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Stories Involving Minors

The editors code of practice states that young people should be free to
complete their time at school without unnecessary intrusions and that
they must not be interviewed or photographed on any issues involving
their own or other childs welfare unless a custodial parent or are in
agreement. Minors are not to be paid for material involving any child
welfare unless its clearly within the childs interest.
For example when newspapers report a story within the court, there isnt
an automatic restriction but the court will make an order to prevent the
identification of the child being revealed as they are involved within the
proceedings.
http://www.pcc.org.uk/cop/practice.html
An example of stories involving minors would be a teenage boy in Salford
that was raped whilst walking through a park at the late hours of the
night: this obviously was a very traumatizing incident and no more harm
would want to be done by revealing his name.
http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchesternews/police-make0fresh-appeal-witnesses-7915895

Contempt of Court
This particular requirement within radio is to protect the integrity of the
legal process that comes from the outside influence; the various types of
reporting restrictions apply automatically when reporting stories in the
court of law.
The BBCs restrictions are designed to limit any publications of any
information that might be prejudice in a jury trial; it is a way of preventing
the reference. They are limited to saying things like
The name of the court.
The judges dealing with the case.
A summary of the charges.
The names, addresses, ages and occupation so f any defendants or
witness in the court.
Lawyers involved (agreements of bail)
E.g. in 2011 the daily mail were found guilty of contempt, after they
published a photograph which showed a man who was on trial for murder
posing with an automatic pistol.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/academy/journalism/article/art20130702112133630.

Libel and defamations


This is a law that protects an individuals or companys reputation- it
allows people to sue for damage of their reputation. Libel is defamatory
material in a permanent recorded form in a newspaper, book, TV or radio
that is sent from one individual to another. Reporters arent allowed to
make defamatory if its:

Lowers them in the estimation of member of the public.


Causes them to be shunned or avoided
Disparages them in the office, their trade or profession.
Or exposes them to hatred.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/academy/journalism/law/defamation/article/art20130
702112133651
An example of this would be http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article2724827/Police-search-home-belonging-Cliff-Richard-historic-sex-abuseinvestigation.html which is story

Coverage of Elections
When reporting such a subject you have to make sure that it is presented
as fair and not biased toward any election group.
For example the BBC have committed to impartiality and fairness is under
intense scrutiny when reporting electron campaigns. Political parties are
likely to seek to influence editorial decisions. With the coverage of
elections there is one law in particular that they all have to follow which is
the Political Parties, election and referendum Act 2000 an act of the
parliament of the united kingdom that sets out how political parties,
elections and referendums are to be regulated in the UK.
The principles of fairness that underlie the coverage of UK elections within
the BBC, should also inform the election about the reportings within other
countries.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/editorialguidelines/page/guidelines-politicspractices-elections/#ReportingUKElectionandReferendumCampaigns
An example of this is http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02p1gwg#auto
from 7.12 onwards Ian Collins has a chat with the report about the
conservative being very bias about them, he said to ask a consecutive
they are trying to play it down like business, showing campaigning as
usual this shows how they are be rather biased against the consecutives
as they have been one of the major parties for years.

Ofcom
Ofcom within radio have a broadcasting code that everything that
reporters and radio present are ordered to do by law and ofcom itself. It
covers topic from protecting under-eighteens to privacy and elections.
Everything you need to know about the licensing process for analogue,
digital and community radio stations. Youll also find the latest radio
broadcasting updates, as well as information on radio station formats and
Radio Restricted Service Licenses.
http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/broadcast/831190/broadcastingc
ode2011.pdf

BBC editorial guidelines


Any proposal to undertake an investigation into crime or serious
anti-social behaviour has to be referred to a senior editorial figure
or, the commissioning editor. Normally, there will be prime evidence

of the behaviour that will be revealed (or intention to carry out the
behaviour) before the BBC will use secret recording as a way of
investigating more. However before any undercover work starts
there needs to be appropriate members of the production team that
should be aware of all relevant Editorial Guidelines and guidances.
The practices must be followed when using secret filming
equipment, when carrying out filming in such a way that the footage
can become evidential value.
Throughout the editing process, it is important to ensure the
finished programme reflects that evidence accurately, taking into
account the context in any which secretly recorded incidents took
place. When the allegations to be made in the film have been
identified, they should be put to the individual, organisation or
company concerned for a response.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/editorialguidelines/guidelines/

Ethics
Invasion of Privacy is what reporters use to intrude into the personal life of
another, without any cause, this can give the person whose privacy has
been invaded a right to bring a form of lawsuit for damages that have
been caused against the person

Public interest
This type of style is known as the welfare of the general public, its seen
as a justification for the use of the subterfuge of covering activities, like
news. The Press complaints Commission code defines public interest as
including but not defines the public interest as including but not confined
to detecting and serious crime it wants to protect the publics health and
safety.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/academy/journalism/article/art20130702112133792
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2012/may/20/open-doordefinition-public-interest
From the class debate we discussed the pros and cons on the topics of
Kate Middleton/ Cheryl Cole, football rape charges and the phone hacking
topics. The main question that popped up throughout the debate of each
topic was where do you draw the line on ethics and what is right and what
isnt when reporting news stories that invade peoples privacy. For
example the Kate Middleton story
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-19595221 - Kate and William angered by
grotesque invasion of privacy (Ethical issues from this story)

Against

Even though the reporter was obey the law it wasnt right for them
to invade the privacy of such important people on their holiday.
Posting topless photos of Katie shouldnt have been taken in the first
place as the publication wasnt right knowing their status in the
royal family.
The royals should take legal action as showing propagative photo
makes the consequences strong because the royal family will do
anything to protective a family member from a reputation that they
dont need.
A UK magazine said that they would have no intention of publishing
any photos of the duchess of Cambridge as it was grotesque.

For

The close editor said that the couple were visible from the street, so
there isnt any law against it really because if they were seen clearly
it would be easy for anyone to take photos.
The couple must have expected something like this as they live they
have as famous royal celebrities it makes it difficult to get any form
of privacy.
The photographer wasnt breaking a laws and said that sunbather
topless is something that happens with most woman when they are
tanning on the beach. Her status made it more personal to her.

However other stories like The Katie Middleton story show just how far
reporters will go to get news to gain a lot more public interest. Like the
Footballers Rape charges
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/sportsnews/article-3051949/Sunderlandmidfielder-Adam-Johnson-arrives-police-station-learn-faces-chargesclaims-sex-15-year-old-gir.html
Pros
The press are doing their jobs which is giving the public they gossips
and news that they want to keep their lives entertaining.
The Celebrity must be aware that whatever happens in his life is
going to be found out about because when you become a celebrity
that mean that your privacy is very limited as they press want to
know everything about you to post it.
Invading a celebrities life give them and the newspaper at lot more
money as people want to buy the magazines and papers to know
this information there for they a gaining higher profit.
Cons
The press are getting involved in a celebrities personal life over
Claims which means that they are making a serious accusation
which could be true or not.

Presenting a report of a topic like this for a celebrity means that the
press is ruining a footballer career giving him a bad name and
reputation, which is said to be a form of deformation.
The press are putting their jobs on the line to create accusation
which if it wasnt true would one lose money for the company and
two make them loose money for lying to the public.

Story Priority
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02p465m
The News Bulletin consists of nine worldwide news reports that have gone
on within the past weeks. The Order in which the stories seem to go in an
order of important with most of the stories involving murder, prison
sentences and the worldwide government. From the list below the stories
have been put in an order of important and how they will impact us
globally informing us the urgent news they have happened recently.
1. Former Egyptian president had been sentenced to 20-year prison
sentence with hard labor in connection to the detention and torture of
protestors during his time in the office.
2. Afghanistan president has unites within the government
3.93-year-old former Nazi is on trial in Germany over mass killing in
Auschwitz concentration camp.
4. Italian authorizes - extreme crowding made by the captain caused a
boat to collide and capsid.
5. Spilled coffee and co-pilot blamed for send Serbian president
government jet into violent decent.
6. Ethiopia 3 days from national insurance Killed by Islamic state
militants in Libya.
7. Judaist release video beheading of men.
8. Course Indonesia sentenced an American to 18 years in prison for
killing his girlfriends mother and the girlfriend received a 10-year
sentence.
9. A japan train has broken the speed record being 6.3 Km an hour.

Immediacy
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02p465m
This news show was broadcasted on Monday 21st April and stories four,
five and seven has said to have been recent news from last week and the
Sunday which was the day before this was broadcasted showing just how
recent their stories are. However the first story about the Egyptian
president had been going on for months so it was seen as a follow-up from
the story giving us any extra information to the story. Some of the stories
that are broadcast within the bulletin are seen as follow up as they want
to keep their audience all up to date with the latest news on the stories to
they are informed quickly.

Follow-up angles

A follow up if the term for a story which is written that you can report
more of a story that has already been published its a way of updating it
will a lot more detail. The extra detail will cover news fact that have been
added on as later developments, new issues will be raised that are vital to
the story. These follow up angles are needed because one story on its own
will not be able to cover all aspects of a certain story. It is able to tell the
listeners added information that will give them aspects to know the full
story clearly. http://www.thenewsmanual.net/Manuals%20Volume
%201/volume1_24.htm
An example of this would be
http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Follow-Up-Drug-firms-scale-backdoctor-promotion-5300202.php which is the follow up story about the
drug firms scale back doctor promotion pay

Availability of audio
An example of this would be http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02pc4xw
the BBC world news on BBC Iplayer contains audio clips with each stories
by they seem to be a lot more formal in the sense that they are normally
from politicians as thats what their story topics mainly cover. Whereas
http://www.bbc.co.uk/1xtra/tx/news_audio.shtml (12pm edition) Radio 1
extra radio show audio clips are used to get more point of views of story
presenting them in a more interesting way that keeps the audience a lot
more engaged. It has music playing in the background which contain
stories to do with well-known celebrities like Eddie Murphy which is
mentioned from 01.55.

Newsroom Policy
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newsroom
Is the central place where all journalist, reporters, editors and producers
will work together to gather news to be published in a newspaper, news
radio, magazines etc. the concept of the newsroom is used through the
public relations practitioners and are seen as representatives of the
organizations which have the ability to influence or create their own
media. The broadcast newsroom are similar to newspaper newsrooms but
have two major differences are these types of newsrooms include rooms
to edit or audio clips that they will also exist next to the radio or television
studio. An example of this would be
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/public_editor/2011/12/07/toronto_star_new
sroom_policy_and_journalistic_standards_guide.html as the Toronto Star
use the newsroom policy to comprehend the principles of journalism
covering radio, news etc. their mission is to responsibly inform, educate,
entertain and delight readers. They said that they are the foundation of
the Stars integrity and our credibility with our audiences showing that
newsrooms are essential for them to be gaining the audiences to create
interesting news reports.

Human Interest
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_interest_story

Its a feature story that discusses a person, animal or people in an


emotional way. It presents people problems, achievements and concerns
in a way that bring us as a human interest, sympathy or motivation.
An example of this would be
http://www.studentnewsdaily.com/blog/human-interest-news-stories/dogborn-without-eyes-serves-as-inspiration/ this is seen as a human interest
story as its something that is interesting and unique involving a topic that
most people can relate too, especially if you have a dog or have any
interest with animals. Having a unique story that will become an interest
to the public, as it makes it a lot more engaging and popular. In this case a
dog that was born with dwarfism and without eyes called Smiley which
never fails to have a smile on his face its seen as inspiring to the
audience making it a human interest.

Public interest agenda


The public interest means that the press are reporting and providing us
with information on matters of significance to every type of ranged
audience.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/academy/journalism/article/art20130702112133792
. Each News organization will have different priorities which will interpret
the nation of the public interest in a different way. Sometimes they can
breach an individuals expectation of privacy as its in the public interest to
tell the people what they are doing they may be corrupt, or anti-social.
Incompetent or unethical as long as it doesnt create a form of danger to
the public. An example of this would be Seymour Hersh has exposed the
torture within Abu Ghraib, Stephen Grey has uncovered the CIA's secret
rendition flights, and The Sunday Times has revealed that powerful figures
may have paid for honors. This watchdog role is important not just for
holding those in power to account, but because those in power know
they're being held to account.