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Melissa Morgan

Repetitive Line Poem Lesson Plan 1. Standards: Writing: o W.K.5 With guidance and support from adults, respond to questions and suggestions from peers and add details to strengthen writing as needed. Language: o L.K.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. 2. Objectives: a. The students will help to write a repetitive line poem about spring that is at least six lines long. b. The students will individually draw a picture reflecting their repetitive line poem about spring. 3. Materials: a. Mouses First Spring by Lauren Thompson b. One large piece of butcher paper to create a T-chart (Spring vs. Winter) c. One large piece of butcher paper to write the class repetitive poem on d. Markers to write with when writing the class repetitive poem e. Worksheet for students to draw their picture about spring (see below) f. Crayons for students to use to create their picture about spring 4. Anticipatory Set: a. To begin my poetry lesson, I will be showing the students two pictures. One picture will be related to spring, while the other picture will be related to winter. I will then take predictions from the students (a total of three hands) about what they think each picture is related to. Then, I will tell the students that I have four more pictures (a total of six) with me, and that our job as a team will be to group the pictures according to the season spring and to the season winter (I will tape each picture to the piece of butcher paper that is made into a T-chart with the heading Spring on one side and Winter on the other side). Before I hold up each picture for the students to see, I will explain to the students that when I hold up a picture, they should hold up a number one if they think the picture is related to spring, and a number two if they think the picture is related to winter. Then, I will post each picture to the correct side of the T-chart and tell the students that today we will be creating a poem about spring! 5. Input: a. Today as a class, we are going to write a repetitive poem about spring. When we repeat something that means we say it again. In our repetitive poem, we will be repeating the words Spring Is at the beginning of each line on our piece of paper

(Spring Is will already be written six times on the piece of butcher paper, followed by a blank and a period). We are going to create a poem that is six lines long. Since there are six lines in our repetitive poem, we will need six characteristics about spring. A characteristic is something that describes spring. For example, I may say that spring is green. As a team, we will come up with six characteristics about the season of spring! 6. Modeling: a. After the students and I are done sorting out the six seasonal pictures on the T-chart, spring vs. winter, then I will begin the process of modeling how to write a repetitive line poem. I will begin the modeling process by saying, Before we can begin reading the book Mouses First Spring to get ideas for our repetitive line poem about spring that we will write together, I am going to show you what a repetitive line poem looks like and how to write it. For my repetitive line poem, I will be writing about the season of winter. As you can see, I have the words Winter is written three times up on my piece of paper. When I think of winter, I think of how it snows outside. Sometimes during winter, we get a lot of snow! On my first line of my poem, I am going to write the word snowy in the blank because the word snowy describes winter. Now, my sentence says, Winter is snowy. Now that I have my first line of my poem done, I will move on to the next line and fill in the blank with a word that describes winter. When I think of winter, I think of how cold it gets outside and how I need to bundle up when I leave my house. So, on my second line, I am going to write the word cold. The second sentence now says, Winter is cold. Once I have written my word on the second line, I can move on to the next line of the poem. I am now going to think of another word that I think of when I think of winter. I think of how white winter can get if it snows a lot outside. It is a lot brighter outside with all the white snow on the ground! I have decided to use the word white on the third line of my poem, and I will write this word in the last blank. My last sentence says, Winter is white. My repetitive line poem about winter is now complete! My poem says: Winter is snowy. Winter is cold. Winter is white. Now that we all know how to write a repetitive line poem, I am going to read the book Mouses First Spring so we can get ideas about what words describe the season of spring. Then, we will write our own repetitive line poem about spring together! 7. Guided Practice/Independent Practice: a. Now that we have read the book Mouses First Spring together, we are going to write a repetitive line poem about spring that will be six lines long. I will the show the students the repetitive line poem about winter that I wrote that is three lines long and say, Our poem about spring will look similar to the poem I wrote about winter. Instead of writing words that describe winter, we will be writing words together as a class that describe the season of spring. Hopefully each of you heard a word from the book that

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describes the season of spring that we can write in our poem. When we write our repetitive line poem about spring, I will be writing the word in the blank on this piece of paper. I will be looking for someone who is sitting correctly on the carpet, who is quiet, and has their hand raised if they have an idea of what word we should put in the blank that describes spring. Remember, we need SIX words that describe the season of spring in order to finish our poem! Check for Understanding/Assessment: a. While we are writing the repetitive line poem about spring as a class, I will know that the students have accurately comprehended the information when they have orally recalled a descriptive word that is linked to spring from either the book (Mouses First Spring by Lauren Thompson) that we have read together as a class or if they have contributed a descriptive word about spring by thinking about their past experiences with this season. Closure: a. Today, we began our poetry lesson by categorizing six pictures that describe spring and winter onto our T-chart on this piece of butcher paper. Then, I showed you what a repetitive line poem looks like when I wrote a poem that was three lines long about the season of winter. Once I showed you this example of what a repetitive line poem should look like, we read the book Mouses First Spring so we could all get ideas for descriptive words about spring that we could add to our repetitive line poem that is six lines long. After we finished reading the book, we were able to create a repetitive line poem about spring because we added six words that described the season of spring using words that we have thought of on our own or words that we heard of from the book. Now, you know what a repetitive line poem is and how to write one! Adaptions: a. Difficulty: Once we are done writing the repetitive line poem about spring as a class, the students can read the poem to me instead of having me reading it to them. b. Time: Allow more time (around 10 seconds) for students to process information when they are called upon to contribute a descriptive word about spring to the poem. Resources: a. Thompson, L. (2005). Mouses First Spring. New York: Simon and Schuster.