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EDUC 450: PROFESSIONAL CLINICAL PRACTICE

LONG RANGE PLAN


Candidate: Candice Seawright
District: Richland County District 1
Major: Elementary Education

Cooperating Teacher: Ms. Gloster


School: Arden Elementary
Cognate(s): English

th

Grade: 4 Grade
Year: 2014-2015

Section I: Student Information


Describe the student information that you feel will have the most impact on the way you plan and deliver instruction.
Important Student Information
Factors
(e.g. gender, SES, reading levels,
disabilities, ethnicity, student
interests, and other relevant
factors, etc.)
Females Interests: soccer,
basketball, karate, jump roping,
drawing, reading and writing.
Females Music preference:
Rap/Hip-Hop and R&B.
Females Career Choices:
Professional swimmer, doctor, judge,
veterinarian, dog trainer, and
teacher.
Females preference during
learning:
7 females prefer learning in small
group, 4 females prefer leaning with
a friend, and none preferred to learn
by themselves.
Females favorite subject: 6
females enjoyed English Language
Arts, 3 females enjoyed
mathematics, 2 females enjoyed
Social Studies and no female
enjoyed the subject of Science.
Males interests: Kung-Fu, X-box,
basketball, football, baseball,
comedy, and helping others.
Males Music preference: Rap/HipHop, Country, R&B.
Males Career Choices: Dentist,
Doctor, Football player, NBA
Basketball Player, and some were
undecided.
Males preference during learning:
5 males preferred to learn in small
group, 2 males preferred to learn
with a friend, and 1 male preferred to
learn by himself.
Males favorite subject: None of the
males enjoyed English Language
Arts, 3 males enjoyed Mathematics,
none of the males enjoyed Social
Studies and 5 males enjoyed the
subject Science.
Gender: 11 female students and 8
male students.

Description
(of your findings in terms of your
students)
Since both female and males students
enjoy sports, it would be in my best
interest to incorporate sports or sports
themed ideas into my lesson. Since the
females enjoy drawing, reading, writing
and sports, during English Language
Arts, I can find books about famous
females in who sports and create
writing assignments where students
can illustrate what they read and write
about it as well. The males seemed to
be interested comedy. I can incorporate
entertaining yet educational books and
videos into my lesson. Most of my
students enjoy Rap/Hip- Hop and R&B
music. To keep students engaged
during lessons, I could find videos or
parody videos of songs students may
be familiar with. These educational
videos will connect with the students
and help them better understand the
content. Since most of my students
preferred to learn in cooperative
learning groups, I will incorporate in my
lesson a lot of group activities, where
students are to work and learn as a
team. There could also be times when I
ask to pair up and review and check
each others work. Lastly, I notice that
most of the males enjoy Science and
Math the most and the females enjoy
Social Studies and English Language
Arts. I will find a way to help turn the
least favorite subjects into ones that
students enjoy equally. This will be
done with engaging videos, fun
activities, projects and enthusiasm from
me in the classroom.

Since I have a few more females than


males in the classroom, I must create
an equal learning environment where
both genders are prosperous. I will
include research based strategies that
have been proven to work with both
genders.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

Sources/Contextual Factors
(e.g. students, community resources,
internet, records, school personnel, family,
etc.)
This information came from my students. I
provided each student with a student interest
survey that they were to complete with honest
answers. I received all of the surveys back that
same day.

This information came from the classroom roster


as well as classroom observation.

Reading Levels: Eight Students are


AAP students (Advanced Academic
Program) and reading on a fourth
grade level or higher. There are 3
resource students and reading on a
second grade or lower level.

Social Economic Status: All 19


students are on free lunch.

Ethnicity: 16 students are African


American and 3 students are
Hispanic.

Since there are eight students reading


above grade level and three students
that are reading below average grade
level, I will have to differentiate my
strategies during reading instruction.
This may include daily reading, oral
reading and one-one-reading to help
these students with reading
comprehension. Making sure to keep a
record of all students reading
throughout the week. This will show all
improvement or decline in reading
comprehension. I will also have to
differentiate all assessments and
classwork given to meet all reading
levels in the classroom.
With all of my students being on free
lunch, this tell me that they come from
a low social economic status. From this
I can conclude that the students may
have emotional and social instability.
This may also mean students are not
able to have all school supplies that are
necessary to complete assignments. I
must place students in collaborative
learning groups where they will have to
share supplies with one another to
complete given assignment.
Since the classroom is very diverse, I
will incorporate in my lesson
multicultural activities that will make
students aware of the diversity and
ethnicities not only in the classroom but
around the world.

This information was gathered from student


records given during a PLC meeting as well as
the Curriculum Resource Teacher.

This information was given to me by the


Cafeteria Staff as well as the help of my
cooperating teacher.

This information was gathered from classroom


observation.

Reflect on the student Information: Why do you feel that this student information is of primary importance, and (2) how did
and will you use this student information to guide the development of your long and short range plans?
The information above is of primary importance because I know that it is vital to know my students in the classroom. I should
know not only their names and faces but their strengths, weaknesses, learning level, interests and social economic status. These
factors will help me as the teacher to differentiate my lessons and instruction to suit the needs of all my students. To become an
effective teacher, I know I must incorporate various strategies to meet the needs of all learning levels and diversity in the classroom. By
incorporating the information that has been provided to me in my long range and short range plans, I will provide an equal learning
environment for every student to succeed as well as accommodating all the students needs within the classroom.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

Section II: Long Range Learning and/or Developmental Goals


Describe the long range learning/developmental goals (standards) that you have established for your students in each of the
four content areas. Make sure that you include goals that address the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains and
diversity for students.
Subject: English Language Arts

Long Range Learning and/or Developmental Goals

1.

Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the
text.

2.

Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

3.

Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a characters
thoughts, words, or actions).

4.

Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each
version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.

Reflect on the long range learning and/or developmental goals: Of the long range learning and/or developmental goals you
have established, which goals do you believe are the most important for all students to achieve, and why?
Of all the long range learning and developmental goals established, I believe the most essential goal is that all students are to
be able to determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details as well as summarizing the text. This is
essential for students to know because this helps them with their reading comprehension and thinking skills. Students need to make
sense of what they are reading and be able to summarize the passage or book as well. Also, students need to understand how to
eliminate unessential information, especially in large text. Key details help students discover what is important in the text and give clues
as to what the main idea is. All of the goals listed above are important in student learning, however, I feel as though this goal is the
most essential.
Subject: Mathematics

Long Range Learning and/or Developmental Goals

1.

Generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers.

2.

Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.

3.

Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve problems.

4.

Build fractions from unit fractions by applying and extending previous understandings of operations on whole numbers.

Reflect on the long range learning and/or developmental goals: Of the long range learning and/or developmental goals you
have established, which goals do you believe are the most important for all students to achieve, and why?
Of all the long range learning and developmental goals established, I believe the most essential goal is that all students are to
generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers. This is fundamental because students need to understand the
meaning of a number. Students need to be able to see or hear a number and recognize that particular number and the value. Place
value can also relate to real life situations such as handling money. Students will handle money from this point on and need to be able
to understand how to count and determine the total value of money. All of the goals listed above are important in student learning,
however, I feel as though this goal is the most essential.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

Subject: Science

Long Range Learning and/or Developmental Goals

1.

The student will demonstrate an understanding of scientific inquiry, including the processes, skills, and mathematical thinking
necessary to conduct a simple scientific investigation.

2.

The student will demonstrate an understanding of weather patterns and phenomena. (Earth Science)

3.

The student will demonstrate an understanding of the properties, movements, and locations of objects in the Solar System.
(Earth Science)

4.

The student will demonstrate an understanding of the properties of light and electricity. (Physical Science)

Reflect on the long range learning and/or developmental goals: Of the long range learning and/or developmental goals you
have established, which goals do you believe are the most important for all students to achieve, and why?
Of all the long range learning and developmental goals established, I believe the most essential goal is that all students are to
demonstrate an understanding of scientific inquiry, including the processes, skills and mathematical thinking necessary to conduct a
simple scientific investigation. This is essential for students because they will have an opportunity to create a prediction (hypothesis) of
their own and participate in a scientific investigation, which is usually engaging and hands on. Students actually get to see if their
prediction was correct. Students will then get a chance to see how scientists are able to answer questions about the world around them.
All of the goals listed above are important in student learning, however, I feel as though this goal is the most essential.

Subject: Social Studies

Long Range Learning and/or Developmental Goals

1.

The student will demonstrate an understanding of political, economic, and geographic reasons for the exploration of the New
World.

2.

The student will demonstrate an understanding of how the settlement of North America was influenced by the interactions of
Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans.

3.

The student will demonstrate an understanding of the conflict between the American colonies and England.

4.

The student will demonstrate an understanding of the beginnings of America as a nation and the establishment of the new
government.

Reflect on the long range learning and/or developmental goals): Of the long range learning and/or developmental goals you
have established, which goals do you believe are the most important for all students to achieve, and why?
Of all the long range learning and developmental goals established, I believe the most essential goal is that all students are to
demonstrate an understanding of how the settlement of North American was influenced by the interactions of Native Americans,
Europeans and Africans. This is essential for students because they need to have a full understanding of how the country they live in
today was influenced greatly by various ethnic groups. This would serve as a way for students to have a better understanding about the
diversity around them in and outside of the classroom. All of the goals listed above are important in student learning, however, I feel as
though this goal is the most essential.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

Section III: Instructional Units


Describe the instructional units, in sequence, for each content area for your class. Make sure that you integrate the arts
(dance, music, theater, and visual arts), health and physical education in your units.
Subject: English Language Arts
Unit Length
(i.e., approximate number of lessons)

Unit Topic or Description

1 week
RI.4.2 Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key
details; summarize the text.
1 week
RI.4.4 Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words
or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.
1 week
RI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text
says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
1 week
RI.4.5 Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect
problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a
text.
Reflect on the instructional units: How did you determine your instructional sequence and the amount of time to be spent on
each unit of instruction?
I determined the instructional sequence and the amount of time to be spent on each English Language Arts unit of instruction,
by following the Richland County District 1 pacing guide as well as the South Carolina State Standards. The Richland County District 1
pacing guide states the English Language Arts standard as well the suggested unit length. Even though the pacing guide provides a
suggested amount of instructional time for each unit, I know that some units may require more instruction and assistance to better
accommodate my students with understanding the content. Therefore, I will extend the lesson to help with content knowledge.
Describe ways in which you will integrate the arts, PE and Health in your unit.

Unit Topics
1

ARTS
The teacher will have students
illustrate what they believe the main
idea of the text or passage is.
Students will share illustrations with
class.
The teacher will have students
illustrate what they believe the main
idea of the text or passage is.
Students will share illustrations with
class.
The teacher will have students
illustrate what they believe the text or
passage is saying. Students will
share illustrations with class.

The teacher will have students


illustrate what they believe the overall
text structure is. Students could draw
a Venn Diagram to show comparison
or drawing pictures in two separate
boxes to show cause/effect and
problem/solution of the text or
passage is. Students will share
illustrations with class.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

PE
Students will take a one minute
interval from reading and writing to do
various exercises involving jumping
jacks, stretching of the arms and legs,
rotations and moving about the
classroom.
Students will take a one minute
interval from reading and writing to do
various exercises involving jumping
jacks, stretching of the arms and legs,
rotations and moving about the
classroom.
Students will take a one minute
interval from reading and writing to do
various exercises involving jumping
jacks, stretching of the arms and legs,
rotations and moving about the
classroom.
Students will take a one minute
interval from reading and writing to do
various exercises involving jumping
jacks, stretching of the arms and legs,
rotations and moving about the
classroom.

HEALTH
Students will read and summarize
passages about childhood obesity
and healthy food to determine the
main ideas.

Students will read and summarize


passages about childhood obesity
and healthy food to determine the
main ideas.

Students will read passages and text


about childhood obesity and healthy
food to determine the main ideas.

Students will describe the overall text


structure while reading passages
about childhood obesity and healthy
food.

Describe the instructional units, in sequence, for each content area for your class. Make sure that you integrate the arts
(dance, music, theater, and visual arts), health and physical education in your units.
Subject: Mathematics
Unit Topic or Description -- Key Element

Unit Length
(i.e., approximate number of lessons)
20 Days

4.NBT.1 Recognize that in a multi-digit whole number, a digit in one place


represents ten times what it represents in the place to its right.
20 Days
4.NBT.2 Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals,
number names, and expanded form.
20 Days
4.NBT.2 Compare two multi-digit numbers based on meanings of the digits in
each place, using >,<, and =.
20 Days
4.NBT.3 Use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to
any place.
Reflect on the instructional units: How did you determine your instructional sequence and the amount of time to be spent on
each unit of instruction?
I determined the instructional sequence and the amount of time to be spent on each Mathematics unit of instruction, by
following the Richland County District 1 pacing guide as well as the South Carolina State Standards. The Richland County District 1
pacing guide states the Mathematics standard as well the suggested unit length. Even though the pacing guide provides a suggested
amount of instructional time for each unit, I know that some units may require more instruction and assistance to better accommodate
my students with understanding the content. Therefore, I will extend the lesson to help with content knowledge.
Describe ways in which you will integrate the arts, PE and Health in your unit.

Unit Topics
1

ARTS
Students will work in collaborative
groups to complete an assignment
where they are to illustrate on anchor
chart paper what they learned during
the class session about multi-digit
whole numbers.
Students will work in collaborative
groups to complete an assignment
where they are to show on anchor
chart paper how to write multi-digit
whole numbers using base-ten
numerals, number names and
expanded.
Students will work in collaborative
groups to complete an assignment
where they are to illustrate on anchor
chart paper what they learned during
the class session about comparing
two multi-digit numbers based on the
digits in each place using >.<, and =.
Students will illustrate on anchor
chart paper a variety of ways they are
to round multi-digit whole numbers to
any place.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

PE
Students will take a one minute
interval from doing mathematics to do
various exercises involving jumping
jacks, stretching of the arms and legs,
rotations and moving about the
classroom.
Students will take a one minute
interval from mathematics to do
various exercises involving jumping
jacks, stretching of the arms and legs,
rotations and moving about the
classroom.

HEALTH
Teacher will call students to walk to
the Smartboard to complete given
examples.

Students will take a one minute


interval from mathematics to do
various exercises involving jumping
jacks, stretching of the arms and legs,
rotations and moving about the
classroom.

Teacher will call students to walk to


the Smartboard to complete given
examples.

Students will take a one minute


interval from mathematics to do
various exercises involving jumping
jacks, stretching of the arms and legs,
rotations and moving about the
classroom.

Teacher will call students to walk to


the Smartboard to complete given
examples.

Teacher will call students to walk to


the Smartboard to complete given
examples.

Describe the instructional units, in sequence, for each content area for your class. Make sure that you integrate the arts
(dance, music, theater, and visual arts), health and physical education in your units.
Subject: Science
Unit Length
(i.e., approximate number of lessons

Unit Topic or Description

1 week
4-1.1 Classify observations as either quantitative or qualitative
1 week
4-1.2 Use appropriate instruments and tools (including a compass, an
anemometer, mirrors, and a prism) safely and accurately when conducting
simple investigations.
1 week
4-1.3 Summarize the characteristics of a simple scientific investigation that
represent a fair test (including a question that identifies the problem, a
prediction that indicates a possible outcome, a process that tests one
manipulated variable at a time, and results that are communicated and
explained).
1 week
4-1.4 Distinguish among observations, predictions, and inferences.
Reflect on the instructional units: How did you determine your instructional sequence and the amount of time to be spent on
each unit of instruction?
I determined the instructional sequence and the amount of time to be spent on each Science unit of instruction, by following
the Richland County District 1 pacing guide as well as the South Carolina State Standards. The Richland County District 1 pacing guide
states the Science standard as well the suggested unit length. Even though the pacing guide provides a suggested amount of
instructional time for each unit, I know that some units may require more instruction and assistance to better accommodate my students
with understanding the content. Therefore, I will extend the lesson to help with content knowledge.

Describe ways in which you will integrate the arts, PE and Health in your unit.

Unit Topics

ARTS
Students will illustrate their
observation and label each
observation as quantitative or
qualitative.

PE
Students will have the opportunity to
walk outside and observe things in
nature. Students are to decide if they
observe is quantitative or qualitative.

Students will illustrate the correct way


to use science instruments and tools
safely and accurately.

Students will have the opportunity to


walk outside and to the science lab to
use appropriate instruments and tools
safely.

Students will work together in


collaborative groups to summarize
the characteristics of a simple
scientific investigation that represent
a fair test. They will use anchor chart
paper to illustrate these
characteristics.
Students will illustrate on anchor
chart paper the difference between
an observation, prediction, and
inference.

Students will take a one minute


interval from science to do various
exercises involving jumping jacks,
stretching of the arms and legs,
rotations and moving about the
classroom.

HEALTH
Students will have the chance to
observe in the garden that is the
schools courtyard. Students will look
at each item in the garden and
discuss whether these items are
healthy or not healthy.
Students will take a one minute
interval from science to do various
exercises involving jumping jacks,
stretching of the arms and legs,
rotations and moving about the
classroom.
Students will take a one minute
interval from science to do various
exercises involving jumping jacks,
stretching of the arms and legs,
rotations and moving about the
classroom.

Students will take a one minute


interval from science to do various
exercises involving jumping jacks,
stretching of the arms and legs,
rotations and moving about the
classroom.

Students will take a one minute


interval from science to do various
exercises involving jumping jacks,
stretching of the arms and legs,
rotations and moving about the
classroom.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

Describe the instructional units, in sequence, for each content area for your class. Make sure that you integrate the arts
(dance, music, theater, and visual arts), health and physical education in your units.
Subject: Social Studies
Unit Length
(i.e., approximate number of lessons)

Unit Topic or Description

3 Days
4-2.1 Summarize the cause and effect relationships of the Columbian
Exchange.
6 Days
4-2.2 Compare the various European settlements in North America in terms of
economic activities, religious emphasis, government, and lifestyles.
3 Days
4-2.3 Explain the impact of the triangular trade, indentured servitude, and the
enslaved and free Africans on the developing culture and economy of
North America.
2 Days
4-2.4 Summarize the relationships among the Native Americans, Europeans,
and Africans, including the French and Indian Wars, the slave revolts, and the
conduct of trade.
Reflect on the instructional units: How did you determine your instructional sequence and the amount of time to be spent on
each unit of instruction?
I determined the instructional sequence and the amount of time to be spent on each Social Studies unit of instruction, by following the
Richland County District 1 pacing guide as well as the South Carolina State Standards. The Richland County District 1 pacing guide
states the Social Studies standard as well the suggested unit length. Even though the pacing guide provides a suggested amount of
instructional time for each unit, I know that some units may require more instruction and assistance to better accommodate my students
with understanding the content. Therefore, I will extend the lesson to help with content knowledge.

Describe ways in which you will integrate the arts, PE and Health in your unit.

Unit Topics
1

ARTS
Students will cut out a worksheet with
a variety of goods that either came
from the New World or the Old World.
They will need to paste each of the
goods in the correct spot.
Students will create a foldable on
color paper that compares the various
European settlements in North
America. Each settlement will have a
foldable.
Students will illustrate how they would
feel if they were enslaved. Students
will share their illustrations with class.

Students will work in collaborative


groups and illustrate the relationships
among the Native Americans,
Europeans and the Africans.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

PE
Students will take a one minute
interval from writing social studies
notes to do various exercises
involving jumping jacks, stretching of
the arms and legs, rotations and
moving about the classroom.
Students will take a one minute
interval from writing social studies
notes to do various exercises
involving jumping jacks, stretching of
the arms and legs, rotations and
moving about the classroom.
Students will take a one minute
interval from writing social studies
notes to do various exercises
involving jumping jacks, stretching of
the arms and legs, rotations and
moving about the classroom.
Students will take a one minute
interval from writing social studies
notes to do various exercises
involving jumping jacks, stretching of
the arms and legs, rotations and
moving about the classroom.

HEALTH
Teacher and students will look at
each of the goods they have cut out
and decided which is item is healthy
and which item is not healthy.

Students will take a one minute


interval from writing social studies
notes to do various exercises
involving jumping jacks, stretching of
the arms and legs, rotations and
moving about the classroom
Students will take a one minute
interval from writing social studies
notes to do various exercises
involving jumping jacks, stretching of
the arms and legs, rotations and
moving about the classroom
Students will take a one minute
interval from writing social studies
notes to do various exercises
involving jumping jacks, stretching of
the arms and legs, rotations and
moving about the classroom

Section III B: Materials and Resources


Make a list of all of the materials that will be needed to teach the unit. As you plan for the use of technology, make sure that
list and explain how you will use software, computer programs, Smart boards, etc., along with power points that you may use.

Teacher Materials

Student Materials
Composition Notebooks (Reading and Writing, Science,
Mathematics and Social Studies)
Scissors
Pencils
Pens
Markers
Group Pencil Box
Highlighters
Colored Paper
Loose Leaf Notebook Paper
Glue
Computer
Success Maker Application (Used for Reading and Mathematics)
Ear buds
Pocket Folders
Rulers

Smart board
Smartboard Markers
Computer
Printer
Anchor Chart Paper
Scotch Tape
Dry Erase Markers
Whiteboard
Scissors
Printer Paper
Colored Paper
Manipulatives
Interactive Smartboard Powerpoint
Powerpoint Application
Glue
Post-Its
Markers
Index Cards
Stapler
Flash Drive
Pencil Sharpener

Section IV: Assessment of Student Performance


Describe (1) the major course assessments (include formative and summative assessments), (2) the evaluation criteria for
this class/subject, and (3) the way(s) in which you will report overall student progress and achievement. You must present
multiple modes of assessments that address multiple levels of Blooms Taxonomy. Your assessments (or a detailed
description, if authentic) must be attached. On each assessment, indicate the matching learning goal or standard(s).
English Language Arts

Assessments (Indicate
whether formative or
summative)

Unit 1: Formative Assessment


(multiple choice, fill in blank)

Evaluative Criteria

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

Student
Progress/Achievement
Reporting Method(s)
All progress on the
assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).
Progress will be reported to
parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.

Matching Goal

RI.4.2 Determine the main


idea of a text and explain how
it is supported by key details;
summarize the text.

Grades recorded in gradebook


and Power Teacher.

Unit 2: Formative Assessment


(multiple choice, fill in blank)

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

All progress on the


assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).

RI.4.4 Determine the meaning


of general academic and
domain-specific words or
phrases in a text relevant to a
grade 4 topic or subject area.

Progress will be reported to


parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.
Grades recorded in gradebook
and Power Teacher.

Unit 3: Formative Assessment


(multiple choice, fill in blank)

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

All progress on the


assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).

RI.4.1 Refer to details and


examples in a text when
explaining what the text says
explicitly and when drawing
inferences from the text.

Progress will be reported to


parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.
Grades recorded in gradebook
and Power Teacher.

Unit 4: Formative Assessment


(multiple choice, fill in blank)

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

All progress on the


assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).
Progress will be reported to
parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.

RI.4.5 Describe the overall


structure (e.g., chronology,
comparison, cause/effect
problem/solution) of events,
ideas, concepts, or information
in a text or part of a text

Grades recorded in gradebook


and Power Teacher.

Mathematics

Assessments (Indicate
whether formative or
summative)
Unit 1: Formative Assessment
(multiple choice, fill in blank)

Evaluative Criteria

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

Student
Progress/Achievement
Reporting Method(s)
All progress on the
assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).

Matching Goal

4.NBT.1 Recognize that in a


multi-digit whole number, a
digit in one place represents
ten times what it represents in
the place to its right.

Progress will be reported to


parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.
Grades recorded in gradebook
and Power Teacher.

Unit 2: Formative Assessment


(multiple choice, fill in blank)

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

All progress on the


assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).
Progress will be reported to
parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

4.NBT.2 Read and write multidigit whole numbers using


base-ten numerals, number
names, and expanded form.

Grades recorded in gradebook


and Power Teacher.

Unit 3: Formative Assessment


(multiple choice, fill in blank)

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

All progress on the


assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).

4.NBT.2 Compare two multidigit numbers based on


meanings of the digits in each
place, using >,<, and =.

Progress will be reported to


parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.
Grades recorded in gradebook
and Power Teacher.

Unit 4: Formative Assessment


(multiple choice, fill in blank)

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

All progress on the


assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).

4.NBT.3 Use place value


understanding to round multidigit whole numbers to any
place.

Progress will be reported to


parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.
Grades recorded in gradebook
and Power Teacher.

Science
Assessments (Indicate
whether formative or
summative)
Unit 1: Formative Assessment
(multiple choice, fill in blank)

Evaluative Criteria

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

Student
Progress/Achievement
Reporting Method(s)
All progress on the
assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).

Matching Goal

4-1.1 Classify observations as


either quantitative or
qualitative

Progress will be reported to


parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.
Grades recorded in gradebook
and Power Teacher.

Unit 2: Formative Assessment


(multiple choice, fill in blank)

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

All progress on the


assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).
Progress will be reported to
parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.

4-1.2 Use appropriate


instruments and tools
(including a compass, an
anemometer, mirrors, and a
prism) safely and accurately
when conducting simple
investigations.

Grades recorded in gradebook


and Power Teacher.

Unit 3: Formative Assessment

ABC-

93-100
92-85
84-77

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

All progress on the


assessments will be reported
to students immediately

4-1.3 Summarize the


characteristics of a simple
scientific investigation that

(multiple choice, fill in blank)

DF-

76-70
69 and below

(within 2 days).
Progress will be reported to
parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.
Grades recorded in gradebook
and Power Teacher.

Unit 4: Formative Assessment


(multiple choice, fill in blank)

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

All progress on the


assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).

represent a fair test (including


a question that identifies the
problem, a prediction that
indicates a possible outcome,
a process that tests one
manipulated variable at a time,
and results that are
communicated and explained).

4-1.4 Distinguish among


observations, predictions, and
inferences.

Progress will be reported to


parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.
Grades recorded in gradebook
and Power Teacher.

Social Studies
Assessments (Indicate
whether formative or
summative)
Unit 1: Formative Assessment
(multiple choice, fill in blank)

Evaluative Criteria

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

Student
Progress/Achievement
Reporting Method(s)
All progress on the
assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).

Matching Goal

4-2.1 Summarize the cause


and effect relationships of the
Columbian Exchange

Progress will be reported to


parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.
Grades recorded in gradebook
and Power Teacher.

Unit 2: Formative Assessment


(multiple choice, fill in blank)

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

All progress on the


assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).

4-2.2 Compare the various


European settlements in North
America in terms of economic
activities, religious emphasis,
government, and lifestyles.

Progress will be reported to


parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.
Grades recorded in gradebook
and Power Teacher.

Unit 3: Formative Assessment


(multiple choice, fill in blank)

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

All progress on the


assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).
Progress will be reported to
parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

4-2.3 Explain the impact of the


triangular trade, indentured
servitude, and the enslaved
and free Africans on the
developing culture and
economy of North America.

Grades recorded in gradebook


and Power Teacher.

Unit 4: Formative Assessment


(multiple choice, fill in blank)

ABCDF-

93-100
92-85
84-77
76-70
69 and below

All progress on the


assessments will be reported
to students immediately
(within 2 days).
Progress will be reported to
parents on the bi-weekly
progress reports and quarterly
report card.

4-2.4 Summarize the


relationships among the
Native Americans, Europeans,
and Africans, including the
French and Indian Wars, the
slave revolts, and the conduct
of trade.

Grades recorded in gradebook


and Power Teacher.

Reflect on student performance: (1) How did you determine that your major assessments are appropriate for evaluating
student progress and achievement, and (2) What did or will you do to help your students and their parents understand (a) the
evaluation criteria you have established for this class/subject as well as (b) the reports regarding the students overall
progress and achievement in the class/subject?
I determined that the major assessments were appropriate for assessing by taking the information from the content that was
taught during the week or the unit period and placing it in the assessment for students. Test items are taken directly from Richland
Ones supporting documents and test prep questions. These resources are used to make sure students are only assessed on those
skills mandated to be taught by the district. Students also have weekly fluency checks depending on which skill is currently being taught
in the classroom. This will check the student for mastery of each subject content. Therefore, I would know what to appropriately place
on each assessment given. These quick checks will be administered frequently to determine mastery of standards. To help parents
understand the evaluation criteria I have established for the class/subject, students will receive a report that will state their report in
each subject. These weekly progress reports will show parents how their child(ren) are behaving in school.

Section IV B: Assessment of Student Performance Record Keeping


Describe your system for maintaining records of student progress and achievement for this subject. Also, discuss your
procedures for aggregating and displaying the data. Discuss how you will use the data to make instructional decisions.

A.

System for maintaining records of student progress and achievement:


Students work will be graded throughout the day. This will include morning work, classwork and activities and homework.
These grades will be placed on Richland District Ones Power Teacher application. Every day students are able to see their
progress in each subject area on a daily progress report located on Power Teacher. Students will be given their graded morning
work, classwork, activities and homework at the end of each day and will be kept in each subjects folder.

B.

Procedures for aggregating and displaying data:


I will aggregate data by having all students complete daily assignments on Success Maker. This will include reading and
mathematics assessments correlated to fourth grade English language arts and math standards. Once each student has
completed an assignment on Success Maker, the students score will be sent to the teacher. The teacher will look at what the
students has made and have a conference with the student. Students are expected to make an 80% or higher on Success
Maker Assessments.

C.

How will you use the data to make instructional decisions?


I will use all of the data collected to check for student mastery. If students have not mastered the content, I will know need to
adjust my teaching and add new strategies that will work for student understanding. I will spend as much time needed on
content until I see that more than half of my students have mastered the content and received an 80% or higher on Success
Maker.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

Section V: Classroom Management


Describe your expectations for student behavior during instruction and during non-instructional routines. . Write your
description as you were explaining these expectations to your students and their parents. List the rules and consequences,
and your procedures for non-instructional activities.
EXPECTATIONS DURING INSTRUCTION

My expectations for student behavior are set high. I believe each student is capable of following the rules in and
outside of the classroom. When students arrives to school in the morning, they are to wait patiently and quietly until
the instructor informs them
that they mayDURING
proceedNON-INSTRUCTIONAL
inside the classroom. Students
are to come in and take down their
EXPECTATIONS
ROUTINES
chair. Once this has been completed, the student should unpack their book bag of all materials they will need for the
class period. They will not be able to get up during instruction to retrieve an item from their book bags. Students will
then place their book bags at the back of classroom on a hook to avoid causing a hazard to other classmates. After
students book bags are placed properly, at least two pencils need to be sharpened. Students will not be allowed to
interrupt classroom instruction to sharpen pencils. Once this has been completed, students are to head to back to their
desk and complete their Morning work that will be placed on the Whiteboard. When they have completed the
morning work, students will then sit quickly and wait for further instruction.
During instruction, students are to pay attention and participate during lecture. Students must practice active listening
in the classroom. This means all mouths should be closed and all ears should be open during instruction. Students will
have the opportunity to communicate and discuss with one another during whole or small group discussion. If
students are involved in whole collaborative group activity, they must refrain from hitting, pushing, and arguing with
one another. Students must practice appropriate, respectful and friendly debates during collaborative work groups. If
students so happens to finish classwork or assignments earlier than peers, they are allowed to pull out a reading book
or review notes for future assessments. They must remember there is no time to dawdle and school is about learning.
Rules:

Listen and follow rules the FIRST time.


Raise your hand and wait to be called on by teacher.
Respect others and their property.
Come to class and hand in assignments on time.
Do not disrupt instruction time.
Be responsible for your own learning.

Consequences:

Verbal Warning
Loss of Privilege
Student/Teacher Conference
Student calls home
Parent/Teacher Conference
Guidance Referral
Principal Visit

Incentives

Positive verbal feedback


Stickers
Grab bag
Extra Computer Time
Beagle Bucks

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

EXPECTATIONS DURING NON-INSTRUCTIONAL ROUTINES


RULES AND CONSEQUENCES

Hallway- Students are to keep their hands, feet and objects to themselves while transitioning from one
place to another. They are to walk in a straight, quiet line with their arms at their side. Students must
remain at least two from the wall and two steps behind the person in front of them. This is to avoid
damaging any other classes work that may be hanging outside their classroom and avoiding stepping on
another persons foot.
Playground- Students are to be respectful to other students and school property. There is absolutely no
rough play on the playground. This is to avoid serious injuries. Students are to make sure they are in
teachers eye sight at all times.
Restroom- Students are given designated restroom break times to use the restroom. No students should be
outside the classroom to use the restroom unless told otherwise.
Assembly- Students must walk to school assembly quietly and follow hallway procedures. Once arrived to
assembly students must sit and listen to guest speaker or person in charge quietly. If questions are
permitted after speaker or assembly has concluded, student must raise their hand and wait to be
acknowledged.
Cafeteria- Students must use their inside voices while in the cafeteria at all times.
Dismissal- After dismissal announcements, student must pack up and write their homework assignments in
their agenda. Students are to wait for teacher to check and sign their agenda before exiting.

Rules:

Listen and follow rules the FIRST time.


Raise your hand and wait to be called on by teacher.
Respect others and their property.
Come to class and hand in assignments on time.
Do not disrupt instruction time.
Be responsible for your own learning.

Consequences:

Verbal Warning
Loss of Privilege
Student/Teacher Conference
Student calls home
Parent/Teacher Conference
Guidance Referral
Principal Visit

Incentives

Positive verbal feedback


Stickers
Grab bag
Extra Computer Time
Beagle Bucks

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

Reflect on classroom management: What are the most important considerations in managing the classroom to maximize
instructional time, and why do you believe them to be important?
The most important considerations in managing a classroom to maximize instructional time is that a teacher will follow through with all
of the classroom rules and consequences. If a teacher does not follow the rules listed, students will continuing with bad behavior thus,
distracting other students who are trying to learn and minimizing instructional period. This is important because students come to school
receive an education and grow. When classroom rules are not followed, it cuts into the learning and growing development.

Section VI: Parent Communications


Describe your procedures for providing initial information about your goals and expectations for student learning, plans for
instruction and assessment, rules for student behavior to your parents and overall recommendations for involving your
parents with learning at home. How do you plan to periodically inform your parents about their childs learning and
behavioral progress in your class? Also, discuss you would involve your parents in home-based and school-based activities.
Procedures for providing initial information

To inform my parents about myself, my goals and my expectation for students learning, I will send home a
parent newsletter. Parents are expected to read this to gain more knowledge of who their child will be
taught by the school year. Once parent has read the letter, there will be a place for their signature as well as
a place for the student to sign. Students will be assigned to return this parent letter with signatures the
following school day. If parents would like to know about my plans for instruction, assessments, rules and
overall recommendations, I will have a parent night. This is a night when all parents will be allowed to come
and meet me to talk about the school year and what I have in store for their child. Parents would receive
with all information given that night placed on it. If they would like to get more details on their particular
child, we could have a one- on- one meeting that specific night, or we could schedule a parent/teacher
conference for another date. To keep parents informed about their childs learning and behavioral progress,
I will send home an updated progress report that students are to have signed. Students will receive this
report bi-weekly. Parents will have my school contact if they need to discuss their childs grades or behavior.
During the year, students will be given a lot of engaging and exciting home projects to do. Parents are to
help their child and get involved with these projects. A note will go home with students stating that students
will a major project to do and that will need the parent or guardian help with it. If project seems
complicated even with parent help, parent call either call school contact or send a note home with student
and we can discuss a way in which student is able to complete the assignment.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

Procedures for involving parents with the learning at home


Section VII: Reflecting and Revision Procedures

There are several ways I will involve parents with student learning at home. I can assign projects that
parents are required to help their child complete. This way the student can see that their parent really
cares about their education by being involved. I could team up with the guidance counselor and have
a Parent of the Week. This could be a parent who has really been involved with their childs learning
in and outside of the classroom. Another idea would be assigning homework that parents can only
sign once their child has completed it in its entirety. This way students will not come to school with
incomplete homework. Their parent would have to check over the homework before that are able to
sign it. Students could take a homework assignment that may involve them talking to their parents
about a specific topic. This way the parent can be involved in homework completion. All these ideas
are just a few that I have to get and keep parents involved in their childs learning and education.

Reflect on your long range plan and determine what might be, or what you think may be strengths and weakness. Decide
what modifications or adaptations might be needed to your plan. Decide how often you think you might need to reflect on
your teaching practices.

A. Strengths:
I believe strengths of my long range plan include great rules for classroom procedure, engaging lesson and a variety of teaching
strategies. Having all three of these components in my long range plan is a way that I can assure not only myself, but students and
parents their child will receive nothing but the best education while covering each standard.

B.

Weaknesses

I believe some weaknesses of my long range plan would be classroom management and time management. Student are to follow
the rules set out by the teacher and the school in and out of the classroom. I need to make sure that I am following through the
rules and consequences and not looking pass the disruptive behavior. Also, I need to make sure that I am completing my
standards and lessons in a timely manner.

C.

Time line for evaluating long range plan components.

I plan to check my long range plan components bi-weekly to make any adjustments needed to improve my long rang plan. I know
that certain standards are going to take longer than what the pacing guide suggests, so I will make those modifications to my long
range plan if needed.
D.

List modifications and adaptations that you think might be needed to improve the procedures.
1. Time Management
2. Completion of standard in timely manner.
3. Classroom Management.

E.

Plan for reflecting on your teaching practices.

I will reflect on my teaching practices every day. After each lesson, I will write down my strengths and weaknesses. I will also write
down what worked for my students to better their understanding and what did not work for my students. From this I will know that I
either need to improve my strategy or stick to that particular strategy for that specific lesson. Reflection will be done often to ensure
student learning.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

Long Range Plan Scoring Rubric


Name: _______________________________ Major: ______________________ Date: _________________________

ACEI/
NAEYC

1.0/1a

5.2/2c;3b

3.1/3a

3.2/1c

2.1/5a

2.2/5a

Component

Target (3)

Acceptable (2)

Unacceptable (1)

Description of Students

Describes students in-depth according to ability, learning


styles, ethnic group, gender and special needs, etc.;
suggests several ways to plan lessons to accommodate
differences.

Describes students according to their


differences, but is unclear about ways to
accommodate differences when
planning.

Does not include at least five (5) types


of descriptions; displays minimal
understanding of addressing a variety
of student needs when planning.

Contextual Factors

Data is collected from multiple sources, including IEPs,


test scores, school records, student interest surveys,
school personnel, students, etc. Candidate reflects an
understanding of the importance of collaborative
relationships with families, school colleagues and agencies
in the community.

Data is collected from at least three types


of sources and the candidate shows some
understanding of the importance of
collaborative relationships with families,
school colleagues and agencies in the
community.

Used primarily secondary source data


(records) to obtain data. No school or
community data included.

Learning and
Developmental Goals

Includes at least four (4) or more standards which exhibit


evidence of objective taxonomy, skills, and dispositions
that support elementary students development, learning,
and motivation to learn.

Includes at least three (3) standards


which exhibit knowledge of objective
taxonomy, skills, and dispositions
relevant and meaningful to specific age
groups.

Includes standards, but lacks


appropriate depth of knowledge of
taxonomy, skills, and dispositions
relevant and meaningful to specific
age groups.

Learning and
Developmental Goals

Goals clearly reflect sensitivity to the diversity of students


in their development and learning styles, as well as race,
ethnicity, culture and exceptional needs.

Goals reflect an understanding of the


diversity of students in their
development and learning styles and
reflect at least two of the following: race,
ethnicity, culture or exceptional needs.

Goals lack sensitivity to the diversity


of students.

Units of Instruction
- English Language Arts

The content area related to reading, writing, speaking,


viewing, listening, and thinking skills is comprehensively
covered. The timeline of instructional units reflects
knowledge of key themes, of concepts, and of English
language arts skills. The content is paced so objectives are
covered.

The content area has 90% of the key


elements covered, reflecting knowledge
of key themes, concepts and of English
language arts skills. The content is paced
so objectives are covered.

The content area is addressed;


however, little evidence supports the
direct alignment with the knowledge
of key themes, concepts and of
English language arts skills. The
content is not paced so objectives are
covered.

Units of Instruction
- Science

The content area related to concepts of physical, life, and


earth science is comprehensively covered. The timeline of
instructional units reflects knowledge of key themes,
concepts and of skills necessary to plan appropriate
science lessons. The content Is paced so objectives are
covered.

The content area has at least 90% of the


key elements covered, reflecting
knowledge of key themes, concepts and
of skills necessary to plan appropriate
science lessons. The content is paced so
objectives are covered.

The content area is addressed;


however, little evidence supports the
direct alignment with the knowledge
of key themes, concepts, and of
science skills. The content is not
paced so objectives are covered.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

Score

Units of Instruction
- Mathematics

The content area related to concepts of number and


operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data
analysis and probability is comprehensively covered. The
timeline of instructional units reflect knowledge of key
themes, concepts and of skills necessary to plan
appropriate mathematics lessons. The content Is paced
so objectives are covered.

The content area has at least 90% of the


key elements covered, reflecting
knowledge of key themes, concepts and
of skills necessary to plan appropriate
mathematics lessons. The content Is
paced so objectives are covered.

The content area is addressed;


however, little evidence supports the
direct alignment with the knowledge
of key themes, concepts, and of
mathematics skills. The content is not
paced so objectives are covered.

2.4/5a

Units of Instruction
Social Studies

The content area related to concepts of history,


geography, and the social sciences is comprehensively
covered. The timeline of instructional units reflect
knowledge of key themes, concepts and of skills necessary
to plan appropriate social studies lessons. The content Is
paced so objectives are covered.

The content area has at least 90% of the


key elements covered, reflecting
knowledge of key themes, concepts and
of skills necessary to plan appropriate
social studies lessons. The content Is
paced so objectives are covered.

The content area is addressed;


however, little evidence supports the
direct alignment with the knowledge
of key themes, concepts, and of social
studies skills. The content is not
paced so objectives are covered.

2.5/5a

Instructional Units
Visual and
Performing Arts

Clear integration of visual and performing arts (dance,


music, theater and the visual arts) is indicated multiple
times throughout the units.

Visual and performing key elements are


integrated at least twice within each unit
outline.

Visual and performing arts key


elements are not included in each
unit.

2.6/5a

Instructional Units Health

Clear integration of health is indicated multiple times


throughout the units.

Health key elements are integrated at


least twice within each unit outline.

Health key elements are not included


in each unit.

2.7/5a

Instructional Units
Physical Education

PE is clearly integrated several times in each of the units.

PE key elements are integrated at least


twice within each unit outline.

Physical Education key elements are


not included in each unit.

1.0/4c

Instructional Materials
& Resources

Uses a variety of instructional materials and resources


that directly align and support units; materials/resources
clearly support curriculum enhancement and successful
learning experiences to support and enrich student
development, characteristics, acquisition of knowledge,
and motivation to learn. Evidence of the use of
community resources is provided.

Materials list is adequate to support


units. List represents variety. Materials
list tends to be general in nature and
does not focus comprehensively on
student characteristics, enrichment,
enhancement, and students needs. No
evidence of the use of community
resources.

Materials list is inadequate and tends


to represent traditionally supplied
materials. Materials are general and
do not directly support or enrich
curriculum units. Student needs and
characteristics do not appear to drive
the choices of materials and
resources. No community resources
are used.

3.5/4b

Instructional Materials
& Resources

Technology, to include hardware, software and assisted


support is listed and reflects the use of such tools to foster
inquiry, collaboration and interaction.

Technology listed includes the teachers


and students uses of tools to reflect an
understanding of its use as a
communication tool.

Technology listed includes only the


teachers use of technology for
instructional presentations.

Formative and summative assessments, use direct and


indirect methods, match learning goals, instructional
activities, and represent a variety of assessment
strategies. The strategies are appropriate for the content
to be covered and the students ability and developmental
levels. Criteria for the weighting process and evaluating
results are clear, concise and promote intellectual, social,
emotional, and the physical development of students.
Higher level thinking and student reflection are promoted.

Formative and summative assessments


match learning goals and the content to
be covered, but the majority are
traditional paper and pencil types.
Criteria for evaluating results are clear.
Assessments reflect an emphasis on
knowledge and application.

Assessments given do not match the


learning goals, or no explanations,
descriptions, or assessments are
attached.

2.3/5a

4.0/3b

Assessment

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

Student Records

Procedures for recording, aggregating and displaying data


indicate that records are organized, well maintained and
easy to interpret; procedures are easy to follow to plan, to
evaluate, strengthen instruction, make content
knowledge decisions, and make individual progress
decisions. Use of data for differentiated instruction is
clear.

Procedures for maintaining recorded


data are clear, with some strategies for
developing, aggregating and displaying
data for decision making. Some
information is given for using data to
make decisions and to promote the
relationship between data collection and
reflective decision-making.

Procedures for maintaining recorded


data are somewhat clear, but little to
no plan is developed for aggregating
and displaying data for decision
making. Plan for using data to make
decisions is unclear. No relationship
between data collection and
reflective decision-making.

3.4/1c

Discipline Policy

States explicit expectations of students and consequences


for misbehavior. Rules and consequences are limited to 5
or less, are age appropriate, focus on behaviors rather
than students, and support a positive learning
environment. Instructional procedures represent
essential routines for promoting efficiency and minimal
loss of time for learning.

Rules and consequences are age


appropriate, represent support for a
positive learning environment, and are
limited to 5 or less. Instructional
procedures cover most of the areas that
promote minimal loss of instructional
time.

Rules and consequences are negative


in nature and are not aligned with age
appropriate practices. More than 5
rules are given. Rules allow for a loss
of instructional time.

3.4/1c

Procedures for NonInstructional Activities

Offers detailed directions for such activities as restroom


break, emergency drills, school assemblies, field trips, and
other movement in the classroom and halls.

Provides adequate directions for noninstructional activities.

No procedures for non-instructional


were given.

Parental
Communications

Clear, consistent evidence exists that the candidate plans


to provide the family appropriate, culturally sensitive,
reader friendly information concerning goals, instruction,
rules and assessment on an initial and periodic basis;
reflects on decisions and involves students, families, and
the learning community to enhance learning.

Adequate evidence exists that the


candidate plans to establish an open line
of communication on an initial and
periodic basis, regarding pertinent
information involving students, families,
and the learning community to enhance
learning; sensitivity to diversity is clear.

Uses minimal, to no attempts to


involve the family in learning goals at
the home or at school. Fails to
provide specific examples of periodic
communication methods. Sensitivity
to diversity is unclear.

Parental
Communications

Plans indicate evidence of collaboration with the learning


community to foster and support communication; a
variety of ways to communicate and ways that families
can be involved at the school and home are given to
promote the growth and well-being of children.

Adequate collaboration regarding


communication with the learning
community is evident.

No procedures for continuous


communication involving the learning
community.

Plans specifically indicate opportunities for reflecting on


teaching practices to improve the teaching and learning
process.

Some evidence of opportunities to reflect


on teaching practices to improve the
teaching and learning process.

The candidate does not provide


reflections or suggest
recommendations for improving the
process of teaching and learning.

4.0/3b

5.2/2b

5.2/2b

5.1/4d

Reflections

OVERALL SCORE
Unacceptable/Developing (1)
Candidate demonstrates a limited amount of the
attributes of the standard. Performance indicates
that few competencies have been demonstrated.

Revised Fall 2013 ACEI/NAEYC 2010 Standards

Acceptable/Meets (2)
Candidate demonstrates most of the attributes of the
standard. Performance indicates that the competency
has been demonstrated including examples, extension,
or enrichment.

Target/Exceeds (3)
Candidate demonstrates all of the attributes of the
standard. Performance clearly indicates that the
competency has been mastered, including examples,
extension, and enrichment.