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Courageous Conversations

Grade 9 Academic English


Analysis
The Ontario Government says:
Attention to Aboriginal self-esteem the connection between the physical, emotionalmental, intellectual and spiritual realms is paramount. Aboriginal learners and their
success are dependent upon educators and schools respecting this view. It requires
changes in how we teach our Aboriginal learners. It means that the pedagogy in
classrooms must be inclusive of Aboriginal culture, language and worldview. Our
Aboriginal students are counting on us today!
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/Toulouse.pdf
For this reason I have organized my analysis into these four realms.
Emotional
Key words: Understanding and Humility
The curriculum leaves space for these kinds of values to be implemented within the
lesson planning. As writing is a critical aspect of the success criteria there is room for
students to express themselves and their understanding in a way that is able to be
private and therefore endlessly expressive. Story telling is a large and important aspect
of Aboriginal culture. Recognizing and valuing this creates many possibilities for
interactive and exciting academic work. The curriculum leaves room for work that can
include connecting to stories and responding with regards to emotional reactions and/or
connections. The curriculum also leaves room for work that can include writing stories. I
believe that in this area, with the right amount of initiative and creativity Aboriginal
pedagogy and content can be incorporated into the grade 9 English curriculum.
Physical:
Key words: Doing and Honesty

This is an area where I think the curriculum needs to create space. My interpretation of
the physical is an opportunity for the curriculum to allow students to experience what
they may be writing about, responding to, or reading. This is a chance for students to do
what it is they are expected to talk about or read about. There is no material within the
curriculum that has student on their feet and I believe there is space, within English
Language Arts instruction, for this. For example, having students read in the round while
working on a Shakespeare unit or having students build shelter while reading Lord of the
Flies. I believe that finding these opportunities should be mandatory within the English
curriculum as it adds to all kinds of learning for every student in the class.
Spiritual:
Key words: Honouring and Respect
I believe this fits into the reading comprehension aspect of the curriculum. With regards
to Aboriginal content this section is lacking. There are no mandatory texts of strict
subjects. The curriculum does highlight reading texts that connect to culture and a
multiplicity of perspective, but I do not believe this is as specific as it needs to be.
Reading is a place for honouring the words, stories, experiences and lessons of others.
There is a sense of respect that comes with this. For this reason I believe including
Aboriginal reading material is an ideal way to respect this aspect of the pedagogy while
simultaneously educating on content and culture.
Intellectual:
Key words: Knowing and Bravery
The curriculum has an Oral Communication section and I believe this is where the
intellectual realm is honoured. Expressing knowledge through public speaking requires
confidence and knowledge. Not only are these two elements critical for effective
communication they can take on aspects of Aboriginal voices and perspectives. Learning
to speak as an ally or in order to advocate for a particular issue of interest is
abstractedly within the curriculum but should be stated much more specifically. This
section also highlights effective listening which I also believe fits into this realm.
Understanding audience and knowing when to speak and when to listen are all values
found within Aboriginal pedagogy. Emphasizing this for students functions to create and
inclusive educational environment.

The curriculum says:


Successful language learners: understand that language learning is a necessary, lifeenhancing, reflective process; communicate that is, read, listen, view, speak, write,
and represent effectively and with confidence; make meaningful connections between
themselves, what they encounter in texts, and the world around them; think critically;
understand that all texts advance a particular point of view that must be recognized,
questioned, assessed, and evaluated; appreciate the cultural impact and aesthetic power
of texts; use language to interact and connect with individuals and communities, for
personal growth, and for active participation as world citizens.
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/english910currb.pdf

Lesson Plan Title / Subject:


Date:

Courageous Conversations / Academic English

April 16th 2015

Class / Grade: Grade 9


Length of Class (minutes): 75 minutes

LEARNING GOALS:
Learning Goal

Success Criteria

Coded Expectations

Developing and Organizing


Content

use appropriate descriptive and


evocative words, phrases, and
expressions to make their writing
clear and vivid for their intended
audience

Writing 2.3

Applying Knowledge of
Conventions

build vocabulary for writing by


confirming word meaning(s) and
reviewing word choice, using
several different types of
resources and strategies, as
appropriate for the purpose

Writing 3.2

LEARNING SKILLS:
Responsibility
Self-regulation
Independent
Work

Collaboration
Initiative
Organization

Notes:

LITERACY FOCUS:
Locate and use information from a
wide variety of sources
Use oral/written communication
suitable for purpose and intended
audience
Read for purpose and/or pleasure

Communicate effectively using


visual forms and symbols
Read and interpret (orally or in
writing) visual forms
Think critically and respond to text
or oral work
Other:

Write with purpose and clarity


Notes:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

OF

OVERALL LESSON:

Students will use a text and writing exercise to explore perspective and bias. This lesson
is a section of a Vetting Sources unit.
This lesson includes Aboriginal content to open up aspects of perspective and bias. Not
only are these concepts important for the English classroom, but also they are critical
when looking at Aboriginal history and the stories that fill Canadas history.
Time
Segment
Description
Resources
(minutes
)
10
Hook
Without explaining the context have Paul Morins Animal
students seated in a circle and read
Dreaming
the text aloud to them.
10
Assessment Once the story is completed inquire
for
about the perspectives present
Learning:
within the text using the
think/pair/share technique:
What character did you like best?
Which character made choices you
do not agree with?
Would another character have done
it differently?

25

35

Delivery of
New Ideas:

Learning
Tasks:

Assessment
as
Learning:
Instruction
al
Strategies:

Through an organizing and charting


process students will describe each
character and pair that description
with that characters perspective.
Each character will have a piece of
chart paper designated. Students
will participate in a gallery walk
writing on each sheet of paper.
Students will write characteristics,
descriptions, comment on choices
the characters made etc..
Once this is complete the class to
will use this material while looking at
the definitions of bias and
perspective via overhead.
These definitions will lead us into the
activity.
Students will be asked to tell the
story they have just heard (at the
beginning of class) using the voices
of two contrasting characters.
Students should have two versions
of the story once the task is
complete.
Students may use the lists around
the classroom to assist them while
completing this task.
These two versions of the story
should differ from one another
dependent on which characters
perspective is being used. These
contrasting versions function to
demonstrate perspective and bias.
Students will be observed as they
begin to complete this task. If they
need guidance or assistance now is
the time to steer them in the correct
direction.
Think/pair/s
Debate
hare
Coding
for
Think/pair/dr importance
aw
Inside/outside
Four corners circles
Graphic
Rapid writing
organizers
Individual/pair/gr
Placemat
oup work
Jigsaw
Numbered heads
Gallery walk
Direct teaching

http://dictionary.
reference.com/brow
se
/bias
http://dictionary.
reference.com/brow
se
/perspective
chart paper
markers

Printed versions of
the story

Graffiti
Role playing
Learning
Seminar panel
centres
Hands-on activity
Demonstrati
on
Notes on
Students will work as a large group
Instruction at the beginning of class. This of
al
followed with pair work. Students
Strategies:
then have a chance to gallery walk,
meaning they are working as
individuals but are able to consult
with the entire group. Finally
students are responsible for an
individual piece of work.
Students begin the class in a circle,
they are able to walk around the
room, and finally students are given
time to find their own space while
working on an individual task.
This lesson could be done outside.
Assessment Students will submit these pieces of
of Learning: writing once complete. They will
likely need another class period to
work. Students should be able to
articulate the differences between
the two versions of their story.
Wrap
Students will complete an exit slip.
Up/End of
The exit slip will ask them to explain
class:
the connection between what they
have done and vetting sources.