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UNIT E: Planet Earth

Grade 7 Science Mr. Bexson


Rationale:
To give students insight into the wealth of knowledge already gained
from the veritable bevy of information our home planet gives us, as it is the
only one we currently have. To give students insight into the methods used
to collect this information, and of course to expand upon further
developments and research being looked into in todays earth and
atmospheric sciences. A look into how we treat our planet and the current
state of the planet will be emphasized, again because it is the one planet we
have and we need to take care of it. A deep look into how we act as
scientists and how the nature of science functions will be emphasized.
The planet we inhabit is a curious machine full of strange things that
create very visible and meaningful views and experiences for us as humans.
It creates the Rocky Mountains, and gorgeous lakes, rivers and oceans; but it
also gives us destructive experiences such as that from volcanoes and
earthquakes. Looking into what causes these phenomena and how scientists
themselves figure out the mechanisms by which they occur are a valuable
insight into how we as humans perceive the world.

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

The unit will answer deeper questions that students think of everyday,
such as: What is the world made of? Does the ground stay still? Where do our
ancestors come from? And how are mountains formed? But, it will also help
students understand more deeply the methodology used in the scientific
world today. Given this, we can hope that our students will become more
scientifically literate and capable of being inquisitive and protective of our
one true home: The Earth.
Key Questions:
1. Focusing Question: What is the world made of? How do we know
how old things are? (Mathematics connection). Why are there
earthquakes, mountains and volcanoes? How did they form? Where
does a volcanos lava come from? Why did things go extinct? What can
we do to ensure we dont? (Social studies/biology connection). Why are
there oceans and rivers and lakes? (Biology connection). Where do
rocks come from? (History connection) What is the difference between
rocks and minerals? Does the ground stay still or does it move? How do
we know who our great-great-great-greatgreat-great grandparents
are? How can we, as a species, help protect our mother earth?
2. I am assuming that the students will know how to research themselves,
hopefully on their own time as well. I am also assuming they
understand the scientific method so I can build off of this and help
them understand a little better how scientists truly work (exact
methodology such as carbon dating etc). I hope that I can further

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

explain to them that from the scientific method, scientists also develop
very complex tools to test their hypothesis (seismographs and the
like) and that this will further their understanding of the nature of
science.
3. Breaking the curricular barriers here should be somewhat simple. I
believe a strong connection to the biology 20 curriculum will be made
with the fossil record and the theory of evolution being the one theory
inextricably linked with it. Social studies is a strong link as well. Natural
disasters such as earthquakes and eruptions have a massive effect on
the worlds civilizations. Pompeii is an example of an entire civilization
being wiped out and preserved by volcanic activity. Indigenous
knowing of our own land has a lot to do with what we are learning
about. How the native cultures used to view the land and philosophize
about its mechanisms are important to see. Finally, physics and
mathematics will tie in as well given the mathematical and physical
nature of scientific techniques such as carbon dating and
seismography.
POS Outcomes (the legitimate curriculum):

Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Knowledge


Students will:
GLO 1k. Describe and demonstrate methods used in the scientific
study of Earth and in observing and interpreting its component
materials

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

1. Investigate and interpret evidence that Earths surface undergoes


both gradual and sudden change (e.g., recognize earthquakes, volcanoes
and landslides as examples of sudden change; recognize glacial erosion and
river erosion as examples of gradual/incremental change)
2. Interpret models that show a layered structure for Earths interior;
and describe, in general terms, evidence for such models
3. Identify and explain the purpose of different tools and techniques
used in the study of Earth (e.g., describe and explain the use of
seismographs and coring drills, as well as tools and techniques for the close
examination of rocks; describe methods used in oil and gas exploration)
4. Explain the need for common terminology and conventions in
describing rocks and minerals, and apply suitable terms and conventions in
describing sample materials (e.g., use common terms in describing the
lustre, transparency, cleavage and fracture of rocks and minerals; apply the
Mohs scale in describing mineral hardness)

GLO 2k. Identify evidence for the rock cycle, and use the rock cycle
concept to interpret and explain the characteristics of particular
rocks
1. Distinguish between rocks and minerals
2. Describe characteristics of the three main classes of rocksigneous,
sedimentary and metamorphicand describe evidence of their
formation (e.g., describe evidence of igneous rock formation, based on
the study of rocks found in and around volcanoes; describe the role of
fossil evidence in interpreting sedimentary rock)
3. Describe local rocks and sediments, and interpret ways they may have
formed
4. Investigate and interpret examples of weathering, erosion and
sedimentation
GLO 3k. Investigate and interpret evidence of major changes in
landforms and the rock layers that underlie them
1. Investigate and interpret patterns in the structure and distribution of
mountain formations (e.g., describe and interpret mountain formations
of the North American cordillera)
2. Interpret the structure and development of fold and fault mountains
3. Describe evidence for crustal movement, and identify and interpret
patterns in these movements (e.g., identify evidence of earthquakes and

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

volcanic action along the Pacific Rim; identify evidence of the movement
of the Pacific plate relative to the North American plate)
4. Identify and interpret examples of gradual/incremental change, and
predict the results of those changes over extended periods of time
(e.g., identify evidence of erosion, and predict the effect of erosional
change over a year, century and millennium; project the effect of a
given rate of continental drift over a period of one million years)
GLO 4k. Describe, interpret and evaluate evidence from the fossil
record
1. Describe the nature of different kinds of fossils, and identify
hypotheses about their formation (e.g., identify the kinds of rocks
where fossils are likely to be found; identify the portions of living things
most likely to be preserved; identify possible means of preservation,
including replacement of one material by another and formation of
molds and casts)
2. Explain and apply methods used to interpret fossils (e.g., identify
techniques used for fossil reconstruction, based on knowledge of
current living things and findings of related fossils; identify examples of
petrified wood and bone)
3. Describe patterns in the appearance of different life forms, as indicated
by the fossil record (e.g., construct and interpret a geological time
scale; and describe, in general terms, the evidence that has led to its
development)
4. Identify uncertainties in interpreting individual items of fossil evidence;
and explain the role of accumulated evidence in developing accepted
scientific ideas, theories and explanations
Skill Outcomes (focus on scientific inquiry)
Initiating and Planning
Students will:
GLO 1s. Ask questions about the relationships between and among
observable variables, and plan investigations to address those
questions
1. Identify questions to investigate (e.g., How are rocks formed?)
2. Define and delimit questions to facilitate investigation (e.g., ask a
question about a sample group of rocks from a specific region, or about
a specific type of rock or rock formation)
3. State a prediction and a hypothesis based on background information
or an observed pattern of events (e.g., predict where an outcrop of a
given rock will appear, based on observations at nearby sites)

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

4. Formulate operational definitions of major variables and other aspects


of their investigations (e.g., define hardness by reference to a set of
mineral samples, or by reference to the Mohs scale of hardness)

Performing and Recording


Students will:
GLO 2s. Conduct investigations into the relationships between and
among observations, and gather and record qualitative and
quantitative data
1. Carry out procedures, controlling the major variables
2. Estimate measurements (e.g., estimate the thickness of sedimentary
layers)
3. Research information relevant to a given question (e.g., research
information regarding the effect of acid rain on the rate of rock
weathering)
4. Select and integrate information from various print and electronic
sources or from several parts of the same source (e.g., demonstrate
proficiency in uploading and downloading text, image, audio and video
files)
5. Organize data, using a format that is appropriate to the task or
experiment (e.g., use diagrams to show the shape and thickness of
different layers in a rock outcrop)
Analyzing and Interpreting
Students will:
GLO 3s. Analyze qualitative and quantitative data, and develop and
assess possible explanations
1. Use or construct a classification key (e.g., apply a classification key to
identify a group of rocks from a local gravel yard)
2. Interpret patterns and trends in data, and infer and explain
relationships among the variables (e.g., interpret example graphs of
seismic data, and explain the lag time between data received at
different locations)
3. Predict the value of a variable, by interpolating or extrapolating from
data (e.g., determine, in a stream table study, the quantity of sediment
carried over a half-hour period, then extrapolate the amount that
would be carried if the time were extended to a day, month, year or
millennium)

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

4. Identify and suggest explanations for discrepancies in data (e.g.,


suggest explanations for an igneous rock being found in a sedimentary
formation)
5. Identify new questions and problems that arise from what was learned
(e.g., identify new questions that arise after learning about plate
tectonics)
Communication and Teamwork
Students will:
GLO 4s. Work collaboratively on problems; and use appropriate
language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results
1. Work cooperatively with team members to develop and carry out a
plan, and troubleshoot problems as they arise (e.g., each group
member is assigned a task to investigate a particular mineral, and the
results are pooled in a common data table)
2. Evaluate individual and group processes used in planning, problem
solving, decision making and completing a task (e.g., evaluate the
relative success and scientific merits of an Earth science field trip
organized and guided by themselves)

Attitude Outcomes
Interest in Science
Students will be encouraged to:
Show interest in science-related questions and issues, and pursue personal
interests and career possibilities within science-related fields (e.g., recognize
potential careers related to Earth science fields; pursue interests in rocks,
through museum visits, personal collections or recreational reading)
Mutual Respect
Students will be encouraged to:
Appreciate that scientific understanding evolves from the interaction of ideas
involving people with different views and backgrounds (e.g., appreciate the
idea of Mother Earth, and recognize different forms of this idea developed
by different cultures; recognize the role of legend and myth in conveying
understandings about Earth; recognize that scientific ideas about Earth have
developed over time)
Scientific Inquiry

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Students will be encouraged to:


Seek and apply evidence when evaluating alternative approaches to
investigations, problems and issues (e.g., critically evaluate inferences and
conclusions, basing their arguments on facts rather than opinions; identify
evidence to support ideas; take the time to accurately gather evidence and
use instruments carefully)

Collaboration
Students will be encouraged to:
Work collaboratively in carrying out investigations and in generating and
evaluating ideas (e.g., listen to the ideas and points of view of others;
consider alternative ideas and interpretations suggested by members of the
group)
Stewardship
Students will be encouraged to:
Demonstrate sensitivity and responsibility in pursuing a balance between the
needs of humans and a sustainable environment (e.g., recognize that fossils
are a part of public heritage and that they should not be defaced or removed
from where they are found; consider the needs of other people and the
precariousness of the environment when making decisions and taking action)
Safety
Students will be encouraged to:
Show concern for safety in planning, carrying out and reviewing activities
(e.g., wear safety goggles when testing the cleavage or fracture of rocks;
ensure the proper disposal of materials)

Connection to POS (See appended my curriculum map):


I dont want to spend too much time on this as I have mainly covered it
throughout the rest of my unit plan. However, I do want to mention that I will
differentiate all my demos, labs and other activities based off of my
students input once I am in the classroom. They will, Im sure, have more

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

incredible feedback than I can give them credit for as far as activities
wanting to be completed. They should have input into what they want to be
graded on as far as the grade 7 curriculum allows. This will give insight into
what they need as well as what they desire out of this unit and will give me
guidance on how to provide it. I sincerely hope that I will be able to hear
every voice in that classroom and differentiate my instruction according to
them. This will ensure I make the lessons engaging and interesting with
respect to the curriculum as well as the students.

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Timeline:
Less
on #

Topics
addressed

Key
Questio
ns

G/SLOs and
curriculum
connections

Resources/
Assessme
activities or nts
materials

Homewor
k, extra
work and
guiding
Qs for
next
lesson

Extra
notes

1.

Introduction and
learn names game
Introduction to
Planet Earth
Discussion on Key
Question and
thoughts of what
we want to learn
throughout the
unit. Intro to
Edmodo

What is
the world
made of?

Chemistry
connection
(periodic table of
elements)

See appended
my unit
outline.

Edmodo reg.

Does the
ground stay
still?

First day

2.

Plate Tectonics
Wegeners Theory
of Continental Drift

If the
world
used to
look like
Pangea,
how did
it end up
like it is
now?

GLO 1.3k
GLO 1.2k
GLO 1.1k

Orange peel
mini
experiment

Exit Slip 1
Formative/Su
mmative

Where did
the Rocky
mountains
come from?
How do we
know what
is at the
centre of
the earth?

2 days

Earths
composition
- Strata
- Crust/mantle/c
ore

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Alfred
Wegener:
https://www.y
outube.com/w
atch?
v=kwfNGatxUJ
I

Sharon Pelech

Plate
Tectonics:
https://www.y
outube.com/w
atch?
v=nbU809Cyr
ao
Pangaea
https://www.y
outube.com/w
atch?v=pvNSqUy0l4

3.

Mountain
Formation
Faults and folds

How do
we know
what is
at the
centre of
the
earth?

Faults
are
constant
ly
moving.
Are the
Rockies
moving?

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

GLO 3.1,2k
GLO 3.3,3.4k

Class paper
mini demo
Mountains
Interactive
software:
https://ees.as.
uky.edu/sites/
default/files/el
earning/modul
e10swf.swf

Sharon Pelech

Where did
Hawaii
come from?

1 day

4.

Volcanoes
- Magma vs lava
- Giant Cooling
vents

How
does the
earth
let off
some
steam?

GLO 4.1,2s

Bill Nye
Youtube on
Volcanoes

https://www.y
outube.com/w
atch?
v=tfXGbzgGJ7
4

If the earth
is made of
orange
peels that
move, what
happens
when they
rub
together?

1 day

Prepare for
Volcano
research.

1 day

Demo: Mass
and pen
seismograph

5.

Earthquakes
- Richter Scales
- Plate rubbin
- P and S waves
- Rayleigh and
love waves

How do
we
prevent
earthqua
ke?
React to
them?
How do
they
occur?

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

GLO 1.3k

Elephant
toothpaste
volcano
Bill Nye:
https://www.y
outube.com/w
atch?
v=1qbg7orb1l
c

Exit Slip 2
Formative/Su
mmative

Earthquakes:
https://www.y
outube.com/w
atch?
v=_YLjIvJXhpg

Sharon Pelech

file:///C:/Users
/Tanner/Downl
oads/earthqua
kesgettingready.p
df
Class mini
demo with p
and s waves
(kids standing
at the front)
blanket vs
student
moving.

Oreo mini
demo?

6.

Researching
Volcanoes project

GLO 3.1,2,3,4,5s
GLO 2.1,2,3,4s
GLO 4.1,2s

Computer Lab

Volcano
Research
Project
Rubric

7.

Erosion
- Weathering
- Glacier erosion
- River erosion
- High Tide/Low

Why do
the
coulees
outside
my

GLO 1.1k
GLO 2.4k
GLO 3.4k

Class mini
demonstration
: Hitting your
hand against
your

Exit Slip 3
Formative

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Why do the
coulees
outside my
window
look the
way they
do? What
made them
appear?
Prepare for
the lab.
Read the
outline on
Edmodo

3 days

1-2 days

Tide
Ocean
weathering
and cave
formation

window
look the
way they
do? What
made
them
appear?

arm.will it
eventually cut
through it?

Faults
are
constant
ly
moving.
Are the
Rockies
moving?
What
about
erosion?
8.

Erosion lab

GLO 2.1,2,3,4s
GLO 3.1,2,3,4,5s
GLO 4.1,2s

9.

Quiz

N/A

N/A

N/A

Chemistry
connection
(periodic table of
elements)
Health
connections to
essential minerals
GLO1.3k

10. Minerals and their

characteristics
- Mohs
Hardness scale
- Lustre,
cleavage etc.

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sand/Dirt
Funnels
Water
Paddles
N/A

Lab Rubric

Quiz 1

N/A

Bring in rock
collection

Exit Slip 4
Formative/Su
mmative

Bring in
your own
rock
tomorrow?
Where do
we get new
rocks from?

Sharon Pelech

1 day

2 days (1
review)
1 day

GLO1.4k

11. Rock Cycle


-

Sedimentary
Caused by
compaction or
cementation
Metamorphic
Cause by heat
or pressure
(diagram in
text)

Igneous
Made by
cooled magma
or lava.

Born from
seafloor
spreading or
volcanic
eruption

12. Rock Cycle

Where do
rocks
come
from?
What are
they
made of

GLO 2.1,2,3k

Demo:
Cooling
melted
something
(crayons etc)

Exit Slip 5
Formative/su
mmative

N/A

Likely will
take more
than one
day

Lab
sheet/rubric

Finish
Experiment
sheet

Another
day to
discuss the
nature of
science in
this lab and
the lab in
general?

Demo:
Rock
collection
gallery (FNMI
connection
Obsidian
arrowheads as
hunting
materials)

experiment

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

GLO 4.1,2s

Crayons
and some
method of
destroying
them
(cheese
graters or
potato

Sharon Pelech

peelers)
Heat
source for
melting
- Aluminum
foil
- Sample
Lesson 1
- Procedure
- Experimen
t sheets
Smithsonian
map on family
heritages.

Only if
possible,
Otherwise,
only one
day.

13. Fossil Records (the


theory of
evolution)
- Sedimentary
rocks
connection
- Compaction
- Decomposition

14. Unit Exam

Who is
your
greatgreatgreat
grandfat
her? How
do we
know
how old
things
are?
N/A

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Connection to Bio
20
GLO 4.1,2,3,4k

Exit slip 9 Formative

N/A

Two classes
for full
comprehen
sion of
fossil
theory
implications

Unit Exam 1
not
completed
yet

N/A

2 Days (1
Review)

Bring in my
own fossil
collection

N/A

N/A

Sharon Pelech

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Resources:
Documentary on volcanoes and volcanic activity across the world
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LB8DLqQXREM
Plate Tectonic video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwfNGatxUJI
Alfred Wegener video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nbU809Cyrao
Pangaea pop-up book video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p-vNSqUy0l4
Mountain formation interactive website:
https://ees.as.uky.edu/sites/default/files/elearning/module10swf.swf
Famous literature on earth science:
Principles of Geology by Charles Lyell:
Lyell, C. (1864). Principles of geology; or, The modern changes of earth and its
inhabitants considered as illustrative of geology. D. Appleton.
Krakatoa by Simon Winchester:
Winchester, S. (2003). Krakatoa: The day the world exploded, August 27, 1883 (1st
U.S. ed.). New York: Harper-Collins.
Bill Nye on Volcanoes:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfXGbzgGJ74
Discovery Education lesson plan on earthquake planning:
http://www.discoveryeducation.com/teachers/free-lesson-plans/earthquakes-gettingready-for-the-big-one.cfm
Giant Shake Table
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duzcOkzwpDo
Earths Interior video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mWQs1_L3fA
Bill Nye on Earthquakes and the Richter scale
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qbg7orb1lc
Scientists see sea floor with sonar
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-fAAxEIFeLU

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Lesson
Title/Focus

Crayon Rocks

Date

5/9/2015

Subject/Gra
de Level

Grade 7 science

Time
Durati
on

40 minutes

Unit

Planet Earth

Teache
r

Mr. Bexson

OUTCOMES FROM ALBERTA PROGRAM OF STUDIES


General
Learning
Outcomes:

GLO 2k. Identify evidence for the rock cycle, and use the rock cycle
concept to interpret and explain the characteristics of particular
rocks
GLO 1s. Ask questions about the relationships between and among
observable variables, and plan investigations to address those
questions.
GLO 4a. Work collaboratively on problems; and use appropriate
language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results
Attitudes. Collaboration
Safety

Specific
Learning
Outcomes:

SLO 2.1k. Distinguish between rocks and minerals


SLO 2.2k. Describe characteristics of the three main classes of rocks
igneous, sedimentary and metamorphicand describe evidence of
their formation
SLO 1.1s. Identify questions to investigate
SLO 1.3s. State a prediction and a hypothesis based on background
information or an observed pattern of events
SLO 4.1s. Work cooperatively with team members to develop and
carry out a plan, and troubleshoot problems as they arise
SLO 4.2s. Evaluate individual and group processes used in planning,
problem solving, decision making and completing a task
SLO 4a. Students will be encouraged to: Work collaboratively in
carrying out investigations and in generating and evaluating ideas
SLO 6a. Students will be encouraged to: Show concern for safety in
planning, carrying out and reviewing activities

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1. Students will identify characteristics of rocks that make them different from
minerals (SLO 2.1k, SLO 1.1s)
2. Students will describe the formation process of igneous, metamorphic and
sedimentary rocks (SLO 2.2k, SLO 1.1s, SLO 1.3s)
3. Students will work collaboratively and follow safety procedures to ensure
experiment is completed soundly and safely (SLO 4a, SLO 6a, SLO 4.2s, 4.1s)

ASSESSMENTS

Observations:

Key Questions:
Products/Performan
ces:

Students are collaborating to create their rock cycles (LO


1,3)
Students are ensuring collaboration between members
and safety procedures are met (LO 3)
Students are understanding the connection between the
experiment and the actual rock cycle (LO 2)
Where do rocks come from?
How are rocks formed?
Experiment Sheet
Experiment Completed

LEARNING RESOURCES CONSULTED


Alberta Ed Program of Studies
http://www.education.com/sciencefair/article/crayon-rock-cycle/

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT


Crayons of various colors (5
packages)
Cheese graters/scissors
Tin foil or foil cupcake holders
Heat resistant gloves
Heat source
Wax Paper

PROCEDURE
Introduction

Time
(min)

Attention Grabber

Everyone sitting in pairs with their materials quietly.

Assessment of
Prior Knowledge

Everyone have any questions about the experiment


prior to beginning it? Experiment procedure was
posted on Edmodo and should have been reviewed for
today.

Expectations for
Learning and
Behaviour

Review Safety issues


-

Advance
Organizer/Agenda

30 s

When using graters or cutters use precaution and


get an adult to help for the last little bit
Get an adult to help with any heat related parts of
the experiment.
Wear goggles and gloves to avoid cuts burns,
particulate in the eye etc.

Experiment procedure printed and posted

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

1 min

1 min

n/a

Sharon Pelech

Transition to Body

Please begin the experiment.

n/a

Body
Procedure

1.

Time
(min)

Remove the paper around each crayon in the


box and throw it away, so only the colorful wax
is left. Set the crayons on a sheet of wax
paper.

35 min

2.

Observelook carefullyat your crayons.


What shape are they? How do they feel?
They're now in the igneous rock stage. (Record
this on the experiment sheet).
3. Label the first column on your experiment
sheet Igneous Rock. List all the things you
noticed about the crayon earlier. For example,
you may write that the "igneous rock" feels
smooth and hard. If it'll help you remember,
draw a picture of your "igneous" crayons in
your notebook.
4.

Set your cheese grater on top of the wax


paper and start grating your crayons, being
careful not to cut your finger. Have an adult
help you when the crayon gets small; you'll be
left with a pile of crayon shavings.

5.

Label the second column on your experiment


sheet Sedimentary Rock. List everything you
observe about the crayon shavings. How are
they different than crayons? Do they stick
together, or fall apart? Write your notes and
draw any pictures in your second column.

6.

Scoop the crayon shavings in a pile and press


down on them for 60 seconds. The crayons
should stay together, but in layers. Your
crayons have now entered the metamorphic
rock phase!

7.

Write Metamorphic Rock in the third column


of your experiment sheet. Again, you will need
to list everything you notice about the crayons,
including the way they look, feel and smell.
You may notice that crayons have bonded
together in layers, but aren't really smooth or

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

completely one rock. There may be some


jagged edges, etc.
8.

9.

With the help of an adult, place your


metamorphic rock into a tinfoil holder and melt
the
Set the crayons aside to cool.

10. When the crayons are cool enough to touch,


examine them. What do they look like? Are
they smooth, hard, rough or soft? Ask yourself
this time what you should label the fourth
column of your experiment sheet (what kind of
rock has your crayon rock become now?).
Assessments/
Differentiation:

Observations: Students completing experiment


collaboratively and safely.
Observations: Students making connections between
experiment and actual rock cycle.
Closure

n/a

Time
(min)

Assessment of
Learning:

Product: Experiment sheet

Feedback From
Students:

Edmodo: Comments on the lab. Positives things that


went well, negatives things I could improve upon.
Did it help understand the rock cycle?

1 min

Feedback To
Students

Comments on positives exhibited during the lab and


the things learned, is there anything that is still
unclear about rock cycles?

1 min

Transition To Next
Lesson

Bring your sheet to class tomorrow, well need it to


discuss.

Reflections from
the lesson

n/a

Performance: Experiment performed

30 s

TBD

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Name: _____________________
Date: ______________________

Experiment Sheet Crayon rocks


Mr. Bexson: Grade 7 Earth Science

Question:
Where do rocks come from? How are they formed?
Procedure: (see the other posted or printed page for the procedure)
Data and Analysis:
Phase 1:

Phase 2:

Phase 3:

Phase 4:

________________
________________

________________
________________

________________
________________

________________
________________

Picture:

Picture:

Picture:

Picture:

Observations:

Observations:

Observations:

Observations:

Discussion: What has this experiment shown you about how rocks are formed? Is
there a place on earth that simply makes rocks like a factory, or is there more to it
than that? Explain your answer.
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Conclusion: How are rocks formed?
_______________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Experiment Grading Rubric


Level
Criteria

Quality of
observations
and
illustrations in
lab sheet (x2)

Quality and
depth of
discussion
(x2)

Quality of
conclusion
(x1)

Excelle
nt

Profici
ent

Adequat
e

Limited
*

Student
observation
s are
correct,
thoughtful
and logical

Student
observatio
ns are
logical
and
correct

Student
observations
are correct
but lack
thought

Student
observation
s are
incorrect
or too
vague to
understand

Student
illustrations
are neat,
correct
and
beautifull
y show the
phase
described

Student
illustrations
are neat,
correct
and
accuratel
y show the
phase
described

Student
illustrations
are messy
but
accurately
show the
phase
described

Student
illustrations
are vague,
incoherent
and do not
accurately
show the
phase
described

Student
discussion
elegantly
explains
how rocks
are formed
and where
they come
from

Student
discussion
accuratel
y explains
how rocks
are formed
and where
they come
from

Student
discussion
moderately
explains how
rocks are
formed and
where they
come from

Student
discussion
barely
explains
how rocks
are formed
and where
they come
from

Student
conclusion
states
precisely
the answer
to the
question of
the
experiment

Student
conclusion
states
accuratel
y the
answer to
the
question of
the
experiment

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Student
conclusion
states
vaguely the
answer to
the question
of the
experiment

Student
conclusion
does not
really
answer to
the question
of the
experiment

Insufficie
nt / Blank
*

No score is
awarded
because there
is insufficient
evidence of
student
performance
based on the
requirements
of the
assessment
task.

No score is
awarded
because there
is insufficient
evidence of
student
performance
based on the
requirements
of the
assessment
task.

No score is
awarded
because there
is insufficient
evidence of
student
performance
based on the
requirements
of the
assessment
task.

Sharon Pelech

* When work is judged to be limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate intervention to
help the student improve.

Lesson
Title/Focus

Erosion Lab

Date

5/9/2015

Subject/Gra
de Level

Grade 7 science

Time
Durati
on

40 minutes

Unit

Planet Earth

Teache
r

Mr. Bexson

OUTCOMES FROM ALBERTA PROGRAM OF STUDIES


General
Learning
Outcomes:

GLO 1k. Describe and demonstrate methods used in the


scientific study of Earth and in observing and interpreting its
component materials
GLO 2k. Identify evidence for the rock cycle, and use the rock
cycle concept to interpret and explain the characteristics of
particular rocks
GLO 3k. Investigate and interpret evidence of major changes in
landforms and the rock layers that underlie them
GLO 2s. Conduct investigations into the relationships between
and among observations, and gather and record qualitative
and quantitative data

Specific
Learning
Outcomes:

SLO 1.1k Investigate and interpret evidence that Earths


surface undergoes both gradual and sudden change
SLO 2.4k Investigate and interpret examples of weathering,
erosion and sedimentation
SLO 3.4k Identify and interpret examples of
gradual/incremental change, and predict the results of those
changes over extended periods of time
SLO 2.1s Carry out procedures, controlling the major variables
SLO 2.2s Estimate measurements
SLO 2.5s Organize data, using a format that is appropriate to
the task or experiment

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1. Students will replicate the effects of erosion (SLO 1.1k, 2.1s)
2. Students will organize, analyze and interpret their observations (SLO 2.4k, 3.4k,
2.2s, 2.5s)
3. Students will make predictions on future effects of erosion (SLO 3.4k)

ASSESSMENTS
Observations:

Key Questions:
Products/Performan
ces:

Students carrying out needed procedures ( LO 1)


Students making connections between lab and real world
implications (LO 1,2,3)
Students interpreting observations logically (LO 2)
Students making sound predictions of what implications
this might have on real world phenomena (LO 3)
What does erosion do to, literally, everything?
What does it effect? How will it affect it?
Experiment Sheet
Lab Performance

LEARNING RESOURCES CONSULTED


Alberta Ed Program of Studies
https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=ZNJe6hrdL3M

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT

Lasagna trays (5-7)


Sand (enough)
Water
Paddles (makeshift will do)
Funnels
Rulers
Experiment sheets for all students

PROCEDURE
Introduction

Time
(min)

Attention Grabber

Walk to lab

Assessment of
Prior Knowledge

Review lab procedure (should have been done on


Edmodo)

1 min

Expectations for
Learning and
Behaviour

Review lab safety and etiquette

1 min

Advance
Organizer/Agenda

N/A (Edmodo)

N/A

Transition to Body

Begin the lab

N/A

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

30s

Sharon Pelech

Body

Time
(min)

Procedure

35 min
Group A (River) Mr. Bexson
1. Look at your scenario. What setting does this
represent? A beach? A lake? What time of year
might it be? Spring? Winter? Summer? Record
your observations.
2. Take the funnel and carefully pour water into it
over the toothpick. Observe. Do this repeatedly
(rotate people pouring and holding the funnel).
Record what is happening.
3. Write down what you notice is happening in
your scenario as you continue pouring.
4. After 5-10 minutes of pouring, you may stop.
5. What do you notice? Has there been any
deposition on the coast (where the river meets
the ocean). Has there been any disturbance on
the land
6. The initial depth of the river was about x.y cm
deep. Measure it again, how deep is it now?
7. Record any additional observations you found.
Group B (Ocean) EA
1. Look at your scenario. What setting does this
represent? A beach? A lake? What time of year
might it be? Spring? Winter? Summer? Record
your observations.
2. Take the paddle provided and simulate waves
by moving it back and forth carefully! Continue
to paddle back and forth (rotate people
paddling)
3. Record what you notice is happening to the
earth. Think: Could this be how caves are
formed?
4. After 5-10 minutes of paddling, you may stop.
5. What do you notice? Has there been any
erosion or weathering? Any deposition?
6. The initial height of the earth was x.y cm high,
what is it now?
7. Record any additional observations you found.
Group C (Waterfall)
1. Look at your scenario. What setting does this
represent? A beach? A lake? What time of year
might it be? Spring? Summer? Winter?
2. Take the funnel and carefully pour water into it
over the toothpick. Observe. Do this repeatedly
(rotate people pouring and holding the funnel).

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Record what is happening.


3. Write down what you notice is happening in
your scenario as you continue pouring.
4. After 5-10 minutes of pouring you may stop.
5. What do you notice? Has there been any
erosion or weathering? Any deposition?
6. There was originally no earth on the bottom of
the cliff. About how much is there now? (Record
your answer in cm)
7. Record any additional observations you found.
Assessments/
Differentiation:

Observations: Students follow procedures


collaboratively and soundly. Students making
connections between this and real life. Students
making logical observations, interpretations and
conclusions.

N/A

Closure

Time
(min)

Assessment of
Learning:

Product: Experiment Sheet (Summative)

Feedback From
Students:

Post on Edmodo positive things about the lab


experience and areas in which I can improve.

Feedback To
Students

Great work, I will support you as much as needed for


the experiment sheet.

Transition To Next
Lesson

Get ready for next class.

Reflections from
the lesson

N/A

Performance: Experiment performance (Informal)

1 min
1 min
30 secs

Important note: If needed, could add a mountain scenario and use a


squirt bottle to simulate rainfall and wind and use toothpicks to
simulate trees. Might give better insight into the various ways
erosion happens and not just running water.

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Name:

Experiment Sheet Sample (Group B)

Date:
Science Erosion Lab

Mr. Bexson Science 7 Earth

Question: What are the effects of erosion, weathering and deposition?

Procedure & Analysis:


Group B - Ocean
1. Look at your scenario. What setting does this represent? A beach? A lake? What time
of year might it be? Spring? Winter? Summer? Record your observations.
______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________
2. Take the paddle provided and simulate waves by moving it back and forth carefully!
Continue to paddle back and forth (rotate people paddling)
3. Record what you notice is happening to the earth. Think: Could this be how caves
are formed?
______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________
4. After 5-10 minutes of paddling, you may stop.
5. What do you notice? Has there been any erosion or weathering? Any deposition?
______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
____
6. The initial height of the earth was x.y cm high, what is it now?
____________________________________________

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

7. Record any additional observations you found.


______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
____

Discussion:
From step 3, explain why you thought whether or not caves could be formed via this
method.
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________

From step 5, explain why you thought erosion, weathering or deposition was
happening or why it was not.
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
From step 6, if you experienced a change, state what this measurement proves.
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Finally, from step 7, explain why any additional observations you made might be
important.
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Conclusion: What happens to materials when they are exposed to the elements
such as rain, running water, wind or ocean waves?
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Experiment Grading Rubric


Level
Criteria

Quality of
observations
and
illustrations in
lab sheet (x2)

Quality and
depth of
discussion
(x2)

Excelle
nt

Profici
ent

Adequat
e

Limited
*

Student
observation
s are
correct,
thoughtful
and logical

Student
discussion
elegantly
explains
their
situation

Student
observatio
ns are
logical
and
correct

Student
discussion
accuratel
y explains
their
situation

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Student
observations
are correct
but lack
thought

Student
discussion
moderately
explains their
situation

Student
observation
s are
incorrect
or too
vague to
understand

Student
discussion
barely
explains
their
situation

Insufficie
nt / Blank
*
No score is
awarded
because there
is insufficient
evidence of
student
performance
based on the
requirements
of the
assessment
task.
No score is
awarded
because there
is insufficient
evidence of
student
performance
based on the
requirements
of the
assessment
task.

Sharon Pelech

Quality of
conclusion
(x1)

Student
conclusion
states
precisely
the answer
to the
question of
the
experiment

Student
conclusion
states
accuratel
y the
answer to
the
question of
the
experiment

Student
conclusion
states
vaguely the
answer to
the question
of the
experiment

No score is
awarded
because there
is insufficient
evidence of
student
performance
based on the
requirements
of the
assessment
task.

Student
conclusion
does not
really
answer to
the question
of the
experiment

* When work is judged to be limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate intervention to
help the student improve.

Lesson
Title/Focus

Earthquake planning

Date

5/9/2015

Subject/Gra
de Level

Grade 7 science

Time
Durati
on

3 lessons

Unit

Planet Earth

Teache
r

Mr. Bexson

OUTCOMES FROM ALBERTA PROGRAM OF STUDIES


General
Learning
Outcomes:

GLO 3k. Investigate and interpret evidence of major


changes in landforms and the rock layers that underlie
them
GLO 4s. Work collaboratively on problems; and use
appropriate language and formats to communicate
ideas, procedures and results
GLO 2s. Conduct investigations into the relationships
between and among observations, and gather and
record qualitative and quantitative data

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Specific
Learning
Outcomes:

SLO 3.4k. Describe evidence for crustal movement, and


identify and interpret patterns in these movements (e.g.,
identify evidence of earthquakes and volcanic action along the
Pacific Rim; identify evidence of the movement of the Pacific
plate relative to the North American plate)
SLO 4.1s. Work cooperatively with team members to develop
and carry out a plan, and troubleshoot problems as they arise
(e.g., each group member is assigned a task to investigate a
particular mineral, and the results are pooled in a common
data table)
SLO 2.3s. Research information relevant to a given question
(e.g., research information regarding the effect of acid rain on
the rate of rock weathering)
SLO 2.4s. Select and integrate information from various print
and electronic sources or from several parts of the same
source (e.g., demonstrate proficiency in uploading and
downloading text, image, audio and video files)

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1. Understand the different types of earthquake waves and the impact they

can have. (SLO 3.4k)


2. Understand why an earthquake can affect different parts of a city in

different ways. (SLO 3.4k, 2.3s)


3. Understand the importance of taking substrate and construction design into

consideration when preparing a city for an earthquake. (SLO 4.1s, 2.3s)


4. Work collaboratively to assess research material and interpret data. (SLO

2.3s, 2.4s, 4.1s)


ASSESSMENTS
Observations:

Key Questions:

Students researching valuable information(LO 2,3,4)


Students interpreting information correctly (LO 2,3)
Students working collaboratively (LO 4)
Students understanding the various effects of earthquakes
on civilization (LO 1)
What effect does an earthquake have on
civilization?
What causes an earthquake and why is it so deadly?

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Products/Performan
ces:

Mini-Presentation on Earthquake scenario and


solution.
Research paper

LEARNING RESOURCES CONSULTED

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT

Alberta Ed Program of Studies


Computers
file:///C:/Users/Tanner/Downloads/earthquake Pens pencils
s-gettingready.pdf
Prior knowledge of earthquakes
Activity sheets for class

PROCEDURE
Introduction

Time
(min)

Attention Grabber

Call for attention

N/A

Assessment of Prior
Knowledge

Open discussion about earthquakes questions about


Edmodo postings.

Expectations for
Learning and
Behaviour

Work quietly and collaboratively

30s

Advance
Organizer/Agenda

N/A (postings on Edmodo)

N/A

Transition to Body

Begin

N/A
Body

Procedure

2
mins

Time
(min)

1. Discuss with students where earthquakes are mostly


likely to occur. If they dont know, they can look at a map
of earthquake hot spots or at the Java Earthquake Globe
at
http://www.crustal.ucsb.edu/ics/understanding/globe/glob
e.html. If students live near one of these areas, discuss
life in earthquake country.

2 - 40
minut
e
perio
ds

2. Before proceeding with the activity, make sure that


students have a basic understanding of plate tectonics
and the relationship between plate movements and
earthquakes. To guide the discussion, review the
following questions:
What are tectonic plates?
What are faults?
What relationships do tectonic plates and faults have
with earthquakes?
What is the Richter scale? What do the numbers on the
Richter scale mean?

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

What is the difference between P waves and S waves?


What are Love and Rayleigh waves, and why are they
more destructive than P and S waves?
What is the relationship between soil type and
susceptibility to damage from an earthquake?
If they need to review this subject, they can browse
through available reference materials or the Web sites
listed below.
Life Along the Faultline (link to Why the Earth Shakes:
Seismic Science):
http://www.exploratorium.com/faultline
This Dynamic Earth: The Story of Plate Tectonics:
http://pubs.usgs.gov/publications/text/dynamic.html
Earthquakes and Plate Tectonics:
http://wwwneic.cr.usgs.gov/neis/plate_tectonics/rift_man.
html
Plate Tectonics, the Cause of Earthquakes:
http://www.seismo.unr.edu/ftp/pub/louie/class/100/platetectonics.html
3. Ask students if they remember hearing about any
particular earthquakes. Where did these earthquakes
occur? What were the consequences? What types of
structural damage resulted? If any of your students have
ever been in an earthquake, ask them to briefly share
their experiences with the class. Help students
understand that two major factors contribute to the level
of earthquake damage: (a) construction design and
quality and (b) the type and magnitude of the waves that
an earthquake emits.
4. Divide the class into small groups of approximately
four students each. Give each group the Classroom
Activity Sheet: Planning for an Earthquake. Ask them to
read and discuss the scenario and to carefully follow the
directions to create proposals for the city government.
Their proposals should include the following components:
- An introductory paragraph that explains why its
important to consider the different types of soil and
construction in a city located near an earthquake fault
- An analysis of the impact of an earthquake on different
neighborhoods of the city
- A map of the city with its neighborhoods numbered in

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

order of priority. Include buildings at greatest risk.


- A discussion of the different types of waves that could
hit the area and why some are more destructive than
others
- A discussion of the types of buildings that face the
greatest risk from earthquake damage
- A discussion of modern construction techniques that
could help protect buildings and bridges from earthquake
damage
- A closing paragraph that summarizes what the city
should do to minimize its earthquake risk and to make
each of its neighborhoods safer
5. Students should be able to find information in print
resources and at the following Web sites:
Life Along the Faultline (link to Why the Earth Shakes:
Seismic Science and
Building for the Big One):
http://www.exploratorium.com/faultline
Earthquakes! http://whyfiles.org/094quake/index.html
Earthquake Hazards and Preparedness:
http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/hazprep/index.html
Soils and Earthquakes:
http://mceer.buffalo.edu/education/exercises/soil.asp
Designing Structures To Perform Well During an
Earthquake:
http://mceer.buffalo.edu/education/exercises/struct.asp
Liquefaction Hazards:
http://www.abag.ca.gov/bayarea/eqmaps/liquefac/liquefa
c.html
6. Have each group share its assessment with the class.
Did the groups come up with similar proposals? What
neighborhoods do they think are the most at risk and
why? Do they all agree on the riskiest neighborhood?
Would they like to be in the position to assess a real
citys earthquake risks? Why or why not? Refer to the
Scenario Fact Sheet for clues about what students might
discover.
7. Assign the Take Home Activity Sheet: Write a Letter for
homework. Ask students to choose one of the two
highest-priority neighborhoods of their fictitious city and
write a letter to its residents. The letter should inform
residents of the reasons why their neighborhood is at

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

risk, describe what might happen to their homes during


the next earthquake, and provide some
recommendations for minimizing their risk. This activity
is a logical extension of the proposal that students
completed and provides them with an opportunity to
consolidate their thinking and practice persuasive writing
techniques.
Assessments/
Differentiation:

Observations: Students doing valuable research


Students making connections between classroom
material and real world scenarios

N/A

Students working together


Students inquiring about further discourse in the subject
Closure
Assessment of
Learning:

Time
(min)

Product/performance: Mini Presentation and research


paper.

One
40
minut
e
class

Feedback From
Students:

Postings on Edmodo, positives and improvements that


can be made to the assignment.

N/A

Feedback To
Students

Postings on Edmodo giving positive feedback and more


leading questions to further learning.

N/A

Transition To Next
Lesson

N/A

N/A

Reflections from
the lesson

TBD

Research Project Rubric

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Excelle
nt

Profici
ent

Adequat
e

Limited
*

Group
research
shows
considera
ble effort

Group
research
shows
good effort

Group
research
shows some
effort

Group
research
shows
minimal
effort

Group
information
is
beautifull
y organized

Group
information
is well
organized

Group
information
is simply
organized

Group
information
is poorly
organized

Paper
shows a
terrific
connection
to the class
material

Paper
shows a
thorough
connection
to the
class
material

Paper shows
an
apparent
connection
to the class
material

Paper shows
a poor
connection
to the class
material

Level
Criteria

Quality of
research and
organization
of information
and shows a
strong
connection of
real life to
class content
(x3)

Quality of
engagement
and
presentation
of findings
(x1)

Student
discussion
elegantly
explains
their
research
findings

Student
discussion
accuratel
y explains
their
research
findings

Student
discussion
moderately
explains their
research
findings

Student
discussion
barely
explains
their
research
findings

Insufficie
nt / Blank
*

No score is
awarded
because there
is insufficient
evidence of
student
performance
based on the
requirements
of the
assessment
task.

No score is
awarded
because there
is insufficient
evidence of
student
performance
based on the
requirements
of the
assessment
task.

Assessments (see appended my Ed3604 Unit assessment plan as


well as rubrics in lesson plans):
Sample Exit Slips

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Lesson #1 Name:_______________________

Why was Wegeners Theory of Plate Tectonics rejected?

Does the ground move? If so, why and how much per year?

What is something you want me (Mr. Bexson) to do to improve upon to help


your learning?

Lesson #2 Name:_______________________

Where did the Rocky Mountains come from?

Are the Rocky Mountains moving? If so, why?

What is something you want me (Mr. Bexson) to do to improve upon to help


your learning?

Lesson #3 Name:______________________

Erosion, weathering and deposition all have considerable impacts upon our
planet. What is a

What is something you want me (Mr. Bexson) to do to improve upon to help


your learning?

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

UNIT E: Earth Science Quiz (Sample Quiz)


Grade 7 Science Mr. Bexson
The quiz is meant to take all class. It consists of 10 multiple
choice and 3 short answer questions. Good Luck!
Multiple Choice Questions

/10

1. What is the outermost layer of the Earths composition?


A. Inner Mantle
B. Core
C. Outer Mantle
D. Crust
2. What is the phenomenon called that defines the gradual destruction of soil, rock or
other material through constant contact with wind, water or other natural agents?
A. Deposition
B. Erosion
C. Destruction
D. Wearing away
3. How come Wegeners Theory of Continental Drift was rejected even though it was
correct?
A. Because his father would not let him publish the theory
B. Because at the time, the theory was incorrect
C. Because he had no way to prove that the continents were actually moving
D. Because there was no evidence that volcanoes were actually functional
E. All of the above
4. Which answer best describes how our Earths crust is shaped?
A. Like orange peels put back on an orange
B. Like an oreo with three layers
C. Like an egg shell with many layers but no cracks
D. All three of the above answers work as descriptions for our Earths crust
5. Before it comes out of a volcano and is released from beneath the Earths surface
1._________ is first called 2.___________.
A. 1. Lava 2. Metamorphic rock
B. 1. Magma 2. Lava
C. 1. Lava 2. Magma
D. 1. Igneous rock 2. Lava

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Use the illustration to the right to


answer the following 2 questions (6
& 7).
6. What kind of phenomenon is
demonstrated in the illustration to
the right?
A. A fault
B. A tectonic fold
C. A strike-slip
D. A divergent boundary
7. Which of the following is a real life example of this?
A. The Rocky Mountains
B. Mount Everest
C. Antarctica
D. None of these
8. A volcano could best be described as:
A. A giant cooling vent for the Earth to let out some of its heat.
B. A lava factory that creates its own lava by melting rocks inside the earth
C. A land creator that does nothing but make land by spewing lava which eventually
cools and forms solid land
D. None of the above
9. What kind of mechanism brings hot substance from the middle of the Earth to the
surface through its mantle in a circular pattern?
A. Inflation
B. Convection Current
C. Atmospheric Current
D. Heating
10. How does a theory in science become proven. What needs to happen in order for
scientists everywhere to agree that one theory is a satisfactory explanation of
something (much like Thomas Wegeners theory).
A. It needs to be logical, well thought-out and convincing.
B. It needs to be thought of by someone who has spent many years studying the
subject
C. It needs to have convincing and real-world evidence that supports it, preferably a
lot of it.
D. It needs to make people happy and rich.

Short answer questions

/6

Explain why earthquakes occur. (Hint: There are 2 reasons) (2 marks)

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
With your knowledge of volcanoes and plate tectonics, explain how Hawaii might have been
formed, given that it has a volcano on its first island. (2 marks)
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Explain why the giant rock of Newfoundland may not be around forever given that it is
surrounded by the ocean. (2 marks)
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________

/16

Appendix: (Course outline, curriculum


map and Unit Assessment Portfolio).

UNIT D: Planet Earth


Outline
Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Grade 7 Science Mr. Bexson


Introduction:
Welcome! I am Mr. Bexson and I will be teaching your unit on Planet
Earth for the coming 6 weeks. I am very excited to start this learning
experience with you and support you in your further learning! The unit we
will be working with is all about the science of the earth. In it, we will discuss
various topics such as plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, rocks &
minerals, erosion and mountains. During the unit we will also discuss much
about how science works itself, and much about how this field of study
affects the daily world. Lastly, we will also engage in hands-on lab
experiments, research and study of current events. If you have any questions
at any point, please feel free to ask me whenever.
Topics:

Plate Tectonics
Earths Composition
Mountains
Erosion
Volcanoes

Earthquakes
Minerals
The Fossil Record
The Rock Cycle

Homework and assignments (or, how I will help your


learning and assess it):

Normally, I will ask you a think-hard question after every lesson. This
will not be for marks but is required to at least give some thought to
these questions as I will ask the class what your thoughts on these
questions are in order to fuel further discussion as well as your learning of
the unit material.
After every lesson (dont worry, that does not mean every day!) I will
assign a quick exit slip assignment. There will be about 9 or 10 of them
depending on how far we get during my stay with you. Your answers will
not be graded, but your completion of them will be.
There will hopefully be 2 lab experiments
There will hopefully be 2 projects that will require research into a topic
you are interested in and collaboration with fellow classmates to
overcome problems
There will be one quiz and one unit exam

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Edmodo (or, Facebook for school):

During this unit I would like to engage you all in an online


software program called www.Edmodo.com .

It resembles Facebook a lot but is meant for us to collaborate as


a class together, ask questions, discuss topics, post related content (such as
videos, articles or other cool and interesting things) and help me get
messages and files out to you. On Edmodo, I will post all think-hard
questions, assignments, material from the day, interesting videos and
rubrics for projects and labs. You are also welcome to post any related and
appropriate content yourselves as you see fit. You send your own messages
or content only to me where only I can read it, or to the entire class.

How to sign up

1. Simply go to www.Edmodo.com and click on students


2. Under Group code, type in xku54b, then type in your information.
3. Voila! You are part of Edmodo!

Important: All posted content on Edmodo MUST be


related to course material, appropriate, positive, and may not under
any circumstances be used to insult, demean or otherwise abuse the
website or any of its users. If that should happen, you will be removed
from Edmodo immediately and will have to receive content via another
method.

Other things:
-

I am a student teacher, which means I am learning how to be a teacher


but, I am still your teacher and you are the students. I am here to help
you learn and support you throughout your learning. Having said that, if
you ever have any questions, need any support or think anything that I
do is ever unfair, let me know and I will be happy to discuss it with you.

Although this is a unit outline, the course outline provided by Ms. Angle
still holds and anything mentioned there is still valid for this unit,
including behavioural expectations.

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

You will still get Jolly Ranchers if the strike board is clear of any strikes!

Be inquisitive, be curious, have fun with the unit, ask as many questions
as you can and put in the effort required and I am certain you will be
successful.

Tanner Bexson ED3601 Unit Plan

Sharon Pelech

Curriculum Map: (If you are having a hard time reading it,
zooming in with CNTRL+scrolling worked for me, otherwise

contact me and I will get it to you via image)

Stage 1 Desired Results

Established Goals:

GLO 1: Investigate and interpret evidence of major changes in landforms and the
rock layers that underlie them

GLO 2: Work collaboratively on problems; and use appropriate language and


formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results

Understandings:

Students will understand


that

The Earths crust is comprised of


different plate tectonics
Earths crust is a dynamic system
that is always moving and colliding
Earth itself is a hot, dynamic system
with many constituent parts
Collaboration and teamwork is
essential in science, especially to
overcome natural disasters such as
earthquakes or eruptions

Essential Questions:

Does the ground move?


Where do rocks come from?
Why do Coulees look the way they do?
Where did Hawaii come from?
What is the benefit to collaboration in
science?

Students will know

3. Investigate and interpret


patterns in the structure and
distribution of mountain
formations

Students will be able to do

3. Work cooperatively with team members


to develop and carry out a plan, and
troubleshoot problems as they arise
4. Evaluate individual and group

4. Interpret the structure and


development of fold and fault
mountains

processes used in planning, problem


solving, decision making and
completing a task

5. Describe evidence for crustal

movement, and identify and


interpret patterns in these
movements

6. Identify and interpret examples of


gradual/incremental change, and
predict the results of those
changes over extended periods of
time

Le
arn
ing
Ou
tco
me
s

Assessments

Su

15

1. Investigate and

interpret patterns in
the structure and
distribution of
mountain
formations

2. Interpret the

structure and
development of fold
and fault mountains

3. Describe evidence for


crustal movement,
and identify and
interpret patterns in
these movements

4. Identify and interpret


examples of
gradual/incremental
change, and predict
the results of those
changes over
extended periods of
time

5. Work cooperatively
with team members
to develop and
carry out a plan,
and troubleshoot
problems as they
arise

6. Evaluate individual
and group
processes used in
planning, problem
solving, decision
making and
completing a task

Assessment Tool Overview

Assessme
nt Tool

Brief Description

Ass

Ass

Ass

Exit Slips

Quiz

At the end of each lesson (not every day!)


I will issue an exit slip assignment to
assess whether or not the students
understood what was taught over the
course of the lesson. It will also provide
the opportunity for the students to give
me constructive feedback on my teaching
so I can better myself with respect to
them. The exit slips will consist of 2-5
Type I or II questions on the material
covered throughout the lesson (not the
day) and one question asking about
feedback for myself as mentioned above. I
hope it will provide valuable insight into
what the students are understanding,
what certain students need work on and
what my own practice looks like through
their eyes. There will be no grade
attached to this assignment except for a
grade given for completion.
The quiz will be a summative assessment
of all knowledge learned at the half way
point of the unit. It will include type I, II
and III questions in order to evaluate
across all levels and will be a terrific way
for us all to converge on issues that
everyone is facing, myself included. It will
also let me see where each individual
student is in their knowledge and where
the class is as a whole with respect to the
final unit exam at the end.

Erosion
Lab
Experimen
t

Volcano
Research
Project

The Erosion Lab experiment will be a


formative and summative assessment
where the students will work
collaboratively to assess a physically
represented situation (such as a flowing
river or crashing waterfall) and
interpret/discuss observations made with
respect to erosion, weathering and
deposition and implications this has on
the real world. The students will present
their findings and discussions to me
before the end of class for me to
challenge them and provide feedback
before they begin the lab report which will
be assessed summatively.
The volcano research project will be an
inquiry based project where a group of
students will each research a particular
volcano and prepare a short paper and
presentation for the class. The students
will have to research valuable information
and assess themselves whether or not
their research is valid. I will provide
ongoing feedback of their research as we
progress through the project. The
students will need to research
geographical location, interesting facts,

Rock Cycle
Experimen
t

activity of the volcano, recent eruptions


etc. They will present in a minipresentation style format. While the
presenters present, I will mark the
location of their volcano on a world map.
We will then come together as a class at
the end and realize that the volcanoes we
researched formed a ring the deadly
ring of fire surrounding the pacific ocean. I
will assess their paper as well as their
presentation summatively via a studentbuilt rubric.

The Rock Cycle Lab experiment will be a


formative and summative assessment
where the students will work
collaboratively to re-create the rock cycle
using crayon bits. The students will need
to think critically about the system and
draw parallels between this experiment
and the real rock cycle. Much like the
erosion lab, the students will need to
make observations and discussions about
the lab and bring up the implications this
has on the real world. Again, the students
will present their findings and discussions
to me before the end of class for me to
challenge them and provide feedback
before they begin the lab report which will
be assessed summatively.