610-692-3971
Email: c.jackson@hypercat-acp.com
www.hypercat-acp.com
HYTORC, 333 Route 17, Mahwah,
NJ 07430
Phone: 201-512-9500
Fax: 201-512-9501
Email: joepaul@hytorc.com
www.hytorc.com
Hyundai Heavy Industries Co.,
140-2 Kye-Dong, Chongro-Ku,
Seoul, 110-793, South Korea
Phone: 822-746-7576
Fax: 922-746-7548
Email: mark@hhi.co.kr
www.hyundai-elec.com/eng/
I
I.C.M.I.(Inductive Components
Mfg.,Inc.), 1200 Ferris Rd., P.O.
Box 188, Amelia, OH 45102
Phone: 513-752-4731
Fax: 513-752-4738
Email: DWM@ICMIinc.com
www.ICMIinc.com
IFS North America, Inc., 200
South Executive Dr., Brookfield,
WI 53005
Phone: 262-317-7480
Fax: 262-317-7401
Email: melissa.visel@ifsworld.com
www.ifsworld.com
igus Inc., P.O. Box 14349, East
Providence, RI 02914
Phone: 401-438-2200
Fax: 401-438-7270
Email: sales@igus.com
www.igus.com
ILLICA Group, 475 Silver St.,
Poca, WV 25159
Phone: 304-776-9370
Fax: 304-776-9464
Email: info@illica.com
www.bluepeterseries.com
Illinois Water Technologies, 5443
Swanson Court, Roscoe, IL 61073
Phone: 815-636-8884
Fax: 815-636-8883
Email: paulb@illinoiswatertech.com
www.illinoiswatertech.com
ILT-RES, LLC, M.Pokrovskaya, 18,
office 312, Nizhniy Novgorod,
603000, Russian Federation
Phone: +7 906 366 12 78
Fax: +7 831 433 77 14
Email: info@ilt-res.com
www.ilt-res.com
Imbibitive Technologies, 8
Hiscott St. #1, St. Catharines, ON
L2R 1C6, Canada
Phone: 888-843-2323
Fax: 877-439-2323
Email: jcp@imbiberbeads.com
www.imbiberbeads.com
Imeco Limited, Imeco House,
Budge Budge Trunk Rd., Ma-
heshtalla, Dakghar, Kolkata,
700141, India
Phone: 913366146614
Fax: 913366146666
Email: lda@imecolimited.com
www.imecolimited.com
Imerys, 100 Mansell Court East,
Ste. 300, Roswell, GA 30076
Phone: 770-645-3705
Fax: 770-645-3460
Email: mrollins@imerys.com
www.imerys.com
IMR Inc., 3634 Central Ave., St.
Petersburg, FL 33711
Phone: 727-328-2818
Fax: 727-328-2826
Email: info@imrusa.com
www.imrusa.com
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POWER 107
COMPANY
DIRECTORY
Incon, 92 Industrial Park Rd.,
Saco, ME 04072
Phone: 207-283-0156
Fax: 207-283-0158
Email: sales@incon.com
www.incon.com
Indeck Power Equipment Com-
pany, 1111 Willis Ave., Wheeling,
IL 60090
Phone: 847-541-8300
Fax: 847-541-9984
Email: rrabago@indeck-power.com
www.indeck.com
Independent Turbine Consulting,
LLC, 15905 Brookway Dr., Ste.
4101A, Huntersville, NC 28078
Phone: 804-397-9411
Email: Independent@Turbine-
FieldService.com
www.TurbineFieldService.com
Indigo Technologies, 8980 Perry
Hwy., Pittsburgh, PA 15237
Phone: 412-358-0171
Email: bob@indigotechnologies-
us.com
www.indigotechnologise-us.com
InduMar Products, Inc., 3355
West Alabama, Ste. 110, Hous-
ton, TX 77098
Phone: 713-977-4100
Fax: 713-977-4164
Email: stopit@indumar.com
www.indumar.com
Industrial Contract Services Inc.,
P.O. Box 13158, Grand Forks, ND
58208
Phone: 701-775-8480
Fax: 701-775-8479
Email: ics@icsgf.com
www.icsgf.com
Industrial Engineering, S.A., P. O.
Box 4146, Florence, SC 29502
Phone: 843-665-9984
Fax: 843-667-1424
Email: twalters@industrialengi-
neering-sa.com
www.industrialengineering-sa.com
Industrial Info Resources, 2277
Plaza Dr., Ste. 300, Sugarland,
TX 77479
Phone: 800-762-3361
Fax: 713-266-9306
Email: asolis@industrialinfo.com
www.industrialinfo.com
Industrial Insite, LLC, P.O. Box
286, Osseo, MN 55369
Phone: 763-753-7595
Email: kpitman@industrialinsite.
com
www.Industrialinsite.com
Industrial Magnetics, Inc., 1385
M-75 S., Boyne City, MI 49712
Phone: 231-582-3100
Email: doleary@magnetics.com
www.magnetics.com
Industrial Marketing Systems,
P.O. Box 890, Twin Peaks, CA
92391
Phone: 909-337-2238
Fax: 909-336-5293
Email: info@imswe.com
www.imswe.com
Industrial Servo Hydraulics, Inc.,
17650 Malyn Blvd., Fraser, MI
48026
Phone: 586-296-0960
Fax: 586-296-0375
Email: klamberti@indservo.com
www.indservo.com
Industrial Solutions Internation-
al, 326 Carter Moir Dr., Lancaster,
PA 17601
Phone: 717-560-0310
Email: dbenn63@attglobal.net
www.indsolint.com
Infolytica Corp, Place du Pare,
300 Leo Pariseau, Ste. 2222,
Montral, Quebec H2X 4B3, Canada
Phone: 514-849-8752
Fax: 514-849-4239
Email: info@infolytica.com
www.infolytica.com
Infor, 13560 Morris Rd., Ste.
4100, Alpharetta, GA 30004
Phone: 800-260-2640
Fax: 678-319-8682
Email: sales@infor.com
www.infor.com
InfoSight Corporation, 20700
US Highway 23, Chillicothe, OH
45601
Phone: 740-642-3600
Fax: 740-642-5001
Email: sales@infosight.com
www.infosight.com
Inland Industrial Services Group.
LLC, 2021 S Schaefer Highway,
Detroit, MI 48217
Phone: 313-220-5533
Fax: 313-841-5270
Email: jim.price@teaminland.
com
www.teaminland.com
INNER-TITE Corp, 110 Industrial
Dr., Holden, MA 01520
Phone: 508-829-6361
Fax: 508-829-4469
Email: security@inner-tite.com
www.inner-tite.com
Innovative Combustion Technolo-
gies, Inc., 2367 Lakeside Dr. Ste.
A-1, Birmingham, AL 35244
Phone: 205- 453-0236
Fax: 205-453-0239
Email: emarks@ict.com
www.innovativecombustion.com
Innovative Steam Technologies,
549 Conestoga Blvd., Carbridge,
ON N1R 7P4, Canada
Phone: 519-740-0757
Fax: 519-740-2051
Email: yservellon@otsg.com
www.otsg.com
Innovative Turnaround Controls,
8602 Spencer Highway, Laporte,
TX 77571
Phone: 713- 922-1303
Fax: 281- 998-9437
Email: valerie.russell@itc.jobs
www.itc.jobs
inoLECT, LLC, 9330 North Inter-
state Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70809
Phone: 225-751-7535
Fax: 225-751-7536
Email: mindi.talley@inolect.com
www.inolect.com
Inspectech, Corporation, 8550 W
Charleston Blvd. #102-148, Las
Vegas, NV 89117
Phone: 800-705-4357
Email: nlindell@inspectechcon-
sulting.com
www.weldtracking.com
InStep Software, 55 E. Monroe,
Chicago, IL 60603
Phone: 312-894-7837
Email: sales@instepsoftware.com
www.instepsoftware.com
Instrument Transformer Equip-
ment Corp (ITEC), P.O. Box
23088, Charlotte, NC 28227
Phone: 704-282-4331
Fax: 704-283-3017
Email: sales@itec-ctvt.com
www.itec-ctvt.com
Intek, Inc., 751 Intek Way,
Westerville, OH 43082
Phone: 614-895-0301
Email: jreynolds@intekflow.com
www.intekflow.com
Intergraph Corporation, 300 In-
tergraph Way, Madison, AL 35758
Phone: 256-730-3390
Email: cathy.lamberth@inter-
graph.com
www.intergraph.com/ppm/
Interliance LLC, 4 Hutton Centre,
Ste. 1050, Santa Ana, CA 92707
Phone: 714-540-8889
Fax: 714-540-6113
Email: info@interliance.com
www.interliance.com
International Cooling Tower,
3310-93 St., Edmonton, AB T6N
1C7, Canada
Phone: 780-469-4900
Fax: 780-489-5858
Email: blafferty@ictower.com
www.ictower.com
International Fog Inc., 7027 N.
Wabash Ave., Portland, OR 97217
Phone: 503-939-9046
Email: eivy@in-fog.com
www.internationalfog.com
International Paint, Stoneygate
Lane, Felling, Gateshead, NE10
0JY, UK
Phone: +44 191 402 2661
Email: protectivecoatings@
akzonobel.com
www.international-pc.com/coal
International Power Machinery
Co., 50 Public Sq, Terminal Tower,
Ste. 834, Cleveland, OH 44113
Phone: 216-621-9514
Fax: 216-621-9515
Email: kernx06@sbcglobal.net
www.intlpwr.com
Interpolymer Corporation, 200
Dan Rd., Canton, MA 02021
Phone: 781-828-7120
Fax: 781-821-2485
Email: info@interpolymer.com
www.interpolymer.com
Inuktun Services Ltd., 2569- C
Kenworth Rd., Nanaimo, BC
V9T3M4, Canada
Phone: 250-729-8080
Fax: 250-729-8077
Email: sales@inuktun.com
www.inuktun.com
Invensys, 10900 Equity Dr.,
Houston, TX 77041
Phone: 888-869-0059
Fax: 713-329-1700
Email: Contact@Invensys.com
www.IOM.Invensys.com
Ionics Inc., 65 Grove St., Water-
town, MA 02472
Phone: 617-926-2500
Fax: 617-926-4304
Email: info@ionics.com
www.ionics.com
Iris Power-Qualitrol, 3110 Ameri-
can Dr., Mississauga, ON L4V
1T2, Canada
Phone: 905-677-4824
Fax: 905-677-8498
Email: sales.iris@qualitrolcorp.com
www.irispower.com
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IRIS Systems Inc., 7583 Vantage
Place, Delta, BC V4F 1A5, Canada
Phone: 604-584-4747
Fax: 604-581-9790
Email: flame@iris-systems.com
www.iris-systems.com
IRISNDTMATRIX, 1115 W 4st St.,
Tulsa, OK 74107
Phone: 780-577-4478
Fax: 780-438-1436
Email: jjanzen@irisndt.com
www.irisndt.com
ITT Flygt Corporation, 35 Nutmeg
Dr., Trumbull, CT 06611
Phone: 203-380-4700
Fax: 203-380-4705
Email: mengxing.yao@itt.com
www.flygtus.com
ITW Devcon Futura Coatings,
1685 Galt Industrial Blvd., St.
Louis, MO 63132
Phone: 314-733-1110
Fax: 314-733-1164
Email: dbryant@futuracoatings.
com
www.futuracoatings.com
Iveco Motors Of North America,
245 E Carol Stream, Carol Stream,
IL 60188,
Phone: 630-260-4226
Fax: 630-260-4267
Email: margaret.bunting@iveco.
com
www.ivecomotors.com
J
J Custon Supply, Inc., 10013
Mammoth, Baton Rouge, LA
70814
Phone: 225-272-2210
Fax: 225-272-2223
Email: robert@jcustom.com
www.jcustom.com
J.H. Reid General Contractor,
3230 Hamilton Blvd., Plainfield,
NJ 07080
Phone: 301-526-7400
Fax: 732-762-7858
Email: pblankfeld@jhreidgc.com
www.jhreidgc.com
J.J. White Inc., 5500 Bingham
St., Philadelphia, PA 19120
Phone: 215-722-1000
Fax: 215-722-1252
Email: dpadlo@jjwhiteinc.com
www.jjwhiteinc.com
J7 Learning & Consulting, P.O.
Box 888, Levittown, PA 19058
Phone: 215-945-4217
Fax: 215-943-0447
Email: Ed@J7Learning.com
www.J7Learning.com
Jamison Products, LP, 27760
Commercial Park Rd., Tomball, TX
77375
Phone: 713-466-6951
Fax: 713-466-5051
Email: kabbey@jamisonproducts.
com
www.jamisonproducts.com
Jamko Technical Solutions, Inc.,
932 Sohn Alloway Rd., Lyons, NY
14489
Phone: 315-871-4420
Fax: 315-871-4430
Email: dean.bailey@jamkocorp.com
www.jamkocorp.com
Janus Fire Systems, 1102 Rupcich
Dr., Crown Point, IN 46307
Phone: 219-663-1600
Fax: 219-663-4562
Email: fhildebrandt@janusfire-
systems.com
www.janusfiresystems.com
Jarret Inc., 7 Centre Dr., Orchard
Park, NY 14127
Phone: 716-662-0406
Fax: 716-740-5121
Email: contact@jarret.com
www.jarret.com
JASC: Jansens Aircraft Systems
Controls Inc., 2303 W. Alameda
Dr., Tempe, AZ 85282
Phone: 602-438-4400
Fax: 602-438-4420
Email: Sales@jasc-controls.com
www.jasc-controls.com
Jefferson Electric, 9650 S. Frank-
lin Dr., Franklin, WI 53132
Phone: 414-209-1620
Fax: 414-209-1621
Email: info@jeffersonelectric.com
www.jeffersonelectric.com
Jeffrey Rader Corporation, 398
Willis Rd., Woodruff, SC 29388
Phone: 864-476-7523
Email: buster@penncrusher.com
www.jeffreyrader.com
Jekko USA, 4517 North Point
Blvd., Baltimore, Maryland 21219
Phone: (410) 419-4219
Email: t@t.com
www.jekkousa.com
Jenny Products, 850 N. Pleasant
Ave., Somerset, PA 15501
Phone: 814-445-3400
Fax: 814-445-2280
www.jennyproductsinc.com
Jiangsu High Hope International
Group Co. Ltd., High Hope Man-
sion, 91 Baixia Rd., Nanjing,
210008, China
Phone: +86-25-84691037
Fax: +86-025-84691038
Email: hhyp@high-hope.com
www.high-hope.com
Jindun Group USA, 10 Lantern
Lane, Lexington, MA 02421
Phone: 617-678-0354
Fax: 617-370-0508
Email: jin.ti@jindunusa.com
www.jindunusa.com
John Crane Inc., Mechanical
Seals Div, 6400 W. Oakton St.,
Morton Grove, IL 60053
Phone: 847-967-2400
Fax: 847-967-3915
Email: seals@johncrane.com
www.johncrane.com
John R. Robinson Inc., 38-05
30th St., Long Island City, NY
11362
Phone: 800-726-1026
Fax: 718-786-6090
Email: jrrinc@earthlink.net
www.johnrrobinsoninc.com
Johnson Bros Metal Forming Co.,
5520 McDermott Dr., Berkeley,
IL 60163
Phone: 708-449-7050
Fax: 708-449-0042
Email: info@jobroco.com
www.JohnsonRollForming.com
Johnson Matthey Catalysts LLC,
1121 Alderman Dr., St.e. 204,
Alpharetta, GA 30005
Phone: 678-341-7521
Fax: 678-341-7509
Email: bruce.gobbel@jmusa.com
www. ect.jmcatalysts.com
Jonas, Inc., 4313 Nebraska Court,
Pomfret, MD 20675
Phone: 301-934-5605
Fax: 301-934-5606
Email: jonasinc@steamcycle.com
www.steamcycle.com
Joseph Oat Corporation, 2500
Broadway, Camden, NJ 08104
Phone: 856-541-2900
Fax: 856-541-0864
Email: sales@josephoat.com
www.josephoat.com
JoshiJampala Engineering Pvt
Ltd., M 64 Additional MIDC,
Satara, 415004, India
Phone: +2162240097
Fax: +2162240017
Email: info@joshijampala.com
www.joshijampala.com
JOWA USA, Inc., 59 Porter Rd.,
Littleton, MA 01460
Phone: 978-486-9800
Fax: 978-486-0170
Email: info@jowa-usa.com
www.jowa-usa.com
JR ASSOCIATES CONSTRUCTION
SERVICES Inc., 1231, Villanova
Place, Riverside, CA 92506
Phone: 951-789-8655
Fax: 951-780-4607
Email: javedz@earthlink.net
JSHP Trasnformer, 68 Kunlun
Development Zone, Liyang, CA
213300, China
Phone: +86-519-87319199
Email: jimcai@jshp.com
www.jshp.com
JVI Vibratory Equipment Inc.,
P.O. Box 40564, Houston, TX
77240
Phone: 832-467-3720
Fax: 832-467-3800
Email: sales@navco-jvi.com
www.jvivibratoryequipment.com
JWF Industries, P.O. Box 1286,
Johnstown, PA 15907
Phone: 814-659-9300
Email: mhughes@etctank.com
www.jwfi.com
K
K&G Power Systems, 150 Laser
Court, Hauppauge, NY 11788
Phone: 631-342-1171
Fax: 631-342-1172
Email: jr@kgpowersystems.com
www.kgpowersystems.com
K.S INDUSTRY CO., Ltd., KSI B/D,
447-9, Cheonho-dong, Gangdong-
gu, Seoul, 134-020, Korea, Seoul,
134-020, South Korea
Phone: +82-2-3431-9040
Fax: +82-2-3431-9045
Email: kanghy@ksindustry.com
www.ksindustry.com
Kafko Intl. Ltd., 3555 W. Howard,
Skokie, IL 60175
Phone: 800-528-0334
Fax: 847-763-0334
Email: rmorgando@kafkointl.com
www.oileater.com
Kahn & Company Inc., 885 Wells
Rd., Wethersfield, CT 06109
Phone: 860-529-8643
Fax: 860-529-1895
Email: adsorb@kahn.com
www.kahn.com
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POWER 109
COMPANY
DIRECTORY
Kansas City Deaerator, 6731 W
121 St., Overland Park, KS 66209
Phone: 913-338-2111
Fax: 913-338-2144
Email: info@deaerator.com
www.deaerator.com
Karl Storz Endoscopy, Mittel-
strasse 8, Tuttlingen, 78532,
Germany
Phone: 33628750510
Email: kdaouadi@karlstorz.fr
www.karlstorz.com
Kawasaki Gas Turbines - Ameri-
cas, 8829 North Sam Houston
Pkwy., Houston, TX 77064
Phone: 281-970-3255 ext 18
Fax: 281-970-6465
Email: steve.cernik@kmc-usa.
com
www.kawasakigasturbines.com
Kaydon Filtration, 1571 Lukken
Industrial Dr. West, LaGrange, GA
31907
Phone: 706-884-3041
Fax: 706-883-6199
Email: kaydon@filtration.com
www.kaydonfiltration.com
KE-Burgmann EJS, 10035 Pros-
pect Ave., Ste. 202, Santee, CA
92071
Phone: 619-562-6083
Fax: 619-562-0636
Email: sales@keb-ejs.com
www.keb-ejs.com
KE-Burgmann USA, Inc., 2100
Conner Rd. Ste. 200, Hebron, KY
41048
Phone: 859-746-0091
Fax: 859-746-0094
Email: info@kebusa.com
www.ke-burgmann.com
Keco Engineered Controls, 1200
River Ave., Bldg 3A, Lakewood,
NJ 08701
Phone: 732-901-5900
Fax: 732-901-5904
Email: keco@optonline.net
www.kecocontrols.com
KEITH Mfg. Co., 401 NW Adler
St., Madras, OR 97741
Phone: 541-475-3802
www.keithwalkingfloor.com
Kentube, 555 W. 4St. St., Tulsa,
OK 74107
Phone: 918-446-4561
Fax: 918-445-4001
www.kentube.com
KEPCO/KPS, Jeongja 1-ro,
Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si 463-
729, Korea
Phone : 82-31-710-4127
E-mail : kst3651@kps.co.kr
See our ad on p. 35
Keystone Electrical Manufactur-
ing Company, 2511 Bell Ave., Des
Moines, IA 50321
Phone: 515-661-2775
Email: dlepage@KeystoneEMC.com
www.KeystoneEMC.com
Kiewit Power, 9401 Renner
Blvd., Lenexa, KS 66219
Phone: 913-928-7000
www.kiewit.com
See our ad on p. 37
K-II Enterprises, 3996 Box Car
Lane, Syracuse, NY 13219
Phone: 315-468-3596
Fax: 315-468-0454
Email: kiient@kiienterprises.com
www.kiienterprises.com/products/
KIMRE, Inc., P.O. Box 571240,
Miami, FL 33257
Phone: 305-233-4249
Fax: 305-233-8687
Email: sales@kimre.com
www.kimre.com
King Filtration Technologies Inc.,
1255 Research Blvd., St. Louis,
MO 63132
Phone: 314-432-8441
Fax: 314-432-5147
Email: bburns@kingfiltration.com
www.king-filter.com
Kingfisher Industrial, Cradley
Business Park, Overend Road,
Cradley Heath, B64 7DW, UK
Phone: +44(0) 1384 410777
Fax: +44(0) 1384 410877
Email: jbrindley@kingfisher-
industrial.co.uk
www.kingfisher-industrial.co.uk
Kingsbury Inc., 10385 Drummond
Rd., Philadelphia, PA 19154
Phone: 215-824-4000
Fax: 215-824-4999
Email: sales@kingsbury.com
www.kingsbury.com
Kingsbury Repair & Service, 3615
Davisville Rd., Hatboro, PA 19040
Phone: 215-956-0565
Fax: 215-956-9027
Email: daa@kingsbury.com
www.kingsbury.com
Kistler Instrument Corp, 75 John
Glenn Dr., Amherst, NY 14228
Phone: 716-691-5100
Fax: 716-691-5226
Email: sales.us@kistler.com
www.kistler.com
Kistler-Morse Corp, 150 Venture
Blvd., Spartanburg, SC 29305
Email: kmcorp@aol.com
Kitmondo Ltd., 55 Penn Rd.,
London, N7 9RE, UK
Phone: +44 870 366 6150
Fax: +44 870 922 3109
Email: richard@kitmondo.com
www.kitmondo.com
Kleentek, 4440 Creek Rd., Cincin-
nati, OH 45242
Phone: 800-252-4647
Fax: 513-891-4171
Email: info@kleentek.com
www.kleentek.com
KMPT AG, Industriestrasse 1-3,
Vierkirchen, 85256, Germany
Phone: +498139802990
Fax: +49813980299150
Email: info@kmpt.com
www.kmpt.com
KMPT USA, Inc., 8070 Production
Dr., Florence, KY 41042
Phone: 859-547-1100
Fax: 859-547-1098
Email: sales@kmpt.net
www.kmpt.net
Knight Pisold Consulting, 1400-
750 WeSt. Pender St., Vancouver,
BC V6C 2T8, Canada
Phone: 604-685-0543
Fax: 604-685-0147
Email: vancouver@knightpiesold.
com
www.knightpiesold.com
Knighthawk Engineering, 17625
El Camino Real Ste. 412, Hous-
ton, TX 77058
Phone: 281-282-9200
Fax: 281-282-9333
Email: dwalker@knighthawk.com
www.knighthawk.com
Knotts & Co, P.O. Box 1335,
Salem, UT 84653
Phone: 801-423-8080
Fax: 801-423-8028
Email: info@knottsco.net
www.knottsco.net
Komline-Sanderson, 12 Holland
Ave., P.O. Box 257, Peapack, NJ
07977
Phone: 908-234-1000
Fax: 908-234-9487
Email: info@komline.com
www.komline.com
Krueger Engr & Mfg Co, Inc., P.O.
Box 11308, Houston, TX 77293
Phone: 281-442-2537
Fax: 281-442-6668
Email: jsylvester@kemco.net
www.kemco.net
KSB, Inc., 4415 Sarellen Rd.,
Henrico, VA 23231
Phone: 804-565-8353
Fax: 804-226-6961
Email: sheinly@ksbusa.com
www.ksbusa.com
K-TEK Corp, 18321 Swamp Rd.,
Prairieville, LA 70769
Phone: 225-673-6100
Fax: 225-673-2525
www.ktekcorp.com
KTSDI LLC, 141 Lost Creek Dr.,
Youngstown, OH 44512
Phone: 330-783-2000
Email: sales@ktsdi.com
www.ktsdi.com
KUKA Real-Time Products, 17821
E. 17th St., Ste. 293, Tustin, CA
92780
Phone: 714-505-1485
Fax: 714-505-1149
Email: e.rankin@kuka-rtosusa.com
www.kuka-rtosusa.com
L
L.R. Kimball, 615 W. Highland
Ave., Ebensburg, PA 15931
Phone: 814-472-7700
Fax: 814-472-7712
Email: janet.hildebrand@lrkim-
ball.com
www.lrkimball.com
La Marche Mfg. Co., 106 Bradrock
Dr., Des Plaines, IL 60018
Phone: 847 299-1188
Fax: 847-299-3061
Email: jbarhorst@lamarchemfg.
com
www.lamarchemfg.com
Laboratory Testing Inc., 2331
Topaz Dr., Hatfield, PA 19440
Phone: 800-219-9095
Fax: 800-219-9096
Email: sales@labtesting.com
www.labtesting.com
Lake Shore Electric Corp, 205 Wil-
lis St., Bedford, OH 44146
Phone: 440-232-0200
Fax: 440-232-5644
Email: sales@lake-shore-electric.
com
www.lake-shore-electric.com
Landstar Ranger, 3909 S.E. 29th
Ste. 105, Del City, OK 73115
Phone: 405-672-5895
Fax: 405-672-5898
Email: calvarych@sbcglobal.net
Lanier Consulting, LLC, 141
Lucretia Lane, Columbiana, OH
44408
Phone: 330-322-9185
Fax: 330-482-9236
Email: info@lanierconsult.com
www.lanierconsult.com
COMPANY
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December 2012 110
Lanj Tools LLC, 1314-B Center
Dr. #424, Medford, OR 97501
Phone: 888-419-1963
Fax: 541-639-4264
Email: Jim@Lanjtools.com
www.Lanjtools.com
LAP Power Engineering, 800
Village Walk, #237, Guilford, CT
06437
Phone: 203-464-9123
Fax: 203-488-3439
Email: lap.power.engineering@
comcast.net
Laser Imaging Systems, 204-A
E McKenzie St., Punta Gorda, FL
33950
Phone: 941-639-3533
Fax: 941-639-6458
Email: lis@sunline.net
www.sunline.net/lis
Lasermap Image Plus/GPR, 16
Sixth Line Rd., Bristol, QC J0X
1G0, Canada
Phone: 819-647-3085
Fax: 819-647-3085
Email: bobf@lasermap.com
www.lasermap.com
Layne Christensen, W229 N5005
Du Plainville Rd., Pewaukee, WI
53072
Phone: 262-246-4646
Fax: 262-246-4784
Email: erin.beck@layne.com
www.layne.com
Lazar Scientific, Inc., 51097
Bittersweet Rd., P.O. Box 1128,
Granger, IN 46530
Phone: 574-271-7020
Fax: 574-271-7477
Email: mike@lazarsci.com
www.lazarsci.com
LCI Corporation, 4433 Chesa-
peake Dr., Charlotte, NC 28216
Phone: 704-394-8341
Fax: 704-392-8507
Email: info@lcicorp.com
www.lcicorp.com
LCR Electronics, 9 South Forest
Ave., Norristown, PA 19401
Phone: 610-278-0840
Fax: 610-278-0935
Email: sales@lcr-inc.com
www.lcr-inc.com
LEA International, 10701 Airport
Dr., Hayden, ID 83835
Phone: 800-881-8506
Fax: 208-762-6099
www.leaintl.com
Lectrodryer, 135 Quality Dr.,
Richmond, KY 40475
Phone: 859-624-2091
Fax: 859-623-2436
Email: abell@lectrodryer.com
www.lectrodryer.com
Lectrus, 2215-C Olan Mills Dr.,
Chattanooga, TN 37421
Phone: 423-894-9268
Fax: 423-553-6166
Email: info@lectrus.com
www.lectrus.com
LEDtronics, Inc., 23105 Kashiwa
CT, Torrance, CA 90505
Phone: 310-534-1505
Fax: 310-534-1424
Email: jpapanier@ledtronics.com
www.LEDtronics.com
LEECO STEEL, LLC, 8255 S.
Lemont Rd., Ste. 100, Darien, IL
60561
Phone: 800-621-4366
Fax: 630-427-2190
Email: jstreicher@leecosteel.com
www.leecosteel.com
Lenox Instrument Company, Inc.,
265 Andrews Rd., Trevose, PA
19053
Phone: 215-322-9990
Fax: 215-322-6126
Email: sales@lenoxinst.com
www.lenoxinst.com
Leslie Controls, Inc., 12501 Tele-
com Dr., Tampa, FL 33637
Phone: 813-978-1000
Fax: 800-933-7543
Email: tware@lesliecontrols.com
www.lesliecontrols.com
Lewis-Goetz & Co, 1217 67th St.,
Baltimore, MD 21237,
Phone: 410-485-1045
Fax: 410-485-1051
Email: bbettridge@lewis-goetz.
com
www.lewis-goetz.com
Liberty Steel Fabricators, 5292
Hog Mountain Rd., Flowery
Branch, GA 30542
Phone: 770-616-4042
Fax: 770-967-8005
Email: LibertySteelFab@aol.com
www.LibertySteelFabricators.com
Liburdi Dimetrics Corporation,
2599 Charlotte Highway, Moores-
ville, NC 28117
Phone: 704-892-8872
Email: mschwall@dimetrics.com
www.liburdi.com
Lift-It Manufacturing Company,
Inc., 4780 Corona Ave., Los
Angeles, CA 90058
Phone: 323-582-6076
Fax: 323-587-1630
Email: mgelskey@aol.com
www.lift-it.com
Lincoln Electric, 22801 Saint
Clair Ave., Cleveland, OH 44117
Phone: 216-383-2576
Fax: 216-383-8381
Email: scott_skrjanc@lincol-
nelectric.com
www.lincolnelectric.com
Lineal Recruiting Services, 46
Copper Kettle Rd., Trumbull, CT
06611
Phone: 203-386-1091
Fax: 203-386-9788
Email: lisalineal@lineal.com
www.lineal.com
LINE-X Protective Coatings, 1862
Sparkman Dr., Huntsville, AL
35816
Phone: 256-713-4267
Fax: 800-846-8319
Email: kjohnson@linexmail.com
www.linexmail.com
Linita Design & Mfg. Corp., 1951
Hamburg Trpk. #24, Buffalo, NY
14218
Phone: 715-566-7753
Email: andrea@linita.com
www.linita.com
Lisbon Hoist, Inc., 321 South
Beaver St., Lisbon, OH 44432
Phone: 330-424-7283
Fax: 330-424-7445
Email: info@lisbonhoist.com
www.lisbonhoist.com
LISEGA Inc., 370 E. Dumplin Val-
ley Rd., Kodak, TN 37764
Phone: 423-625-2225
Fax: 423-625-9009
Email: dan.klawonn@us.lisega.
com
www.us.lisega.com
Lista International Corp., 106
Lowland St., Holliston, MA 01746
Phone: 800-722-3020
Fax: 508-626-0353
Email: sales@listaintl.com
www.listaintl.com
LoadBanks of America, 2004
Howard Lane, Austin, TX 78728
Phone: 877-288-4482
Email: casey@loadbanksofamer-
ica.com
www.loadbanksofamerica.com
Lockmasters USA, P.O. Box 2532,
Panama City, FL 32402
Phone: 800-461-0620
Fax: 850-914-9754
Email: sales@lockmastersusa.com
www.lockmastersusa.com
Lockwood Greene, CH2M HILL,
P.O. Box 491, Spartanburg, SC
29304
Phone: 864-578-2000
Fax: 864-599-4117
Email: lockwood@lg.com
www.lg.com
Logistics Planning Services,
1140 Centre Point Dr., Ste. 100,
Mendota Heights, MN 55120
Phone: 651-789-4920
Fax: 651-552-4910
Email: pmccarthy@shiplps.com
www.shiplps.com
Look Technologies, LLC, 2723
Wilshire Ave., West Lafayette, IN
47906
Phone: 217-419-5641
Fax: 888-600-7610
Email: support@Lookrvi.com
www.Lookrvi.com
LPP Combustion LLC, 8940 Old
Annapolis Rd., Ste. K, Columbia,
MD 21045
Phone: 410-884-3089
Fax: 410-884-3267
Email: couslere@lppcombustion.
com
www.lppcombustion.com
Lucifer Furnaces, Inc., 2048 Bun-
nell Rd., Warrington, PA 18976
Phone: 215-343-0411
Fax: 215-343-7388
Email: info@luciferfurnaces.com
www.luciferfurnaces.com
LUDECA, Inc., 1425 NW 88 th
Ave., Doral, FL 33172
Phone: 305-591-8935
Fax: 305-591-1537
Email: dieter.seidenthal@ludeca.
com
www.ludeca.com
Lufft USA, 123 Gray Ave., Santa
Barbara, CA 93101,
Phone: 805-453-9668
Email: apattison@abbeon.com
www.lufftusa.com
LumaSense Technologies, 3301
Leonard Ct., Santa Clara, CA
95054
Phone: 906-370-0232
Fax: 408-727-1600
Email: j.coponen@lumasenseinc.
com
www.lumasenseinc.com
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POWER 111
COMPANY
DIRECTORY
LVI Services, Inc., 2250 East Ad-
ams Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19124
Phone: 973- 476-9066
Email: mduffy@lviservices.com
www.lviservices.com
LYNN Engineered Systems LLC,
28835 N. Herky Dr., Ste. 103,
Lake Bluff, IL 60044
Phone: 847-549-8900
Fax: 847-549-8901
Email: ned@lynnengineeredsys-
tems.com
www.lynnengineeredsystems.com
M
M+P Labs, Inc., 2210 Technology
Dr., Schenectady, NY 12308
Phone: 518-382-0082
Fax: 518-382-1182
Email: info@mandplabs.com
www.mandplabs.com
M+W Group, Lotterbergstrae 30,
Stuttgart, 70499, Germany
Phone: +4971188040
Fax: +4971188041393
Email: mario.borst@mwgroup.net
www.mwgroup.net
MACCHI - A Division of Sofinter
SPA, Largo Buffoni, 3, Gallarate
(VA), 21013, Italy
Phone: +390331738111
Fax: +390331738377
Email: macchi@macchiboiler.it
www.macchiboiler.it
Machine Control Systems, 90
Monarch Rd., Guelph, ON N1K
1S3, Canada
Phone: 519-767-0830
Fax: 519-767-0841
Email: info@mcsltd.ca
www.machinecontrolsystems.ca
Machinery Mounting Solutions,
Inc., 8000 Research Forest Dr.,
Ste. 115-244, Spring, TX 77382
Phone: 281-298-9911
Fax: 281-220-8368
Email: RotaChock@ymail.com
www.machinerymountingsolu-
tions.com
MacroTech, Inc., 246 Mamaroneck
Rd., Scarsdale, NY 10583
Phone: 914-723-6185
Fax: 914-723-6085
Email: wjblume@verizon.net
www.macrotechinc.com
Magellan Professional Solutions,
Inc., 109-G Gainsborough Sq.
#744, Chesapeake, VA 23320
Phone: 757-549-1880
Fax: 866-861-9647
Email: dlong@magellan-ps.com
www.magellan-ps.com
Magna Machine Co., 11180
Southland Rd., Cincinnati, OH
45240
Phone: 513-851-6900
Fax: 513-851-6904
Email: sabney@magna-machine.
com
www.magna-machine.com
Magnatech LLC, 6 Kripes Rd., P.O.
Box 260, East Granby, CT 06026
Phone: 860-653-2573
Fax: 860-653-0486
Email: info@magnatechllc.com
www.magnatechllc.com
Magnetics Division, Global Equip-
ment Mktg Inc., P.O. Box 810483,
Boca Raton, FL 33481
Phone: 561-750-8662
Fax: 561-750-9507
Email: info@globalmagnetics.com
www.globalmagnetics.com
Magnetrol International, Inc.,
5300 Belmont Rd., Downers
Grove, IL 60515
Phone: 630-690-4000
Fax: 630-969-9489
Email: kcacciato@magnetrol.com
www.magnetrol.com
Mainsaver, 15150 Ave. of Science,
San Diego, CA 92128
Phone: 858-674-8700
Email: Mainsaver.info@main-
saver.com
www.mainsaver.com
MajorPower Corporation, 7011
Industrial Dr., Mebane, NC 27302
Phone: 919-563-6610
Fax: 919-563-6620
Email: order-spport@majorpower.
com
www.majorpower.com
Mammoet USA, 20525 FM 521,
Rosharon, TX 77583
Phone: 281-595-2705
Fax: 281-369-2178
Email: ashten.postell@mammoet.
com
www.mammoet.com
MAN Turbo Inc. USA, 2901
Wilcrest Dr., Ste. 345, Houston,
TX 77042
Phone: 713-780-4200
Fax: 713-780-2848
Email: powergeneration@
manturbo-us.com
www.manturbo.com
See our ad on cover 2
Mapna Turbine engineering &
Manufacturing Co.(TUGA), 8th
floor No.231 Mirdamad Blvd.,
Tehran, 1918953651, Iran
Phone: +0098 2122908581
Fax: +0098 21 22908654
Email: saljooghi.amir@mapnatur-
bine.com
www.mapnaturbine.com
Marathon Sensors Inc., 3100
E Kemper Rd., Cincinnati, OH
45241
Phone: 513-772-1000
Fax: 513-326-7090
www.marathonsensors.com
Margan Inc., 330 Rayford. Rd.,
Ste. 412, Spring, TX 77386
Phone: 936-273-1144
Fax: 936-273-1148
Email: rw@margan.com
www.margan.com
Marietta Silos LLC, 2417 Water-
ford Rd., Marrietta, OH 45750
Phone: 740-373-2822
Fax: 740-376-2635
Email: andrea@mariettasilos.com
www.mariettasilos.com
Marking Services Inc., 8265 N
Faulkner Rd., Milwaukee, WI
53224
Phone: 414-973-1331
Fax: 414-973-1332
Email: jasonh@markserv.com
www.markserv.com
Martech Media, Inc., 9450
Grogan,s Mill Rd., Ste. 150, The
Woodlands, TX 77380
Phone: 281-465-0625
Fax: 281-465-3531
Email: contactus@martechmedai.
com
www.martechmedia.com
Martin Engineering, One Martin
Place, Neponset, IL 61345
Phone: 309-594-2384
Fax: 309-594-2432
Email: tradeshows@martin-eng.
com
www.martin-eng.com
Mason - Grey Corp, 400 Galleria
Parkway Ste. 1500, Atlanta, GA
30339
Phone: 678-385-7470
Fax: 678-385-7471
Email: jreini@mason-grey.com
www.mason-grey.com
Master Bond, Inc., 134 Hobart
St., Hackensack, NJ 07601
Phone: 201-343-8983
Fax: 201-343-2132
Email: main@masterbond.com
www.masterbond.com
Master Lock Company, 137 West
Forest Hill Ave., Oak Creek, WI
53154
Phone: 417-571-5625
Fax: 423-634-3401
Email: gpinson@mlock.com
www.mlock.com
Matec In America, 71 South St.,
Hopkinton, MA 01748
Phone: 508-293-8400
Fax: 508- 435-1919
Email: info@matecinamerica.com
www.matecinamerica.com
Materials Recycling of Orlando
Inc., 5361 Young Pine Rd.,
Orlando, FL 32829
Phone: 407-234-1788
Fax: 407-380-5188
Email: jmm@materialsorlando.
com
www.materialsorlando.com
Matrix Service, 5100 East Skelly
Dr. # 700, Tulsa, OK 74135
Phone: 918-838-8822
Fax: 918-838-0782
Email: dstarcher@matrixservice.
com
www.matrixservice.com
MAVEN POWER, LLC, 134 Vintage
Park Blvd., Ste. A-101, Houston,
TX 77070
Phone: 832-552-9225
Fax: 832-460-3760
Email: info@mavenpower.com
www.mavenpower.com
Mazzella Lifting Techonolgies,
21000 Aerospace Parkway, Cleve-
land, OH 44142
Phone: 440-239-7000
Fax: 440-239-7010
Email: mminissale@mazzellacom-
panies.com
www.mazzellacompanies.com
MB Oil Filters, c/o Meiji Corpora-
tion, 660 Fargo Ave., Elk Grove
Village, IL 60007
Phone: 847-364-9333 x 652
Email: TroyL@mboilfilters.com
www.mboilfilters.com
MBDi (Mastering Business
Development, Inc.), 7422 Carmel
Executive Park Dr., Ste. 202,
Charlotte, NC 28226
Phone: 704-553-0000
Fax: 704-553-0001
Email: info@mbdi.com
www.mbdi.com
McCrometer, 3255 W. Stetson
Ave., Hemet, CA 92545
Phone: 951-652-6811
Fax: 951-652-3078
www.mccrometer.com
COMPANY
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December 2012 112
McDermott Brothers Products,
2435 W. Union St., Allentown,
PA 18104
Phone: 610-432-6188
Fax: 610-432-5690
Email: tnunn@iso-con.com
www.iso-con.com
McGill AirClean LLC, 1777 Refu-
gee Rd., Columbus, OH 43207
Phone: 614-829-1200
Fax: 614-445-8759
Email: sales@mcgillairclean.com
www.mcgillairclean.com
McGills Equipment, 4803 N Mil-
waukee Ave., Chicago, IL 60630
Phone: 773-209-3211
Email: mcgillsequip@aol.com
www.mcgillsequipment.com
McLaren Software, Inc., 10375
Richmond Ave., Ste. 825, Hous-
ton, TX 77042
Phone: 713-357-4714
Fax: 713-357-4711
Email: angela.restani@mcclaren-
software.com
www.mclarensoftware.com
MCNS Environmental Systems
Inc., 5940 Young St., Smithville,
ONL0R2A0, Canada
Phone: 905-957-7041
Email: mcnsenv1@aol.com
www.mcnsenvironmental.com
MDF Cable Bus Systems, 4465
Limaburg Rd., Hebron, KY 41048
Phone: 888-808-1655
Fax: 859-586-6572
Email: mmiller@mdfbus.com
www.mdfbus.com
Mead & Hunt, Inc., 6501 Watts
Rd., Madison, WI 53719
Phone: 608-273-6380
Email: miro.kurka@meadhunt.com
www.meadhunt.com
Measurement Specialties Inc., 1000
Lucas Way, Hampton, VA 23666
Phone: 800-678-7226
Fax: 757-766-4297
Email: Denise.Topping@meas-
spec.com
www.meas-spec.com
Mechanical & Ceramic Solutions,
Inc., 730 Superior St., Building
16, Carnegie, PA 15106
Phone: 412-429-8991
Fax: 412-429-8766
Email: kevinb@mcs-pa.com
www.mcs-pa.com
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis,
Ltd., 19 British American Blvd.,
Latham, NY 12110
Phone: 518-399-3616
Fax: 518-399-3929
Email: smclenithan@MDAtur-
bines.com
www.MDAturbines.com
MECS Inc., 14522 S Outer Forty
Rd., Chesterfield, MO 63017
Phone: 314-275-5700
Fax: 314-275-5701
Email: generalquestions@gold-
wing.mecsglobal.com
www.mecsglobal.com
Meeco Inc., 250 Titus Ave., War-
rington, PA 18976
Phone: 215-343-6600
Fax: 215-343-4194
Email: sales@meeco.com
www.meeco.com
Megger, 4271 Bronze Way, Dallas,
TX 75237
Phone: 800-723-2861
Fax: 214-331-7379
Email: ussales@megger.com
www.megger.com
Meiji Corporation, 660 Fargo
Ave., Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
Phone: 847-364-9333 ext 652
Fax: 847-364-1140
Email: troyl@meijicorp.com
www.meijicorp.com
Membrana, 13800 S. Lakes Dr.,
Charlotte, NC 28273
Phone: 704-587-8888
Fax: 704-587-8610
Email: info@liqui-cel.com
www.liqui-cel.com
MEN Micro Inc., 24 North Main
St., Ambler, PA 19002
Phone: 215-542-9575
Fax: 215-542-9577
Email: Stephen.Cunha@menmi-
cro.com
www.menmicro.com
Mercer International Oil Water
Separators, P.O. Box 540, Mend-
ham, NJ 07945
Phone: 973-543-9000
Email: aellman@mercerows.com
www.oil-water-separators.com
Metabo, P.O. Box 2287, 1231 Wil-
son Dr., West Chester, PA 19380
Phone: 800-638-2264
Email: dsmith@metabousa.com
www.metabousa.com
Metabo Corporation, 1231 Wilson
Dr., West Chester, PA 19380
Phone: 610-436-5900
Fax: 610-436-9072
Email: ttuerk@metabousa.com
www.metabo.us
Metalfab, Inc., P.O. Box 9,
Prices Switch Road, Vernon, NJ
07462
Phone: 973-764-2111
Fax: 973-764-0272
Email: sales@metalfabinc.com
www.metalfabinc.com
See our ad on p. 45
METEODYN AMERICA, 2207 Chest-
nut St., Philadelphia, PA 19103
Phone: 332-407-0505
Fax: 332-407-0506
Email: delphine.pouzet@meteo-
dyn.com
www.meteodyn.com
Metric Systems Corporation, 2320
Cousteau Ct., Ste. 201, Vista,
CA 92081
Phone: 760-560-0348
Fax: 760-560-0356
Email: dbarak@metricsystems.
com
www.metricsystems.com
Metrix Instrument Co, A Roper
Industries Company, 1771 Town-
hurst Dr., Houston, TX 77043
Phone: 713-461-2131
Fax: 713-461-8223
Email: sales@metrix1.com
www.metrix1.com
Metrohm-Peak, 12521 Gulf Free-
way, Houston, TX 77034
Phone: 281-484-5000
Fax: 281-484-5001
Email: info@mp-ic.com
www.mp-ic.com
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.,
2715 Pleasant Valley Rd., York,
PA 17402
Phone: 412-239-5298
Fax: 412-269-5212
Email: keith.ference@metso.com
www.metso.com
Metso Power, 3430 Toringdon
Way, Charlotte, NC 28277
Phone: 704-541-1453
Fax: 704-541-1128
Email: info.power@metso.com
www.metsopower.com
Mettler-Toledo Thornton, Inc.,
36 Middlesex Turnpike, Bedford,
MA 01730
Phone: 781-301-8600
Fax: 781-301-8701
Email: craig.lazinsky@mt.com
www.mt.com/thornton
Mexel USA LLC, 1655 N. Fort Myer
Dr. # 350, Arlington, VA 22207
Phone: 703-349-3347
Fax: 703-528-9069
Email: amcentarffer@mexelusa.
com
www.mexelusa.com
MGE UPS Systems, 1660 Scenic
Ave., Costa Mesa, CA 92626
Phone: 714-557-1636
Fax: 714-434-0865
www.mgeups.com/us
MHT Access Services, Inc., 4127
Hollister St., Ste. A, Houston, TX
77080
Phone: 713-460-4001
Email: howard.wall@mhtgroup.net
www.mhtgroup.net
Mid America Engine, 2500 State
Hwy. 160, Warrior, AL 35180
Phone: 205-590-3505
Fax: 205-590-3558
Email: sales@maegen.com
www.maegen.com
Middough Inc., 1901 East 13th
St., Cleveland, OH 44114
Phone: 216-367-6307
Fax: 216-367-6020
Email: bakapj@middough.com
www.middough.com
Midland-ACS, P.O. Box 422,
Grimsby, ON L3M 4H8, Canada
Phone: 905-309-1834
Fax: 905-309-1835
Email: marketing@midland-acs.com
www.midland-acs.com
Mid-Mountain Materials, Inc.,
2385 - 82nd Ave. SE Ste. 100,
Mercer Island, WA 98040
Phone: 800-382-2208
Fax: 206-762-7694
Email: info@mid-mountain.com
www.mid-mountain.com
Midwest Industrial Supply Inc.,
1101 3rd St. SE, Canton, OH
44707
Phone: 330-456-3121
Fax: 330-456-3247
Email: julie.mamula@midwestind.
com
www.midwestind.com
Midwest Towers, 1153 Hwy. 19
East, Chickasha, OK 73018
Phone: 405-224-4622
Fax: 405-224-4625
Email: sales@midwesttowers.com
www.midwesttowers.com
MikroPul, 4433 Chesapeake Dr.,
Charlotte, NC 28216
Phone: 704-998-2600
Fax: 704-998-2601
Email: info@mikropul.com
www.mikropul.com
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Milbank Mfg Co, 4801 Deramus,
Kansas City, MO 64120
Phone: 816-483-5314
Fax: 816-483-6357
Email: lbirks@milbankmfg.com
www.milbankmfg.com
Millcreek Engineering, 495 East
4500 South, Ste. 200, Salt Lake
City, UT 84107
Phone: 804-904-2260
Fax: 801-904-2261
Email: stephanieh@millcreekeng.
com
www.millcreekeng.com
Miller Engineering-ANM Equip-
ment, 3801 N. Hwy. Dr., Tucson,
AZ 85705
Phone: 520-888-2605
Fax: 520-888-5984
Email: dwarren@anm-equipment.
com
www.anm-equipment.com
Mil-Ram Technology, Inc., 4135
Business Center Dr., Fremont, CA
94538
Phone: 510-656-2001
Fax: 510-656-2004
Email: sls@mil-ram.com
www.mil-ram.com
Milton Roy, 201 Ivyland Rd.,
Ivyland, PA 18974
Phone: 215-441-7848
Fax: 215-441-8620
Email: rdougherty@miltonroy.com
www.miltonroy.com
Mining Media International, 8751
East Hampden Ave. #B-1, Denver,
CO 80231
Phone: 713-343-1872
Email: djohnsont@mining-media.
com
Minnotte Manufacturing Corp.,
Minnotte Square, Pittsburgh, PA
15220
Phone: 412-922-2963
Email: martinj@minnotte.com
www.minnotte.com
MinTech, P.O. Box 19903, At-
lanta, GA 30325
Phone: 404-355-4580
Fax: 404-355-8284
Email: alecia.cofield@momar.com
www.momar.com
Mission Instruments, 26705 Loma
Verde, Mission Viejo, CA 92691
Phone: 949-582-0889
Fax: 949-916-2193
Email: missionist@aol.com
www.cegrit.com
Mitsubishi Power Systems Inc.,
100 Colonial Center Pkwy., Lake
Mary, FL 32746
Phone: 407-688-6100
www.mpshq.com
Moffitt Corporation, 1351 13th
Ave. South, Ste. 130, Jackson-
ville Beach, FL 32250
Phone: 904-241-9944
Fax: 904-246-8333
Email: ilachut@moffitthvac.com
www.moffitthvac.com
Mogas Industries, 14330 E. Hardy
St., Houston, TX 77039
Phone: 281-449-0291
Fax: 281-590-3412
Email: mogas@mogas.com
www.mogas.com
moisttech, 5140 Commerce Ave.,
Moorpark, CA 93021
Phone: 805-378-1160
Fax: 803-378-1163
Email: jfordham@moisttech.com
www.moisttech.com
Moon Fabricating Corp., 700 W.
Morgan St., Kokomo, IN 46901
Phone: 765-459-4194
Fax: 765-452-6090
Email: gveach@moontanks.com
www.moontanks.com
MOPAC Plant & Building Service,
836 Joseph Lowery Blvd., P.O.
Box 93325 (30337), Atlanta, GA
30318
Phone: 404-872-0434
Fax: 404-892-0250
Email: mopac@mopac.biz
www.mopac.biz
Moran Iron Works Inc., 11739
M-68 Hwy., P.O. Box 732, On-
away, MI 49765
Phone: 989-733-2011
Fax: 989-733-2371
Email: sales@moraniron.com
www.moraniron.com
Morgan Schaffer Systems, 5110
Ave. de Courtrai, Montreal, QC
H3W 1A7, Canada
Phone: 514-739-1967
Fax: 514-739-0434
Email: info@morganschaffer.com
www.morganschaffer.com
MOST Mobilization Optimization
Stabilization Train, 753 State
Ave. Ste. 800, Kansas City, KS
66101
Phone: 800-395-1089
Fax: 913-281-0037
Email: bconnors@mostprograms.
com
www.mostprograms.com
Mott Corporation, 84 Spring Ln,
Farmington, CT 06032
Phone: 860-747-6333
Fax: 860-747-6739
Email: Quest@mottcorp.com
www.mottcorp.com
MPW Industrial Services Inc.,
9711 Lancaster Rd. SE, Hebron,
OH 43025
Phone: 800-827-8790
Fax: 740-928-8033
Email: hhempy@mpwservices.com
www.mpwservices.com
MRG, Inc., 21 Glen Rd., Sandy
Hook, CT 06482
Phone: 203-264-0500
Fax: 203-270-3712
Email: carolanj@mrginc.net
www.mrgsolutions.com
MRU Instruments, Inc., 6699
Portwest Dr. Ste. 130, Houston,
TX 77024
Phone: 713-426-3260
Fax: 713-426-3213
Email: mwende@mru-instru-
ments.com
www.mru-instruments.com
MSE-Tetragenics, 65 East Broad-
way, Butte, MT 59701
Phone: 406-533-6800
Fax: 406-533-6818
Email: tgcontact@mse-ta.com
www.tetragenics.com
MTU Onsite Energy Corporation,
100 Power Dr., Mankato, MN
56001
Phone: 800-325-5450
Fax: 507-625-2968
Email: powergen3@mtu-online.com
www.mtu-online.com
Multifab Inc. Fabricators, 1200
Elmwood Ave., Sharon Hill, PA
19079
Phone: 610-534-2000
Fax: 610-534-7308
Email: multifabinc@rcn.com
www.multifabinc.com
Muns Welding and Mechanical,
Inc., 205 Cary Dr., Beech Island,
SC 29842
Phone: 803-827-1572 x202
Fax: 803-827-9034
Email: lmuns@munswelding.com
www.munswelding.com
Munters Corporation, 225 S.
Magnolia Ave., Buena Vista, VA
24416
Phone: 540-291-1111
Fax: 540-291-3333
Email: dhinfo@munters.com
www.munters.us
Munters Corporation, Mist
Eliminator & Tower Packing Div,
210 Sixth St.e SE, Fort Myers, FL
33907
Phone: 239-936-1555
Fax: 239-278-1316
Email: usfmycs_me@americas.
munters.com
www.munters.us
MWM GmbH, Carl-Benz-Strae 1,
Mannheim, 68167, Germany
Phone: +6213840
Fax: +621384880
Email: info@mwm.net
www.mwm.net
MYMIC LLC, 1040 University
Blvd., Ste. 100, Portsmouth, VA
23703
Phone: 757-391-9200
Fax: 757-391-9098
Email: zach.fauver@mymic.net
www.mymic.net
Myrex Industries, 9119 Weedy
Lane, Houston, TX 77093
Phone: 713-691-5200
Email: ppatel@myrex.com
www.myrex.com
N
N.O.W. & Associates Inc., 172
Bradwick Dr., Concord, ON K4K
1K8, Canada
Phone: 905-669-2461
Fax: 905-669-2685
Email: nowassociates@bellnet.ca
www.nowassociates.com
NAB, 902-904 Whitehorse Rd.,
Boxhill, 3128, Australia
Phone: +03-88430397
Fax: +03-88430397
Email: diana.lin@nab.com.au
www.nab.com.au
NAES Corporation, 1180 NW
Maple St., Ste. 200, Issaquah,
WA 98027
Phone: 425-961-4700
Fax: 425-961-4646
Email: jeanette.carroll@naes.com
www.naes.com
See our ad on p. 48
Nalco Air Protection Technolo-
gies, 1601 W Deihl Rd., Naper-
ville, IL 60563
Phone: 630-305-1328
Email: nalcomobotec@nalco.com
www.nalcomobotec.com
Namco, 2100 West Broad St.,
Elizabethtown, NC 28337
Phone: 910-862-2511
Fax: 910-879-5486
Email: dcoe@dancon.com
www.danaherspecialtyproducts.
com/Namco/
COMPANY
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December 2012 114
Nash, A Gardner Denver Product,
Alta Vista Business Park, 200
Simko Blvd., Charleroi, PA 15022
Phone: 724-239-1500
Email: nash@gardnerdenver.com
www.GDNash.com
Nat-Com, 8515 Lafrenaie Blvd.,
St. Leonard, QC H1P2B3, Canada
Phone: 514-326-2571
Fax: 514-326-9347
Email: info@national-combus-
tion.com
www.natcomonline.com
National Conveyors Company
Inc., 33 Nicholson Rd., East
Granby, CT 06026
Phone: 860-653-0374
Fax: 860-653-2965
Email: info@nationalconveyors.
com
www.nationalconveyors.com
National Electric Coil, 800 King
Ave., Columbus, OH 43212
Phone: 360-753-9126
Fax: 614-488-8892
Email: jhutt@national-electric-
coil.com
www.national-electric-coil.com
National Inspection & Consul-
tants, Inc., 9911 Bavaria Rd., Ft.
Myers, FL 33913
Phone: 941-475-4882
Fax: 321-234-0305
Email: charlie.moore@nicinc.com
www.nicinc.com
National Steel City, LLC, 14650
Jib St., Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: 734-459-9515
Fax: 734-459-9543
www.nationalsteelcity.com
National Steel Erection, 1115
Industrial Dr., Owensboro, KY
43202
Phone: 270-926-2534
Fax: 270-683-1960
Email: terry.byrnes@hornhis.com
www.nationalsteelerection.com
National Technical Systems,
24007 Ventura Blvd., Ste. 200,
Calabasas, CA 91302
Phone: 818-591-0776
Fax: 818-591-0899
Email: info@ntscorp.com
www.ntscorp.com
Nationwide Boiler Inc., 42400
Christy St., Fremont, CA 94538
Phone: 510-490-7100
Fax: 510-490-0571
Email: lday@nationwideboiler.com
www.nationwideboiler.com
NatronX Technologies, LLC,
1735 Market St., Philadelphia,
PA 19103
Phone: 215-299-6208
Fax: 215-299-6387
Email: denise.daponte@fmc.com
www.natronx.com
See our ad on p. 41
Navigant Consulting Inc., 30 S.
Wacker St., Ste. 3100, Chicago,
IL 60606
Phone: 312-583-5700
Email: dprobasco@navigantcon-
sulting.com
www.navigantconsulting.com/
industries/energy/
NCM Demolition + Remediation,
404 North Berry St., Brea, CA
92821
Phone: 425-881-0623
Fax: 425-881-5935
Email: cboydd@ncmgroup.com
www.ncmgroup.com
Neptune Underwater Services
(USA) LLC, 123 Sentry, Mansfield,
TX 76063
Phone: 800-860-2178
Fax: 817-447-0021
Email: jschrader@neptunems.com
www.neptunems.com
NES Rentals, 8770 W. Bryn Mawr,
4th Floor, Chicago, IL 60631
Phone: 773-695-3999
Fax: 773-714-0538
Email: request_info@nesrentals.
com
www.nesrentals.com
Nesco Sales & Rentals, 3112
East State Rd. 124, Bluffton, IN
46714
Phone: 800-252-0043
Fax: 260-824-6350
Email: sales@nescosales.com
www.nescosales.com
NeuCo, Inc., 33 Union St., 4th
Floor, Boston, MA 02108
Phone: 617-587-3188
Fax: 617-262-4186
Email: levy@neuco.net
www.neuco.net
New Pig Corporation, One Pork
Ave., Tipton, PA 16684
Phone: 814-686-2212
Fax: 814-686-2333
Email: deannag@newpig.com
www.newpig.com
Newport Electronics, Inc., 2229
S. Yale St., Santa Ana, CA 92704
Phone: 714-540-4914
Email: literature@newportUS.com
www.newportus.com
Niagara Blower Company, 673
Ontario St., Buffalo, NY 14207
Phone: 716-875-2000
Fax: 716-875-1077
Email: sales@niagarablower.com
www.niagarablower.com
Nilfisk CFM, 300 Technology Dr.,
Malvern, PA 19355
Phone: 800-645-3475
Fax: 610-647-6427
Email: questions@nilfisk-ad-
vance.com
www.nilfiskcfm.com
www.nol-tec.com
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc., 425
Apollo Dr., Lino Lakes, MN
55014
Phone: 651-780-8600
Fax: 651-780-4400
Email: sales@nol-tec.com
www.nol-tec.com
See our ad on p. 50
Nooter Construction Company, Six
Neshaminy Interplex, Ste. 300,
Trevose, PA 19053
Phone: 215-680-6931
Fax: 215-638-8080
Email: jlwoodward@nooter.com
www.nooter.com
Nooter/Eriksen, Inc., 1509 Ocello
Dr., Fenton, MO 63026
Phone: 636-651-1000
Fax: 636-651-1500
Email: sales@ne.com
www.ne.com
NORD Drivesystems - Getriebebau
NORD GmbH & Co. KG, Rudolf-
Diesel-Str. 1, Bargteheide 22941,
Germany
Phone: +49 4532 401-0
Fax: +49 4532 401-253
Email: info@nord.com
www.nord.com
NORD-LOCK, 1051 Cambridge Dr.,
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
Phone: 877-799-1097
Fax: 224-875-3256
Email: julie.pereyra@nord-lock-
inc.com
www.nord-lock.com
North America Services Group,
1240 Saratoga Rd., Ballston Spa,
NY 12020
Phone: 518-885-1820
Fax: 518-885-7638
Email: cspain@naisinc.com
www.naisinc.com
North American Dismantling
Corp, 384 Lake Nepessing Rd.,
Lapeer, MI 48446
Phone: 810-664-2888
Fax: 810- 664-6053
Email: vchappel@nadc1.com
www.nadc1.com
North Side Power Transmission
Corp., 309 Morgan Ave., Brook-
lyn, NY 11211
Phone: 718-782-5800
Fax: 718-782-1757
Email: sales@nsptcorp.com
www.nsptcorp.com
Northern Cast parts Com-
pany Inc., 304-2185 Marine Dr.,
Oakville, ON L6L 5L6, Canada
Phone: 905-465-1773
Fax: 905-465-1775
Email: sales@northerncastparts.
com
www.northerncastparts.com
Norton Corrosion Ltd., 8820
222nd St. SE, Woodinville, WA
98077
Phone: 425-483-1616
Fax: 425-485-1754
Email: jweiser@nortoncorrosion.
com
www.nortoncorrosion.com
Nova Analytical Systems Inc., 1925
Pine Ave., Niagara Falls, NY 14301
Phone: 800-295-3771
Fax: 716-282-2937
Email: sales@nova-gas.com
www.nova-gas.com
Nova Machine Products, Inc.,
18001 Sheldon Rd., Middleburg
Heights, OH 44130
Phone: 216-267-3200
Fax: 216-267-8518
Email: tdavis@curtisswright.com
www.novamachine.com
Novinda Corporation, 2000 S.
Colorado Blvd., Ste. 3-A, Denver,
CO 80222
Phone: 720-473-8320
Fax: 720-473-8360
Email: m.henessee@novinda.com
www.novinda.com
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Novinium Cable LIfe Extension,
34110 9th Ave. South, Federal
Way, WA 98003
Phone: 206-529-4828
Fax: 206-774-9754
Email: rich.brinton@novinium.com
www.novinium.com
Nuclear News, 555 N. Kensington
Ave., LaGrange Park, IL 60526
Phone: 708-579-8225
Fax: 708-579-8204
Email: jmosses@ans.org
www.ans.org/pubs/magazines/nn
Nuclear Systems Associates, Inc.,
2701 Saturn St., Brea, CA 92821
Phone: 949-499-9980
Fax: 949-499-9980
Email: nuclearsystems@cox.net
www.nuclearsystems.com
NWL Transformers, 312 Rising Sun
Rd., Bordentown, NJ 08505
Phone: 609-298-7300
Fax: 609-298-1982
Email: jmanna@nwl.com
www.nwl.com
O
ODonnell Consulting Engineers,
Inc., 2940 South Park Rd., Bethel
Park, PA 15102
Phone: 412-835-5007
Fax: 412-835-5017
Email: wo@odonnellconsulting.com
www.odonnellconsulting.com
Oak Park Chimney, 1800 Des
Plaines Ave., Forest Park, IL
60130
Phone: 800-476-2278
Fax: 708-386-4004
Email: cwessels@oakparkchimney.
com
Oil Skimmers Inc., P.O. Box 33092,
12800 York Rd., Cleveland, OH
44133
Phone: 440-237-4600
Fax: 440-582-2759
Email: info@oilskim.com
www.oilskim.com
OILKLEEN, Inc., 1510 River Dr.
S.W., Ste. A, Ruskin, FL 33570
Phone: 813-333-6356
Fax: 813-944-2893
Email: paul@oilkleen.com
www.oilkleen.com
Olin Brass - Fineweld Tube, 102
Progress Parkway, Cuba, MO 65453
Phone: 573-885-6546
Fax: 573-885-6500
Email: fwt@olinbrass.com
www.fineweldtube.com
OLYMPUS, 48 Woerd Ave. Ste.
105, Waltham, MA 02453
Phone: 781- 353-4916
Fax: 781-419-3980
Email: paula.scordino@olym-
pusndt.com
www.olympus-ims.com
Omaha Standard Palfinger, 3501
S. 11th St., Council Bluffs, IA
51501
Phone: 800-279-2201
Fax: 712-328-8383
Email: os@omahastd.com
www.omahastd.com
OMSCO, 2150 Baneberry Dr.,
Birmingam, AL 35244
Phone: 205-994-1847
Fax: 205-403-0829
Email: david.brunson@omscoinc.
com
www.omscoinc.com
Onset Computer Corporation,
HOBO Data Loggers, 470 MacAr-
thur Blvd., Bourne, MA 02532
Phone: 800-564-4377
Fax: 508-759-9100
Email: sales@onsetcomp.com
www.onsetcomp.com
Open Systems International
(OSI), 3600 Holly Lane N., Ste.
40, Minneapolis, MN 55447
Phone: 763-551-0559
Fax: 763-551-0750
Email: sales@osii.com
www.osii.com
OpenLink, 1021 Main St., Ste.
1200, Houston, TX 77002
Phone: 713-655-9600
Fax: 713-655-9605
Email: info@olf.com
www.olf.com
Orbeco Analytical Systems Inc.,
185 Marine St., Farmingdale, NY
11735
Phone: 631-293-4110
Fax: 631-293-8258
Email: kay@orbeco.com
www.orbeco.com
Orbital Tool Technologies, 6550
Revlon Dr., Belvidere, IL 61008
Phone: 815-978-2156
Fax: 815-547-3609
Email: paul.parry@orbittool.com
www.orbitaltool.com
Orion Instruments LLC, 6646
Complex Dr., Baton Rouge, LA
70809
Phone: 225-906-2343
Fax: 225-906-2344
Email: jpereira@orioninstruments.
com
www.rioninstruments.com
Orival Water Filters, 213 S Van
Brunt St., Englewood, NJ 07631
Phone: 201-568-3311
Fax: 201-568-1916
Email: filters@orival.com
www.orival.com
OVIVO USA LLC, 4255 Lake Park
Blvd., Ste. 100, Salt Lake City,
UT 84120
Phone: 801-931-3113
Fax: 801-931-3090
Email: guy.beauchesne@ovivowa-
ter.com
www.ovivowater.com
P
P&S Vorspannsysteme AG, Ri-
etwiesstrasse 2, St.Gallenkappel,
8735, Switzerland
Phone: +41 55 284 64 64
Email: f.rueegg@p-s.ch
www.p-s.ch
Paharpur Cooling Towers
Ltd, Paharpur House, 8/1/B
Diamond Harbour Rd., Kolkata,
700 027, India
Phone: +91-33-4013 3000
Fax: +91-33-4013 3499
Email: pctccu@paharpur.com
www.paharpur.com
See our ad on p. 49
Palfinger North America, P.O. Box
846, 7942 Dorchester Rd., Ni-
agara Falls, ON L2E 6V6, Canada
Phone: 800-567-1554
Fax: 905-374-1203
Email: info@palfingerna.com
www.palfinger-northamerica.com
Pall Corporation, 25 Harbor Park
Dr., Port Washington, NY 11050
Phone: 516-484-3600
Fax: 516-484-0364
Email: michele_asquino@pall.com
www.pall.com
Palmetto Depot Services LLC, 3
Conservation Ct, Savannah, GA
31419
Phone: 912-660-8118
Email: palmettodepot@aol.com
www.palmettodepot@aol.com
Panasonic Computer Solutions Co,
50 Meadowland Pkwy., Secaucus,
NJ 07094
Phone: 800-662-3537 ext 5
Fax: 201-271-3460
www.panasonic.com/toughbook/
energy
Panglobal Training Systems Ltd.,
1301 16 Ave. NW, Calgary, AB
T2M 0L4, Canada
Phone: 866-256-8193
Fax: 403-284-8863
Email: info@powerengineering.org
www.powerengineering.org
Paragon Airheater Technologies,
23143 Temescal Canyon Rd., Ste.
B, Corona, CA 92883
Phone: 951-277-8035
Fax: 951-277-8031
Email: cturner@paragonairheater.
com
www.paragonairheater.com
Parker Fluid Control Division, 95
Edgewood Ave., New Britain, CT
06051
Phone: 860-827-2300
Fax: 860-827-2384
Email: llofrumento@parker.com
www.parkerfluidcontrol.com
Parker Hannifin- Precision Cool-
ing Systems Division, 10801 Rose
Ave., New Haven, IN 46774
Phone: 509-552-5112
Email: joe.baddeley@parker.com
www.parker.com/pc
Parkline Inc., P.O. Box 65, Win-
field, WV 25213
Phone: 800-786-4855
Fax: 304-586-3842
Email: sjarrell@parkline.com
www.parkline.com
Parkson Corporation, 5420 Spring
Lane, Minnetonka, MN 55345
Phone: 954-558-4470
E-mail: jswanson@parkson.com
www.parkson.com
Parmar Metals Pvt. Ltd., 28, A
Bhaktinagar Industrial Estate,
Rajkot, 360004, India
Phone: +91-0281-362256
Fax: +91-0281-365240
Email: info@parmarmetal.com
www.parmarmetal.com
Patriot Solar Group, 1007 Indus-
trial Ave., Albion, MI 49224
Phone: 517-629-9292
Fax: 517-629-9296
Email: info@patriotsolargroup.com
www.patriotsolargroup.com
Paul Mueller Company, 1600 West
Phelps St., Springfield, MO 65802
Phone: 417-575-9000
Fax: 417-575-9669
Email: sales@paulmueller.com
www.paulmueller.com
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PB Power, a division of Parsons
Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, 75
Arlington St., 4th Floor, Boston,
MA 02116
Phone: 617-960-4864
Fax: 617-960-5460
Email: Durica@pbworld.com
www.pbworld.com
PECO, 27881 Clemens Rd., West-
lake, OH 44145
Phone: 440-899-3888
Fax: 440-899-3890
Email: info@peco-fgc.com
www.peco-fgc.com
Pemamek Oy Ltd., Lamminkatu
47, Loimaa, 32201, Finland
Phone: +358-2-760771
Fax: +358-2-7628660
Email: jukka.rantala@pemamek.com
www.pemamek.com
Penn Separator Corp, P.O.
Box 340, 5 South Pickering,
Brookville, PA 15825
Phone: 814-849-7328
Fax: 814-849-4510
Email: info@pennseparator.com
www.pennseparator.com
Pennsylvania Breaker LLC, 30
Curry Ave., P.O. Box 441, Canons-
burg, PA 15301
Phone: 724-743-4376
Fax: 724-743-4850
www.pabreaker.net
Pennsylvania Crusher, 600 Abbott
Dr., Broomall, PA 19008
Phone: 610-544-7200
Email: buster@penncrusher.com
www.penncrusher.com
PENTA Industrial Corp., 10276
Bach Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63132
Phone: 314-878-0143
Fax: 314-878-0166
Email: mmohan@penta.net
www.pentaindustrial.com
Pentair Valves & Controls (for-
merly known as Tyco Valves &
Controls), 4607 New West Dr.,
Pasadena, TX 77507
Phone: 832-261-2416
Fax: 281-291-8801
Email: ssdcustomercare@tyco-
valves.com
www.pentair.com/valves
See our ad on p. 9
People and Processes, Inc., P.O.
Box 460, Yulee, FL 32041
Phone: 843-814-3795
Email: tpickett@peopleandpro-
cesses.com
www.peopleandprocesses.com
Performance Consulting Services,
154 Colorado Ave., Montrose, CO
81401
Phone: 970-240-4381
Fax: 720-528-8107
Email: montrose@pcs-mail.com
www.pcs-mail.com
Petron Corporation, 16800 W
Glendale Dr., New Berlin, WI
53151
Phone: 724- 987-6787
Email: jliberatore@petroncorp.com
www.petroncorp.com
Petro-Valve, 11248 East Hardy
St., Houston, TX 77093
Phone: 713-676-1212
Fax: 832-615-5303
Email: shawnw@petrovalve.com
www.petrovalve.com
PFBC Environmental Energy Tech-
nology Inc., 111 Riverview Dr.,
Monessen, PA 15062
Phone: 724-684-4844
Fax: 724-684-4944
Email: kshoup@pfbceet.com
www.pfbceet.com
PGH Marketing, 1028 Oakmont
Ave., Unit A, Oakmont, PA 15139
Phone: 412-225-7478
Fax: 412-202-0450
Email: sbarbaro@pghmarketing.
com
www.pghmarketing.com
PGI International, 16101 Vallen
Dr., Houston, TX 77041
Phone: 713-466-0056
Fax: 800-744-9899
www.pgiint.com
Phenix Technologies Inc., 75
Speicher Dr., Accident, MD 21520
Phone: 301-746-8118
Fax: 301-895-5570
Email: info@phenixtech.com
www.phenixtech.com
Philadelphia Gear Corp., 901 East
8th Ave., Ste. 100, King of Prus-
sia, PA 19406
Phone: 610- 337-5425
Fax: 610-337-5637
Email: rfisher@philagear.com
www.philagear.com
Philippi-Hagenbuch, Inc., 7424 W
Plank Rd., Peoria, IL 61604
Phone: 309-697-9200
Fax: 309-697-2400
Email: sales@philsystems.com
www.philsystems.com
Phillips 66 E-Gas Technology
for Gasification, PO Box 4428,
Houston, TX 77210
Phone: 832-765-1398
Fax: 918-662-8717
Email: donna.m.wood@p66.com
www.e-gastechnology.com

Phillips 66 Lubricants, PO Box
4428, Houston, TX 77210
Phone: 832-765-2132
Fax: 918-977-8769
Email: bill.c.brown@p66.com
www.phillips66lubricants.com
See our ad on p. 5
Phoenix Air Flow, Inc., 1453 Mars
Ave., Lakewood, OH 44107
Phone: 216-228-8468
Fax: 216-228-8596
Email: phoenix@bge.net
Photon Control, 8363 Lougheed
Hwy., Burnaby, BC V5A 1X3
Phone: 604-422-8861
Email: sales@photon-control.com
www.photon-control.com
PIC Group, Inc., 1000 Parkwood
Circle, Ste. 1000, Atlanta, GA
30339
Phone: 770-850-0100
Fax: 770-850-2200
Email: marketing@picworld.com
www.picworld.com
See our ad on p. 13
Pick Heaters, Inc., 730 S. Indiana
Ave., West Bend, WI 53095
Phone: 262-338-1191
Fax: 262-338-8489
Email: info1@pickheaters.com
www.pickheaters.com
PICOR, 1730 Old Gray Station
Rd., Gray, TN 37615
Phone: 423-282-9900
Fax: 423-282-3118
www.picor.biz
Pittsburg Tank & Tower Mainte-
nance Co., P.O. Box 913, Hender-
son, KY 42419
Phone: 270- 826-9000
Fax: 270- 831-7025
Email: kwilkerson@watertank.com
www.watertank.com
PJ Murphy Forest Products Corp.,
P.O. Box 300, Montville, NJ
07045,
Phone: 973- 316-0800
Fax: 973- 316-9455
Email: kyle@pjmurphy.net
www.murphy.net
Plant Professionals, 1851 Albright
Rd., Montgomery, IL 60538
Phone: 630-844-1300 X220
Fax: 630-844-0064
Email: huntera@benetechusa.com
www.plantprofessionals.com
Plant Specialties Inc., P O Box
110537, Carrollton, TX 75011
Phone: 972-245-9673
Fax: 972-245-9699
Email: PSI@bryer-dfw.com
www.bryer-dfw.com
PLANTKOREA COMPANY, 1366-6,
Joong-Dong, Gwangyang-City,
545880, South Korea
Phone: +82-10-3310-4529
Fax: +82-61-795-4529
Email: plantkorea@gmail.com
www.plantkorea.net
Plastocor Inc., 100 Research Rd.,
Hingham, MA 02043
Phone: 724- 942-0582
Fax: 724- 942-0583
Email: jemplastocor@aol.com
www.plastocor.com
Platts UDI, 1200 G St NW Ste.
1000, Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-942-8788
Fax: 202-942-8789
Email: udi@platts.com
www.platts.com
Plymouth Tube Company, 29W150
Warrenville Rd., Warrenville, IL
60555
Phone: 630-393-3550
Fax: 630-393-3551
Email: sales@plymouth.com
www.plymouth.com
Pneumafil Corp, Gas Turbine Div,
P.O. Box 16348, Charlotte, NC
28297
Phone: 704-399-7441
Fax: 704-398-7507
Email: gtinfo@pneumafil.com
www.pneumafil.com
POLARIS Laboratories, 7898
Zionsville Rd., Indianapolis, IN
46268
Phone: 877-808-3750
Fax: 317-808-3751
Email: sales@polarislabs.com
www.polarislabs.com
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COMPANY
DIRECTORY
Polsinelli Shughart, PC, 1152
15th St., NW, Ste. 800, Washing-
ton, DC 20005
Phone: 202-626-8356
Fax: 202-315-3050
Email: mross@polsinelli.com
www.polsinelli.com
Polycorp Ltd., 33 York St., Elora,
ON N0B 1S0, Canada
Phone: 519-846-2075
Fax: 519-846-2372
Email: pkumar@poly-corp.com
www.poly-corp.com
Portland Bolt & Manufacturing,
3441 NW Guam St., Portland, OR
97210,
Phone: 800-547-6758
Fax: 503-227-4634
Email: adam@portlandbolt.com
www.portlandbolt.com
Positron Inc., 5101 Buchan St.,
Montreal, QC H4P 2R9, Canada
Phone: 514-345-2200
Fax: 514-345-2271
Email: powerdivision@positron-
power.com
www.positronpower.com
Power & Industrial Services,
95 Washington St., Donora, PA
15033
Phone: 724-379-4477
Fax: 724-379-4408
Email: nshekell@piburners.com
www.piburners.com
Power Engineers, 3940 Glenbrook
Dr., Hailey, ID 83333
Phone: 678-966-4426
Fax: 678-966-4499
Email: lcarter@powereng.com
www.powereng.com
Power Equipment Maintenance,
Inc., 110 Prosperity Blvd., Pied-
mont, SC 29673
Phone: 864-622-3606
Fax: 864-395-0092
www.peminc.net
Power Generation Service, Inc.,
1160 McKinley St., Anoka, MN
55303
Phone: 763-421-1104
Fax: 763-421-3451
www.powergensvc.com
Power Source International,
18680 Augusta Dr. # 100, Monu-
ment, CO 80132
Phone: 719 487 8877
Email: PowerSourceI@comcast.net
Power Systems Mfg LLC, 1440
W Indiantown Rd., Jupiter, FL
33458
Phone: 561-354-1100
Fax: 561-354-1199
Email: power@powermfg.com
www.powermfg.com
Powerspan Corp., 100 Interna-
tional Dr. Ste. 200, Portsmouth,
NH 03801,
Phone: 603-570-3000
Fax: 603-570-3100
Email: info@powerspan.com
www.powerspan.com
Pragmatics Hydrogen Leak Detec-
tion, 8440 Central Ave., Newark,
CA 94560
Phone: 510-794-4296
Fax: 510-794-4330
Email: sales@kwjengineering.com
www.pragmatics-arson.com
Praxair Surface Technologies,
7615 Fairview St., Houston, TX
77041
Phone: 443-831-1536
Email: greg_groff@praxair.com
www.praxairsurfacetechnologies.
com
Precast Specialties Corp, 999 Ad-
ams St., P.O. Box 86, Abington,
MA 02351
Phone: 781-828-7220
Fax: 781-878-7464
Email: precastspecialties@msn.com
www.precastspecialtiescorp.com
Precision Blasting Inc., P.O. Box
785, Flatwoods, KY 41139
Phone: 606-836-2600
Fax: 606-836-2698
Email: precision_blasting@
worldnet.att.net
www.bpionline.com
Premier Energy Services Inc.,
140 Colony Center Dr., Ste. 202,
Woodstock, GA 30188
Phone: 770-592-1398
Fax: 770-592-2316
Email: info@premierenergy.com
www.premierenergy.com
Pressure Systems, Inc., 34 Re-
search Dr., Hampton, VA 23666
Phone: 757-865-1243
Fax: 757-865-8744
Email: denise.topping@pressure-
systems.com
www.pressuresystems.com
Price Brothers Company, 333 W.
First St., Ste. 700, Dayton, OH
45402
Phone: 937-226-8829
Fax: 937-226-8752
Email: jkillin@pricebrothers.com
www.pipesite.com
Primesouth Inc., 246 Stoneridge
Dr., Ste. 101, Columbia, SC 29210
Phone: 803-753-5199
Fax: 803-354-4260
Email: tevergetis@primesouth-
inc.com
www.primesouth.biz
PRO Solutions, Inc., 30 Bethel
Rd., Glen Mills, PA 19342
Phone: 865-414-7644
Email: jdischner@p-rosolutions.
com
www.p-rosolutions.com
Process Automation and Control,
Inc., 4502 Cogswell Ave., Pell
City, AL 35125
Phone: 205-338-1147
Fax: 205-338-1167
Email: tbassett@pac-service.com
www.pac-service.com
Process Engineering & Manufac-
turing, 13653 Beach St., Cerritos,
CA 90703
Phone: 310-548-1523
Fax: 562-602-1918
Email: rscrews@peandm.com
www.peandm.com
Process Equipment/Barron Indus-
tries, 2770 Welborn St., Pelham,
AL 35124
Phone: 205-663-5330
Fax: 205-663-6037
Email: wunderwood@processbar-
ron.com
Process Solutions-MicrOclor, 820
Geranium Dr., Warrington, PA
18976
Phone: 215-530-9200
Email: tomooney@4psi.net
www.4spi.net
Prochaska & Associates, 11317
Chicago Circle, Omaha, NE 68154
Phone: 402-334-0755
Fax: 402-334-0868
Email: cjones@prochaska.us
www.architectsusa.com
Proe Power Systems, LLC, 5072
Morning Song Dr., Medina, OH
44256
Phone: 800-315-0084
Email: raproe@proepowersys-
tems.com
www.proepowersystems.com
ProEnergy Services, 2001
ProEnergy Blvd., Sedalia, MO
65301
Phone: 660-829-5100
Fax: 660-829-1160
Email: Acairer@proenergyser-
vices.com
www.proenergyservices.com
See our ad on cover 4
PROMECON USA Inc., 314 Collins
Blvd., Orrville, OH 44667
Phone: 330-683-9074
Email: todd.melick@promecon.us
www.promecon.us
ProMinent Dosiertechnik GmbH,
Im Schuhmachergewann 5-11,
Heidelberg, 69123, Germany
Phone: +49 6221 842 0
Fax: +49 6221 842 617
Email: info@prominent.com
www.prominent.com
ProSonix, P.O. Box 26676, Mil-
waukee, WI 53226
Phone: 800-849-1130
Fax: 800-849-1130
Email: info@pro-sonix.com
www.pro-sonix.com
Protectowire Firesystems, 60
Washington St., Pembroke, MA
02359
Phone: 781-826-3878
Fax: 781-826-2045
Email: dmcpeck@protectowire.com
www.protectowire.com
PROTO Manufacturing Inc., 12350
Universal Dr., Taylor, MI 48180
Phone: 734-946-0974
Fax: 734-946-0975
Email: proto@protoxrd.com
www.protoxrd.com
Proton OnSite, 10 Technology Dr.,
Wallingford, CT 06492
Phone: 203-949-8697
Fax: 203-949-8016
Email: customerservice@pro-
tonenergy.com
www.protononsite.com
PS DOORS, 1150 S 48th St.,
Grand Forks, ND 58201
Phone: 701-746-4519
Fax: 701-746-8340
Email: cmelland@psdoors.com
www.psdoors.com
PS International, Inc., 5309 East
Ryan Pl, Sioux Falls, SD 57110
Phone: 605-332-1885
Fax: 605-332-1293
Email: gale@psinternational.com
www.psinternational.com
PSB Industries, 1202 West 12th
St., Erie, PA 16501
Phone: 814-453-3651
Fax: 814-454-3492
Email: al.wassel@psbindustries.com
www.psbindustries.com
PTMW, Inc., 5040 NW US Hwy 24,
Topeka, KS 66618
Phone: 785-232-7792
Fax: 785-232-7793
Email: pgoff@ptmw.com
www.ptmw.com
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Pugmill Systems, Inc., 212 Cem-
etery Ave., Columbia, TN 38401
Phone: 931-388-0626
Fax: 931-380-0319
Email: pugjohn@charter.net
www.pugmillsystems.com
Pulse Corp, PMB 216, 1799 W 5th
Ave., Columbus, OH 43212
Phone: 800-394-5688
Fax: 614-340-7106
www.lifehook.com
Pumping Solutions, Inc., 2850
139th St., Blue Island, IL 60406
Phone: 708-272-1800
Fax: 708-272-1825
Email: SM@pump96.com
www.pump96.com
Pure Technologies Ltd., 4700
Dixie Rd., Mississauga, ON T2R
0E3, Canada
Phone: 289-374-3598
Email: info@puretechltd.com
www.puretechltd.com
Pure Water Technologies, B
209, Anum Classic, Shahrah-e-
Faisal,Karachi, 75400, Pakistan
Phone: + 92 21 34321851
Fax: + 92 21 34380189
Email: arshad@purewater.com.pk
www.purewater.com.pk
PWR - Plasma Waste Recycling,
250 Finney Dr., Huntsville, AL
35824
Phone: 256-258-2800
Fax: 256-258-2803
Email: betty.hall@astutemarket-
ing.net
www.plasma-wr.com
Q
Qinhuangdao Huadian Survey In-
strument and Controller Co.,Ltd.,
367 Wenhua Rd., Qinhuangdao,
Hebei, 66000, China
Phone: +86-13633333120
Fax: +86-335-3640930
Email: access0001@163.com
www.hdsc.net
Quanta Services, 2800 Post Oak
Blvd., Ste. 2600, Houston, TX
77056
Phone: 713-629-7600
Email: questions@quantaservices.
com
www.quantaservices.com
Quest-Tec Solutions, P.O. Box
2127, Stafford, TX 77497
Phone: 866-240-9906
Email: rhett.baker@QuestTecSo-
lutions.com
www.questtecsolutions.com
Quietly Making Noise, 300 W
Mitchell Hammock Rd., Ste. 8,
Oviedo, FL 32765
Phone: 407-359-5146
Fax: 407-977-9646
Email: wbmccune@peoplepc.com
www.quietlymakingnoise.com
R
R - V Industries, Inc., 584 Poplar
Rd., Honey Brook, PA 19344
Phone: 610-273-2457
Fax: 610-273-3361
Email: davel@rvii.com
www.rvii.com
R&G Laboratories, Inc., 217
Hobbs St., Ste. 105, Tampa, FL
33619
Phone: 813-643-3513
Fax: 813-793-4429
Email: cheryl@randglabs.com
www.randglabs.com
R. W. Beck, Inc., 1801 California
St., Ste. 2800, Denver, CO 80202
Phone: 303-299-5200
Fax: 303-297-2811
www.rwbeck.com
Radwaste Solutions, 555 N.
Kensington Ave., LaGrange Park,
IL 60526
Phone: 708-579-8255
Fax: 708-579-8204
www.new.ans.org/pubs/maga-
zines/rs/
Ram-3 Combustion Technologies,
P.O. Box 35712, Greensboro, NC
27425
Phone: 540-493-1166
Fax: 540-721-3451
Email: john@ram-3.com
www.ram-3.com
Randall Industries, 741 S. Rt 83,
Elmhurst, IL 60126
Phone: 800-966-7412
Fax: 630-833-9108
Email: b.skoda@randallind.com
www.fiberglassscaffolds.com
RCI Technologies, 462 Borrego
Court, Ste. D, San Dimas, CA
91773
Phone: 800-868-2088
Fax: 909-305-1245
Email: info@rcitechnologies.com
www.rcitechnologies.com
RdF Corporation, 23 Elm Ave.,
Hudson, NH 03051
Phone: 603-882-5195
Fax: 603-882-6925
Email: sensor@rdfcorp.com
www.rdfcorp.com
React 365 Inc., P.O. Box 2788,
Pawleys Island, SC 29585
Phone: 866-811-8365
Fax: 866-450-0553
Email: info@react365.com
www.react365.com
Redline Industries, Inc., 8401
Mosley Rd., Houston, TX 77075
Phone: 713-946-5355
Fax: 713-946-0747
Email: johnk@redlineindustries.com
www.redlineindustries.com
Reef Industries Inc., Griffolyn,
9209 Almeda Genoa Rd., Hous-
ton, TX 77075
Phone: 713-507-4251
Fax: 713-507-4295
Email: ri@reefindustries.com
www.reefindustries.com
Reliability Management Group
(RMG), 350 W. Burnsville Pkwy.,
Ste. 465, Minneapolis, MN 55337
Phone: 952-882-8122
Fax: 952-882-8133
Email: pwensmann@rmgmpls.com
www.reliabilitymanagement.com
Reliance industries limited, 2/31,
Kaveri Apartment, Dahej bypass
Rd., Bharuch, 392001, India
Phone: +9898201310
Email: sohilkapasi@yahoo.co.in
www.ril.com
REMBE GmbH - Safety + Control,
Gallbergweg 21, Brilon, 59929,
Germany
Phone: +49 2961 7405-0
Fax: +49 2961 50714
Email: sales@rembe.de
www.rembe.de
Remtron, 1916 West Mission Rd.,
Escondido, CA 92029
Phone: 800-328-5570
Fax: 760-737-7810
Email: info@remtron.com
www.remtron.com
Renewal Parts Maintenance, 4485
Glenbrook Rd., Willoughby, OH
44094,
Phone: 440-946-0082
Fax: 440-946-5524
Email: sdecrow@MDAturbines.
com
www.RenewalParts.com
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc.,
5025-A E. Business 20, Abilene,
TX 79601
Phone: 325-672-3400
Fax: 325-672-9996
Email: sales@rentechboilers.com
www.rentechboilers.com
RetubeCo, Inc., 6024 Ooltewah-
Georgetown Rd., Ooltewah, TN
37363
Phone: 423-238-4814
Fax: 423-238-9028
Email: sales@retubeco.com
www.retubeco.com
Reverso Pumps, Inc., 201 SW
20th St., Fort Lauderdale, FL
33064
Phone: 954-523-9396
Email: info@reversopumps.com
www.reversopumps.com
REW Solar USA, 215-415 Northern
Blvd., Bayside, NY 11361
Phone: 718-225-6600
Fax: 718-225-6605
Email: nbrand.rewsolar@gmail.
com
www.rewsolarusa.com
Reynolds, Inc., 4520 North State
Rd. 37, Orleans, IN 47452
Phone: 812-865-3232
Fax: 812-865-3075
Email: tporter@reynoldsinc.com
www.reynoldsinc.com
RF System Lab, 123 W. Main St.,
Gaylord, MI 49735
Phone: 989-731-5083
Fax: 989-688-5966
Email: bsprotte@rfsystemlab.us
www.rfsystemlab.us
RH Systems, 3416 Vista Alameda
NE, Albuquerque, NM 87113
Phone: 505-856-5766
Fax: 866-891-3399
Email: kris@rhs.com
www.rhs.com
Richmond Engineering Works,
1204 Parkway View Dr., Pitts-
burgh, PA 15205
Phone: 412-787-9640
Fax: 412-787-9645
Email: dfetcko@richmondengi-
neering.com
www.richmondengineering.com
Richwood, 707 7th St. West,
Huntington, WV 25704
Phone: 304-525-5436
Fax: 304-525-8018
Email: info@richwood.com
www.richwood.com
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COMPANY
DIRECTORY
Rig-A-Lite, 8500 Hansen Rd.,
Houston, TX 77075
Phone: 713-943-0340
Fax: 713-943-8354
Email: rossblanford@azz.com
www.rigalite.com
Riley Power Inc., 5 Neponset St.,
P.O. Box 15040, Worcester, MA
01615
Phone: 508-852-7100
Fax: 508-852-7548
Email: info@babcockpower.com
www.babcockpower.com
Ritepro Inc., A subsidiary of
BRAY International, Inc., 12200
Alberty Hudon Blvd., Montreal,
QC H1G 3K7, Canada
Phone: 514-324-8900
Fax: 514-324-9525
Email: strudel@bray.qc.ca
www.ritepro.com
River Consulting, 445 Hutchison
Ave., Ste. 740, Columbus, OH
43235
Phone: 614-890-3456
Fax: 614-890-1883
Email: ksmith@riverconsulting.
com
www.riverconsulting.com
Rkneal Engineering, 1010 Market
St., Ste. 550, St. Louis, MO
60310
Phone: 314-754-8814
Fax: 312-264-5445
Email: asbrewer@rkneal.com
www.rkneal.com
Roberts & Schaefer, A KBR Com-
pany, 222 S Riverside Plaza, Ste.
1800, Chicago, IL 60606
Phone: 312-236-7292
Fax: 312- 726-2872
Email: bob.williamsjr@kbr.com
www.r-s.com
Rochem Technical Services, 4711
SW Huber St., Ste. 7E, Portland,
OR 97219
Phone: 503-246-8618
Fax: 503-246-8697
Email: bob.auguston@rochemltd.
com
www.rochemltd.com
Rodney Hunt Co, 46 Mill St.,
Orange, MA 01364
Phone: 978-544-2511
Fax: 978-544-3928
Email: tomm@rodneyhunt.com
www.rodneyhunt.com
Rogers Equipment Sales, 690
Sawmill Rd., Durango, CO 81301
Phone: 800-990-7374
Fax: 970-259-7177
Email: joeymotors@frontier.net
www.rogersequip.com
Rolls-Royce plc, 105 Sandusky,
Mount Vernon, OH 43050,
Phone: 740-393-8015
Email: jonathan.li@rolls-royce.
com
www.rolls-royce.com
RoMaDyn, 1711 Orbit Way, Min-
den, NV 89423
Phone: 775-783-0155
Fax: 775-783-4650
Email: services@romadyn.com
www.romadyn.com
Rotek Instrument Corp., 390 Main
St., P.O. Box 504504, Waltham,
MA 02454
Phone: 781-899-4611
Fax: 781-894-7273
Email: sales@rotek.com
www.rotek.com
Rotex Global, 1230 Knowlton St.,
Cincinnati, OH 45223
Phone: 513-541-1236
Fax: 513-541-4888
Email: info@rotex.com
www.Rotex.com
Rotork, 5607 W. Douglas Ave.,
Milwaukee, WI 53218
Phone: 414-461-9200
Fax: 414-461-1024
Email: katie.wilson@rotork.com
www.rotork.com
RTDS Technologies Inc., 100-150
Innovation Dr., Winnipeg, MB
R3T 2E1, Canada
Phone: 204-989-9700
Fax: 204-452-4303
Email: rtds@rtds.com
www.rtds.com
Russelectric Inc., South Shore
Park, 99 Industrial Park Rd.,
Hingham, MA 02043
Phone: 781-749-6000
Fax: 781-749-4205
Email: info@russelectric.com
www.russelectric.com
S
S & B Engineers and Construc-
tors, Ltd., 7809 Park Place Blvd.,
P. O. Box 266245, Houston, TX
77087
Phone: 713-845-3176
Fax: 713-640-0045
Email: SBPower@sbec.com
www.sbec.com
S.M. Stoller Corp., 105 Technol-
ogy Dr., Ste. 190, Broomfield, CO
80021
Phone: 303-546-4300
Email: eolson@stoller.com
www.stoller.com
S.T. Cotter Turbine Service, Inc./
TexBlast, 2167 196th St. E, Clear-
water, MN 55320
Phone: 612-424-5614
Fax: 320-558-2365
Email: nichole.cotter@stcot-
terturbine.com
www.stcotterturbine.com
SABIA, Inc., 15070 Ave. of Sci-
ence, Ste. 200, San Diego, CA
92128
Phone: 858-217-2200
Fax: 858-217-2203
Email: sales@sabiainc.com
www.sabiainc.com
Sabre Tubular Structures, 8653 E
Hwy. 67, Alvarado, TX 76009
Phone: 817-852-1700
Fax: 817-850-1703
Email: utilityinfo@sabreindus-
tries.com
www.SabreTubularStructures.com
SAFE Fire Detection, Inc., 5915
Stockbridge Dr., Monroe, NC
28110
Phone: 704-821-7920
Email: alexh@safefiredetection.com
www.safefiredetection.com
SAFEmap, 108-4664 Lougheed
Highway, Burnaby, BC V5C 5T5,
Canada
Phone: 604-296-3481
Fax: 604-291-8082
Email: katie.tarcea@safemap.com
www.safemap.com
Safway Services, LLC, N19
W24200 Riverwood Dr., Wauke-
sha, WI 53188
Phone: 262-523-6500
Email: info_request@safway.com
www.safway.com
Saint-Gobain Ceramics & Plastics,
Inc., 1 New Bond St. MS 301-
432, Worcester, MA 01606
Phone: 508-795-2963
Fax: 508-795-5011
Email: susan.m.munyon@saint-
gobain.com
www.refractories.saint-gobain.com
Salem Stainless Steel Suppliers Pvt
Ltd., 33,Lawyer Chinna Thambi
St., Kondithope,
Chennai, 600079, India
Phone: 044-23463000
Fax: 044-25207353
Email: ssss.vipul@gmail.com
www.ssssgroup.com
Sanford Rose Opportunity Center,
265 S. Main St., Akron, OH 44308
Phone: 330-762-6211
Fax: 330-762-6161
Email: deilertson@sraoc.com
www.sraoc.com
Sargent & Lundy LLC, 55 East
Monroe St., Chicago, IL 60603
Phone: 312-269-2000
Fax: 312-269-3680
Email: thinkingpower@sargent-
lundy.com
www.sargentlundy.com
SAS Global Power (Divison of SAS
Global Corp.), 21601 Mullin Ave.,
Warren, MI 48089
Phone: 248-414-4470
Fax: 248-414-4490
Email: justinb@sasglobalcorp.com
www.sasglobalcorp.com
Scaffolding Solutions, LLC, 808
Holly Springs Ave., Richmond, VA
23224
Phone: 804-232-9081
Email: roger.jetton@scaffolding-
solutions.com
www.scaffoldingsolutions.com
Scantech International, P.O. Box
1485, Springwood, QLD 4119,
Australia
Phone: + 61 7-371-08400
Fax: + 61 7-327-53964
Email: h.powell@scantech.com.au
www.scantech.com.au
SCHADE Lagertechnik GmbH,
Dorstener Strasse 360, Herne,
44653, Germany
Phone: +49232558740
Fax: +492325587474
Email: info@schade-lagertechnik.
de
www.schade-lagertechnik.com
Scheck Industries, 500 East
Plainfield Rd., Countryside, IL
60525
Phone: 708-482-8100
Fax: 708-482-8185
Email: thodous@goscheck.com
www.gosccheck.com
Schenck Trebel Corporation, 535
Acorn St., Deer Park, NY 11729
Phone: 631-242-4010
Fax: 631-242-8715
Email: Bernard.Bohnhorst@
schenck-usa.com
www.schenck-usa.com
COMPANY
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Schmidt Industries, 3290 Patter-
son Rd., Bay City, MI 48706
Phone: 989-684-3216
Fax: 989-684-3228
Email: schmidtind@aol.com
www.schmidtindustries.com
Schonstedt Instrument Company,
100 Edmond Rd., Kearneysville,
WV 25430
Phone: 304-725-1050
Fax: 304-725-1095
Email: info@schonstedt.com
www.schonstedt.com
Schutte & Koerting, 2510 Metro-
politan Dr., Trevose, PA 19053
Phone: 215-639-0900
Fax: 215-639-1597
Email: sales@s-k.com
www.s-k.com
Scientific Instruments, 200 Saw
Mill River Rd., P.O. Box 268, Haw-
thorne, NY 10532
Phone: 914-769-5700
Fax: 914-769-5473
Email: b.sherry@worldnet.att.net
www.scientificinstrumentsny.com
Sci-Tek Consultants, Inc., 655
Rodi Rd., Ste. 303, Pittsburgh,
PA 15235
Phone: 412-371-4460
Fax: 713-371-4462
Email: fthomas@scitekanswers.com
www.scitekanswers.com
Scott Specialty Gases, 6141
Easton Rd., P.O. Box 310, Plum-
steadville, PA 18949
Phone: 215-766-8861
Fax: 215-766-2476
Email: markreq@scottgas.com
www.scottgas.com
SDS Power Company Ltd., 1805,
Founder Tower, 1122 New Jinqiao
Rd., Pudong, Shanghai, 200135,
China
Phone: 0086-21-61052072
Email: gunjan@sdspower.com
www.sdspower.com
Sealeze A Unit of Jason Inc.,
8000 Whitepine Rd., Richmond,
VA 23237
Phone: 804-275-1675
Fax: 804-743-0051
Email: mharvey@sealeze.com
www.sealeze.com
Securicon, LLC, 5520 Cherokee
Ave., Ste. 230, Alexandria, VA
22312
Phone: 703-914-2780 ext 101
Fax: 703-914-2785
Email: info@securicon.com
www.securicon.com
seepex Inc., 511 Speedway Dr.,
Enon, OH 45323
Phone: 937-864-7150
Fax: 937-864-7157
Email: sales@seepex.net
www.seepex.com
SEFAR AG, Hinterbissaustrasse
12, Heiden, 9410, Switzerland
Phone: +41718985700
Email: filtration@sefar.com
www.sefar.com
Sega Inc., 16041 Foster, P.O. Box
1000, Overland Park, KS 66085
Phone: 913-681-2881
Email: info@segainc.com
www.segainc.com
Selkirk Corporation, 5030 Corpo-
rate Exchange Blvd. SE, Grand
Rapids, MI 49512
Phone: 800-992-VENT
Fax: 877-393-4145
Email: sales@selkirkinc.com
www.selkirkcorp.com/commer-
cial-and-industrial/
Senior Flexonics Pathway, 2400
Longhorn Industrial Dr., New
Braunfels, TX 78130
Phone: 830-629-8080
Fax: 830-629-6899
Email: sales@pathway.flexonics.
com
www.myej.com
Sensor Developments, Inc., 1050
W Silver Bell Rd., Orion, MI
48359
Phone: 248-391-3000
Fax: 248-391-0107
Email: sales@sendev.com
www.sendev.com
Sentry Equipment Corp, 966 Blue
Ribbon Circle North, Oconomo-
woc, WI 53066
Phone: 262-567-7256
Fax: 262-567-4523
Email: sales@sentry-equip.com
www.sentry-equip.com
Separator Spares & Equipment,
LLC, 144 Intracoastal Dr., Houma,
LA 70363
Phone: 985-346-0122
Fax: 985-346-0244
Email: info@separatorequipment.
com
www.separatorequipment.com
sera ComPress GmbH, sera-
Strasse 1, Immenhausen, 34376,
Germany
Phone: +49 (0) 5673 999-04
Fax: +49 (0) 5673 999-05
Email: info@sera-web.com
www.sera-web.com
Sera ProDos GmbH, sera-Strasse
1, Immenhausen, 34376, Ger-
many
Phone: +49 (0) 5673 999-02
Fax: +49 (0) 5673 999-03
Email: info@sera-web.com
www.sera-web.com
Service Tech Cooling Towers, 801
S. 29th St., Chickasha, OK 73018
Phone: 405-222-0722
Fax: 405-222-5074
Email: howie@stcoolingtowers.com
www.stct.biz
Shell Lubricants, 700 Milam St.,
Houston, TX 77002
Phone: 713-546-8038
Fax: 713-423-8203
Email: melissa.cantuell@shell.
com
Sick Maihak, Inc., 4140 World
Houston Parkway, Ste. 180,
Houston, TX 77032
Phone: 281-436-5100
Fax: 281-436-5200
Email: information@sick.com
www.sicknorthamerica.com
Sidi Kerir Petrochemicals Com-
pany, kilo 36 Alex-Cairo Rd.,
Alexandria - Egypt, , Alex, 1416,
Egypt
Phone: +20121189877
Fax: +4770126
Email: friskytazmania@yahoo.com
www.sidpec.com
Siemens AG, I IA AS PA CIS, Karl-
Legien-Str. 190, Bonn, 53117,
Germany
Phone: +49 228 64805210
Fax: +49 228 64805125
Email: info.comos@siemens.com
www.siemens.com/comos
Siemens Energy, 4400 Alafaya Trl,
Orlando, FL 32862
Phone: 407-736-2000
Fax: 407-736-5008
Email: environmental.pg@
siemens.com
www.siemens.com/energy
Siemens Energy Inc. - Environ-
mental Systems & Services, 501
Grant St. - 4th Floor, Pittsburgh,
PA 15219
Phone: 412-572-3700
Email: martin.craig@siemens.com
www.energy.siemens.com/hq/en/
power-generation/environmental-
system/
Siemens Financial Services, Inc.,
170 Wood Ave. South, Iselin, NJ
08830
Phone: 732-476-3492
Email: jillian.lukach@siemens.com
www.usa.siemens.com/finance
Siemens Industry, Inc. - Water
Technologies Business Unit, 181
Thorn Hill Rd., Warrendale, PA
15086
Phone: 866-926-8420
Email: information.water@
siemens.com
www.water.siemens.com
SIGMA, Inc., 1295 Hwy. 62,
Charlestown, IN 47111
Phone: 800-210-6907
Fax: 812-256-5275
Email: vic@sigmappc.COM
www.sigmappc.com
Signal-X-Press Concept, 12,
Industrial Crescent, Ilupeju
Recreation Hall, Ilupeju, 23401,
Nigeria
Phone: +2348097764030
Email: signal@signalxpresscon-
cept.com
www.signalxpressconcept.com
Silicon Power Corporation, 275
Great Valley Pkwy., Malvern, PA
19355
Phone: 610-407-4705
Fax: 610-407-3688
Email: robert_berta@silicon-
power.com
www.siliconpower.com
Simutech Multimedia, Ste. 412,
2249 Carling Ave., Ottawa, ON
K2B 7E9, Canada
Phone: 613-656-1592
Fax: 613-722-2043
Email: tracy@simutechmultime-
dia.com
www.troubleshootingskills.com
SISCO, Inc., 6605 19 1/2 Mile
Rd., Sterling Heights, MI 48314
Phone: 586-254-0020
Fax: 586-254-0053
Email: info@sisconet.com
www.sisconet.com
SKF USA, 4141 Ruffin Rd., San
Diego, CA 92123
Phone: 619-496-3400
Fax: 619-496-3531
www.skfcm.com
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POWER 121
COMPANY
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SKODA JS a.s., Orlik 266, Plzen,
31606, Czech Republic
Phone: +420-378 042 410
Fax: +420-377 520 600
Email: info@skoda-js.cz
www.skoda-js.cz
SkyFuel, Inc., 18300 West Hwy.
72, Arvada, CO 80007
Phone: 303-330-0276
Fax: 866-422-1292
Email: alison.mason@skyfuel.com
www.skyfuel.com
Slingmax Inc., 2626 Market St.,
Aston, PA 19014
Phone: 610-485-8500
Fax: 610-494-5835
Email: jeff@slingmax.com
www.slingmax.com
SMA America, 6020 West Oaks
Blvd., Ste. 300, Rocklin, CA
95765
Phone: 916-625-0870
Fax: 916-625-0871
Email: info@SMA-America.com
www.sma-america.com
Smith & Loveless Inc., 14040
Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, KS
66215
Phone: 913-888-5201
Email: answers@smithandlove-
less.com
www.smithandloveless.com
SNC Manufacturing, 101 West
Waukau Ave., Oshkosh, WI 54902
Phone: 800-558-3325
Fax: 920-231-1090
Email: telecom@sncmfg.com
www.sncmfg.com
Sodimate, Inc. - Bulk Handling
System Specialist, 639 W. Di-
versey Pkwy., Ste. 219, Chicago,
IL 60614
Phone: 773-665-8800
Fax: 773-665-8805
Email: sodimate.inc@sodimate.com
www.sodimate-inc.com
SoftPLC Corporation, 25603 Red
Brangus, Spicewood, TX 78669
Phone: 512-264-8390
Fax: 512-264-8399
Email: info@softplc.com
www.softplc.com
Sohre Turbomachinery Inc., 128
Main St., Monson, MA 1057,
Phone: 413-267-0590
Fax: 413-267-0592
Email: tsohre@sohreturbo.com
www.sohreturbo.com
Solar Turbines Inc., 2200 Pacific
Hwy., San Diego, CA 92186
Phone: 619-544-5352
Fax: 619-544-2444
Email: powergen@solarturbines.
com
www.solarturbines.com
SolarBOS, Inc., 310 Stealth
Court, Livermore, CA 94551
Phone: 925-456-7744
Fax: 925-456-7710
Email: sales@solarbos.com
www.solarbos.com
Solarca USA, 1095 Evergreen
Circle, Ste. 200-120, The Wood-
lands, TX 77380
Phone: 281-210-0056
Fax: 832-764-5252
Email: mac.mirazee@solarca.com
www.solarca.com
SolarDock, P.O. Box 711, Wilm-
ington, DE 19899
Phone: 302-504-0124
Fax: 302-225-8716
Email: info@solardock.com
www.solardock.com
Solberg Filtration & Separation,
1151 Ardmore Ave., Itasca, IL
60143
Phone: 630-616-4411
Fax: 630-773-0727
Email: info@oilmistsolutions.com
www.solbergmfg.com
Sologic, LLC, 2501 Washington
St., 2nd Floor, Midland, MI 48642
Phone: 425-225-5885
Email: cory.boisoneau@sologic.com
www.sologic.com
Solon Manufacturing Company,
425 Center St., P.O. Box 207,
Chardon, OH 44024
Phone: 440-286-7149
Email: heland@solonmfg.com
www.solonmfg.com
SOLVAir Solutions/Solvay Chemi-
cals, Inc., 3333 Richmond Ave.,
Houston, TX 77098
Phone: 713-525-6500
Fax: 713-525-6759
Email: solvay@solvaychemicals.com
www.solvair.us
SOR Inc., 14685 West 105th St.,
Lenexa, KS 66215
Phone: 913-888-2630
Fax: 913-888-8150
Email: mbuckley@sorinc.com
www.sorinc.com
Sound Technologies, 310 Com-
merce Square, Michigan City, IN
46360
Phone: 2198792600 x3409
Email: s_schreeg@soundtech.us
www.soundtech.us
Southeast Valve, Inc., P.O. Box
7850, Charlotte, NC 28241
Phone: 704- 813-5277
Fax: 704-688-9810
Email: eden@sevalve.com
www.sevalve.com
Southern Environmental, 6690
W. Nine Mile Rd., Pensacola, FL
32526
Phone: 850-944-4475
Fax: 850-944-8270
Email: apcsales@sei-group.com
www.southernenvironmental.com
Southern Research, Ste. 238, 500
Southland Dr., Birmingham, AL
35226
Phone: 205-978-8630
Fax: 205-978-8675
Email: nelson@sri.org
www.southernresearch.org
Southwell Industries, 265 Arch
St., Laguna Beach, CA 92651
Phone: 949-497-6051
Fax: 949-497-6665
Email: m-daud@cox.net
www.southwellindustries.com
Southwest Microwave, Inc., 9055
S. McKemy St., Tempe, AZ 85284
Phone: 480-783-0201
Fax: 480-783-0401
Email: infossd@southwestmicro-
wave.com
www.southwestmicrowave.com/
ssd
Span-O-Matic, 825 Columbia St.,
Brea, CA 92821,
Phone: 714-256-4700
Fax: 714-245-4401
Email: skrause@spanomatic.com
www.spanomatic.com
Specialized Carriers and Rigging
Association, 2750 Prosperity
Ave., Ste. 620, Fairfax, VA 22031
Phone: 703-698-0291
Fax: 703-698-0297
Email: mbaehr@scranet.org
www.scranet.org
Specialized Safety Products, Inc.,
4321 W. Knox Ave., Chicago, IL
60641
Phone: 773-777-7100
Fax: 773-777-0909
Email: sales@specializedsafety-
products.com
www.specializedsafetyproducts.
com
Specialty Underwater Services,
1000 John Roebling Way, Saxon-
burg, PA 16056
Phone: 443-992-4731
Fax: 724-443-8733
Email: k_wells@braymancon-
struction.com
www.specialtyunderwater.com
SpecWorks, Inc., 810 S. Bond St.,
Baltimore, MD 21231
Phone: 410-558-1191
Fax: 410-558-1410
Email: ideas@specworks.com
www.specworks.com
Spinwave Systems, Inc., 235
Littleton Rd., Westford, MA
01886
Phone: 978-392-9000
Fax: 978-692-8400
Email: cinge@spinwavesystems.
com
www.spinwavesystems.com
Spirax Sarco, Inc., 1150 North-
point Blvd., Blythewood, SC
29016
Phone: 803-714-2000
Fax: 803-714-2222
Email: ssisales@spirax.com
www.spiraxsarco.com/us
SPL WorldGroup, Inc., 525 Market
St., 33rd Fl, San Francisco, CA
94150
Phone: 415-963-5600
Fax: 415-963-5601
Email: splinfo@splwg.com
www.splwg.com
Spraying Systems Co., North Ave.
at Schmale Rd., P.O. Box 7900,
Wheaton, IL 60189
Phone: 630-517-1494
Fax: 630-260-9727
Email: bob.jett@spray.com
www.spray.com
SPX Cooling Technoogies, 7401 W
129 St., Overland Park, KS 66213
Phone: 913-664-7587
Fax: 913-664-7872
Email: don.lillig@spx.com
www.spxcooling.com
SPX Flow Technology, 611 Sugar
Creek Rd., Delavan, WI 53115
Phone: 800-252-5200
Fax: 800-252-5012
www.spxprocessequipment.com
SPX Heat Transfer, 2121 North
161st St. East, Tulsa, OK 74101
Phone: 918-234-6000
Fax: 918-234-3345
Email: susan.hanson@spxht.com
www.spxheattransfer.com
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COMPANY
DIRECTORY
Super Radiator Coils, 451
Southlake Blvd., Richmond, VA
23236
Phone: 804-378-1300
Email: ray.birk@superradiator-
coils.com
www.superradiatorcoils.com
Superbolt, Inc., 1000 Gregg St.,
Carnegie, PA 15106
Phone: 412-279-1149
Email: jmilburn@superbolt.com
www.superbolt.com
Superior Interlock Corporation,
7339 Central Ave., Glendale, NY
11385
Phone: 718-821-8949
Fax: 718-417-6162
Email: info@superiorinterlock.com
www.superiorinterlock.com
Superior Water Screen Company,
Inc., 28230 OrchaRd. Lake Rd.,
Ste. 204, Farmington Hills, MI
48334
Phone: 248-419-5322
Email: kbridge@superiorwater-
screens.com
www.superiorwaterscreens.com
SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave.,
Schenectady, NY 12304
Phone: 518-346-1414
Fax: 518-346-6080
Email: info@superpower-inc.com
www.superpower-inc.com
Swagelok Company, 31500 Aurora
Rd., Solon, OH 44139
Phone: 440-349-5934
Fax: 440-349-5843
Email: publicrelations@swagelok.
com
www.swagelok.com
Swan Analytical USA, 225 Larkin
Dr., Unit 4, Wheeling, IL 60090
Phone: 847-229-1290
Fax: 847-229-1320
Email: sales@swan-analytical-
usa.com
www.swan-analytical-usa.com
Sword CTSpace, 49 Stevenson
St., Ste. 950, San Francisco, CA
94105
Phone: 415-882-1888
Fax: 415-882-1888
Email: sword.ctspace@live.com
www.sword-ctspace.com
Synergy, 1982 Ohio St., Lisle, IL
60532
Phone: 630-724-1960
Fax: 630-724-1969
Email: hunter@synsysinc.com
www.synsysinc.com
Synthetic Materials, LLC, 6009
Brownsboro Park Blvd., Louisville,
KY 40207
Phone: 502-895-2810
Fax: 502-255-0202
Email: djulian@synmatusa.com
www.synmat.com.
Syscom Instruments S.A., Rue de
l,Industrie 21, Sainte-Croix, CH-
1450, Switzerland
Phone: 314-361-5084 (USA)
Email: ayden@syscominstru-
ments.net
www.syscom.ch
T
Taggart Global LLC, 4000 Town
Center Blvd. Ste. 200, Canons-
burg, PA 15317
Phone: 412-429-9800
Fax: 412-429-9801
Email: jbassano@taggl.com
www.taggl.com
Tank Connection, P.O. Box 579,
Parsons, KS 67357
Phone: 620-423-3010
Fax: 620-423-3999
Email: lheady@tankconnection.
com
www.tankconnection.com
Taprogge America Corp, 150-J Ex-
ecutive Dr., Edgewood, NY 11717
Phone: 631-964-1400
Fax: 631-964-1414
Email: ldonovan@taprogge.com
www.taprogge.com
Tatman Associates Inc., P.O. Box
39400, 29015 Solon Rd., Solon,
OH 44139
Phone: 440-248-0644
Fax: 440-248-0649
Email: tatmansubs@sbcglobal.
net
www.tatmansubstations.com
TAW Miami Service Center, 9930
NW 89th Ave., Miami, FL 33178
Phone: 813-426-7301
Fax: 813-425-0933
Email: enrique.gonzalez@tawinc.
com
www.tawinc.com
Taylor Technologies Inc., 31
Loveton Circle, Sparks, MD 21152
Phone: 800-TEST-KIT
Fax: 410-771-4291
Email: customerservice@tay-
lortechnologies.com
www.taylortechnologies.com
Team Industrial Services, 200
Hermann Dr., Alvin, TX 77511
Phone: 281-388-5551
Fax: 281-331-4107
Email: benjamin.schatte@
teaminc.com
www.teamindustrialservices.com
Tech Center, 265 S. Main St.,
Akron, OH 44308
Phone: 330-762-6212
Fax: 330-762-2035
Email: douge@techcenterinc.com
www.techcenterinc.com
Tech Products, Inc., 105 Willow
Ave., Staten Island, NY 10305
Phone: 718-442-4900
Email: team@techproducts.com
www.techproducts.com
Technical Services Group Inc.,
P.O. Box 140268, Edgewater, CO
80214
Phone: 720-232-7107
Fax: 303-462-0318
Email: xfmrfieldservice@aol.com
Technology Transfer Services,
14497 North Dale Mabry Hwy.,
Ste. 120N, Tampa, FL 33618
Phone: 813-908-1100
Email: mmiller@techtransfer.com
www.techtransfer.com
TEi Construction Services, Inc.,
170 Tucapau Rd., Duncan, SC
29334
Phone: 864- 485-0600
Fax: 864-485-0655
www.babcockpower.com
TEi Struthers Services, 201 North
4th Ave., Royersford, PA 19468
Phone: 610-948-5400
Fax: 610-948-5779
www.teiservices.com
Teledyne Monitor Labs, 35
Inverness Dr. East, Englewood,
CO 80112
Phone: 303-792-3300
Fax: 303-799-1409
Email: dmcgee@teledyne.com
www.teledyne-ml.com
Temp-Pro Inc., 200 Industrial Dr.,
Northampton, MA 01060
Phone: 413- 584-3165
Email: stanley.grip@temp-pro.
com
www.temp-pro.com
Terrington Data Management, IT
Centre, York Science Park, Hes-
lington, York, YO10 5NP, UK
Phone: +44 (0)1904 567674
Fax: +44 (0)1904 567719
Email: tm@terringtondm.com
www.terringtondm.com
Teseq, 52 Mayfield Ave., Edison,
NJ 08837
Phone: 732-225-9533
Fax: 732-225-4789
Email: MJSalvador@teseq.com
www.teseq.com
Tesla Energy Solutions, 36068
Hidden Springs Rd., Ste. C - 119,
Wildomar, CA 92595
Phone: 888-583-7525
Fax: 888-837-6086
Email: damberson@teslaener-
gyllc.com
www.teslaenergyllc.com
Testo Inc., 40 White Lake Rd.,
Sparta, NJ 07871
Phone: 800-227-0729
Fax: 862-354 - 5020
Email: info@testo.com
www.testo.com
Thaker Simulation Technologies,
57 W Farms Rd., Canaan, NH
03741
Phone: 603-632-3767
Fax: 603-632-4546
Email: info@thakerllc.com
www.thakerllc.com
Thayer Scale Hyer Industries,
Inc., 91 Schoosett St., Pembroke,
MA 02359
Phone: 781-826-8101
Fax: 781-826-7944
Email: Tpicone@thayerscale.com
www.ThayerScale.com
The Avogadro Group, LLC, 2825
Verne Roberts Circle, Antioch, CA
94509
Phone: 877-602-1023
Fax: 925-680-4416
Email: craig.thiry@avogadro-
group.com
www.avogadrogroup.com
The Conklin Sherman Co, Inc., 59
Old Turnpike Rd., Beacon Falls,
CT 06403
Phone: 203-881-0190
Fax: 203-881-0178
Email: conklin59@aol.com
www.conklin-sherman.com
The David Wood Co, P.O. Box
87875, Vancouver, WA 98687
Phone: 360-260-0979
Fax: 360-253-5292
Email: dwood@staffing.net
www.powerindustrycareers.com
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December 2012 122
SRC Greenpower pvt ltd, 222,sid-
co industrial estste, Ambuttur,
Chennai, 600098, India
Phone: 28586999
Email: ganesh@srcgreenpower.com
www.srcgreenpower.com
SRP, P.O. Box 52025, KYS102,
Phoenix, AZ 85079
Phone: 602-236-8754
Fax: 602-685-3271
Email: kelly.may@srpnet.com
www.investmentrecovery.srpnet.com
SS Power Systems, 2 Corporate
Dr., Ste. 430, Shelton, CT 06484
Phone: 203-926-9388
Fax: 203-926-9720
Email: j.hochstein@shock-
system.com
www.shock-system.com
SSS Clutch Company Inc., 610 W
Basin Rd., New Castle, DE 19720
Phone: 302-322-8080
Fax: 302-322-8548
Email: engineering@sssclutch.com
www.sssclutch.com
St. Lawrence Steel, 2500 Crane
Centre Dr., Streetsboro, OH 44241
Phone: 800-837-3789
Fax: 330-562-1100
Email: dharvanek@stlawrences-
teel.com
www.stlawrencesteel.com
Stanley Consultants, Inc., 225
Iowa Ave., Muscatine, IA 52761
Phone: 800-553-9694
Fax: 563-264-6658
Email: power@stanleygroup.com
www.stanleyconsultants.com
STAR (Steam Turbine Alternative
Resources), 116 Latourette St.,
Marion, OH 43302
Phone: 740-387-5535
Fax: 740-383-2089
Email: Vince@Starturbine.com
www.starturbine.com
StatSoft, Inc. / STATISTICA, 2300
East 14th St., Tulsa, OK 74104
Phone: 918-749-1119
Email: info@statsoft.com
www.statsoftpower.com
STEAG Energy Services LLC, P.O.
Box 1727, 304 Linwood Rd. Ste.
102, Kings Mountain, NC 28086
Phone: 704-734-0688
Fax: 704-734-1088
Email: dorothee.seidel@steag.us
www.steag.us
Steag LLC, P.O. Box 410728, 224
Westinghouse Blvd., Ste. #607,
Charlotte, NC 28273
Phone: 704-588-7657
Fax: 704-588-7644
Email: HHartenstein@SteagLLC.com
www.SteagLLC.com
Steel America, 400 East Indian
River Rd., Norfolk, VA 23523,
Phone: 757-545-5311
Fax: 757-545-7627
Email: kmebane@steelamerica.net
www.steelamerica.net
Sterling Boiler and Mechanical,
1420 Kimber Lane, Evansville, IN
47715
Phone: 812- 306-3036
Fax: 812-471-4198
Email: rgreenwell@sterlingboiler.
com
www.sterlingboiler.com
Sterling Energy International,
26893 Calle Hermosa, Capistrano,
CA 92624,
Phone: 949-248-2017
Email: MarkJ@Sterling-Energy.com
www.Sterling-Energy.com
Sterling Lumber Company, 3415
W. 127th St., Blue Island, IL
60406
Phone: 708-388-2223
Email: carson@sterlinglumber.com
www.sterlinglumber.com
Sterline Strips Ltd., 2/10, Meghal
Industrial Estate, Devidayal Rd.,
Mulund West, Mumbai, India
Phone: +912225605588
Fax: +912225916496
Email: ssl@hathway.com
www.sterlingstripsltd.com
STF spa, via robecco 20
20013 Magenta (mi) Italia
Phone: 02-972091
Fax: 02-9794977
Email: stf@stf.it
www.stf.it
See our ad on p. 62
Stock Environmental Co., 16490
Chillicothe Rd., Chagrin Falls, OH
44023
Phone: 440-543-6000
Fax: 440-543-3936
Email: royce.warnick@stock-
equipment.com
www.stockequipment.com
Stock Equipment Company, 16490
Chillicothe Rd., Chagrin Falls, OH
44023
Phone: 440-543-6000
Fax: 440-543-5944
Email: david.ratcliffe@stock-
equipment.com
www.stockequipment.com
Stork H&E Turbo Blading Inc.,
334 Comfort Rd., Ithaca, NY
14850
Phone: 607-277-4968 x292
Fax: 607-277-1193
Email: joe.walker@storkhe.com
www.he-machinery.com
Storm Copper Components, 240
Industrial Dr., P.O. Box 99, Deca-
tur, TN 37322
Phone: 423-506-4178
Email: dkrikorian@stormcopper.
com
www.stormgrounding.com
StormwateRx, 122 SE 27th Ave.,
Portland, OR 97214
Phone: 800-680-3543
Email: beckyb@stormwaterx.com
www.stormwaterx.com
Structsure Scaffolding, 1054
Central Industrial Dr., St. Louis,
MO 63110
Phone: 314-633-4934
Fax: 314-633-4936
Email: jryan@structsurescaffold.
com
www.structsurescaffold.com
STRUCTURAL, 7455 New Ridge
Rd., Ste. T, Hanover, MD 21076
Phone: 720-519-3886
Fax: 303-792-2158
Email: cwills@structural.net
www.structural.net
Structural Integrity Associates,
11515 Vanstory Dr., Ste. 125,
Huntersville, NC 28078
Phone: 704-977-1301
Fax: 704-597-0335
Email: jnoto@structint.com
www.structint.com
See our ad on p. 11
Struthers Wells, 8825 N. Sam
Houston Parkway West, Houston,
TX 77064
Phone: 281- 664-8020
Email: sales@strutherswells.com
www.strutherswells.com
Sturtevant, 348 Circuit St.,
Hanover, MA 02339
Phone: 781-829-1433
Fax: 781-829-1463
Email: cstevens@sturtevantinc.com
www.sturtevantinc.com
STYL&TECH, 1-2435 Watt Ave.,
Quebec, QC G1P3X2, Canada
Phone: 418-656-1661
Email: rchampagne@stylntech.com
www.stylntech.com
SUBNET Solutions Inc., #100,
4639 Manhattan Rd. SE, Calgary,
AB G1P3X2, Canada
Phone: 403-270-8885
Fax: 403-270-9631
Email: info@subnet.com
www.subnet.com
Substructure, Inc., P.O. Box 4094,
Portsmouth, NH 03802
Phone: 603-436-1039
Email: info@substructure.com
www.substructure.com
Sullair, 3700 E. Michigan Blvd.,
Michigan City, IN 46360
Phone: 219-879-5451
Fax: 219-874-1267
Email: sullairsolutions@sullair.com
www.sullair.com
Sulzer Turbo Services, 11518 Old
Laporte Rd., La Porte, TX 77571
Phone: 713-567-2700
Fax: 713-567-2830
Email: sulzertshouston@sulzer.com
www.sulzerts.com
Sumitomo Electric Lightwave-
Future FLEX Air-Blown Network
Solutions, P.O. Box 13445, 78
T.W. Alexander Dr., Research
Triangle Park, NC 27709
Phone: 919-541-8383
Fax: 919-541-8265
Email: amanning@sumitomoelec-
tric.com
www.sumitomoelectric.com
Summit Filter Corporation, 20
Milltown Rd., Union, NJ 07083
Phone: 800-321-4850
Fax: 908-687-4202
Email: sales@summitfilter.com
www.summitfilter.com
Summit Industrial Products, 9010
CR 2120, Tyler, TX 75707
Phone: 800-749-5823
Email: info@klsummit.com
www.klsummit.com
Summit Training Source, 4170
Embassy Dr. SE, Grand Rapids, MI
49546
Phone: 800-842-0466
Fax: 616-949-5684
Email: info@safetyontheweb.com
www.safetyontheweb.com
Sunrise Systems Ltd., Sunrise
Business Park, Ely Rd., Waterbeach,
Cambridge, TX CB25 9QZ, UK
Phone: +44 1223 441311
Email: olga@sunrise-sys.com
www sunrise-sys.com
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The Deritend Group Ltd., Cyprus
St., Off Upper Villiers St., Wolver-
hampton, WV2 4PB, UK
Phone: +44 (0)1902 426354
Email: awinstanley@deritend.
co.uk
www.deritendindustries.com
The Dow Chemical Company, P.O.
Box 1206, Midland, MI 48642
Phone: 989-832-1560
Fax: 989-832-1465
Email: dowcig@dow.com
www.dow.com
The Graphic Works, 1141 Dith-
ridge Dr., Johnstown, PA 15905
Phone: 814-255-6417
www.TheGraphicWorksUSA.com
The Halvorsen Company, 7500
Grand Division Ave., Garfield
Heights, OH 44125
Phone: 216-341-7500
Fax: 216-341-7557
Email: guysipe@bellsouth.net
www.halvorsenusa.com
The Protectowire Co Inc., P.O. Box
200, Hanover, MA 02359
Phone: 781-826-3878
Fax: 781-826-2045
Email: pwire@protectowire.com
www.protectowire.com
The Proudfoot Company, P.O. Box
276, Monroe, CT 06468
Phone: 203-459-0031
Fax: 203-459-0033
www.soundcell.biz
The Ripley Company, 46 Nooks
Hill Rd., Cromwell, CT 06416
Phone: 860-635-2200
Fax: 860-635-3631
www.ripley-tools.com
The Shaw Group, 128 South Tryon
St., Charlotte, NC 28202
Phone: 704-343-7500
Email: morepower@shawgrp.com
www.shawgrp.com
The Silchem Group, P.O. Box
231487, Encinitas, CA 92923
Phone: 760-798-4390
Fax: 901-328-1427
Email: custsvc@silchem.com
www.silchem.com
The Solid Waste Authority of Palm
Beach County, 7501 North Jog
Rd., West Palm Beach, FL 33412
Phone: 561-640-4000
Fax: 561-640-3400
Email: andyg@swa.org
www.swa.org
The Stellar Group, 2900 Hartley
Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32257
Phone: 904-260-2900
Fax: 904-268-4932
Email: stellar@thestellargroup.
com
www.thestellargroup.com
The Tata Power Company Lim-
ited, Registered Office, Bombay
House 24, Homi Mody Street,
Fort, Mumbai 400001.India
Phone: 022-6655-8282
Fax: 022-6665-8801
Email: shalinis@tatapower.com
www.tatapower.com
See our ad on p. 51
The Utility FPE Group, Inc. (Plant
Risk Engineering), 15937 Swindon
Ct, Midlothian, VA 23112
Phone: 540-729-0095
Fax: 804-378-3357
Email: edouberly@ufpeg.com
www.ufpeg.com
Thermal Engineering Associates,
1424 Farrington Dr., Knoxville,
TN 37923
Phone: 865-357-2002
Fax: 865-357-2002
Email: lthomas@thermalea.com
www.thermalea.com
Thermal Engineering International
(USA) Inc., 10375 Slusher Dr.,
Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670
Phone: 323-726-0641
Fax: 323-726-9592
Email: sales@thermalengint.com
www.thermalengint.com
Thermal Instrument Co, 217
Sterner Mill Rd., Trevose, PA
19053
Phone: 215-355-8400
Fax: 215-355-1789
www.thermalinstrument.com
Thermal Kinetics, 667 Tifft St.,
Buffalo, NY 14220
Phone: 716-826-3836
Fax: 716-826-3853
Email: mdiefenbach@thermalki-
netics.net
www.thermalkinetics.net
ThermaSteel Corp, 847 S. Randall
Rd., Ste. 191, Chicago, IL 60123
Phone: 224-400-8134
Email: ghisky@hotmail.com
www.thermasteelcorp.com
Thermo Scientific, 166 Cummings
Center, Beverly, MA 01915
Phone: 978-232-6228
Email: sara.whyte@thermofisher.
com
www.thermoscientific.com/water
Thielsch Engineering, 8761 May-
field Rd., Ste. 308, Chesterland,
OH 44026
Phone: 440-729-8866
Fax: 440-729-8060
Email: psmoske@thielsch.com
www.thielschfes.com
ThirdPartyInspections.com, 559
Union Church Rd., Elkton, MD
21921
Phone: 410-620-0392
Fax: 270-573-3594
Email: steven.christian@thirdpar-
tyinspections.com
www.thirdpartyinspections.com
Thomas & Betts, Utility Products
Group, 8155 T&B Blvd., Memphis,
TN 38125
Phone: 901-752-5000
Fax: 800-888-0690
Email: barry_minatra@tnb.com
www.tnb.com
Ti Anode Fabricators Pvt Ltd., 48,
Noothanchary, Madambakkam,
Selaiyur, Chennai, 600073, India
Phone: +0091 44 22781148
Fax: +0091 44 22781362
Email: info@tianode.com
www.tianode.com
Tioga Air Heaters, 9201 Inter-
national Pkwy., Minneapolis, MN
55428
Phone: 763-525-4000
Fax: 763-525-9796
Email: bwallace@tioga-inc.com
www.tioga-inc.com
Tioga Pipe Supply Co., Inc., 2450
Wheatsheaf Lane, Philadelphia,
PA 19137
Phone: 215-831-0700
Fax: 215-533-1645
Email: jshaw@tiogapipe.com
Titan Contracting, P.O. Box 1905,
Owensboro, KY 42302
Phone: 270-683-6564
Fax: 270-684-4056
Email: wayne.lewis@titancon-
tracting.com
www.titancontracting.com
Titan Fabrication, P.O. Box 1905,
Owensboro, KY 42302
Phone: 270-683-6564
Fax: 270-684-4056
Email: tbyrnes@titanfab.com
www.hornhis.com
TITAN Rail, Inc., One East Mer-
chants Dr., Ste. 304, Oswego, IL
60543
Phone: 630-892-9020
Fax: 630-892-9090
Email: ebachman@titanrail.com
www.titanrail.com
TLT-Babcock, 260 Springside Dr.,
Akron, OH 44333
Phone: 330-867-8540
Fax: 330-869-4819
www.tltbabcock.com
Toadfly Technologies, 3512 Fair-
mont Parkway, Pasadena, TX 77504
Phone: 713- 922-1303
Fax: 281-998-9437
Email: info@itc.jobs
www.toadfly.com
Topographic Imaging Inc., 11211
Katy Freeway, Ste. 625, Houston,
TX 77079
Phone: 713-973- 8676
Fax: 713- 973-8670
Email: colemanj@lidarmapping.com
www.lidarmapping.com
Toshiba International Corp, Power
Systems Div, 6 Dickinson Dr.,
Building 300, Ste. 2, Chadds Ford,
PA 19317
Phone: 610-361-9300
Fax: 610-459-7846
Email: info@toshibatic-pa.com
Toshiba International Corpora-
tion, 6623 West Washington St.,
West Allis, WI 53213
Phone: 414-475-2800
Email: mark.mcneely@psd.
toshiba.com
Total Power Limited, 6450 Kestrel
Rd., Mississauga, ON L5T1Z7,
Canada
Phone: 905-670-1535
Email: sales@totalpower.ca
www.totalpower.ca
Tower Elevator Systems, Inc., 900
RR 620 South, C206, Lakeway, TX
78734
Phone: 512-266-6200
Fax: 512-266-6210
Email: info@towerelevators.com
www.towerelevators.com
Tower Performance, Inc., 23 Vree-
land Rd., Florham Park, NJ 07932
Phone: 800-314-1695
Fax: 970-472-1304
Email: jfritz@towerperformance.
com
www.coolingtowercomponents.com
Trachte, Inc., 422 North Burr Oak
Ave., Oregon, WI 53575
Phone: 608- 835-5707
Fax: 608- 835-3920
www.trachteusa.com
Track Software, 15600 JFK Blvd.,
Ste. 220, Houston, TX 77032
Phone: 281- 617-0406
Fax: 281-590-5884
Email: sean.oconnell@tracksoft-
ware.com
www.tracksoftware.com
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COMPANY
DIRECTORY
Tradewinds Power Corp, 5820 NW
84 Ave., Miami, FL 33166
Phone: 305-592-9745
Fax: 305-592-7461
Email: sales@tradewindspower.com
www.tradewindspower.com
Traka USA, 448 Commerce Way
Ste. 100, Longwood, FL 32750
Phone: 407-681-4001
Fax: 407- 681-4003
Email: jd@traka.com
www.traka.us
Transcube USA, 290 Quarry Rd.,
Milford, CT 06460,
Phone: 203-847-4300
Fax: 203-847-4310
Email: info@transcube.us.com
www.transcube.net/us
Transfer Bulk Systems, 600 W.
Roosevelt Rd., B2, Wheaton, IL
60187
Phone: 630-784-9671
Fax: 775-659-1598
Email: info@semcotbs.com
www.transferbulksystems.com
Trans-Global Distributions, 357,
10654 82 Ave., Edmonton, AB
T6E 2A7, Canada
Phone: 780-907-2929
Fax: 780-433-5706
Email: tgd2006@telus.net
www.tgdtrading.ca
Transocean Equipment Manage-
ment, LLC, P O Box 53924,
Fayetteville, NC 28305
Phone: 910-483-7828
Fax: 910-483-7876
Email: Containers@nc.rr.com
www.Transoceancontainers.net
Transtector Systems, 10701 Air-
port Dr., Hayden, ID 83835
Phone: 800-882-9110
Fax: 208-762-6133
Email: sales@transtector.com
www.transtector.com
Tranter, 1900 Old Burk Hwy.,
Wichita Falls, TX 76306,
Phone: 940-723-7125
Fax: 940-723-1131
Email: jstone@tranter.com
www.tranter.com
Tranter International AB, P.O. Box
17233, SE-10462, Maria Skol-
gata 79B, Stockholm, SE-118 53,
Sweden
Phone: +46-8-442 49 70
Fax: +46-8-442 49 80
Email: info@se.tranter.com
www.tranter.com
Travelliance, 10225 Yellow Circle
Dr., Minnetonka, MN 55343
Phone: 952- 826-2823
Email: aclaude@travellianceinc.
com
www.travellianceinc.com
TRAX LLC, 107 Vista Centre Dr.,
Forest, VA 24551
Phone: 434-385-7250
Fax: 434-385-8233
Email: tjkane@traxcorp.com
www.traxcorp.com
TRC - Nuclear Generation Ser-
vices, 14 Gabriel Dr., Augusta,
ME 04330
Phone: 207-620-3862
Fax: 207-621-8226
Email: bgriffin@trcsolutions.com
www.trcsolutions.com
Trent Tube, 2015 Energy Dr., East
Troy, WI 53120
Phone: 262-642-7321
Fax: 262-642-9571
Email: sales@trent-tube.com
www.trent-tube.com
TRI TOOL Inc., 3041 Sunrise
Blvd., Rancho Cordova, CA 95742
Phone: 916- 288-6100
Fax: 916 288-6160
Email: s.stanton@tritool.com
www.tritool.com
TRI Transmission & Bearing Corp,
P.O. Box 454, Lionville, PA 19353
Phone: 610- 363-8570
Fax: 610-524-6326
Email: mel@turboresearch.com
www.turboresearch.com
Triangle Enterprises, Inc., 3630
Cairo Rd., Paducah, KY 42001
Phone: 270-443-2424
Email: bsayner@triangle-co.com
www.triangle-co.com
Tricor Metals, 3225 West Old Lin-
coln Way, Wooster, OH 44691
Phone: 330-264-3299
Fax: 330-262-6678
Email: chuck@tricormetals.com
www.tricormetals.com
TRIFLOW Power Valves & Pipe
Fab, 150 Cooper Rd., A-1, West
Berlin, NJ 08091
Phone: 856- 768-7159
Fax: 856- 768-2013
Email: serena@triflowcorp.com
www.triflowcorp.com
Trinity Industries, Inc., P.O. Box
568887, Dallas, TX 75356
Phone: 214-589-8529
Fax: 214-589-8553
Email: don.wallace@trin.net
www.trin.net
Triple-S Steel Supply, P.O. Box
21119, 6000 Jensen Dr., Hous-
ton, TX 77226
Phone: 713-697-7105
Fax: 713-697-5945
Email: davids@sss-steel.com
www.sss-steel.com
Truescape, 1515 SW 5th Ave.,
Ste. 1022, Portland, Oregon
97214
Phone: 643- 365-0405
Email: andrew.lewis@truescape.
com
www.truescape.com
Tuf-Lok International, P.O. Box
5078, Madison, WI 53705
Phone: 608-270-9478
Fax: 608-270-2080
Email: info@tuflok.com
www.tuflok.com
Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC,
4627 N. Sam Houston Pkwy. E.,
Houston, TX 77032
Phone: 281-227-0090
Fax: 281-227-0098
Email: Sales@TurbineEnergySolu-
tions.com
www.turbineenergysolutions.com
Turbine Generator Maintenance,
Inc., 4635 Coronado Pkwy., Cape
Coral, FL 33914
Phone: 239-549-7500
Fax: 239-549-0767
Email: teamtgm@turbinegenera-
tor.com
www.turbinegenerator.com
Turbine Inlet Cooling Asso-
ciation, 427 Prairie Knoll Dr.,
Naperville, IL 60565
Phone: 630-357-3960
Fax: 630-537-1004
Email: dpunwani@avalonconsult-
ing.com
www.turbineinletcooling.org
Turbo Parts, LLC, 767 Pierce Rd. -
Ste. 2, Clifton Park, NY 12065
Phone: 518-885-3199
Fax: 518-885-3072
Email: info@turboparts.com
www.mdaturbines.com
TurboCare, Inc., 2140 Westover
Rd., Chicopee, MA 01022
Phone: 713-336-1340
Fax: 713-336-1449
Email: rbetsold@turbocare.com
www.turbocare.com
Turnell Corp., 17269 Wild Horse
Creek Rd., Ste. 220, Chesterfield,
MO 63005
Phone: 314-971-0920
Email: victort@turnellcorp.com
www.turnellcorp.com
Turner Business Services LLC,
1300 Gladolas Dr., Winter Park,
FL 32792
Phone: 407-927-6517
Email: turnerbizservices@gmail.com
Turner OCTO, Turner Fabrication
Ltd.,65 Craigton Rd., Glasgow,
Scotland G51 3EQ, UK
Phone: +44 0 141 309 5513
Fax: +44 0 141 309 5513
Email: enquiries@turner-octo.
com
www.turner-octo.com
Tuthill Energy Systems, Millbury
Industrial Park, P.O. Box 8000,
Millbury, MA 01527
Phone: 508-756-8391
Fax: 508-754-4516
www.tuthill.com
TVC Systems, 284 Constitution
Ave., Portsmouth, NH 03801
Phone: 603-431-5251
Fax: 603-431-8909
Email: adam@tvcsystems.com
www.tvcsystems.com
TWR Lighting, Inc., 4300
Windfern Rd. # 100, Houston, TX
77041
Phone: 713-973-6905 x 108
Fax: 713-973-9352
Email: sandra.prewitt@twrlight-
ing.com
www.twrlighting.com
Tyco Flow Control, See Pentair
Valves & Controls, Pasadena, TX
77507
Phone: 832-261-2416
Email: ssdcustomercare@tyco-
valves.com
www.pentair.com/valves
Tymetal Corp., 2549 State Route
40, Greenwich, NY 12834
Phone: 800- 328-4283
Fax: 518- 649-9404
Email: mmagner@tymetal.com
www.tymetal.com
U
U.S. Metals, 19102 Gundle, Hous-
ton, TX 77073
Phone: 281-443-7473
Fax: 281-443-6748
Email: steve_tralie@usmetals.
com
www.usmetals.com
U.S. Department of Energy, Office
of Clean Coal, 1000 Indepen-
dence Ave., SW, Washington, DC
20585
Phone: 202- 586-6503
Fax: 202-586-5146
Email: steven.geiger@us.ibm.com
www.fossil.energy.gov
COMPANY
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U.S. Underwater Services, LLC,
123 Sentry Dr., Mansfield, TX
76063
Phone: 800-860-2178
Fax: 817-447-0021
Email: jimschrader@usunderwa-
terservices.com
www.usunderwaterservices.com
UBE, 261 Madison Ave., 28th
Floor, New York, NY 10016
Phone: 212-551-4700
Email: admin@ube.com
www.ube.com
Ultraflo Corporation, A subsidiary
of BRAY International, Inc., P.O.
Box 423, , Ste. Genevieve, MO
63670
Phone: 573-883-8881
Fax: 573-883-8882
Email: ultraflo@ultraflovalve.com
www.ultraflovalve.com
Ultramax Corporation, 110 Boggs
Ln, Ste. 325, Cincinnati, OH
45246
Phone: 513-469-8629
Email: ultramax@ultramax.com
www.ultramax.com
Unimar Inc., 4944 Verplank
Rd.,P.O. Box 220, Clay, NY 13041
Phone: 315-699-4400
Fax: 315-699-3700
Email: maurita@unimar.com
www.unimar.com
United Conveyor Corporation,
2100 Norman Dr. West, Waukegan,
IL 60085
Phone: 847-473-5900
Fax: 847-473-5959
Email: contactucc@unitedcon-
veyor.com
www.unitedconveyor.com
United Dynamics Corporation,
2681 Coral Ridge Rd., Brooks, KY
40109
Phone: 502-957-7525
Fax: 502-957-5441
Email: Sales@udc.net
www.udc.net
United Electric Controls, 180 Dex-
ter Ave., Watertown, MA 02472
Phone: 617-926-1000
Email: msandlin@ueonline.com
www.ueonline.com
United Fiberglass of America Inc.,
P.O. Box 1511, Springfield, OH
45503
Phone: 937-325-7305
Fax: 937-325-7380
Email: sales@unitedfiberglass.com
www.unitedfiberglass.com
United Group,Inc. /Ergonomic
Office Chairs Division, 13700 Polo
Trail Dr., Lake Forest, IL 60045,
Phone: 847-557-2729
Fax: 847-816-7111
Email: tkramer@unitedgp.com
www.eocusa.com
United Scrap Metal, 1545 S Cicero
Ave., Cicero, IL 60804
Phone: 708-774-0436
Fax: 708 -780-0510
Email: jhaas@unitedscrap.com
www.unitedscrap.com
Universal Analyzers Inc., 5200
Convair Dr., Carson City, NV 89706
Phone: 775-883-2500
Fax: 775-883-6388
Email: marketing@universalana-
lyzers.com
www.universalanalyzers.com
Universal Flow Monitors Inc.,
1755 E Nine Mile Rd., P.O. Box
249, Hazel Park, MI 48030
Phone: 248-542-9635
Fax: 248-398-4274
Email: ufm@flowmeters.com
www.flowmeters.com
Universal Utility Services, LLC,
P.O. Box 30608, 2900 NE Sixth,
Amarillo, TX 79120
Phone: 806-378-4186
Fax: 806-378-4196
Email: david.l.theel@ue-corp.com
www.uus-llc.com
University of Maryland, 2105 J.M.
Patterson Building., College Park,
MD 20742
Phone: 301-405-3017
Fax: 301-405-3305
Email: peaster@umd.edu
www.advancedengineering.umd.edu
UnseenHeroes, P.O. Box 726,
Artesia, CA 90703
Phone: 760-985-4376
Email: dave@unseenheroes.com
www.unseenheroes.com
URS, Power Business Unit, 510
Carnegie Ctr, Princeton, NJ 08543
Phone: 609-720-2000
Fax: 609-720-2050
www.urscorp.com
Uticom Systems Inc., 109 Inde-
pendence Way, Coatesville, PA
19320,
Phone: 610-895-2655
Fax: 610-895-2986
Email: graphics@uticom.net
www.uticom.net
Utility Consultants Inc., 1810
Water Place, Ste. 200, Atlanta,
GA 30339
Phone: 770-955-9922
Fax: 770-955-9955
www.ucinc.net
Utility Equipment Leasing Corp,
N4 W22610 Bluemound Rd., P.O.
Box 177, Waukesha, WI 53186
Phone: 262-547-1600
Fax: 262-544-8546
Email: rent@uelc.com
www.uelc.com
UTILX Corp, 22820 Russell Rd.,
P.O. Box 97009, Kent, WA 90864
Phone: 253-395-0200
Fax: 253-395-1040
Email: marketing@utilx.com
www.utilx.com
V
Valcor Engineering Corp, 2 Law-
rence Rd., Springfield, NJ 07081
Phone: 973- 467-8400
Fax: 973-467-9592
Email: katiecolon@valcor.com
www.valcor.com
Valdes Engineering Company, 100
West 22nd St., Lombard, IL 60148
Phone: 630-792-1886
Fax: 630-792-1986
Email: mprestemon@valdeseng.
com
www.valdeseng.com
Valmont Industries, Structures
Div, 7002 N 288th St., Valley, NE
68064
Phone: 402-359-2201
Fax: 402-359-6221
Email: polesinfo@valmont.com
www.valmont.com
Valquest Systems, 351 S. Sherman
Ste. 100, Richardson, TX 75081
Phone: 972-234-2954
Email: feliz@valquest.net
www.valquest.net
VALTIMET, 5501 Air Park Blvd.,
Morristown, TN 37813
Phone: 423-587-1888
Fax: 423-585-4215
Email: us.contact@valtimet.com
www.valtimet.com
Valvesearch.com, P.O. Box 85,
Malvern, PA 19355
Phone: 484-320-8043
Email: sales@valvesearch.com
www.valvesearch.com
Vandal Shields, 8560 Roland St.,
#E, P.O. Box 434, Buena Park, CA
90621
Phone: 714-523-0572
Fax: 714-523-3328
Email: sales@vandalshields.com
www.vandalshields.com
Varo Engineers Inc., 2751 Tuller
Parkway, Ste. 100, Dublin, OH
43017
Phone: 614- 459-0424 x149
Fax: 614-442-2750
Email: elee@varoeng.com
www.varoengineers.com
VEGA Americas, Inc., 4170 Ross-
lyn Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45209
Phone: 800-367-5383
Email: americas@vega.com
www.vega-americas.com
Velan Valve Corp, 94 Ave. C, Wil-
liston, VT 05495
Phone: 514-748-7743
Fax: 514-748-8635
Email: sales@velan.com
www.velan.com
Velcon Filters Inc., 1210 Garden
of the Gods Rd., Colorado Springs,
CO 80907
Email: vfsales@velcon.com
www.velcon.com
Ventyx, an ABB company, 400 Pe-
rimeter Center Terrace, Ste. 500,
Atlanta, GA 30346
Phone: 678-830-1000
Email: gary.frazier@ventyx.abb.
com
www.ventyx.com
Vericor Power Systems, 3625
Brookside Parkway, Ste. 500,
Alpharetta, GA 30022
Phone: 770-569-8838
Fax: 770-569-7524
Email: ken.peters@vericor.com
www.vericor.com
Verizon, One Verizon Way, Bask-
ing Ridge, NJ 07920
Phone: 800-526-3178
www.verizon.com
See our ad on p. 79
VERSITRON Inc., 83-C Albe Dr.,
Newark, DE 19702
Phone: 302-894-0699
Fax: 302-894-0624
Email: fiberlink@versitron.com
www.versitron.com
VibroSyst M, 2727 E Jacques-
Cartier Blvd., Longueuil, QC J4N
1L7, Canada
Phone: 450-646-2157
Fax: 450-646-2164
Email: sales@vibrosystm.com
www.vibrosystem.com
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COMPANY
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Victaulic, 4901 Kesslersville Rd.,
Easton, PA 18040
Phone: 610-559-3300
Fax: 610-250-8817
Email: victaulic@victaulic.com
www.victaulic.com
Victory Energy Operations, LLC,
10701 E 126th St. N., Collins-
ville, OK 74021
Phone: 918-382-4840
Email: cswallow@victoryenergy.com
www.victoryenergy.com
See our ad on p. 82
Virtual Phone System, 30150
Telegraph Rd., Bingham Farms,
MI 48025,
Phone: 800-962-0126
Email: sales@voiceshot.com
www.voiceshot.com/public/vr.asp
Viryanet, 2 Willow St., Southbor-
ough, MA 01745
Phone: 508-490-8600
Fax: 508-490-8666
Email: jack.mcavoy@viryanet.
com
www.viryanet.com
Vista Control Systems, Inc., 2101
Trinity Dr., Ste. Q, Los alamos,
NM 87544
Phone: 505- 662-2484
Email: vista-sales@vista-control.
com
www.vista-control.com
viZaar Industrial Imaging, 3392
Saxonburg Blvd., Building B, Ste.
450, Glenshaw, PA 15116
Phone: 412- 767-4048
Fax: 412- 767-5876
Email: hutz@vizaar-na.com
www.vizaar-na.com
Vogt Power International Inc.,
13551 Triton Park Blvd., Ste.
2000, Louisville, KY 40223
Phone: 502-899-4500
Fax: 502-899-4690
Email: sales@vogtpower.com
www.vogtpower.com
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG,
Voithstr. 1, Crailsheim, 74564,
Germany
Phone: +49 7951 32-0
Fax: +49 7951 32-500
Email: industry@voith.com
www.voith.com
Vooner FloGard Corporation,
4729 Stockholm Ct., Charlotte,
NC 28273
Phone: 704-552-9314
Fax: 704-554-8230
Email: info@vooner.com
www.vooner.com
Vulcan Iron Works Inc., 400 3rd
Ave., Ste. 100, Kingston, PA
18704
Phone: 717-822-2161
W
W.O. Grubb Crane Rental, 5120
Jefferson Davis Highway, Rich-
mond, VA 23234
Phone: 804-271-9471
Fax: 804-271-2539
Email: dwheeler@wogrubb.com
www.wogrubb.com
Wabash Power Equipment
Company, 444 Carpenter Ave.,
Wheeling, IL 60090
Phone: 847-541-5600
Fax: 847-541-1279
Email: info@wabashpower.com
www.wabashpower.com
Wahlco, Inc., 3600 W Segerstrom,
Santa Ana, CA 92704
Phone: 714-979-7300
Email: sales@wahlco.com
www.wahlco.com
Walters Power International,
2915 N. Classen Blvd., Ste. 400,
Oklahoma City, OK 73106
Phone: 405-528-2860
Email: jay@walterspower.com
www.walterspower.com
Warren & Baerg Manufacturing,
Inc., 39950 Rd. 108, Dinuba, CA
93618
Phone: 559-591-6790
Fax: 559-591-5728
Email: info@warrenbaerg.com
www.warrenbaerg.com
Wartsila North America, Inc.,
16330 Air Center Blvd., Houston,
TX 77032
Phone: 281-233-6200
Fax: 281-233-6233
Email: sabrina.garg@wartsila.com
www.wartsila.com/power
Washington Laboratories, Ltd.,
7560 Lindburgh Dr., Gaithers-
burg, MD 20879
Phone: 301- 216-1500
Fax: 301- 216-1590
Email: christopher.dao@washing-
ton.com
www.wll.com
Watlow, 12001 Lackland Rd., St.
Louis, MO 63146
Phone: 1-800-WATLOW2
Fax: 314-878-6814
Email: inquiry@watlow.com
www.watlow.com
Watthour Engineering Co, 333
Crosspark Dr., Pearl, MS 39208
Phone: 601-933-0900
Fax: 601-933-0901
Email: sales@watthour.com
www.watthour.com
Waukesha Bearings Corporation,
W231N2811, Ste. 200, Pewaukee,
WI 53072
Phone: 262-506-3000
Email: info@waukbearing.com
www.waukeshabearing.com
WebLayers, Inc., 100 Cambridge-
Park Dr., 3rd Floor, Cambridge,
MA 02140
Phone: 617-500-7620
Email: carlos.bernal@weblayers.
com
www.weblayers.com
Weidmann Systems International,
One Gordon Mills Way, P.O. Box
799, St. Johnsbury, VT 05851
Phone: 802-748-3936
Fax: 802-748-8630
Email: service@weidmann-
systems.com
www.weidmann-systems.com
Weir Slurry North America, 2701
S, Stoughton Rd., Madison, WI
53716
Phone: 608-221-2261
Fax: 608-221-5810
Email: msngeneralinfo@weirslur-
rygroup.com
www.weirslurrygroup.com
Welding Technologies, 2330 Cen-
tennial Dr., Gainesville, GA 30504
Phone: 877-935-3832
Fax: 770-297-6511
Email: info@babcockpower.com
www.weldingtechnologies.com
Weldstar Company, 1750 Mitchell
Rd., Aurora, IL 60505
Phone: 630-859-3100
Fax: 630-859-3199
Email: bdecker@weldstar.com
www.weldstar.com
Weschler Instruments, 16900
Foltz Pkwy., Cleveland, OH 44149
Phone: 440-238-2550
Fax: 440-238-0660
Email: sales@weschler.com
www.weschler.com
Westcon Inc., P.O. Box 1735,
Bismarck, ND 58502
Phone: 701- 222-0076
Fax: 701-224-8178
Email: sue.gustafson@westconin-
dustries.com
www.westconindustries.com
WesTech Engineering, 3665 S.
West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT
84115
Phone: 801-265-1000
Fax: 801-265-1080
Email: info@westech-inc.com
www.westech-inc.com/en-usa
Western Integrated Technologies,
13406 SE 32nd St., Bellevue, WA
98005
Phone: 425-747-0927
Fax: 425-747-0940
Email: jjohnston@westernintech.
com
www.westernintech.com
Westfalia Separator Inc., Mineral
Oil Div, 100 Fairway Ct, North-
vale, NJ 07647
Phone: 201-767-3900
Fax: 201-767-3416
Westinghouse Electric Compa-
ny, 1000 Westinghouse Drive,
Cranberry Township, PA 16066
Phone: 412-374-2558
Fax: 724-940-8518
Email: rossmams@westinghouse.
com
www.westinghousenuclear.com
See our ad on p. 25
Weston Solutions Inc., 1400
Weston Way, West Chester, PA
19380,
Phone: 610-701-3000
Email: wes.fritz@westonsolu-
tions.com
www.emissionstestingsolutions.
com
WH Salisbury & Co, 7520 N, Long
Ave., P.O. Box 1060, Skokie, IL
60077
Phone: 847-679-6700
Fax: 847-679-2401
www.whsalisbury.com
Wheelwash USA, P.O. Box
810607, Boca Raton, FL 33481
Phone: 561-750-8662
Fax: 561-750-9507
Email: global@gate.net
www.WheelwashUSA.com
WIKA Instrument Corporation -
Electrical Temperature Division,
950 Hall Court, Deer Park, TX
77536
Phone: 713-475-0022
Fax: 713-475-0011
Email: info@wikaetemp.com
www.wika.com
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WIKA Instruments Canada Ltd.,
3103 Parsons Rd., Edmonton, AB
T6N 1C8, Canada
Phone: 780-463-7035
Fax: 780-462-0017
Email: info@wika.ca
www.wika.ca
William Frick & Company, 2600
Commerce Dr., Libertyville, IL
60048
Phone: 847-918-3808
Fax: 847-918-3701
Email: barbara.crystal@fricknet.
com
www.fricknet.com
Williams Scotsman, 901 South
Bond St., Ste. 600, Baltimore, MD
21231
Phone: 410- 931-6139
Fax: 410- 931-6047
Email: linda.snyder@as.willscot.
com
www.willscot.com
Williamson Corporation, 70
Domino Dr., Concord, MA 01742,
Phone: 978-396-9607
Fax: 978-369-5485
Email: sales@williamsonir.com
www.williamsonir.com
Wilmore Electronics Co, Inc., 607
US 70-A East, P.O. Box 1329,
Hillsborough, NC 27278
Phone: 919-732-9351
Fax: 919-732-9359
Email: info@wilmoreelectronics.
com
www.wilmoreelectronics.com
WINCO Inc., 225 South Cordova
Ave., Le Center, MN 56057
Phone: 507-357-6821
Fax: 507-357-4857
Email: sales@wincogen.com
www.wincogen.com
WINSAFE Corp., One Valley Wood
Dr., Unit 1, Markham, ON L3R 5L9,
Canada
Phone: 905-474-9340
Fax: 905-474-9341
Email: rik@winsafe.com
www.winsafe.com
Winsted Corporation, 10901
Hampshire Ave. South, Minneapo-
lis, MN 55438
Phone: 800-237-5606
Fax: 770-840-9685
Email: custom@winsted.com
www.winstedcustom.com
Winters Instruments, 600 Ens-
minger Rd., Buffalo, NY 14150
Phone: 716-874-8700
Fax: 716-874-8800
Email: usasales@winters.com
www.winters.com
Wiznucleus, Inc., 244 Fifth Ave.,
Ste. K227, New York, NY 10001
Phone: 646-367-1947 x 501
Email: kshetty@wiznucleus.com
www.wiznucleus.com
Wolf Material Handling Systems,
12680 Industrial Blvd., Elk River,
MN 55330
Phone: 763-576-9040
Fax: 763-576-9070
Email: sales@wolfmhs.com
www.wolfmhs.com
Wood Group GTS, 15600 John F
Kennedy Blvd., Ste. 500, Houston,
TX 77032
Phone: 281- 227 5600
Fax: 281- 227 5655
Email: gts@woodgroup.com
www.woodgroup.com
Woodward GmbH, Handwerkstr.
29, Stuttgart, 70656, Germany
Phone: +49 (0) 711 789 54-0
Fax: +49 (0) 711 789 54-1
Email: stgt-info@woodward.com
www.woodward.com
WorleyParsons Group, Inc., 2675
Morgantown Rd., Reading, PA
19607
Phone: 610-855-2000
Fax: 610-855-2602
Email: wwwfeedback@worleypar-
sons.com
www.worleyparsons.com
WPC, Inc., 10907 Downs Rd.,
Charlotte, NC 28134
Phone: 704-927-4000
Fax: 704-927-4001
Email: icooper@wpceng.com
www.wpceng.com
WRB Communications, 4200
Lafayette Center Dr., Chantlly, VA
20151
Phone: 703-449-0520
Email: denise.dixon@wrbcorp.com
www.wrbcorp.com
X
Xdot Engineering and Analysis,
pLLc, 370C Greenbrier Dr., Char-
lottesville, VA 22901
Phone: 434-972-9368
Email: erik@xdotea.com
www.xdotea.com
Xenics, Ambachtenlaan 44, Leu-
ven, 3001, Belgium
Phone: +3216 389900
Email: kve@xenics.com
www.xenics.com
Xtralis, 700 Longwater Dr., Nor-
well, MA 02061,
Phone: 800-229-4434
Email: marketing@xtralisameri-
cas.com
www.xtralis.com
Y
Yeomans Pump - Div. Yeomans
Chicago Corp., P.O. Box 6620,
3905 Enterprise Ct., Aurora, IL
60598
Phone: 630-236-5500
Fax: 630-236-5511
Email: sales@yccpump.net
www.yeomanspump.com
YIEH CORP., NO.6 E-DA Rd.
Yanchao Town, Kaohsiung County,
82445, Taiwan
Phone: +88676151000
Fax: +88676153000
Email: ec@yieh.com
www.yieh.com
Yokogawa, 2 Dart Rd., Newnan,
GA 30265
Phone: 800-888-6400 x2438
Fax: 770- 254-1337
Email: cristy.treleani@
us.yokogawa.com
www.yokogawa.com/us
Yuba Heat Transfer, 2121 N 161 E
Ave., Tulsa, OK 74116
Phone: 918-234-6000
Fax: 918-437-3429
Z
Zachry Engineering Corporation,
1515 Arapahoe St., Tower 1, Ste.
800, Denver, CO 80202
Phone: 303-928-4400
Fax: 303-928-4368
Email: uesales@ue-corp.com
www.zhi.com
Zensol Automation Inc., 7075
Place Robert-Joncas, Ste. 139, St.
Laurent, QC H4M 2Z2, Canada
Phone: 514-333-3488
Fax: 514-333-3499
Email: zensol@zensol.com
www.zensol.com
Zequanox by MBI, 2121 Second
St. B-107, Davis, CA 95618
Phone: 408- 221-9014
Fax: 978- 709-8779
Email: kjones@accelamar.com
www.marronebio.com
Zinkan Enterprises, Inc., 1919
Case Pkwy. North, Twinsburg, OH
44087
Phone: 800-229-6801
Email: sales@zinkan.com
www.zinkan.com
ZOLLERN GmbH & Co. KG, Hitz-
kofer Strasse 1, Sigmaringendorf,
72517, Germany
Phone: +49 7571 70-0
Fax: +49 7571 70-602
Email: raik.flaemig@zollern.de
www.zollern.com
Zolo Technologies, Inc., 4946
North 63rd St., Boulder, CO 80301
Phone: 303-604-5800
Fax: 303-530-1843
Email: sales@zolotech.com
www.zolotech.com
ZSI, 45065 Michigan Ave., Can-
ton, MI 48188
Phone: 800-32-7053
Fax: 734-844-0066
Email: twright@zsi-inc.com
www.zsi-inc.com
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ACI SYSTEMS FOR MERCURY
CONTROL
ADA Environmental Solutions
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Dustex Corporation
ACOUSTICS
1 Acoustics - General
10 Instrumentation
20 Panels
30 Supplies
Hawk Measurement (10)
The Proudfoot Company (1,20,30)
ACTUATORS
AZZ | N L I
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc
Blac Inc.
Compact Automation Products LLC
Flowserve
Rotork
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG
ADDITIVES, COAL
10 Coal-pile binders
20 Dust-suppression agents
30 Freeze-conditioning agents
40 Slag modifiers
Benetech (10,20,30,40)
ADDITIVES, FUEL-OIL
Jiangsu High Hope International Group Co.
Ltd
AERATORS
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 50
AERIAL LIFTS
1 Aerial lifts - General
10 Basket testers
20 Boom- and bucket-type
Dueco Inc (20)
Hinkel Equipment Rental Associates, Inc.
(1,20)
Nesco Sales & Rentals (1)
Phenix Technologies Inc (10)
AIR PREHEATER BASKETS
SUPPLY
Imeco Limited
Tesla Energy Solutions
AIRFLOW MEASUREMENT,
COMBUSTION
Enerac, Inc
PROMECON USA Inc.
Testo Inc.
ALARMS
30 Pressure
70 Fire
90 Temperature
100 Vibration
140 Flow
Kistler-Morse Corp (140)
SKF USA (30,90,100)
The Protectowire Co Inc (70)
ALIGNMENT SYSTEM SHAFT
10 Dial indicator
20 Laser
Elos Fixturlaser AB (20)
LUDECA, INC. (20)
Machinery Mounting Solutions, Inc. (10,20)
ALIGNMENT SYSTEMS
TURBINE COMPONENT
10 Laser
Alignment Supplies, Inc. (10)
ANALYZERS, AIR-POLLUTION
1 Analyzers, air-pollution - General
10 CO, CO2
20 Continuous emissions monitors
30 HCL
40 HF
50 Hydrocarbons
60 Hydrogen sulfide
70 NH3
80 NO, NOx
90 Particulates
100 SO2 and/or SO3
110 Stack-gas
Air Instruments & Measurements LLC (20)
CEMTEK Environmental
(1,20,70,80,90,100,110)
Cosa Instrument Corp, Process Control Div
(110)
Delta Instrument LLC (10,20,30,40,50,60,70,
80,100,110)
Ducon Technologies Inc, MIP Div (10,20,
30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100,110)
Emerson Process Management, Rosemount
Analytical (10,20,50,80,110)
ENOTEC Inc. (1,10,20,110)
FilterSense (20)
Horiba Instruments, Inc.
(1,10,20,50,60,70,80,100,110)
ANALYZERS, AIR-QUALITY
Pragmatics Hydrogen Leak Detection
ANALYZERS, HYDROGEN
PURITY
10 H2-cooled Power Generators
Hitech Instruments (10)
Nova Analytical Systems Inc. (10)
ANALYZERS, WATER-PURITY
1 Analyzers, water-purity - General
10 Alkalinity
20 Boron
30 Calcium hardness
40 Chloride
50 Hydrazine
60 Hydrogen
70 Oxygen
80 Silica
90 Sodium
100 Sulfide
Camarines Sur Polytechnic College (60)
CHEMetrics, Inc. (1,10,30,40,50,70,80,100)
Hach (1,10,30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100)
Metrohm-Peak (1,40,50,80,90,100)
Orbeco Analytical Systems Inc (1)
Scientific Instruments (1,40,50,80,90,100)
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,40,50,60,70,80,90)
Swan Analytical USA (1,50,70,80,90)
Taylor Technologies Inc
(1,10,20,30,40,50,80,90,100)
Thermo Scientific
ARRESTERS
60 Transmission, line
70 Transmission, station
CITEL Surge Protection (60,70)
Siemens Energy
ASH-HANDLING SYSTEMS
1 Ash-handling systems - General
10 Air washers
20 Blowers
30 Ceramic lined pipe
40 Clinker grinders (crushers)
50 Combining tubes
60 Conveyors
70 Coolers
80 Dewatering bins
90 Exhausters
100 Feeders
110 Fluidizers
120 Jet ash pumps
140 Receiver/separators (air/ash)
150 Rotary unloaders
160 Sluice pumps
170 Storage bins
180 Storage tanks
Allen-Sherman-Hoff (1,30,40,60,70,80)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
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Detroit Stoker Company (40,150)
See our ad on p. 52
Diamond Power International Inc
(1,30,40,60,70,80)
FLSmidth Inc. (1,20,60,100,120,150)
Helmick Corporation (40,50,90,120)
National Conveyors Company Inc (10,20,
40,60,90,100,110,140,150,170)
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc. (1,60)
See our ad on p. 50
Philippi-Hagenbuch, Inc. (1)
United Conveyor Corporation (1,10,20,
30,40,50,60,80,90,100,110,120,140,150,
160,170,180)
AUGERS (EARTH)
Nesco Sales & Rentals
BAGHOUSES
10 Pulse Jet
Buell APC A (10)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Dustex Corporation
Global Power Supply
MCNS Environmental Systems Inc.
Southern Environmental
BAGS
1 Bags - General
Dustex Corporation (1)
Summit Filter Corporation (1)
BATTERIES/CHARGERS
La Marche Mfg. Co.
BEARINGS
1 Bearings - General
10 Magnetic
30 Sleeve babbitt
40 Sleeve, bronze
50 Thrust, special
Bently Pressurized Bearing Co (1,40,50)
Fusion Babbitting Co. Inc (30)
Graphite Metallizing Corp, Graphalloy Division
(1)
igus Inc. (1)
Kingsbury Inc (50)
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,30,40,50)
Renewal Parts Maintenance (1,30,40,50)
Schmidt Industries
Waukesha Bearings Corporation (1,10,50)
ZOLLERN GmbH & Co. KG (1,40,50)
BELTS SAFETY/TOOL
FrenchCreek Production, Inc.
BLADE MANUFACTURING
Schmidt Industries
BLOWERS
10 Exhaust
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Dustex Corporation (10)
Tuthill Energy Systems (10)
BOILER PARTS
10 Air Preheater Baskets-Enameled and Non-
Enameled Types
20 Pressure and non-pressure parts
30 ID, FD, PA Fan Parts
40 Soot Blower parts
50 Electrostatic precipitator parts
Air Systems Limited (10,20,30,40,50)
CTI Power/Chicago Tube & Iron Company (20)
Greens Power Equipment USA Inc. (20)
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc
BOILERS
Factory Sales & Engineering, Inc.
Greens Power Equipment USA Inc.
Indeck Power Equipment Company
STF spa
See our ad on p. 62
Victory Energy Operations, LLC
See our ad on p. 82
Wabash Power Equipment Company
BOILERS, FLUIDIZED-BED
1 Boilers, fluidized-bed - General
10 Bubbling-bed
20 Circulating
30 Other
AE&E Austria GmbH & Co KG (1,10,20,30)
Babcock & Wilcox Company (10,20)
Energy Products of Idaho (1,10,30)
Metso Power
STERLING STRIPS LTD
BOILERS, INDUSTRIAL
Babcock Power Inc.
BOILERS, UTILITY
Babcock Power Inc.
BOLTS
Applied Bolting
See our ad on p. 46
Portland Bolt & Manufacturing
Schmidt Industries
BOXES TOOL/PICK-UP TRUCK
Lista International Corp.
BRUSHES
20 Grounding
Cutsforth Products Inc.
Sohre Turbomachinery Inc (20)
BUCKETS
Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc
Schmidt Industries
BURNERS
1 Burners - General
10 Coal, pulverized
20 Gas, natural
30 Management Systems
40 NOx, low
50 Oil
60 Orimulsion
70 Slurries
80 Valves
90 Waste fuels
Coen Company, Inc. (1,20,30,40,50,80,90)
Detroit Stoker Company (40)
See our ad on p. 52
Faber Burner Company (40)
Fuel Tech Inc. (1,10,20,40,50)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,10,40).
See our ad on cover 3
Nat-Com (20,30,40,50,90)
Riley Power Inc (10,20,30,40,60,90)
Vulcan Iron Works Inc (70)
BURNERS, SUPPORT
EQUIPMENT
Coen Company, Inc.
Forney Corporation
Frederick Cowan & Co Inc
BUS
1 Bus - General
10 Aluminum/copper
EMS Industrial and Service (1,10)
MDF Cable Bus Systems (1,10)
BUS DUCT
1 Bus duct - General
20 Isolated phase
30 Non-segregated phase
40 Open (ac/dc)
50 Segregated phase
Delta Unibus Division (1,20,30,40,50)
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Delta/Unibus, Div. of Powell Electrical Sys-
tems (1,20,30,40,50)
MDF Cable Bus Systems (1)
BUSHINGS/BUSHING WELLS
Schmidt Industries
CABLE ACCESSORIES
50 Fittings & connectors
ZSI (50)
CABLE LAYERS
Dow Electrical & Telecommunications
CABLE PULLING
1 Cable pulling - General
10 Pullers, pulling accessories
Nesco Sales & Rentals (1,10)
CABLE SUPERCONDUCTING
Parmar Metals Pvt. Ltd.
CABLE TERMINATIONS/
SPLICES
20 Potheads
30 Splice kits, distribution
40 Splice kits, transmission
50 Stress cone kits
Thomas & Betts, Utility Products Group
(20,30,40,50)
CABLE,
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
Calvert Wire & Cable Corporation
CABLE, TRANSMISSION
SNC Manufacturing
CALIBRATION EQUIPMENT
Beamex, Inc.
CAPACITORS/CONTROLS
LCR Electronics
Valquest Systems
CASTINGS
1 Castings - General
10 Ferrous
20 Nonferrous
Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc (1,10)
Hillscape, Inc. (1)
Northern Cast parts Company Inc (1,10,20)
CATALYST
CoaLogix/SCR-Tech
Cormetech, Inc.
DAEYOUNG C & E CO., LTD.
Fuel Tech Inc.
Haldor Topsoe Inc.
Hypercat Advanced Catalyst Products
Johnson Matthey Catalysts LLC
CATHODIC PROTECTION
Advance Products & Systems
Corrpro Companies, Inc.
Norton Corrosion Ltd
CENTRIFUGES
KMPT AG
KMPT USA, Inc.
Separator Spares & Equipment, LLC
Westfalia Separator Inc, Mineral Oil Div
CHEMICALS, FLUE-GAS
DESULFURIZATION
10 Reagents
SOLVAir Solutions/Solvay Chemicals, Inc. (10)
CHEMICALS,
TURBOMACHINERY
1 Chemicals, turbomachinery - General
20 Centrifugal compressors
30 Gas turbines
40 Steam turbines
ECT Inc (20,30,40)
FP Turbomachinery (30)
Rochem Technical Services (1,30)
CHEMICALS, WATER-
TREATMENT
1 Chemicals, water-treatment - General
10 Antifoulants
20 Coagulants (and aids)
30 Corrosion inhibitors
40 Disinfectants
50 Flocculants
60 Neutralizers
70 Oxidizers
80 Reducing agents
90 Scale inhibitors
Ashland Water Technologies (30)
Buckman Laboratories Inc, Water Technolo-
gies (10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90)
GC3 Specialty Chemicals, Inc.
(1,10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90)
The Dow Chemical Company (1,30,90)
CHILLERS
AZZ | N L I
CHIMNEYS
Commonwealth Dynamics Inc
Hadek Protective Systems
Hamon Custodis, Inc.
Hoffmann, Inc
Oak Park Chimney
CHLORINATORS
Ti Anode Fabricators Pvt Ltd
CIRCUIT BREAKERS, HIGH
VOLTAGE
1 Circuit breakers, high voltage - General
40 Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)
Belyea Company Inc (1)
Carling Technologies
Pennsylvania Breaker LLC (1,40)
Siemens Energy
CIRCUIT BREAKERS, LOW
VOLTAGE
1 Circuit breakers, low voltage - General
10 Air-magnetic
40 Moulded case
60 Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)
70 Vacuum
AZZ | N L I (1,10,40,60,70)
CLOTHING, PROTECTIVE
1 Clothing, protective - General
30 Glove testing, electric
40 Glove testing, inflators
50 Gloves
90 Raingear
120 Sleeves, rubber
DragonWear (1)
Phenix Technologies Inc (30)
WH Salisbury & Co (1,40,50,90,120)
CLUTCHES
1 Clutches - General
10 Automatic
SSS Clutch Company Inc (1,10)
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG (1,10)
COAL FEEDERS
1 Coal feeders - General
10 Gravimetric
Bedeschi America, Inc (1)
Stock Equipment Company (10)
Thayer Scale-Hyer Industries, Inc. (1,10)
COAL GASIFIERS
Siemens Energy
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PRODUCT DIRECTORY
COAL-CLEANING EQUIPMENT
Coal Recovery Investments Ltd
COATINGS
1 Coatings - General
10 Insulating
30 Protective
40 Sealing
60 Silicone
Belzona Western Ltd. (30)
BHI Energy (1,30,40)
See our ad on p. 21
Blome International (1,10,30,40,60)
CMP Coatings, Inc. (1,30,60)
Duromar Inc (30)
Ellison Surface Technologies (1)
Hadek Protective Systems (1,10,30,40)
International Paint (1,10,30,40)
ITW Devcon Futura Coatings (30)
Kingfisher Industrial (30)
Master Bond, Inc. (1)
Praxair Surface Technologies (1)
The Silchem Group
COGENERATION SYSTEMS,
PACKAGED
2G - CENERGY Power Systems Technologies
Inc.
Alturdyne
American DG Energy Inc.
Centrax Limited
COILS & BARS
10 High-voltage
National Electric Coil (10)
COMBUSTERS
20 Rotary-kiln
AE&E - Von Roll Inc (20)
COMBUSTION AIRFLOW
MEASUREMENT
AMETEK Land, Inc.
LPP Combustion LLC
COMBUSTION-CONTROL
SYSTEMS
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc
Coen Company, Inc.
DURAG Group
Eutech Scientific Engineering
IMR Inc
Invensys
Marathon Sensors Inc
COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS/
EQUIPMENT
1 Communications systems/equipment -
General
10 Broadband/LAN
30 Fiber-optics
40 Headsets
60 Mobile
70 Modems
80 Networking products
Aitech Defense Systems
Alcatel-Lucent
E.A.R., Inc. (40,60)
Elma Systems Division
EtherWAN Systems (1,10,30,80)
H&L Instruments (1,30,70,80)
MEN Micro Inc
SISCO, Inc. (80)
VERSITRON Inc (30,80)
COMPRESSORS
1 Compressors - General
5 Air booster high pressure
10 Centrifugal
40 Portable
50 Reciprocating
60 Reciprocating nonlubricated
70 Reciprocating tank-mounted
80 Rotary-screw
90 Rotary-vane (sliding-vane)
Air Engineering Inc. (1,10,50,60,70,80,90)
Atlas Copco Compressors LLC
(1,5,10,40,50,60,70,80,90)
Bauer Compressors Inc. (1,5,50,80)
Jenny Products (1,40)
sera ComPress GmbH
Siemens Energy
COMPRESSORS STEAM AND
GAS
Nash, A Gardner Denver Product
COMPUTER SOFTWARE
1 Computer software - General
10 Automation & control
30 Environmental compliance
40 Financial
50 Geographic information systems (GIS)
60 Maintenance management
65 Materials quality tracking
75 Monitoring
80 Neural Network
90 Operations & maintenance
100 Performance monitoring
110 Piping systems
120 Plant design
Automation Technology, Inc
(1,30,50,60,90,100,110)
CD-adapco (1)
CYME International T&D (1)
Eagle Technology Inc (60)
EchoMail Inc (1,75)
Ecutel Systems (1,10)
ENOSERV, LLC 90
HTRI (1)
Infor (1,10,40,60,90,100)
Intergraph Corporation (60,65,110,120)
Mainsaver (60)
NeuCo, Inc. (1,10,30,60,75,80,90,100)
Siemens AG
SPL WorldGroup, Inc (60,90)
Sunrise Systems Ltd (110)
Terrington Data Management (30,60,90,100)
Ventyx, an ABB company (60,90)
Wiznucleus, Inc. (1)
COMPUTER TERMINALS/
KEYBOARDS/PRINTERS
5 Control Room Furniture
70 Printers
Dynamic Systems Inc. (70)
Ergonomic Office Chairs by United Group,
Inc. (5)
COMPUTER-AIDED-DESIGN
EQUIPMENT (CAD)
Infolytica Corp
COMPUTERS
1 Computers - General
10 Analog
20 Data collection devices
30 Digital
40 Expert systems
50 Input/output devices
60 Laptop
GETAC Inc. (1,10,20,30,40,50,60)
Panasonic Computer Solutions Co (1,60)
CONDENSATE POLISHERS
GEA Process Engineering
CONDENSERS
1 Condensers - General
10 Air-cooled
40 Surface
Ambassador Heat Transfer Co (40)
GEA Power Cooling, Inc. - Headquarters A
(10)
LYNN Engineered Systems LLC (1)
Niagara Blower Company (1)
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CONDENSERS, TWO PLUG
The Conklin Sherman Co, Inc
CONDUIT
60 Fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP)
United Fiberglass of America Inc (60)
CONNECTORS
20 Compression
60 Power
Amphenol Industrial Operations
Aries Electronics
DMC Power (20,60)
Hubbell Power Systems, Inc
J Custom Supply, Inc (60)
CONTROL SYSTEMS
1 Control systems - General
10 Compressor
20 Engine
30 Gas-turbine
40 Main plant
ABB Inc (1,30)
Allen-Sherman-Hoff (1)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Diamond Power International Inc (1)
Emerson Process Management, Power & Water
Solutions (1)
Enercon Engineering Inc (1)
Environment One Corporation (1)
Gastops Ltd (20,30)
Innovative Control Systems, Inc. (1,10,30)
Invensys (1,10,30,40)
Machine Control Systems (1)
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,30,40)
Pentair Valves & Controls (formerly known
as Tyco Valves & Controls)
See our ad on p. 9
TVC Systems (1)
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG (1,10,30)
CONTROLLERS (ENERGY
MANAGEMENT)
10 Demand
20 Load
30 Power-factor
E / SYSTEMS (10,20,30)
Invensys (20)
CONTROLLERS (KEY
MEASUREMENTS)
BinMaster Level Controls
CONTROLLERS,
PROGRAMMABLE
I.C.M.I.(Inductive Components Mfg.,Inc.)
SoftPLC Corporation
CONVERTERS
40 DC/DC
Wilmore Electronics Co, Inc (40)
CONVEYOR ACCESSORIES
1 Conveyor accessories General
10 Belt cleaner
ASGCO Complete Conveyor Solutions (1,10)
Benetech
Flexco (1)
Martin Engineering (1)
CONVEYOR DRIVES
10 Hydrodynamic
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG (10)
CONVEYORS
1 Conveyors - General
10 Belt
20 Drag
30 Flight
40 High-angle
50 Pneumatic
60 Screw
Allen-Sherman-Hoff (1,10,20,50)
Beltservice de Mexico (1,20,40)
BEUMER Maschinenfabrik GmbH & Co. KG (10)
Conveyor Services/Classic Conveyor Compo-
nents (1,10,60)
E-ZLIFT Portable Conveyors (1,10,20,30,40)
Fenner Dunlop Americas (1,10)
Flexco Engineered Systems Group (1)
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc. (50)
See our ad on p. 50
Transfer Bulk Systems (50)
COOLING TOWERS
1 Cooling towers - General
10 Dry
20 Wet, mechanical draft
30 Wet, natural draft (hyperbolic)
40 Wet/dry
BIS Both Industrial Services BV
Cooling Tower Depot, Inc. (1,20,30)
GEA Heat Exchangers - Cooling Tower Solution
Division (1,20)
Midwest Towers (1,20)
Paharpur Cooling Towers Ltd
(1,10,20,30,40)
See our ad on p. 49
Parker Hannifin- Precision Cooling Systems
Division (1)
SPX Cooling Technologies, Inc (1)
Thermal Kinetics (1)
Tower Performance, Inc. (1,20)
CORROSION CONTROL
10 Inhibitors
20 Monitors
30 Protection
40 Silicone
CMP Coatings, Inc. (30,40)
Corrosion Service Company Europe Ltd (20,30)
Cortec Corporation (10)
Electrochemical Devices, Inc. (20)
Hadek Protective Systems (30)
PENTA Industrial Corp. (30)
COUPLINGS
North Side Power Transmission Corp.
Tuf-Lok International
Victaulic
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG
CRANES/DERRICKS
1 Cranes/derricks - General
5 120,000 lb overhead crane
30 Controls, remote radio
35 Fuel-handling
40 Gantry
65 Radwaste-handling
90 Telescopic
100 Traveling, overhead
110 Truck
Barnhart Crane & Rigging Co.
Gantrex Inc. (1,35,40,65,100)
Mazzella Lifting Technologies (1,30,40,100)
NES Rentals
Nesco Sales & Rentals (1,30,90,110)
Remtron (30)
Schmidt Industries (5)
CROSSARMS
1 Crossarms - General
10 Braces
20 Brackets
30 Fiberglass
40 Gains
GEOTEK, Inc/PUPI Crossarms (1,10,20,30,40)
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CRUSHERS/BREAKERS
10 Bradford breakers
20 Double-roll
30 Hammermills
40 Reversible mills
50 Single-roll
Pennsylvania Crusher (10,20,30,40,50)
Sturtevant (40)
CYCLONE COLLECTORS
Dustex Corporation
DAMPER ACTUATORS
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc
Jarret Inc
Keco Engineered Controls
DAMPERS
1 Dampers - General
10 Guillotine
20 Louvers
30 Special-design
Braden Mfg LLC
Clyde Bergemann Bachmann (1,10,20,30)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
McDermott Brothers Products (1,10,20,30)
Senior Flexonics Pathway (1)
DATA ACQUISITION/
MANAGEMENT
Contec Systems
DGH Corporation
Elsys Instruments
InStep Software
Invensys
Lufft USA
Onset Computer Corporation
StatSoft, Inc. / STATISTICA
DEAERATORS (STEAM
GENERATION)
30 Spray-type
40 Tray-type
Kansas City Deaerator (30,40)
DEGASIFIERS
Membrana
DEMINERALIZERS
GEA Process Engineering
Pall Corporation
DESALINATION EQUIPMENT
GEA Process Engineering
DESUPERHEATERS
Pentair Valves & Controls (formerly known
as Tyco Valves & Controls)
See our ad on p. 9
Pick Heaters, Inc.
Schutte & Koerting
DIGESTORS
20 Anaerobic
BIOFerm Energy Systems (20)
DRILLS
Metabo Corporation
DRY SCRUBBERS
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Dustex Corporation
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
DRYERS
10 Hydrogen gas dessicant
GEA Process Engineering
Kahn & Company Inc (10)
DUCT BURNERS
Coen Company, Inc.
DUCT JOINTS, EXPANSION
Energy Systems Products
DUCT SEALANT
American Polywater Corp
DUCT WORK
Chanute Manufacturing
Dustex Corporation
Moon Fabricating Corp.
DUST-COLLECTION
10 Bags
20 Systems
Airtrol, Inc. (20)
Benetech (20)
CAMCORP, Inc.
DCM Clean-Air Products, Inc.
Dustex Corporation (10,20)
MikroPul (10,20)
Nilfisk CFM (20)
EARTH-MOVING EQUIPMENT
Emtrade Intrnational Ltd
ECONOMIZERS
1 Economizers - General
10 Nonsteaming
20 Steaming
Cain Industries, Inc. (1)
Chanute Manufacturing (1)
E-Tech, Inc. (1,10,20)
Greens Power Equipment USA Inc. (1,10)
ELECTROSTATIC
PRECIPITATORS
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 50
PECO
Southern Environmental
ELEVATORS
1 Elevators- General
10 Bucket
Alimak Hek, Inc (1,10)
Tower Elevator Systems, Inc. (1)
EMISSIONS-SAMPLING
SYSTEMS
10 Extractive
20 In-situ
Apex Instruments, Inc. (10,20)
Sentry Equipment Corp (10)
SICK MAIHAK, Inc. (10,20)
Universal Analyzers Inc. (10)
ENCLOSURES
30 Fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP)
60 Metal
70 Plastic
80 Switchgear
90 Turbine/generator
CDR Systems Group (30,80)
Lectrus (60,80,90)
Pentair Valves & Controls (formerly known
as Tyco Valves & Controls)
See our ad on p. 9
Reef Industries Inc, Griffolyn (70)
Span-O-Matic (60)
Trachte Prefabricated Buildings (60,80)
ENERGY MANAGEMENT
SYSTEMS/CONTROLS
1 Energy management systems/controls -
General
10 Distribution automation equipment
Invensys (1,10)
Siemens Energy
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Woodward GmbH
ENERGY STORAGE
Caldwell Energy/Caldwell Tanks
Energy Storage and Power
ENGINES (FUEL)
10 Dual-fuel
20 Full-diesel
30 Spark-ignitions gas
Iveco Motors Of North America (20)
Wartsila North America, Inc. (10,20,30)
ENVIRONMENTAL
COMPLIANCE
1 Environmental compliance - General
20 Noise abatement, transformers
30 NOx control
40 SOx control
Basic Concepts (1,20)
Benetech
C.I.Agent Solutions, LLC (1)
Coen Company, Inc. (30)
Lenox Instrument Company, Inc. (1,30)
Plant Professionals
Southern Environmental (1,40)
StormwateRx (1)
ENVIRONMENTAL PRODUCTS
1 Environmental products - General
10 Active Carbon
ADA Carbon Solutions (10)
Babcock Power Inc.
Chesapeake Soda Clean, Inc.
Indigo Technologies (1)
Industrial Solutions International (1)
EQUIPMENT (SURPLUS)
Commerce Lanes, Inc
EQUIPMENT PARTS (REPAIR/
REPLACE)
1 Equipment parts (repair/replace) - General
10 Ash-handling equipment
20 Coal-handling equipment
25 Pulverizer
Coen Company, Inc.
Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc (1,10,20,25)
Conforma Clad Inc (20)
HR Power
EVAPORATORS
1 Evaporators - General
10 Distillation
20 Falling-film
30 Thin-film
50 Vertical-tube
Aston Evaporative Services (1)
GEA Process Engineering
LCI Corporation (10,20,30,50)
EXPANSION JOINTS
4-STAR Hose & Supply
Advanced Flexible Systems Inc
Allegheny Industrial Sales Inc
Braden Mfg LLC
Custom Expansion Joints, Inc.
ESP/Energy Systems Products, Inc
Frenzelit North America
Garlock Sealing Technologies
Hose Master Inc.
KE-Burgmann EJS
KE-Burgmann USA, Inc.
Multifab Inc. Fabricators
FABRIC FILTERS (DESIGN)
1 Fabric filters (design) - General
10 Pulse-jet
20 Reverse-air
30 Shaker
Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc (10)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Dustex Corporation (1,10,20,30)
McGill AirClean LLC (1,10,20,30)
Sefar AG (1)
FABRIC FILTERS (MATERIALS)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Dustex Corporation
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
FABRICATION
10 Metal
20 Steel
40 Steel
CERREY SA de CV
Chanute Manufacturing (20)
CTI Industries, Inc.
Delta Mechcons India Ltd. (20)
Gill Manufacturing ltd (10,20)
Gremp Steel Company (20)
Johnson Bros Metal Forming Co. (10,20)
Liberty Steel Fabricators (10,20)
Moran Iron Works Inc. (20)
Myrex Industries (20)
N.O.W. & Associates Inc
Process Equipment/Barron Industries
PTMW, INC (10,20)
Redline Industries, Inc. (10,20)
The Halvorsen Company (40)
Tricor Metals (10)
FANS
1 Fans - General
30 Forced-draft
35 Servicing
40 Gas-recirculation
50 Induced-draft
60 Overfire-air
70 Primary-air
80 Scrubber-exhaust
90 Transformer
Canadian Buffalo (1,30,35,40,50,60,70,80,90)
FlaktWoods (1,30,35,40,50,60,70,80)
Howden North America Inc.
Industrial Marketing Systems
(1,30,35,40,50,60,70,80)
TLT-Babcock
FASTENERS (ADHESIVES,
WASHERS, ETC)
NORD-LOCK
Nova Machine Products, Inc.
FEEDERS
1 Feeders - General
50 Screw
60 Vibrating
JVI Vibratory Equipment Inc (60)
Sodimate, Inc. - Bulk Handling System Spe-
cialist (1)
St. Lawrence Steel (50)
FEEDWATER HEATERS
(CLOSED)
1 Feedwater heaters (closed) - General
10 High-pressure (downstream of feedpump)
20 Low-pressure (upstream of feedpump)
American Exchanger Services (1,10,20)
Pick Heaters, Inc.
Thermal Engineering International (USA) Inc
(10,20)
Yuba Heat Transfer (10,20)
FIBERGLASS
Fibergrate Composite Structures
FILTER
Dollinger Filtration, an SPX Brand
GE Energy
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PRODUCT DIRECTORY
GEA Process Engineering
Komline-Sanderson
FILTERS (PUMPS,
COMPRESSORS)
Reverso Pumps, Inc.
FILTERS (TURBINES, DIESELS)
1 Filters (turbines, diesels) - General
10 Fuel-oil
20 Intake-air
30 Lube-oil
Advanced Filtration Concepts (1,20)
Braden Mfg LLC (20)
C.C. Jensen, Inc. Oil Maintenance (1,10,30)
Camfil Farr Power Systems (1,20)
Defitec (Filtration) (1,10,20,30)
Filtration Advantage (1)
Freudenberg Filtration Technologies SE & Co.
KG (20)
MB Oil Filters (1,10,30)
RCI Technologies (1,10)
Solberg Filtration & Separation (1,20,30)
Velcon Filters Inc (10)
FILTERS, DRY
1 Filters, dry - General
10 Cartridge-type
Dustex Corporation (1,10)
FILTERS, LIQUID
1 Filters, liquid - General
10 Activated-carbon
40 Gravity
50 Polishing
90 Vacuum
100 Water intake
Clear Lake Filtration (1)
Croll-Reynolds Engineering Company Inc (50)
Filtration & Membrane Technology, Inc.
(1,10,50,100)
Kaydon Filtration (1,40,90)
King Filtration Technologies Inc (1,10,100)
FILTERS, WATER
Orival Water Filters
FIRE-PROTECTION SYSTEMS
1 Fire-protection systems - General
10 CO2 systems
American Fire Technologies Inc (1,10)
Chemetron Fire Systems
DuraSystems Barriers, Inc. (1)
Fireaway Inc. (1)
Hiller Systems, Inc. (1,10)
SAFE Fire Detection, Inc. (1)
FLOWMETERS
1 Flowmeters - General
10 DP (differential pressure: orifice, venturi)
20 Nonintrusive (magnetic, resonance,
ultrasonic)
30 PD (positive displacement : Dighragm
rortary vane)
40 Swirl, vortex-shedding
50 Totalizers
60 Turbine
70 Variable-area (plug, rotameter)
Control Plus Inc. (1,10,20,30,40,50,60,70)
Emerson Process Management, Rosemount Div
(10,40)
FCI-Fluid Components International (1,20)
FLEXIM AMERICAS Corporation (1,20)
FlowMeters.com (20,60)
Invensys (1,40)
McCrometer (10)
Phoenix Air Flow, Inc. (10)
Photon Control (1,20)
Spirax Sarco, Inc. (20,60,70)
Thermal Instrument Co (20)
Universal Flow Monitors Inc (1,10,40,50,70)
Yokogawa Corporation Of America (1,10,70)
FLUE-GAS DESULFURIZATION
UNITS
1 Flue-gas desulfurization units - General
20 Spray dryer
30 Wet lime
40 Wet limestone
Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc (1,20,40)
GEA Process Engineering
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (30,40)
See our ad on cover 3
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc. (1)
See our ad on p. 50
Pick Heaters, Inc.
Powerspan Corp.
FUEL ANALYZERS
Lazar Scientific, Inc.
FUEL ECONOMIZERS
ALGAE-X International (AXI)
Kentube
FUEL MANAGMENT
10 Fuel supply tracking
40 Fuel yard managment
Engineering Consultants Group, Inc. (10,40)
Fuel Purification
FUEL-HANDLING EQUIPMENT
1 Fuel-handling equipment - General
10 Scales, weighing
20 Stacker/reclaimers
30 Stackers
Benetech (1,20)
Roberts & Schaefer Company (1,20,30)
Transcube USA (1)
FUEL-OIL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
30 Pumping/heating/straining sets
40 Pumps, burner
50 Pumps, transfer
seepex Inc. (30,40,50)
GAS TURBINE AIR-INTAKE
SYSTEMS
Braden Mfg LLC
FAIST Anlagenbau GmbH
Pneumafil Corp, Gas Turbine Div
GAS TURBINE AUXILIARY
SYSTEMS
Braden Mfg LLC
Chromalox, Inc.
GAS TURBINE AUXILIARY
SYSTEMS REPLACEMENT
PARTS
Braden Mfg LLC
GAS TURBINE EXHAUST
SYSTEMS
Alloy Bellows and Precision Welding
Braden Mfg LLC
Selkirk Corporation
GAS-HANDLING EQUIPMENT
1 Gas-handling equipment - General
Advanced Specialty Gases
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Scott Specialty Gases (1)
GAUGE GLASSES
Ernst Flow Industries
Hindusthan Mica Mart
GAUGES
Quest-Tec Solutions
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GAUGES PRESSURE
10 Deflection ( bellows Bourdon-tube dia-
phragm)
30 Pneumatic (force/balance vacuum)
WIKA Instruments Canada Ltd. (10,30)
Winters Instruments (10)
GAUGES, LIQUID-LEVEL
1 Gauges, liquid-level - General
10 Capacitance
20 Displacer
40 Hydrostatic
50 Noncontact
60 Resistance
Automation Products, Inc. - DYNATROL Divi-
sion (1)
Diamond Power International Inc (1)
JOWA USA, Inc. (60)
Orion Instruments LLC
Pentair Valves & Controls (formerly known
as Tyco Valves & Controls)
See our ad on p. 9
Pressure Systems, Inc
Qinhuangdao Huadian Survey Instrument and
Controller Co.,Ltd. (1,10,20,60)
VEGA Americas, Inc. (1,10,40,50)
GAUGES, STRAIN
Sensor Developments, Inc
GEARS
1 Gears - General
10 Engineered gear drives
Allen Gears Ltd (1,10)
Amarillo Gear Company (1,10)
Schmidt Industries
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG (1,10)
GENERATOR, HYDRAULIC
Western Integrated Technologies
GENERATOR/ MOTOR SETS
Lectrus
GENERATOR/ENGINE SETS, IC
Coffman Electrical Equipment Company
Mid America Engine
MWM GmbH
Tradewinds Power Corp
GENERATOR/TURBINE SETS,
GAS (GT)
Belyea Company Inc
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
International Power Machinery Co
Kawasaki Gas Turbines - Americas
Rolls-Royce plc
Siemens Energy
Solar Turbines Incorporated
Vericor Power Systems
GENERATORS
BRUSH Turbogenerators
Caterpillar Inc.
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
MTU Onsite Energy Corporation
SDS Power Company Ltd
Total Power Limited
Wabash Power Equipment Company
WINCO INC
GENERATORS, ELECTRIC
1 Generators, electric - General
10 Continuous-duty
20 Standby
APOYOTEC (Plantas de Energa) (10)
ElectraWave Inc. (10)
National Electric Coil (1,10)
Power Source International (1,10,20)
GENERATORS, HOT-WATER
40 Watertube
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc (40)
GENERATORS, HYDROGEN
GAS
Proton OnSite
GENERATORS, STEAM
1 Generators, steam - General
20 Boilers
40 Firetube
50 Heat-recovery
60 Nuclear
80 Watertube, industrial
90 Watertube, special - design
100 Watertube, utility
Ansaldo Caldaie SPA (1,20,50,100)
Greens Power Equipment USA Inc.
(1,20,40,80,90)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,20,50,60)
See our ad on cover 3
MACCHI - A DIVISION OF SOFINTER SPA
(1,20,50,80)
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc (1,20,50,80,90)
Siemens Energy
Wabash Power Equipment Company
(20,40,80,100)
GENERATORS/ENGINES,
DIESEL
ABC - Diesel
Belyea Company Inc
EPG - Enginuity Portable Grid
Wabash Power Equipment Company
Walters Power International
GRADUATED STRAIGHTENING
GRID
Fuel Tech Inc.
GROUND CLAMPS/
CONNECTORS
Storm Copper Components
GT COMPRESSOR CLEANING
SYSTEMS
Rochem Technical Services
HEAT EXCHANGERS
1 Heat exchangers - General
10 All-welded plate
20 Bare-tube
30 Finned-tube
35 Tube failure analysis
40 Geothermal
45 Tube cleaners
50 Upgrading coils
60 Heat-recovery
70 Plate
80 Shell-and-tube
90 Straight-tube
95 Tube cleaners
100 U-tube
Alfa Laval
Babcock Power Inc.
Bowman (Birmingham) Ltd
Chanute Manufacturing (20,30,60,90,100)
Chromalox (1,10,20,30,35,40,45,50,60,70,
80,90,95,100)
Dustex Corporation (1,20,45,60,80,90,100)
Joseph Oat Corporation (80)
Munters Corporation (10)
Pick Heaters, Inc.
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,30,60,80)
Super Radiator Coils (1,30,40,50,60)
Tranter (1,10,40,60,70,80,100)
Tranter International AB (1,10,40,60,70)
HEAT RECOVERY STEAM
GENERATORS (HRSGS)
Babcock Power Inc.
Vogt Power International Inc
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PRODUCT DIRECTORY
HEATERS COAL THAWING
(INFRARED)
Advanced Detection Systems, LLC
HEATERS, AIR
1 Heaters, air - General
5 Electric turbine bolt heaters
50 Tubular
Armstrong-Hunt, Inc. (1)
Coen Company, Inc. (1)
Greens Power Equipment USA Inc. (1,50)
Heatrex Inc (5)
Tioga Air Heaters (1)
HEATERS, ELECTRIC
Watlow
HEATERS, THERMAL-LIQUID
Pick Heaters, Inc.
ProSonix
Struthers Wells
HOISTS
1 Hoists - General
10 Blocks
30 Lever
40 Powered
Columbus McKinnon (1)
Cornerstone Material Handling Inc.
(1,10,30,40)
Harrington Hoists, Inc. (1)
Lisbon Hoist, Inc. (1)
HUMIDIFIERS
Atomizing Systems Inc
INCINERATORS
Coen Company, Inc.
INSPECTION EQUIPMENT
10 Binocular
20 Confined spaces
30 Infrared
40 Nuclear Inservice
AcousticEye
Aqua-Vu (20)
Exact Metrology
FARO
Inuktun Services Ltd. (10,30,40)
Karl Storz Endoscopy
RF System Lab
INSULATION (ENERGY
MANAGEMENT)
Advanced Industrial Systems Inc.
INSULATION (GENERAL)
10 Cable
20 Pipe
50 Valves and fittings
60 Vessel
AB Technology Group (10,20,50,60)
Triangle Enterprises, Inc.
INSULATION (MATERIAL)
40 High-temperature
50 Metallic
60 Nonmetallic
80 Sheet
AB Technology Group (40,50,60,80)
Mid-Mountain Materials, Inc. (40)
INVERTERS
MajorPower Corporation
SMA America
LIGHTNING (EQUIPMENT)
30 Protection
ERICO International Corporation (30)
Positron Inc (30)
LIGHTS
Genesis Lamp Corporation
GulfRim Navigation
LEDtronics, Inc.
Rig-A-Lite
TWR Lighting, Inc./Orga Aviation
Unimar, Inc.
LIME STONE SUPPLIERS
Palmetto Depot Service,s LLC
LIMESTONE-GRINDING
SYSTEMS
1 Limestone-grinding systems - General
10 Ball mills
Polycorp Ltd. (1,10)
LININGS
10 Duct
40 Oil-containment pits
50 Scrubbers
60 Stack
70 Tank
Ceilcote Products / International Paint LLC
(10,40,50,60,70)
Hadek Protective Systems (10,60)
LOAD MANAGEMENT
EQUIPMENT/SYSTEMS
AeroGo, Inc.
AleaSoft
Cannon Technologies, Inc
Cooper Power Systems
LoadBanks of America
PICOR
LOCATORS/TRACERS
b3o enviroTek
LOCKS
Lockmasters USA
Superior Interlock Corporation
LUBRICANTS
ExxonMobil Lubricants & Petroleum Spe-
cialties (Mobil Industrial Lubricants)
See our ad on p. 3
Shell Lubricants
Phillips 66 Lubricants
See our ad on p. 5
MARKERS/LABELS
1 Markers/labels - General
20 Bar codes
40 metal
50 Pipe marker tags
60 Plastic
70 Self-adhesive
InfoSight Corporation (1,20,40,50,70)
Tech Products, Inc (1,20,40,50,60,70)
MATERIALS-HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
1 Materials-handling equipment - General
10 Railcar hopper unloaders
AeroGo, Inc. (1)
Airfloat, LLC (1)
Allen-Sherman-Hoff (1)
AUMUND Frdertechnik GmbH (1)
B&W Mechanical Handling Ltd. (1)
Benetech (1,10)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
E-ZLIFT Portable Conveyors (1,10)
Jeffrey Rader Corporation
KEITH Mfg. Co. (1)
Metalfab, Inc.
See our ad on p. 45
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc. (1,10)
See our ad on p. 50
Palfinger North America (1)
Rotex Global
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SAS Global Power (Divison of SAS Global
Corp.) (1)
SCHADE Lagertechnik GmbH
Wolf Material Handling Systems (1)
METALS
1 Metals - General
10 Non-ferrous, processing & manufacture
Chatham Steel Corporation (1)
See our ad on p. 17
Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc
Leeco Steel, LLC (1)
Lucifer Furnaces, Inc. (10)
Salem Stainless Steel Suppliers Pvt. Ltd.
(1,10)
METER ACCESSORIES
10 Bases/sockets
100 Test equipment
Milbank Mfg Co (10)
Watthour Engineering Co (100)
METERING EQUIPMENT
Sera ProDos GmbH
METERS/INSTRUMENTS
20 Ammeters
60 Calibration
80 Clamp-on
90 Demand
120 Frequency
130 Galvanometers
180 kWh, electronic
190 Manometers
200 Multimeter
210 Ohmmeters
230 Panel
260 Power
270 Power-factor
300 Relative humidity
320 Revenue-meters
370 Tachometers
400 Totalizer
410 VAr
430 voltmeter
450 Voltmeter high-voltage
460 Voltmeter low voltage
470 Watthour
480 Wattmeter
Ametek Power Instruments (320)
Continental Control Systems
(80,90,180,260,270,320,470,480)
Hanover Technical Sales, Inc. (260)
Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works Inc. (260)
moisttech (300)
Weschler Instruments (230)
Yokogawa Corporation of America (20,60,80,1
20,130,190,200,210,230,260,270,370,400,41
0,430,450,460,480)
MIST ELIMINATORS
1 Mist eliminators - General
10 Chevron-type
20 Mesh
30 Other
KIMRE, Inc. (1,10,20,30)
Munters Corporation, Mist Eliminator & Tower
Packing Div (10)
MIXERS
AVA Americas, LLC
AVA-Huep GmbH u. Co. KG
Pugmill Systems, Inc
MONITORS/DETECTORS/
INDICATORS
1 Monitors/detectors/indicators - General
5 Air in-leak
10 Air-pollution ambient
20 Conductivity
30 Continuous emissions (CEMS)
60 Level
90 Temperature
100 Fault locators
110 Fault, incipient (gas analyzers)
130 Flame
150 Gas
160 Gas, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)
170 Gases, combustible
180 Gases poisonous
200 Humidity
220 Leak
230 Level
280 Moisture
290 pH monitors
310 Position
350 Smoke
360 Temperature
380 Transformer
390 Transformer (LTC)
410 Vibration
Arizona Instrument LLC (150,180,200,280)
Banner Engineering (230,310,360)
CEC Vibration Products Inc. (410)
Coen Company, Inc. (1,130)
ENERGY EQUIPMENTS & PRODUCTS COMPANY
(280)
ENMET Corporation (150)
General Monitors (130,150,170,180)
Heath Consultants Inc (150)
Incon (90,220,310,390)
IRIS Systems Inc (130)
K-TEK Corp (60)
Meeco Inc (280)
Metrix Instrument Co, A Roper Industries
Company (100)
Mil-Ram Technology, Inc.
(1,5,10,30,130,150,160,170,180)
Morgan Schaffer Systems (110)
Phenix Technologies Inc (100)
Schonstedt Instrument Company (100)
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,20,290)
VibroSyst M (100)
Weschler Instruments (380)
Xtralis (150,170,180,350)
MOTOR CONTROL CENTERS
AZZ | N L I
Lectrus
MOTOR DRIVES (ADJUSTABLE-
FREQUENCY)
1 Motor drives (adjustable-frequency) -
General
Galco Industrial Electronics (1)
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG (1)
MOTORS
Baldor Electric Company
See our ad on p. 23
Exlar Corporation
MOTORS, INDUCTION
(FRAMES)
1 Motors, induction (frames) - General
10 Enclosed
20 Fan-cooled
Hyundai Heavy Industries Co. (1,10,20)
NITROGEN-OXIDES CONTROL
1 Nitrogen-oxides control - General
5 Combustion modeling & NOx control
10 Low-NOx combustion systems
30 SCR catalysts
40 SCR systems
50 SNCR systems (urea, NH3)
Braden Mfg LLC (40)
Coen Company, Inc. (1,5,10)
Fuel Tech Inc. (1,5,10,30,40,50)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,5,10,30,40)
See our ad on cover 3
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 50
Wahlco, Inc.
NUCLEAR ANALYZERS
SABIA, Inc.
NUCLEAR CORE INTERNALS
SKODA JS a.s.
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NUCLEAR FUEL ASSEMBLIES
Energy and Process Corp
NUCLEAR METERS/
INSTRUMENTS
Sentry Equipment Corp
NUCLEAR MONITORS/
DETECTORS/INDICATORS
1 Nuclear monitors/detectors/indicators -
General
30 Contamination
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,30)
NUCLEAR PRESSURE VESSELS
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
NUCLEAR RADIATION
SHIELDING
10 Containers
CONTAINER, d.o.o. (10)
NUCLEAR RADWASTE-
TREATMENT EQUIPMENT
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
NUCLEAR REACTORS
AREVA Inc.
See our ad on p. 29
NUCLEAR REMOTE HANDLING
DEVICES
KTSDI LLC
NUTS
HYTORC
OIL
Gas Depot S.A.
OIL SPILL/LEAK CONTROL
EQUIPMENT
1 Oil spill/leak control equipment - General
Andax Industries LLC (1)
InduMar Products, Inc. (1)
PS International, Inc (1)
OIL-HANDLING EQUIPMENT
1 Oil-handling equipment - General
5 Filtration systems
10 Oil/water separators
20 Purifiers
30 Reclamation
40 Skimmers
Kleentek (5)
Meiji Corporation (5)
Oil Skimmers Inc (10,40)
OILKLEEN, Inc. (1,5,20,30)
OVERTORQUE PROTECTORS
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG
PACKAGE WATERTUBE BOILER
Wabash Power Equipment Company
PACKING
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
Schmidt Industries
STAR (Steam Turbine Alternative Resources)
PIPE
1 Pipe - General
10 Abrasion-resistant
20 Aluminum
30 Cleaning
40 Corrosion-resistant
50 Ductile iron
70 High-carbon steel
80 Iron/steel
100 Lined
110 Low-alloy steel
120 Plastic
130 Thermoplastic
Allen-Sherman-Hoff
(1,10,40,50,70,80,100,110)
Georg Fischer Piping Systems Ltd (120,130)
PLANTKOREA COMPANY (10)
Tioga Pipe Supply Co., Inc.
(1,10,40,70,80,110)
Triple-S Steel Supply (80)
U. S. Metals (1)
Yieh Corp. (1,10,20,30,40,50,70,80,100,110)
PIPE BENDS/FABRICATION
Chanute Manufacturing
Haberberger, Incorporated
Mechanical & Ceramic Solutions, Inc.
Muns Welding and Mechanical, Inc.
PIPE FITTINGS (MATERIALS)
DYLANGroup
PIPE FITTINGS (TYPE)
30 Groove-end
Anvil International (30)
PIPE JOINTS, EXPANSION
1 Pipe joints, expansion - General
20 Nonmetallic
PLANT SPECIALTIES INC (1,20)
PIPE SUPPORTS
1 Pipe supports - General
10 Constant-support
20 Rigid
30 Snubbers
Anvil Engineered Pipe Supports (1,10,20,30)
Binder Group Pty Ltd (1,10,20,30)
HALFEN GmbH (1)
HALFEN USA Inc.
PIPE TOOLS
20 Portable
E.H. Wachs (20)
Metabo
PLASTICS (REINFORCED,
SHAPES/SHEETS)
C.U.E., Inc.
PLUGS
Great Northern Products
POLE ACCESSORIES
Vandal Shields
POLES, DISTRIBUTION
1 Poles, distribution - General
50 Wood
Brown Wood Preserving Co., Inc. (1,50)
POLES, STREETLIGHT
10 Aluminum
Valmont Industries, Structures Div (10)
POLES, TRANSMISSION
60 Steel
Sabre Tubular Structures (60)
POLYMERS
Interpolymer Corporation
Sidi Kerir Petrochemicals Company
POWER CENTERS
LEA International
Lectrus
POWER QUALITY EQUIPMENT
Electro Industries/GaugeTech
POWER SUPPLIES
1 Power supplies - General
10 High voltage
20 Uninterruptible
Ametek, Solidstate Controls (20)
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APC by Schneider Electric (1,20)
Computer Power Supply (1,10,20)
MGE UPS Systems (1,20)
Phenix Technologies Inc (10)
Reliance industries limited (1,10,20)
PRECAST CONCRETE
Precast Specialties Corp
PRESSURE RELIEF
REMBE GmbH - Safety + Control
PRESSURE SEAL HEADS
Schmidt Industries
PRESSURE VESSELS (CODE/
NON-CODE)
Benjamin Company
PROTECTORS, INTERFERENCE,
COMMUNICATION AND RELAY
Alstom Projects India Limited
Beckwith Electric Co., Inc.
PULVERIZERS
35 Parts, replacement wear
40 Roller-and-race
American Pulverizer Company
Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc (35)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (40)
See our ad on cover 3
Wabash Power Equipment Company
PUMPS (GENERAL)
1 Pumps (general) - General
10 Ash-service
20 Boiler-feed
30 Condensate
40 Condenser-circulating
50 Dewatering
60 Diaphragm
65 End suction
70 Fire
80 General-service, base-mounted
90 General-service, close-coupled
100 General-service, frame-mounted
105 Horizontal split-case
110 Liquid-ring
120 Metering
130 Mixed-flow
140 Oil
150 Propeller
160 Reciprocating
170 Rotary
180 Screw
190 Sewage/sludge
200 Slurry
205 Submersible
210 Sump
220 Turbine, deep-well
230 Turbine regenerative
240 Vacuum
250 Vacuum, liquid-ring
260 Vacuum, mechanical
270 Water
Andritz AG
CAT PUMPS (1,10,20,30,40,50,65,70,80,
90,100,140,150,160,210)
Dekker Vacuum Technologies, Inc.
(110,140,170,240)
Edwards Industrial Equipment Corp (1,20,
30,40,50,70,80,90,105,110,140,160,170,
180,200,220,240,250,260)
Edwards Vacuum Inc (240)
Eliminator Slurry Pumps (1,10,50,65,190,
200,205,210,270)
Fairbanks Morse Pump, Pentair Water
(10,50,65,70,105,130,140,150,190,220)
Flowrox Inc. (1,10,120,170,190,200,240,270)
GIW Industries Inc
(1,10,50,190,200,205,210,270)
Gorman-Rupp Co. (190)
Hayward Tyler (1,20,30,40,70,105,130,
140,170,180,205,210,220,230)
Highpoint Sales, Inc.
(20,65,105,110,160,200,205,250)
Hydro, Inc.
ITT Flygt Corporation (1,10,50,130,150,
190,200,205,210,270)
ProMinent Dosiertechnik GmbH (60)
Pumping Solutions, Inc. (1,10,20,30,40,
50,60,65,80,90,105,110,120,130,140,
150,160,170,180,190,200,205,210,220,
230,240,250,260,270)
Sera ProDos GmbH
Vooner FloGard Corporation
(10,50,110,240,250)
Yeomans Pump - Div. Yeomans Chicago Corp.
(1,50,130,190,200,205,210)
Weir Slurry North America (10,50,60,65,
140,160,190,200,210)
RADIOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT
FreeWave Technologies, Inc.
RAILROAD/RAILCAR
EQUIPMENT
1 Railroad/railcar equipment - General
10 Locomotive radio remote
20 Locomotives
30 Railcar dumpers (rotary)
35 Railcar hopper unloaders
40 Railcar positioners
60 Railcars (coal)
Albert Products (35)
Heyl & Patterson,Inc. (1,30,35,40)
TITAN Rail, Inc. (1,10,20,40,60)
RECLOSERS
Siemens Energy
RECTIFIERS
Corrosion Control Inc.
REELS, STEEL FOR CABLE
Nesco Sales & Rentals
REFRACTORY
1 Refractory - General
10 Brick
20 Castable
30 Other
Saint-Gobain Ceramics & Plastics, Inc
(1,10,20,30)
RELAYS
1 Relays - General
10 Auxiliary
20 Control
30 Isolating
40 Protective
Basler Electric (1,20,30,40)
Gas Turbine Efficiency (1,10,20,30,40)
Siemens Energy
RENTAL BOILER
Wabash Power Equipment Company
RESINS, ION EXCHANGE
1 Resins, ion exchange - General
10 Beaded
Pick Heaters, Inc.
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,10)
REVERSE-OSMOSIS
EQUIPMENT
Pick Heaters, Inc.
RIGGING EQUIPMENT
Aeris Corp
Sterling Lumber Company
SAMPLERS
1 Samplers - General
10 Coal
20 Liquid
30 Trace elements
40 Wastewater
Mission Instruments (1)
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,10,20,30,40)
SCADA
1 SCADA - General
10 Data acquisition systems
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20 Remote terminal units
30 Supervisory control systems
Elecsys Corp. (1,10,20,30)
Invensys (1,10,20,30)
Metric Systems Corporation (1)
MSE-Tetragenics (1,10,20,30)
Open Systems International (OSI)
(1,10,20,30)
Siemens Energy
Vista Control Systems, Inc. (1)
SCAFFOLDING
Atlantic Plant Services
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 21
Brand Energy & Infrastructure Services
Randall Industries
Safway Services, LLC
SCALES, WEIGHING
Berthold Technologies USA, LLC
Hardy Process Solutions
SCR BYPASS SYSTEMS
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Silicon Power Corporation
SCREENS, LIQUID
1 Screens, liquid - General
10 Bar
20 Rotating-disc
30 Traveling
Beaudrey A.S. (1,10,20,30)
Superior Water Screen Company, Inc (10,30)
SCRUBBERS & AUXILIARIES
1 Scrubbers & auxiliaries - General
10 Dry
30 In-duct sorbent injection
40 Packed-bed
50 Packed-tower
60 Spray-tower
80 Turbulent-contact-absorber (TCA)
90 Venturi
Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc (10)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,30,60,90)
See our ad on cover 3
Komline-Sanderson (10)
Process Engineering & Manufacturing
(1,30,40,50,60,80)
Siemens Energy
SEALS (TYPE)
1 Seals (type) - General
10 Mechanical
20 Steam turbine
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,10,20)
See our ad on cover 3
John Crane Inc, Mechanical Seals Div (10)
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,10,20)
Paragon Airheater Technologies (1,10)
SECURITY EQUIPMENT/
SYSTEMS
EK Ekcessories
INNER-TITE Corp
Southwest Microwave, Inc.
Winsted Corporation
SEISMIC EQUIPMENT
10 Instrumentation
Syscom Instruments S.A. (10)
SENSORS, CURRENT AND
VOLTAGE
epro GmbH
Onset Computer Corporation
Spinwave Systems, Inc
SENSORS, TEMPERATURE
1 Sensors, temperature - General
10 Filled systems (thermometers)
20 Noncontact (infrared, optical)
30 RTDs (resistance temperature detectors)
40 Thermistors
50 Thermocouples
ILLICA Group (1,30,50)
LumaSense Technologies (1,20)
RdF Corporation (1,30,50)
Temp-Pro Inc. (1,30,40,50)
WIKA Instrument Corporation - Electrical
Temperature Division (1,10,20,30,50)
Williamson Corporation (20)
SEPARATORS
1 Separators - General
10 Air
15 Liquid gas
20 Magnetic
Industrial Magnetics, Inc. (20)
Penn Separator Corp (10,15)
UBE (1)
SIGNAL CONDITIONERS
Acromag, Inc.
SIGNS/FLAGS
10 Safety warning
William Frick & Company (10)
SILENCERS (GENERAL)
1 Silencers (general) - General
10 Duct
20 Exhaust
30 Piping
ATCO Emissions (1,20)
Braden Mfg LLC (20)
CU Services LLC (1,30)
Higgott-Kane (now ATCO Structures & Logis-
tics) (1,20)
Sound Technologies (1,10,20,30)
SILOS
10 Concrete
Hoffmann, Inc (10)
SIMULATORS
1 Simulators - General
10 System
GSE Systems, Inc (1,10)
Invensys (1,10)
RTDS Technologies Inc. (10)
TRAX LLC (1,10)
SLAG REMOVAL SYSTEMS
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
SLUDGE-CONTROL
EQUIPMENT
Entech Design, Inc
Matec In America
SOIL TESTERS
WPC, Inc.
SOLAR BOILERS
Aalborg CSP
SOLAR COLLECTOR SYSTEMS
20 Heat generation
SkyFuel, Inc. (20)
SolarDock
SOLAR PV
Lectrus
Patriot Solar Group
REW Solar USA
SolarBOS, Inc.
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SOLID-WASTE-HANDLING
EQUIPMENT (INDUSTRIAL/
MUNICIPAL)
1 Solid-waste-handling equipment (indus-
trial/municipal - General)
70 Trommel screens
Corrosion Engineering (70)
Magnetics Division, Global Equipment Mktg
Inc (1)
Warren & Baerg Manufacturing, Inc. (1)
SOOTBLOWERS
1 Sootblowers - General
10 Acoustic
20 Air
25 Detonation
30 Steam
40 Water
Advanced Acoustic Technologies, LLC (10)
Analytec Corp (10)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
(1,10,20,30,40)
Diamond Power International Inc
(1,20,25,30,40)
SS Power Systems (1,25)
SORBENT INJECTION
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Fuel Tech Inc.
NatronX Technologies, LLC
See our ad on p. 41
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 50
Novinda Corporation
United Conveyor Corporation
SPACERS
20 Cable
Enerscan Engineering Inc. (20)
SPARGERS
Mott Corporation
SPRAY NOZZLES
1 Spray nozzles - General
10 Fire protection
20 Scrubber-FGD (wet dry)
Rochem Technical Services (1)
Spraying Systems Co. (1,10,20)
STACKS
Hadek Protective Systems
STOKERS, MASS-BURNING
10 Chaingrate
40 Water-cooled vibrating grate
Detroit Stoker Company (10,40)
See our ad on p. 52
STOKERS, SPREADER
50 Traveling grate
60 Vibrating grate
Detroit Stoker Company (50,60)
See our ad on p. 52
STOKERS, UNDERFEED
10 Multiple retort
20 Single retort
Detroit Stoker Company (10,20)
See our ad on p. 52
STORAGE
1 Storage - General
10 Bins
20 Hazardous materials
30 Units
Big Top Manufacturing (1,10,20,30)
ClearSpan Fabric Structures (1)
Transocean Equipment Management, LLC
(1,20,30)
STRAINERS
Jamison Products, LP
STRINGING EQUIPMENT
Nesco Sales & Rentals
SUBSTATIONS (GENERAL)
1 Substations (general) - General
30 Metal-enclosed
50 Outdoor
60 Packaged
Belyea Company Inc (1)
Beta Engineering
DIS-TRAN Packaged Substations (1,50,60)
Parkline, Inc. (30)
SUBNET Solutions Inc. (1)
Tatman Associates Inc (1,50,60)
SUBSTATIONS (MATERIALS)
20 Steel
30 Packaged
DIS-TRAN Packaged Substations (20,30)
SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE
RH Systems
SUPPORT EQUIPMENT
(GENERAL)
Chromium Corporation
SURGE PROTECTORS
Carzoli Engineering Sales
Transtector Systems
SWITCHBOARDS
Keystone Electrical Manufacturing Company
SWITCHES
1 Switches - General
10 Air, group-operated
50 Grounding
140 Submersible
150 Vacuum
CORIMPEX USA, Inc. (1,10,50)
Namco (1)
Siemens Energy
United Electric Controls (1,140,150)
SWITCHES, TRANSFER
20 Automatic
30 Manual
Lake Shore Electric Corp (20,30)
SWITCHGEAR
1 Switchgear - General
20 Low-voltage
30 Medium-voltage
80 Padmounted
240 Vacuum
Belyea Company Inc (1)
Gilbert Electrical Systems & Products (30,80)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1)
See our ad on cover 3
Russelectric Inc (1,20,30,240)
SWITCHGEAR CUBICLES
Siemens Energy
TANKS
1 Tanks General
10 Reaction
20 Settling
30 Storage
40 Storage thermal energy
50 Storage transformer
Allegheny Industrial Sales Inc (30)
Columbian TecTank Inc (10,20,30)
CONVAULT Inc. (1,30)
Fisher Tank Company (1,10,20,30,40)
Gas Corporation of America
(1,10,20,30,40,50)
Paul Mueller Company (1,10,30,40)
Pittsburg Tank & Tower Maintenance Co. (1)
Trinity Industries, Inc. (1,30)
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TENSIONERS
1 Tensioners - General
20 Stud, multi-jackbolt
Nesco Sales & Rentals (1)
P&S Vorspannsysteme AG (20)
Superbolt, Inc. (20)
TERMINAL BLOCKS
HOPPY Industrial Co., Ltd.
TEST EQUIPMENT
1 Test equipment - General
10 Cable faults
30 Circuit breaker
40 Communications
50 Flow
60 Ground resistance
70 HV impulse
80 HV test sets
90 High current
100 Insulation
110 Load banks
120 Oil
180 Power-factor
200 Reclosers
210 Relay
215 SF6
220 SF6 leak detection
240 Testing standards
250 Tools electric
260 Transducers
American Aerospace Controls, Inc (260)
AMREL/American Reliance (110)
ComRent International (110)
Doble Engineering Company
(10,30,100,120,180,210,215)
Eagle Eye Power Solutions (1,40,60,110,240)
Fluke Corporation (1,240,250)
Haefely Test AG (1,10,70,80,90)
Highland Technology, Inc.
Iris Power-Qualitrol (1,100)
Laser Imaging Systems (220)
Megger (1,10,30,60,100,180,210)
Newport Electronics, Inc. (1,50,260)
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 50
Phenix Technologies Inc
(1,30,70,80,90,100,120,200)
Rotek Instrument Corp (240)
Teseq (60)
Zensol Automation Inc (30)
TEST EQUIPMENT,
NONDESTRUCTIVE
1 Test equipment, nondestructive - General
10 Borescopes
40 Remote visual
70 Videoimagescopes
Advanced Inspection Technologies Inc.
(1,10,40,70)
Phenix Technologies Inc (1)
TOOLS
10 Battery powered
30 Hand
40 Hand-powered
50 Hydraulic
60 Portable
Associated Electric Products,Inc (50,60)
Atlas Copco Tools and Assembly Systems
(10,40)
C.S. Osborne & Co (30)
Daniels Manufacturing Corp
Metabo Corporation (10,30,60)
The Ripley Company (30)
TORQUE CONVERTERS
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG
TRAILERS
10 Cable splicer
70 Pole
80 Reel
Nesco Sales & Rentals (10,70,80)
TRAILERS/PRE-FAB
BUILDINGS/SHELTERS
ThermaSteel Corp
TRAINING MATERIALS
TEXTBOOKS, WORKBOOKS,
MEDIA, ONLINE LEARNING
PORTAL
10 Environmental
20 Equipment
30 Fossil
40 Management and Supervisory
45 Online LMS Educator supported and Self
Directed
50 Operation and Maintenance
60 Safety
70 Thermal Management
80 Training - General
Energy Providers Coalition for Education
(EPCE) (45,80)
Global Training Solutions Inc
(10,20,30,40,45,50,60,70,80)
Panglobal Training Systems Ltd.
(10,20,30,40,45,50,60,70,80)
Simutech Multimedia (45,50,60)
Technology Transfer Services (20,30,45,50,80)
TRANSDUCERS
1 Transducers - General
Kistler Instrument Corp (1)
Measurement Specialties Inc
TRANSFORMER PADS
Highline Products
TRANSFORMERS
Siemens Energy
TRANSFORMERS,
DISTRIBUTION
Belyea Company Inc
Jefferson Electric
TRANSFORMERS,
TRANSMISSION/SUBSTATION
1 Transformers, transmission/substation -
General
20 Large power (10+ MVA)
30 Medium power (510 MVA)
JSHP Trasnformer (1,20,30)
TRANSMISSION MECHANICAL
20 Couplings
30 Gears gear boxes
NORD Drivesystems - Getriebebau NORD GmbH
& Co. KG 30
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG (20,30)
TRANSMITTERS
1 Transmitters - General
10 Flow
20 Liquid-level
30 Pressure
40 Temperature
Magnetrol International, Inc (1,10,20,30,40)
TRAPS
20 Steam
Pentair Valves & Controls (formerly known
as Tyco Valves & Controls) (20)
See our ad on p. 9
TRASH RACKS
Linita Design & Mfg. Corp.
TRUCK DUMPERS
Airoflex Equipment
TUBE CLEANERS
Conco Systems Inc.
TUBES
Fine Tubes Ltd.
VALTIMET
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TURBINE INLET VALVE,
HYDRAULIC
Pentair Valves & Controls (formerly known
as Tyco Valves & Controls)
See our ad on p. 9
TURBINE/ROTOR/SHELL
REPAIR
Schmidt Industries
TURBINES, GAS
1 Turbines, gas - General
13 Engineering
20 Overhauling
30 Rebuilding
40 Servicing
50 Spare
ap+m
Applied Gas Turbines (1)
Ares Technology, LLC (1,13,20,30,40,50)
Capstone Turbine Corporation
Chromalloy (1)
E.D.I, Inc (1)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1).
See our ad on cover 3
Siemens Energy
Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC (1,50)
Wabash Power Equipment Company (1)
TURBINES, HYDRAULIC
10 Axial
20 Bulb
30 Crossflow
40 Francis
50 Kaplan
60 Pelton
70 Tube-type
Dongfang Electric Corp / DSI
(10,20,30,40,50,60,70)
TURBINES, STEAM
1 Turbines, steam - General
10 Coupling bolts
20 Generator-drive
30 Mechanical-drive, multistage
40 Mechanical-drive, single-stage
50 Spare
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1)
See our ad on cover 3
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,10,20,30,40,50)
Siemens Energy
Wabash Power Equipment Company (1)
TURBINES, WIND
Siemens Energy
VALVE ACTUATORS/
POSITIONERS
1 Valve actuators/positioners - General
10 Electric, motor
20 Electric, solenoid
30 Electrohydraulic
60 Pneumatic, cylinder
Alcon Solenoid Valves (20)
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc (1,10)
DREHMO GmbH (1)
Flowserve (1,10,30,60)
Midland-ACS (60)
Pentair Valves & Controls (formerly known
as Tyco Valves & Controls)
See our ad on p. 9
VALVES
1 Valves - General
10 Abrasion-resistant
15 Airlocks
20 Angle
30 Ball
40 Butterfly
50 Ceramic
60 Check
70 Control
80 Corrosion-resistant
90 Diaphragm
100 Drain
110 Four-way
120 Gate
130 Globe
140 Instrument
150 Metering
160 Needle
170 Nuclear
180 Pinch
190 Plug
200 Pressure-reducing (PRV)
210 Safety/relief
220 Solenoid
230 Special-purpose
240 Test equipment
250 Three-way
260 Vacuum
Allen-Sherman-Hoff (1,10,15,40,60,70,
80,90,100,110,120,130,140,150,160,
180,190,200,210,220,230,240,250,260)
American Industrial Supply (1)
Asco Valve Inc (220)
CCI (Control Component Inc) (1,10,20,
30,40,60,70,80,90,100,110,120,130,
140,150,170,190,210)
Champion Valves, Inc. (1,60)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Conval, Inc (1,20,60,80,100,120,130,
160,170,250)
Copes-Vulcan, An SPX Brand (1,70,130,170)
DFT Inc. (70)
Emerson Process Management, Fisher
(1,20,30,40,70,80,130,170,250)
TUBES, MATERIALS
1 Tubes, materials - General
50 Stainless steel
60 Titanium
VALTIMET (1,50,60)
TUBES, REPLACEMENT
1 Tubes, replacement - General
10 Boilers
20 Condensers
30 Heat exchangers
Chanute Manufacturing (1,10)
Knotts & Co (10)
Minnotte Manufacturing Corp. (10)
Plymouth Tube Co (10,20,30)
VALTIMET (1,20,30)
TUBING
1 Tubing - General
20 Copper
50 Stainless-steel
Boiler Tube Co of America (50)
Olin Brass - Fineweld Tube (20)
Plymouth Tube Company (1,50)
Trent Tube (50)
VALTIMET (1,50)
TURBINE
Alstom Thermal Services
Capstone Turbine Corporation
Schmidt Industries
Wabash Power Equipment Company
TURBINE BLADES
1 Turbine blades - General
10 Gas turbine
20 Steam turbine
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd. (1,20)
Stork H&E Turbo Blading Inc (1,10,20)
TURBINE COMPONENTS
20 Gears & Bearings
30 Turbine Sub-Components, Mechanical
50 Bearings
70 Hubs, Rings, Forged Components
90 Other Turbine Components
Turbo Parts, LLC (20,30,50,70,90)
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PRODUCT DIRECTORY
Everlasting Valve Company
(1,10,120,230,250)
Flowrox Oy (1,10,70,120,180)
Flowserve (1,20,30,40,60,70,120,130,170)
GESTRA AG (100)
JoshiJampala Engineering Pvt Ltd (40,230)
Leslie Controls, Inc. (70)
Mogas Industries (1,30,70,100,210)
Parker Fluid Control Division (1,20,50,
60,70,80,110,200,210,220,250)
Pentair Valves & Controls (formerly known
as Tyco Valves & Controls)
See our ad on p. 9
Petro-Valve
PSB Industries (1,30,60,70,100,170)
Schmidt Industries
Sigma, Inc (1,20,30,40,60,80,90,100,
120,130,150,160,170,190)
Southwell Industruies (70)
SPX Flow Technology
(1,30,40,70,120,130,170,250)
Tyco Flow Control
VEHICLES/TRUCKS/TRUCK
BODIES
80 Specalized
Omaha Standard PALFINGER (80)
VENTILATORS
Dresser-Rand, COPPUS Portable Ventilators
General Equipment Co.
Moffitt Corporation
VIBRATION ISOLATORS
ABB Switzerland Ltd
Enidine Inc
Fabreeka International, Inc.
VOLTAGE REGULATORS
Phenix Technologies Inc
Siemens Energy
WASHERS
1 Washers General
Solon Manufacturing Company (1)
Wheelwash USA (1)
WASTE-MANAGEMENT
GTI
WASTE-TO-ENERGY SYSTEMS
ElectraTherm
Proe Power Systems, LLC
PWR - Plasma Waste Recycling
WASTEWATER TREATMENT
SYSTEMS
Amiad Filtration Systems
Aquatech International Corporation
GEA Process Engineering
Mercer International Oil Water Separators
Pick Heaters, Inc.
Siemens Industry, Inc. - Water Technologies
Business Unit
Smith & Loveless Inc.
WesTech Engineering
WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS
1 Water treatment systems - General
5 Electrodeionization
10 Mobile
20 Ozone generators
eNPure Process Systems, Inc. (1,5,10)
GEA Process Engineering
H2O Innovation USA, Inc (1,5)
Ionics Incorporated (1,5,10,20)
MacroTech, Inc. (1)
MPW Industrial Services (5,10)
NAB (1)
Ovivo USA LLC (1,5)
Parkson Corporation (1)
Zinkan Enterprises, Inc. (1)
WEB-BASED PRODUCTS
10 Software
Atlas Business Solutions, Inc. (ABS)
Inspectech, Corporation
Viryanet (10)
WELDING EQUIPMENT
Arc Machines, Inc.
Astro Arc Polysoude Inc
ESAB Welding & Cutting Products
Eutectic Corporation
Liburdi Dimetrics Corporation
Magnatech LLC
Pemamek Oy Ltd
Weldstar Company
WIND TURBINES USED
SRC Greenpower pvt ltd
WINDINGS
10 Generator/motor
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd. (10)
National Electric Coil (10)
WIRE
Anixter
WIRE SUPER CONDUCTING
SuperPower Inc.
WIRING PRODUCTS
BMC P. Ltd.
SERVICE DIRECTORY
ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY
GAS TURBINE REBUILDING
Quanta Services
Sulzer Turbo Services
AERIAL LIFTS
20 Rental/leasing
Utility Equipment Leasing Corp (20)
AERIAL SURVEY
10 Color Digital Imagery
20 Lidar
Topographic Imaging Inc (10,20)
AIR-PREHEATER CLEANING
Corrosion Monitoring Services
ALIGNMENT
1 Alignment - General
10 Shaft
20 Turbine component
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,10,20)
ASH POND MAINTENANCE
10 Dredging
Encore Dredging, Inc. (10)
ASSET RECOVERY
SRP
ASSOCIATION,
PROFESSIONAL AND/OR
TRADE
American Wind Energy Association
Signal-X-Press Concept
Ukraine Partnership Bureau
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SERVICE DIRECTORY
BALANCING
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
Schenck Trebel Corporation
BOILER OPTIMIZATION
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Diamond Power International Inc.
Fuel Tech Inc.
BOILERS
1 Boilers General
10 Cleaning, chemical
20 Deslagging explosive
Babcock Power Services Inc. (1)
BORSIG GmbH (1)
Cleaver-Brooks (1)
See our ad on p. 39
Expro Services Inc. (1,20)
George H. Bodman Inc. (10)
Industrial Engineering, S.A. (1)
Nationwide Boiler Incorporated (1)
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc. (1)
Siemens Energy
CABLE RESTORATION AND
CONDITION ASSESSMENT
Novinium Cable Life Extension
UTILX Corp.
CALL PROCESSING
WRB Communications
CERTIFICATION & TESTING
American Association of Boiler Assessors, Inc.
Laboratory Testing Inc.
CLEANING (EQUIPMENT)
1 Cleaning (equipment) General
10 Chemical cleaning
20 Vacuuming
AIMS LLC (1,20)
Cryogenic Institute of New England, Inc.
MinTech Enterprises
React 365 Inc. (1,10)
Specialized Safety Products, Inc. (1)
COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES
Virtual Phone System
COMPRESSORS
1 Compressors General
10 Overhauling
80 Rotary-screw
160 Reciprocating
CECO Compressor Engineering Corp. (160)
Fluor Enterprises, Inc. (1,10)
Gardner Denver (1)
K&G Power Systems (1)
MAN Turbo Inc. USA
See our ad on cover 2
Quanta Services
Sullair (80)
COMPUTING SERVICES/
SOFTWARE
1 Computing services/software General
5 Computer modeling
10 Database services
20 Electronic documentation services
35 Information management
40 Software design
EcoSys (1,10,20,35,40)
Engineering Software (1,5,10,35,40)
KUKA Real-Time Products (1,40)
Navigant Consulting Inc. (1,10,35)
OpenLink (35)
Sword CTSpace (1,5,10,20,35)
WebLayers, Inc. (1)
CONDENSERS
10 Cleaning
20 Inspection
30 Performance analysis
40 Plugging
50 Testing
60 Retubing
Curran International (10)
Graham Corp. (40)
Intek, Inc. (20,30,50)
RetubeCo, Inc. (20,40,50,60)
CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT
RENTAL/LEASING
Bulldog Erectors, Inc. - Crane Division
CONSTRUCTION SERVICES
1 Construction services General
10 Buildings/shelters
20 Distribution line
40 Stacks
50 Substations
60 Transmission line
BE&K Construction Company, LLC (1)
Cambria Contracting, Inc.
Casey Industrial, Inc. (1)
CB&I (1)
CIANBRO (1,20,50,60)
Conomos Industrial Services (1)
Construction Business Associates, LLC
(1,50,60)
Industrial Contract Services Inc. (10)
Kiewit Power (1)
See our ad on p. 37
Quanta Services
S & B Engineers and Constructors, Ltd. (1,40)
TEi Construction Services, Inc. (1)
The Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach
County (1)
URS, Power Business Unit (1)
CONSULTANT
GSI - Generator Services Intl, Inc.
Hurst Technologies Corp.
CONSULTING
1 Consulting General
10 Computer/software
20 Consulting services information systems
30 Energy management
33 Field Service
35 Independent system operators
37 Inspection
40 Management
45 Market structures
50 Materials
55 Organization/Industrial Development
60 Power generation systems
62 Psychological
70 Soil mechanics
75 Substation automation
80 System engineering
90 T&D economics
100 Telecommunications
Allegro (10,30)
Asia Carbon Energy
(30,33,40,45,50,55,60,62,80,90)
Belgrave Management Ltd. (30,40,60)
Cogen Power Inc. (1,40,60)
Commodities Consulting & Asset Management
COMCAM (1,20,30,40,45,55,90)
Construction Business Associates, LLC
(1,33,40,60)
Data Systems & Solutions LLC (60)
Drennen Engineering, Inc. (1,33,37)
Fern Engineering (60)
GSE Consulting, LP (1)
Interliance LLC (1,40)
JR ASSOCIATES CONSTRUCTION SERVICES INC.
(1)
Lanier Consulting, LLC (1)
LAP Power Engineering (60)
Lockwood Greene (20,30,33,35,37,40,
45,50,55,60,70,80,100)
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SERVICE DIRECTORY
M+P Labs, Inc. (1,50)
MBDi (Mastering Business Development, Inc.)
(1,40)
MECS Inc. (60)
National Technical Systems (1,20)
PB Power, a division of Parsons Brinckerhoff
Quade & Douglas (60)
People and Processes, Inc. (1)
R. W. Beck, Inc. (30)
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1,10,20,30,33,
35,37,40,45,50,60,70,75,80,90,100)
Securicon, LLC (20)
Stanley Consultants, Inc. (1)
The Stellar Group (60)
The Utility FPE Group, Inc. (Plant Risk Engi-
neering) (37)
URS, Power Business Unit (1)
CONSULTING/SERVICES,
ENVIRONMENTAL
1 Consulting/services, environmental Gen-
eral
10 Continuous emissions monitoring
15 Emissions control
20 Emissions testing
30 Noise control
Airflow Sciences Corporation (1,10,15,20)
Albemarle Environmental Division (1)
See our ad on p. 47
Alchemy Consultants, Inc. (1)
Benetech
Ellison Consultants (1,15)
ENV Environmental (1)
S.M. Stoller Corp. (1)
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1,10,15,30)
Stanley Consultants, Inc. (1)
Steag LLC (15)
URS, Power Business Unit (1)
Weston Solutions Inc. (1,20)
COOLING TOWERS
1 Cooling towers General
10 Repairing
20 Wet, mechanical draft
30 Upgrading
Cooling Tower Consulting, LLC (1,30)
Cooling Tower Technologies, Inc. (1,10,20)
SPX Cooling Technoogies (1,10,20,30)
Tower Performance Inc. (20)
Universal Utility Services, LLC (1,20)
CRANES/DERRICKS
Barnhart
DESIGN SERVICES
Bibb EAC
Quanta Services
Sargent & Lundy LLC
Stanley Consultants, Inc.
URS, Power Business Unit
EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT
UPGRADES
Rochem Technical Services
ELECTRIC SERVICES
Flight Systems Industrial Products
ELECTROSTATIC
PRECIPITATORS
20 Rebuilding
60 Repairing
70 Upgrading
Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc.
Beltran Technologies, Inc. (20,60,70)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 50
Southern Environmental
ENERGY EFFICIENCY
SERVICES
1 Energy efficiency services General
30 Energy audits
60 Equipment sale and or lease
earth energy Solutions GROUP (1,30,60)
Energy Concepts Company (60)
ENERGY SERVICES
1 Energy services General
10 Consulting
20 Plant or system operations
30 Plant or system maintenance & other
40 Products & Installation
3Degrees (1)
Aptech Engineering Services Inc. (10,20,30)
Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (1)
FMC Technologies, Inc. (1)
GP Strategies Corporation
Energy Services Group (1,10,20,40)
See our ad on p. 7
Jonas, Inc. (10)
PIC Group, Inc. (1,10,20,30,40)
See our ad on p. 13
ENERGY SYSTEM
MANAGEMENT
1 Energy system management General
57 Performance optimization
70 Risk management
90 System/plant operation
Calpine Corp (1,70,90)
Performance Consulting Services (57)
PFBC Environmental Energy Technology Inc.
(90)
ENGINEERING SERVICES
Ampirical Solutions, LLC
See our ad on p. 14
BARTEC GmbH
Bechtel
See our ad on p. 31
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 21
Bilfinger Berger Power Services GmbH
Energy Associates, P.C.
Invensys
Knight Piesold Consulting
Mead & Hunt, Inc.
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
POWER Engineers, Inc.
Pure Technologies Ltd.
Quanta Services
Richmond Engineering Works
Sega Inc.
Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.
See our ad on p. 11
Synergy
Tech Center
Thaker Simulation Technologies
Thielsch Engineering
Turnell Corp.
Xdot Engineering and Analysis, pLLc
ENGINEERING STUDIES
Alden
Invensys
Nuclear Systems Associates, Inc.
ENGINEERING, DESIGN
SERVICES
1 Engineering, design services General
10 Distribution systems
20 Environmental
22 Field Service
23 Noise abatement
26 Protective systems
30 Stacks
40 Substations
50 Transmission line
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SERVICE DIRECTORY
Aquatic Sciences L.P. (1)
Benetech (1,20,22)
Beu-Math Engineering, Inc. (1)
BICE Engineering and Consulting (1,10,26)
CCC Group Inc., Air Control Science Division
(1)
CCC Group, Inc. Engineering & Design Division
(1,20)
CE Power Solutions (1,10,22,26,40)
CH2M HILL (1,10,20,22,23,26,30,40,50)
Concepts NREC (20)
CRC Engineering, P.C. (1,10,22)
Design Analysis Services (1)
Doosan Engineering & Services, LLC ( A Burns
& Roe - Doosan Projects Alliance) (1)
ESI Inc of Tennessee (1)
GAI Consultants, Inc. (50)
kizilirmak co.
KnightHawk Engineering
M+W Group (1)
MAVEN POWER, LLC (1)
Mead & Hunt (1)
ODonnell Consulting Engineers, Inc. (1)
Prochaska & Associates (1,10)
Quanta Services
Quietly Making Noise (1,20,22,23,26,30)
River Consulting, LLC (1,10,20,22,30,40,50)
Sargent & Lundy LLC
(1,10,20,22,23,26,30,40,50)
Sega Inc. (40,50)
Southern Research (1,22,23)
Stanley Consultants, Inc. (1,10,20,40,50)
STEAG Energy Services LLC (1,20,22)
STYL&TECH (1,22)
URS, Power Business Unit (1)
Utility Consultants Inc. (1)
Valdes Engineering Company (1,10,40)
Weidmann Systems International (22)
Zachry Engineering Corporation (1,20,40)
ENVIRONMENTAL
CONSULTING
Sargent & Lundy LLC
EXECUTIVE SEARCH
CONSULTANTS
Barry Persky & Company, Inc.
Sanford Rose Opportunity Center
FANS
1 Fans - General
30 Forced-draft
40 Gas-recirculation
50 Induced-draft
60 Overfire-air
70 Primary-air
80 Scrubber-exhaust
Boldrocchi Srl (1,30,40,50,60,70,80)
FEEDWATER HEATER &
CONDENSER SERVICES
TEi Struthers Services
FEEDWATER HEATERS
(CLOSED)
1 Feedwater heaters (closed) - General
10 Rebuilding
20 Removal/Installation
30 Repair
40 Retubing/Rebundle
50 Tube plugging
60 Tube sleeving
70 Welding
Hydro Dyne Inc. (1,10,20,30,40,50,60,70)
FILTERS, FABRIC
Southern Environmental
FINANCIAL SERVICES
Altec Capital Services, LLC
FLOW MEASUREMENT/
CALIBRATION SERVICES
Sentry Equipment Corp
FLOW MODELING
Braden Mfg LLC
FLUE-GAS CONDITIONING
SYSTEM SERVICES
Fuel Tech Inc.
FUEL SUPPLY SERVICES
1 Fuel supply services - General
10 Brokering
12 Fuel cost minimization
20 Procurement, delivery or management
Bannerstone Energy
Materials Recycling of Orlando Inc.
(1,10,12,20)
FUEL-HANDLING SERVICES
Benetech
FULL-INSTALLATION SERVICES
URS, Power Business Unit
GALVANIZING
American Galvanizers Association
Imbibitive Technologies America, Inc.
GAS SERVICES
Phillips 66 E-Gas Technology for Gasification
GENERATORS, STEAM
1 Generators, steam - General
10 Boilers
40 Rebuilding
45 Fluidized bed
60 Upgrading
80 Watertube, industrial
100 Watertube, utility
Foster Wheeler Ltd, Foster Wheeler North
America Corp (10,45,80,100)
Nooter/Eriksen, Inc. (1)
Premier Energy Services Inc (10)
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc (1,40,60)
GENERATORS/MOTORS
10 Maintenance
20 Rebuilding
30 Repairing
AGT Services Inc (10,20,30)
Equipment Maintenance Services, Inc.
(10,20,30)
KEPCO/KPS
See our ad on p. 35
HEAT EXCHANGERS
10 Rebuilding
20 Retubing
30 Tube Cleaning
40 Tube plugging
60 Heat-recovery
80 Shell-and-tube
Colmac Coil Manufacturing, Inc. (20,30,60)
Condenser & Chiller Services, Inc. (20,30)
Hydropro Incorporated (10,20,40)
Krueger Engr & Mfg Co, Inc. (80)
HELICOPTERS, HELICOPTER
SERVICES
Erickson Air-Crane Inc.
INFORMATION SERVICES
Platts UDI
INSPECTION SERVICES
1 Inspection services General
3 Critical pipe hanger
5 Eddy current testing
6 Expansion Joint
10 Infrared
20 Leak detection
50 SF6 leak detection
Express Integrated Technologies LLC (1)
GE Inspection Technologies (1,5)
GKS Inspection Services & Laser Design
(1,3,5,6,10,20,50)
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Jamko Technical Solutions, Inc. (1)
Laboratory Testing Inc. (1)
Look Technologies, LLC (1)
MHT Access Services, Inc. (1,3,5,6)
National Electric Coil
National Inspection & Consultants, Inc. (1)
Quanta Services
ThirdPartyInspections.com (1)
U.S. Underwater Services, LLC
United Dynamics Corporation (1,5,10)
URS, Power Business Unit (1)
INSTRUMENTATION/CONTROL
SYSTEM SERVICES
1 Instrumentation/control system services -
General
10 Calibration
20 Component replacement
30 Diagnostics
40 Installation
50 Maintenance
60 Repairing
AquatiPro
Coritech Services (1,10,20,30,40)
HC Controls Inc. (1,10,20,30,40,50,60)
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,10,20,30,40,50,60)
Phenix Technologies Inc. (10)
Process Automation and Control, Inc.
(1,10,20,30,40)
Scheck Industries (1,10,20,30,40)
SOR Inc. (1)
Zolo Technologies, Inc. (1)
LEGAL SERVICES
Polsinelli Shughart, PC
LONG TERM SERVICE
AGREEMENTS
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
LUBE OIL
Analysts, Inc.
MAINTENANCE SERVICES/
PRODUCTS
A.J. Weller Corporation
ASB Industries, Inc.
Benetech
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 21
CGV Engineering Services Ltd.
ClearView Monitoring Solutions
Construction Techniques, Inc.
Day & Zimmermann NPS
EHC Field Services, Inc.
Field Works Inc.
Kafko Intl. Ltd.
Lanj Tools LLC
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
National Electric Coil
Quanta Services
R&G Laboratories, Inc.
TurboCare Inc.
MAPS/MAPPING SERVICES
Geospatial Corporation
Lasermap Image Plus/GPR
MARKETERS
Allied Union Inc.
PGH Marketing
Turner Business Services LLC
MATERIALS HANDLING
MANAGEMENT
20 Materials flow modeling
30 Materials quality tracking
Benetech (20,30)
MERCURY CONTROL
Fuel Tech Inc.
Nalco Air Protection Technologies
MODELING
Fuel Tech Inc.
MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL
Babcock Power Environmental Inc.
Fuel Tech Inc.
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 50
Siemens Energy Inc. - Environmental Systems
& Services
NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES
Westinghouse Electric Company
See our ad on p. 25
NUCLEAR POWER PLANT
1 Nuclear power plant - General
20 Component repairing
30 Component replacement
40 On-site machining
50 Pipe preparation
BHI Energy (1,20,30)
See our ad on p. 21
HydraTight / D.L. Ricci (40)
Neptune Underwater Services (USA) LLC.
(1,20,50)
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1)
TRC - Nuclear Generation Services (1)
URS, Power Business Unit (1,30)
OPERATIONS AND
MAINTENANCE SERVICES
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 21
Delta Power Services
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
NAES Corporation
See our ad on p. 48
OMSCO
Primesouth Inc.
PRO Solutions, Inc
Quanta Services
Sargent & Lundy LLC
Siemens Energy
Sterling Energy International
URS, Power Business Unit
PERSONNEL SUPPORT
SERVICES
1 Personnel support services General
10 Consultants
20 Craft labor
25 Recruitment/employment
30 Technical/professional
Aerotek Energy Services (1,25,30)
BHI Energy (1,10,20,25,30)
See our ad on p. 21
Lineal Recruiting Services (1,25,30)
The David Wood Co. (25)
UnseenHeroes (1,10,20)
PIPE
1 Pipe General
10 Abrasion-resistant
60 Fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP)
70 High-carbon steel
80 Iron/steel
120 Plastic
130 Thermoplastic
Beetle Plastics, LLC (60,120,130)
CBP Engineering Corp (10)
EdgenMurray (1,10,70,80)
Georg Fischer (120)
Price Brothers Company (1)
PIPELINE REHABILITATION
Quanta Services
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POLE INSPECTIONS
Quanta Services
POLE SETTING SERVICES
HELICOPTER
Quanta Services
POWER QUALITY SERVICES
1 Power quality services - General
10 Assessment and/or monitoring
20 Management
30 Upgrades and/or improvements
Allied Industrial Marketing, Inc (1)
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1,10,20,30)
URS, Power Business Unit (1,30)
POWER/BROKERS/
MARKETERS/SUPPLIERS
Advanta Energy Corp.
eMpasys
PROJECT DEVELOPMENT
SERVICES
Benetech
Canasia Power Corp.
CarrierClass Green Infrastructure
Engineers India Limited
F.E. Moran Special Hazard Systems
ILT-RES, LLC
Sargent & Lundy LLC
PUMPS
1 Pumps General
10 Overhauling
20 Rebuilding
30 Repairing
Miller Engineering-ANM Equipment
(1,10,20,30)
RENEWABLE ENERGY
The Tata Power Company Limited
See our ad on p. 51
SAFETY PROGRAMS
Belt Conveyor Guarding
COSS
Summit Training Source
SERVICES, MISCELLANEOUS
1 Services, miscellaneous - General
10 Asbestos removal
20 Equipment maintenance
40 Outage
55 Plant cleaning
60 Plant startup/operation
American Efficiency Services, LLC (1)
Bianchi Industrial Services, LLC (1)
Bibb & Associates (1)
Bierlein Companies (1)
Brandenburg Industrial Service Co. (1,10)
Enertech, a business unit of Curtiss-Wright
Flow Control Company
Magellan Professional Solutions, Inc.
MOPAC Plant & Building Service
(1,10,20,40,55,60)
Precision Blasting Inc. (1)
ProEnergy Services
See our ad on cover 4
URS, Power Business Unit
SITING SERVICES
20 Environmental studies
Sargent & Lundy LLC (20)
Stanley Consultants, Inc.
SPARE PARTS
Beumer Kansas City LLC
BRUKS Rockwood
See our ad on p. 57
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
STACKS
Hoffmann, Inc
STEAM TURBINE AND
COMPRESSOR OVERHAUL
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
Schmidt Industries
STOKERS
Detroit Stoker Company
See our ad on p. 52
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
SERVICES
Automated Appointment Reminders
Verizon
See our ad on p. 79
TESTING
1 Testing General
10 Motors (electric)
20 Oil
25 Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)
27 Switchgear
30 Vibration analysis
American Electrical Testing Co., Inc.
(1,10,20,25,27,30)
Breen Energy Solutions
See our ad on p. 72
ComRent International, LLC
Gearhart Mckee Inc. (1,27)
Laboratory Testing Inc. (1)
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd. (1,30)
Phenix Technologies Inc (10,20,27)
POLARIS Laboratories (20)
RoMaDyn (30)
The Avogadro Group, LLC (1)
THERMOGRAPHIC
EQUIPMENT/SERVICES
Xenics
TRAINING
1 Training General
10 Environmental
20 Equipment
30 Fossil
35 Interactive CD-ROM
37 Maintenance
38 Management and Supervisory
40 Nuclear
45 Organization Development
50 Safety
55 Team Development
60 Video
360training.com and LKItraining.com
Automation Training Inc. (1,20,37,38,50)
AVO Training Institute, Inc. (1,50)
EITI - Electrical Industry Training Institute
USA Inc. (1)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1,20)
See our ad on cover 3
IFS North America, Inc
Industrial Insite, LLC
(1,10,20,35,37,38,40,50)
Martech Media, Inc
(1,10,20,30,35,37,40,50,60)
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd. (30,37)
Pulse Corp (20)
Sargent & Lundy LLC
Sologic, LLC (10,37,40,50)
The Graphic Works (1,10,20,30,35,
37,38,40,45,50,55,60)
Thermal Engineering Associates
(1,30,37,40,50)
TRANSFORMERS
20 Rebuilt, sales/lease
30 Rebuilding
40 Repairing
50 Servicing
60 Testing
ABB Transformer Remanufacturing and
Engineering Services (30,40,50,60)
Belyea Company Inc. (20)
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December 2012 152
SERVICE DIRECTORY
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
Instrument Transformer Equipment Corp.
(ITEC)
Phenix Technologies Inc. (60)
Technical Services Group Inc (50,60)
TRANSPORT/PROCESSING,
COAL-ASH
10 Coal-ash sales
20 Utilization applications
Headwaters Inc. (10,20)
TRANSPORTATION
ATM Air Freight
C.H.ROBINSON WORLDWIDE
TURBINES, GAS
1 Turbines, gas - General
10 Blade repairing
12 Brush seals
13 Engineering
15 Oil-flushing
20 Overhauling
30 Rebuilding
40 Servicing
Active3D Inc.
Advanced Combustion Technology Inc
(10,20,30,40)
Allied Power Group (1)
Gas Turbine Maintenance LLC
(1,10,12,15,20,30,40)
Independent Turbine Consulting, LLC
(1,13,20,40)
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,13,20,30,40)
Mitsubishi Power Systems Inc (1)
NAES Corporation (1,10,12,15,20,30,40)
See our ad on p. 48
Power Systems Mfg LLC (1)
Wood Group GTS (40)
WorleyParsons Group, Inc. (1)
TURBINES, STEAM
1 Turbines, steam - General
10 Blade repairing
15 Induction bolt heating
30 Oil flush
40 Overhauling
50 Rebuilding
60 Rotor aligning
70 Servicing
Belyea Company Inc. (1)
BHI Energy (1,15,30,40,50,60,70)
See our ad on p. 21
Electroputere S.A., DIEC
Global Industrial Solutions (30,70)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1)
See our ad on cover 3
Kingsbury Repair & Service (1)
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,10,40,50,60,70)
Power Equipment Maintenance
(1,40,50,60,70)
Power Generation Service, Inc.
(1,10,15,30,40,50,60,70)
Toshiba International Corporation
(1,10,15,30,40,50,60,70)
Turbine Generator Maintenance, Inc. (1)
TurboCare Inc (1,10,40,50,60,70)
USED EQUIPMENT SALES
Kitmondo Ltd.
McGills Equipment
Trans-Global Distributions
VALVES
1 Valves General
10 Installation
20 Modifying
30 Reconditioning
40 Repairing
60 Check
70 Control
100 Drain
120 Gate
130 Globe
140 Instrument
150 Metering
160 Needle
200 Pressure-reducing (PRV)
210 Safety/relief
230 Special-purpose
240 Vacuum
250 Three-way
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 21
Bonetti Valves and Gauges (130)
BRAY Controls, Division of Bray
International, Inc. (40)
Cesare Bonetti Inc. (1)
CFM/VR-TESCO, LLC-Continental Field Machin-
ing (1,10,20,30,40)
CPV Manufacturing (1,20,60,210)
Dexter Innovative Solutions LLC (40)
Flowserve (1,20,30,40)
Flow-Tek Inc, A subsidiary of
BRAY International Inc.
Industrial Servo Hydraulics, Inc. (40)
JASC: Jansens Aircraft Systems Controls Inc.
(1,60,70,150,250)
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,10,20,30,40)
Pentair Valves & Controls (formerly
known as Tyco Valves & Controls)
See our ad on p. 9
PGI International (140)
Ritepro Inc, A subsidiary of BRAY
International, Inc. (60)
Rodney Hunt Co. (40)
Swagelok Company (30)
Ultraflo Corporation, A subsidiary of BRAY
International, Inc. (40)
Valvesearch.com (1,10,20,30,40)
Velan Valve Corp (10,20,30,40,60,70,
100,120,130,140,160,200,230,240)
Victaulic
WATER AND/OR
WASTEWATER SERVICES
1 Water and/or wastewater services - General
10 Sales, retail
20 Sales, wholesale
ASI Group Ltd. (1)
C.M.G. AND ASSOCIATES INC (10,20)
GEA Process Engineering
J7 Learning & Consulting (1)
Reynolds, Inc. (1)
Sentry Equipment Corp. (1)
WELDING
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 21
Welding Technologies
WIND FARM DESIGN &
MAPPING
METEODYN AMERICA
Sargent & Lundy LLC
Wind Farm Operation & Maintenance
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
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Opportunities in Operations and Maintenance,
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Steve Elonka began chronicling the exploits of Marmaduke
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Albemarle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47. . . . . . . . . .23
www.albemarle.com
Ampirical Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . .8
www.ampirical.com
Applied Bolting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46. . . . . . . . . .22
www.appliedbolting.com
AREVA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29. . . . . . . . . .16
www.areva.com
Baldor Electric. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23. . . . . . . . . .13
www.baldor.com
Bechtel Corp.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31. . . . . . . . . . . .
www.bechtel.com
BHI Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21. . . . . . . . . .12
www.bhienergy.com
Breen Energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72. . . . . . . . . .34
www.breenes.com
BRUKS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57. . . . . . . . . .31
www.bruks.com
Caterpillar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19. . . . . . . . . . . .
www.catelectricpowerinfo.com/pm
Chatham Steel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . .7
www.chathamsteel.com
CleaverBrooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39. . . . . . . . . .19
www.cleaverbrooks.com/engineered
Detroit Stoker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52. . . . . . . . . .28
www.detroitstoker.com
Exxon Mobil. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . . .2
www.mobilindustrial.com
General Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . .4
www.etaproefficiency.com
Hitachi Power Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 3. . . . . . . . . .37
www.hitachipowersystems.us
Kepco/KPS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35. . . . . . . . . .17
www.kps.co.kr
Kiewit / TIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37. . . . . . . . . .18
www.kiewit.com
MAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 2. . . . . . . . . . .1
www.man-engines.com
Metalfab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45. . . . . . . . . .21
www.metalfabinc.com
MTU. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
www.mtu-onlne.com
NAES Corp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48. . . . . . . . . .24
www.naes.com
NatronX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41. . . . . . . . . .20
www.natronx.com
Nol-Tec Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50. . . . . . . . . .26
www.nol-tec.com
Paharpur. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49. . . . . . . . . .25
www.paharpur.com
Pentair Valves & Controls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . .5
www.pentair.com
Phillips 66. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . .3
www.phillips66lubricants.com
PIC Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17. . . . . . . . . .10
www.picworld.com
ProEnergy Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 4. . . . . . . . . .38
www.proenergyservices.com/vision
STF S.p.A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62. . . . . . . . . .33
www.stf.it
Structural Integrity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . .6
www.structint.com
Tata Power. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51. . . . . . . . . .27
www.tatapower.com
Verizon Wireless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79. . . . . . . . . .35
www.verizonwireless.com/utilities
Victory Energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82. . . . . . . . . .36
www.victoryenergy.com
Westinghouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25. . . . . . . . . .14
www.westinghousenuclear.com
ADVERTISERS INDEX
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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
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December 2012 160
COMMENTARY
Navigating a Sea of New
Regulations
By Dr. Thomas E. Higgins, PE
A
convergence of new environmental regulations and practical
realities is creating a boatload of challenges for power pro-
ducers. Impending regulations addressing raw water intake,
wastewater discharges, and coal ash managementas well as is-
sues such as drought, water scarcity, and public concerns and utility
liabilities with ash pondsare giving power plant owners much to
consider. Add the fact that states are enacting their own, sometimes
more-stringent requirements, and the horizon is anything but clear
as utility decision-makers chart a course for compliance.
A Wave of Changes
Two anticipated regulations are of key concern to utilities oper-
ating coal-fired power plants:
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys (EPA) proposed
regulations addressing coal combustion residuals (CCR) for
electric generating plants.
The EPAs updated rulemaking for steam electric power gener-
ating industry effluent limitation guidelines (ELGs).
These issues primarily boil down to the need for either ash pond
lining or replacement of ponds with wastewater treatment systems
(for the first) and applying best available technology to treat flue
gas desulfurization scrubber and other wastewater (for the second).
The ELGs may also prohibit discharge of ash transport water, ne-
cessitating changes to plants ash-handling systems. Also on the
horizon are changes to Sections 316(a) and (b) of the Clean Water
Act, addressing power plant thermal discharge impacts and cooling
water intake structure impacts on fish and other aquatic life.
Meanwhile, many power plant owners are facing, or already
must meet, strict limits on contaminants in their plants wastewa-
ter discharges, primarily driven by regional water qualitybased
limits. As more receiving water bodies are listed as impacted or
impaired due to metals, nutrients, or salinity, such limits will
likely become more common and more stringent.
Dont Wait for the Regulations
Prudence suggests doing more than treading water while await-
ing the new regulations, the changes they will require, and the
deadlines they will impose. Committing to specific modifications
or new processes like zero liquid discharge (ZLD) too quickly,
however, can be counterproductive, possibly resulting in over-
spending yet underachieving.
A good way to start is with the end in mind: Identify your
specific goalsfor example, complying with current and future
regulations, reducing water use/increasing reuse, or closing ash
ponds. Then gather the information needed to meet those goals.
Next, fill any data gaps (using methods such as sampling and
analysis, flow balance and mass balance, and modeling). Collect-
ing data from multiple years will account for variability of coal
composition and wastewater streams under different conditions
and allow designs to reduce conservatism necessitated by lack
of data. Finally, evaluate alternatives and make well-informed
choices. Important screening criteria include compliance with
current and pending regulations, long-term effectiveness and
permanence, reliability, suitability for implementation, land
availability, potential for adverse effects, and cost.
A practical approach to selecting cost-effective alternatives is to
progressively evaluate their ability to meet the desired objectives,
starting with the least costly alternative. For example, a first step
might simply be to determine whether negotiating more-favorable
permit conditions is possible. Once the best options are identified,
conduct bench-scale or pilot-scale testing, if possible, to confirm
that they work effectively under actual plant conditions.
This type of approach will help ensure cost-effective, sustain-
able solutions that address the myriad complexities inherent in
coal composition and wastewater variability, water and wastewa-
ter treatment and reuse potential, CCR management options, and
the flexibility to meet future regulations.
Plan to Be Flexible
Getting a jump on meeting upcoming regulations is a great start.
Incorporating flexibility to meet stricter regulations in the future
is even better. A Northeastern power producer, for example, de-
cided to convert two coal-fired plants to tank-based wastewater
treatment systems so it could close its ash ponds. CH2M HILL is
working with the owner to meet its objectives and provide flex-
ibility to accommodate expansion and the cost-effective addi-
tion of treatment for future trace metals limits. Anticipating that
future discharge limits could necessitate additional, expensive
treatment (such as ZLD), the system was designed to allow full
effluent reuse in the future, eliminating virtually all of the nearly
8 mgd of wastewater discharge and reducing the size of any fu-
ture ZLD system, if required, from over 10,000 gpm to 400 gpm.
For water scarcity issues, reuse of another type could be an op-
tion. In New York, the new Empire Power Plants water resource
needs were matched with a nearby wastewater treatment plant,
and a drilled pipeline was constructed to convey municipal efflu-
ent to the new facility. This effluent meets the power plants full
process water needs, thus reducing freshwater consumption by
up to 4,800 gpm. The WaterMatch Initiative (www.ch2mhill.com/
watermatch) promotes sustainable solutions like this by facilitating
partnerships between alternative water sources and water users.
Go with the Flow
As the surge of regulatory change approaches, make the most of
this quiet time to identify your goals, consider how you might
meet them, and gather the necessary data. Starting now and
taking a practical, comprehensive, forward-looking approach to
compliance can help you keep an even keel as you meet the chal-
lenges of changing regulations in a changing world.
Thomas Higgins, PE, PhD (tom.higgins@ch2m.com) is a
technology fellow, vice president, and global technology leader of
power water and process at CH2M HILL. This article was written
in October 2012 prior to the then-anticipated December 2012
release of the EPAs Draft Effluent Limitation Guidelines.
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