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Running head: TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

Teacher Work Sample


Tammy McCluskey
December 5, 2014
Fourth Grade Language Arts

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

Table of Contents
Contextual Factors

Community, District, and School Factors

Classroom Factors

Student Characteristics

10

Implications for Instructional Planning and Assessment

11

Learning Goals and Objectives

12

Learning Goal #1 and Objectives

12

Learning Goal #2 and Objectives

12

Learning Goal #3 and Objectives

13

Learning Goal #4 and Objectives

13

Connection to Common Core Georgia Performance Standards

13

Context of Learning Goals

15

Assessment Plan

16

Table 1: Learning Goals, Learning Objectives, and Assessments

17

Pre-Assessment

24

o Pre-Assessment Data

25

o Pre-Assessment

26

Formative Assessments

29

o Post-Assessment

30

Instructional Design

35

Table 2: Unit Overview

36

Elaboration of Learning Activities

70
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Table of Contents Continued


Instructional Decision Making

73

Analysis of Learning Results

78

Whole Class Analysis

79

Subgroup Analysis

91

Individual Analysis

94

Reflection and Self-Evaluation


Appendix

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Contextual Factors
Leonardo Da Vinci once said, Learning is the only thing the mind never exhausts, never
fears, and never regrets (Slowbuddy, 2014, par. 6). The goal for any teacher should be to reach
students in such a way that they will never fear or regret learning. To successfully do this,
teachers must take into consideration the learning style of each student along with any learning
or physical disabilities they might possess. Student teachers must learn how to reflect on every
lesson to ensure they are meeting the goal of effective lesson planning and delivery. Creating a
teacher work sample is a form of assurance to the student teacher that all factors are addressed
prior to, during, and after completion of student teaching. This teacher work sample will serve
as an insurance policy that will ensure there is never exhaustion, never fear, and never regret in
the teaching process.
Community, District, and School Factors
Prince Avenue Christian School is one of four schools serving Bogart, Georgia. The city
of Bogart is located in Oconee County with a small portion extending into neighboring Clarke
County. In 2012, the population totaled 1,047 of which 94% were located in urban areas with
the remaining 6% living in rural areas of which 56.1% of the population were male and 43.9%
female (City-Data, 2014). Of those 1,047 individuals living in Bogart 75.3% are white, 13.4%
are Hispanic, 7.1% are African American, 1.8% are Asian, 0.2% are American Indian, and 2.1%
are two or more races. For the population living in Bogart over the age of 25: 80.7% have a high
school diploma, 21.4% have a Bachelors degree or higher, and 6.4% have a graduate or
professional degree (City-Data, 2014). According to the United States Census completed in
2000,

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There were 425 households out of which 34.8% had children under the age of 18 living
with them, 57.2% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder
with no husband present, and 27.1% were non-families. 22.1% of all households were
made up of individuals and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or
older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 2.88 (CityData, n.d. par. 4).
In 2012, the estimated medium household income was $37, 579, which dropped from
$41, 190 in 2000 falling below the $47, 209 for the state of Georgia in 2012. The estimate
median house or condo value in 2012 was $133,474, which rose from $94,400 in the year 2000.
The estimated median house or condo value for Georgia in 2012 was $142,300, which is slightly
above the Bogart median. The mean prices for Bogart in 2011 on all housing units were
$153,234 with detached houses at $176,865, and mobile homes at $57,529. In 2012, 18.6% were
living at or below the poverty level (City-Data, 2014).
The climate in Bogart stays consistent with North Georgia weather patterns with daily
high temperatures falling slightly above the U.S. average. Tornado activity is slightly above the
Georgia average, which is 93% greater than the overall U.S. average. In November of 1992, a
category F4 tornado was responsible for the death of five people causing $50,000,000 in
damages (City-Data, 2014). Earthquake activity is present and is near the state average with a
94% smaller average than the overall U.S. average with magnitudes ranging from 3.2 in January
of 1992 to 4.9 in August of 1974 (City-Data, 2014). The number of natural disasters in Oconee
County is five, which falls below the U.S. average of 12. Out of those five disasters, two were
presidential declared major disasters.

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35.1% of Bogart is affiliated with a religious congregation, with Southern Baptist


Convention holding the largest percentage at 53% with 32.5% in congregations (City-Data,
2014). This high percentage is a supporting factor of Prince Avenue Christian Schools success
in the community as they are affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention. Prince Avenue
Christian School is part of Prince Avenue Baptist Church serving the community of Bogart for
the past seven years. One of the ministries located at Prince Avenue Baptist Church is WMSL
Great 88 the Christian FM, which is the areas source of Christian music for over 25 years.
WSML remains the only full time, full service, full power station with Christian programming
in the region. The station serves as a broadcast ministry to families here and around the world
since singing on in December of 1987 (Prince Avenue Baptist Church, 2014, par.1).
Prince Avenue Christian School is the only private Christian School serving the
community of Bogart with a student body population of 850 students and 115 faculty and staff.
The school consists of grade levels from kindergarten all the way through twelfth grade. Out of
the 850 students, 92% are white, 4% are African American, 2% are Asian, 2% are Hispanic, and
1% is two or more races. Prince Avenue is not a Title I school, but rather a 501(c)(3) non-profit
institution with its own Board of Trustees. They are fully accredited by the Association of
Christian Schools International, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, and members of
the Georgia Independent School Association (Prince Avenue Christian School, n.d.).
The school campus is situated on 50 acres with over 100,000 square feet of educational
space along with the addition of a new church facility. The school itself is 35 years old;
however, the campus relocated to Bogart nearly eight years ago. This is their seventh year at the
new campus facility. In 1986, Prince Avenue saw its first three students graduate, with an
increase in student enrollment each year. Since relocating to Bogart, enrollment has increased by

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nearly 50% (Prince Avenue Christian School, n.d.). For more than thirty years, the area of
Athens has recognized Prince Avenue Christian School (P.A.C.S.) for its academic distinction in
Christian education. P.A.C.S. provides its students with the skills required to become successful
in the area of academics with their primary goal to inspire you men and women to become fully
devoted followers of Jesus Christ and to challenge them to achieve their highest academic,
creative, and athletic potential (Prince Avenue Christian School, n.d. par.5). P.A.C.S. has a fine
arts program and athletic program that has been established in the community as among the best
in the area.
P.A.C.S. values and encourages community involvement. Each year students in all
grades participate in Operation Christmas Child where they fill shoe boxes with toys and items to
send to children in poverty stricken countries. There are several opportunities for students to
give back to the community through P.A.C.S.s community involvement activities that include a
canned food drive, letters to service members, and the empty bowl program. While P.A.C.S.
does not have a PTO or PTA, it does provide several opportunities for parents to volunteer their
time and talents. Opportunities for parents to assist in student learning are provided through a
tutoring program comprised of parents and high school students. Parents are also encouraged to
volunteer in their childs classroom to support the teacher in any way that is needed. Parent
involvement is the driving force for the schools fundraising events, which include a walk-a-thon
called Thing-A-Thong where students solicit their neighborhoods, friends, and family members
to sponsor them for a nominal fee per mile walked.
Prince Avenue houses several other programs in the areas of academics, athletics, and the
fine arts in which students can participate in. The Barnabas Ministry allows high school students
to mentor elementary students and encourage them to excel both academically and athletically.

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The program provides a platform for students who are sophomores, juniors, and seniors to learn
about service by teaching and mentoring students in the lower school (Prince Avenue Christian
School, n.d. par.1). P.A.C.S. participates in spelling bees, geography bees, and the Math
Olympics. Each year there are a select few fourth and fifth graders that are given an opportunity
to participate in The Duke University Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP). Athletically,
P.A.C.S. houses girls and boys basketball, football, volleyball, softball, baseball, and
cheerleading for both junior varsity and varsity teams.
Classroom Factors
The fourth grade classroom is located in the very back of the school building on the
elementary wing of the school. The back wing of the building is split between the elementary
grade levels and the middle school grade levels. The right wing of the hall facing the front of the
school building contains grades first through fifth while the left wing houses grades sixth through
eighth. Students are dropped off in the car pool line on the same wing where the lower school
grades are located. There are four different fourth grade classrooms that students rotate through
for four subject areas. Each of the fourth grade teachers collaborate to make a complete
curriculum with subjects broken down as follows: history and science, reading and spelling,
math, and language arts and vocabulary.
Students rotate classrooms five times throughout the day. All students begin their day
homeroom for the first 15 minutes of school, and return back to their homeroom for a 20 minute
Bible class prior to going to lunch. Students attend specials on a rotating schedule, which begins
immediately after lunch. On Mondays, students have art, Tuesday is music, Wednesday they
have P.E., Thursday is Spanish, and Friday is library. After specials, students return to their
homeroom class to pack up and go to recess. Thursdays schedule is slightly different as a result

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of chapel that students attend in the morning prior to the first period. Chapel schedule consists of
the elimination of Bible class along with shortened class periods.
Consistency is somewhat neglected in this classroom when it comes to the arrangements
of desks. The desks are arranged differently every week to encourage students to find new
friends and discourage them from creating cliques in the classroom. When entering the
classroom, the teachers desk is located at the front left of the room. There is a bulletin board
located to the left of the room in front of the teachers desk that consists of Mountain Language
for students to complete each morning. A Smartboard at the front of the room is placed at the
appropriate height for students to be able to use the board with minimal adjustments. To the
right of the Smartboard is an additional small desk that has a book shelf beside it, which contains
age appropriate books that students may choose to read should they finish their assignments
early. Above this desk is a mounted television and DVD player. On the right wall there is a
plastic cabinet containing supplies as well as a white board and a computer desk with three
computers. The back wall of the room has student cubbies, cabinets with a countertop, and
another book shelf that goes from floor to ceiling where student text books are kept. There are
various posters placed throughout the room with the rules of writing, language arts terms and key
information, classroom rules, Biblical principles, and grammar rules. This classroom is
extremely conducive and optimal for academic learning.
Classroom management is based on positive reinforcement principles where negative and
disruptive behaviors are addressed by having students sign a clipboard, which results in loss of
five minutes of recess. Students who sign the clipboard more than seven times in a two week
period will receive a conference with the lower school principal where their parents along with
the teacher are required to attend. Incomplete homework assignments are treated as a negative

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behavior. There is an uplifting and encouraging environment that is occurring with limited
classroom rules that students assist in creating at the beginning of the year. The first and most
important rule is respect. Students are expected to be respectful and courteous to each other and
treat other students just as they would want to be treated. Outstanding behaviors are rewarded
with a compliment, which is written on the compliment board for other students and parents to
view. When the class receives ten compliments they are rewarded with a compliment party of
their choice. Parties range from technology day to a pajamas and popcorn party. Parties are held
on Fridays at the end of the day to prevent disruption of learning.
Student Characteristics
There are a total of 66 students in the fourth grade with two homeroom classes having 17
students and two having 16. This particular classroom has 17 students in homeroom. Of those
seventeen students nine are girls and eight are boys with percentages broken down as follows: 14
white, 1 African American, 1 Asian, and 1 Latin American. There are two English language
learners (ELL) students, one potential talented and gifted (TAG) student, and no special
education (SPED) students. The two ELL students are adopted and have spent very little time in
their new homes. The Asian student was recently adopted from China and brought to America in
July of 2014. The Latin American student came from an orphanage in Central America. Both
students are pulled from the regular classroom for certain subject areas and instructed by an ELL
teacher in another classroom. With little help from a paraprofessional that is shared between the
fourth grade and fifth grade teachers, it can be difficult to address the needs of the ELL and TAG
students. To combat this issue, Prince Avenue uses an AP Assessments, which is a computer
program that assesses TAG students through online assessments they perform on a weekly basis
covering all subject areas.

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Most students are reading at or above the fourth grade level with only a few requiring
additional after school assistance. Two students are sent to a different classroom during formal
assessments where they are monitored by a SPED teacher. These two students are struggling in
language arts, which can be attributed to some difficulty in reading, comprehension, and
following instructions. Prince Avenue has something called the Resource Room where teachers
can send struggling students for additional help during assessments or any assignment. There are
several SPED teachers in this room that will assist students in any area where they are struggling.
There are a total of six students in the fourth grade that currently utilize the Resource Room
when taking assessments or completing long assignments.
There appears to be no behavioral issues concerning bullying within this group of fourth
grade students. They are very accepting of the ELL students and encourage them throughout
class to participate in lesson activities. Students are also accepting of students with medical
disabilities in the school. This class does not possess any medical issues; however, one of the
fourth grade classes has two students with food allergies for which an Epi Pen Jr. is required. A
bag with a tag listing the students name, allergies, and instructions for what to do if the student
comes in contact with their allergen houses each students medication. This bag is carried from
class to class to ensure that it never leaves the student at any time.
Implications for Instructional Planning and Assessment
All of the contextual factors previously mentioned greatly impact a students academic
success as well as encourage positive behavior. Strategies for instruction will be carefully
measured and based on each component currently found in the classroom. Based on these
components, assessments will be cautiously measured to ensure that each students needs are
being met. To do this effectively, technology, differentiation of instruction, multiple teaching

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strategies that will address the various learning styles in the classroom, various usage of formal
and informal assessments, scaffolding of curriculum instruction, and lesson modification will be
the key factors of this teacher work sample used to compel student success. Theses contextual
factors will assist in understanding the strengths and weaknesses of students while providing
instructional support to assist all students in attaining their goals.
Learning Goals
Creating learning goals and measurable objectives are an essential element to ensuring a
focused and intentional classroom environment. When creating lesson plans it is imperative that
teachers know and understand their State Standards for their specific grade level. These
standards give educators a complete map of what skills and knowledge their students need to
master and possess by the end of the school year. This unit was created using the fourth grade
English Language Arts Common Core Georgia Performance Standards to ensure that students
are performing within the state standards. The learning goals with their objectives for the unit
are outlined below.
Learning Goal 1 (LG1): Students will illustrate their writing foundations through the creation
of Key Word Outlines and test their outlines by retelling using complete sentences.
Objectives
1. Students will use various source texts to compose and test a Key Word Outline (KWO).
2. Students will summarize the source by formulating their own notes in a KWO.
3. Students will be able to test by retelling the KWO using complete sentences.
Learning Goal 2 (LG2): Students will develop their writing foundations by converting outlines
into a written paragraph.
Objectives

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1. Students will be able to restate a story in complete sentences using a KWO.


2. Students will be able to construct a rough draft from their KWO integrating strong verbs
into their sentences.
3. Students will be able to check their writing for spelling and grammatical errors.
Learning Goal 3 (LG3): Students will recall information from a story and systematically place
the information into paragraphs to become summaries.
Objectives
1. Students will be able to identify the story sequence in a story.
2. Students will record information from a story onto a Story Sequence Chart (SSC).
3. Students will create a Story Sequence Outline (SSO) based on the (SSC).
4. Students will summarize stories from their SSO internalizing the components of a wellconstructed paragraph.
5. Students will revise their summary to include dress-ups.
Learning Goal 4 (LG4): Students will learn to gather, organize, and place important
information from a reference source obtained at the library into an outline to create a rough draft.
Objectives
1. Students will be able to create an outline from a reference source found in the library.
2. Students will create a rough draft using only their KWO.
3. Students will revise their rough drafts incorporating dress-ups into their writing.
4. Students will practice documenting references and in-text citations.
Connection to Common Core Georgia Performance Standards (CCGPS)
4th Grade English Language Arts Common Core Georgia Performance Standards
Reading Literary (RL)

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Key Ideas and Details


ELACC4RL1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the
text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Georgia
Standards, 2011).
ELACC4RL2: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the
text; summarize the text (Georgia Standards, 2011).
Reading Informational (RI)
Key Ideas and Details
ELACC4RI1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the
text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Georgia
Standards, 2011).
ELACC4RI2: Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported
by key details; summarize the text (Georgia Standards, 2011).
Writing (W)
Production and Distribution of Writing
ELACC4W4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and
organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience (Georgia Standards,
2011).
ELACC4W5: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and
strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing (Georgia
Standards, 2011).
Research to Build and Present Knowledge

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ELACC4W8: Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant


information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information,
and provide a list of sources (Georgia Standards, 2011).
Language (L)
Conventions of Standard English
ELACC4L1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
grammar and usage when writing or speaking (Georgia Standards, 2011).
ELACC4L2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing (Georgia Standards, 2011).
Context of Learning Goals
The learning goals set forth in this unit were designed to meet the English Language
Common Core Georgia Performance Standards for fourth grade. They cover reading and writing
concepts that are both necessary and imperative for the development of writing skills. This unit
is designed to strengthen the skills necessary for summarizing source texts through the use of
Key Word Outlines. Students will use various forms of text to create Key Word Outlines where
they will only be permitted to use three words per sentence with unlimited use of symbols.
Referencing sources and in text citations will be introduced toward the end of the unit along with
a lesson on the importance of avoiding plagiarism.
To accommodate the diverse classroom this unit provides accommodations for English
language learners (ELL), talented and gifted students (TAG), and special education students
(SPED). For those students needing guidance, re-teaching will be provided based on individual
need. Various forms of assessments and differentiated instructional strategies will be utilized to
address the individual learning styles within the classroom. Each learning style is addressed

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within the lesson plans. Technology is incorporated into most of the lessons to hold the interest
and keep the attention of each student regardless of learning styles. Individual, small group
collaboration and team work are planned to create some variation.
Assessment Plan
Assessments are an essential part of instructional planning that provides valuable
information on each students prior knowledge. They measure the level of mastery that students
possess in each skill-set within the area content creating a picture for the teacher to see the areas
where improvement is needed. E.S. Grassain once said, We plan. We develop. We deliver.
We assess and evaluate the results of the assessment. We revise, deliver the revised material,
and assess and evaluate again. Perfection is always just out of reach; but continually striving for
perfection contributes to keeping both our instruction fresh and our interest in teaching piqued
(Sunny Orange, n.d.). Assessments demonstrate that students have the knowledge, skills, and the
competencies that are consistent with the goals set forth by the school and the CCGPS to ensure
students are receiving a higher education.
Assessments come in various forms falling into either the formative or summative
category. Within those two categories there are formal and informal forms of assessments that
range from standardized paper and pencil exams to small group or collaborative work. The
Middle States Standard XIV says, The systematic assessment of student learning outcomes is
essential to monitoring quality and providing the information that leads to improvement (Sunny
Orange, n.d.). To properly monitor the improvement of a student, there must be a balance of
formative and summative assessments with multiple forms of assessments in each category
utilized. Doing this will provide a more accurate understanding of a students comprehension of

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content. Table 1 illustrates the CCGPS and how they relate to the learning goals, learning
objectives, assessments, and adaptations of the unit as described in this teacher work sample.
Table 1: Learning Goals, Learning Objectives, and Assessments
Learning Goal

Learning Goal 1: Students will illustrate their writing foundations through the creation of Key Word
Outlines and test their outlines by retelling using complete sentences.

4th Grade
Language Arts
Common Core
Georgia
Performance
Standards
Reading Literary
(RL)

Learning Objectives

ELACC4RL1:
Refer to details and
examples in a text
when explaining
what the text says
explicitly and when
drawing inferences
from the text.
ELACC4RL2:
Determine a theme
of a story, drama, or
poem from details in
the text; summarize
the text.
Reading
Informational (RI)

Objectives:
1. Students will use
various source texts
to compose and test
a Key Word Outline
(KWO).
2. Students will
summarize the
source by
formulating their
own notes in a
KWO.

Assessments

Format of
Assessment

Adaptation(s)

Pre-Assessment
To be given at the
beginning of the
unit.

KWO Chart
completed from a 5
sentence paragraph.

Note: There are no adaptations


for the pre-assessment in order
to correctly assess what
students already know.

Formal
Formative
Assessments

KWO Chart
completed from a 5
sentence paragraph.

Informal
Summative
Assessments

Students will retell


their KWO Chart to
the class while
seated at their desk.
A Public Speaking
Rubric will be used
to grade this
assessment.

3. Students will be
able to test by
retelling the KWO
using complete
sentences.

ELACC4RI1:
Refer to details and
examples in a text
when explaining
what the text says
explicitly and when
drawing inferences
from the text.
ELACC4RI2:
Determine the main
idea of a text and
explain how it is
supported by key
details; summarize
the text.

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Talented and Gifted (TAG):


students will be required to
complete a KWO Chart from a
7-9 sentence paragraph and then
retell the paragraph using their
KWO Chart.
Special Education (SPED) &
English Language Learners
(ELL): students will be given a
4 sentence paragraph that
contains simple sentences along
with a KWO that has one of
three key words already
provided. Pictures can be used
for the remaining two key
words.

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18

Writing (W)
ELACC4W8:
Recall relevant
information from
experiences or
gather relevant
information from
print and digital
sources; take notes
and categorize
information, and
provide a list of
sources.
Language (L)
ELACC4L1:
Demonstrate
command of the
convention of
standard English
grammar and usage
when writing or
speaking.
Learning Goal

Learning Goal 2: Students will develop their writing foundations by converting outlines into a written
paragraph.

4th Grade
Language Arts
Common Core
Georgia
Performance
Standards
Reading Literary
(RL)

Learning Objectives

ELACC4RL1:
Refer to details and
examples in a text
when explaining
what the text says
explicitly and when
drawing inferences
from the text.
ELACC4RL2:
Determine a theme
of a story, drama, or
poem from details in
the text; summarize
the text.

Objectives:
1. Students will be
able to restate a
story in complete
sentences using a
KWO.
2. Students will be
able to construct a
rough draft from
their KWO
integrating strong
verbs into their
sentences.

Assessments

Format of
Assessment

Pre-Assessment
Was given at the
beginning of the unit
and listed under
Learning Goal 1.

Formal
Formative
Assessments

3. Students will be
able to check their
writing for spelling

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Adaptation(s)

Talented and Gifted (TAG):


students will be required to
complete their rough drafts
from a 2 paragraph story and
then retell the story.

Students will
construct a rough
draft paragraph
using their KWO
from the 7 sentence
paragraph using
strong verbs from
their verbs list in
their sentences.

Special Education (SPED) &


English Language Learners
(ELL): students will be allowed
to pass on retelling their stories
out loud if they are
uncomfortable with reading to
the class. The teacher will
grade the rough drafts using a
rubric.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

Reading
Informational (RI)

and grammatical
errors.

19

Informal
Summative
Assessments

ELACC4RI1:
Refer to details and
examples in a text
when explaining
what the text says
explicitly and when
drawing inferences
from the text.
ELACC4RI2:
Determine the main
idea of a text and
explain how it is
supported by key
details; summarize
the text.
Writing (W)
ELACC4W4:
Produce clear and
coherent writing in
which the
development and
organization are
appropriate to task,
purpose, and
audience.
ELACC4W5: With
guidance and
support from peers
and adults, develop
and strengthen
writing as needed by
planning, revising,
and editing.
ELACC4W8:
Recall relevant
information from
experiences or
gather relevant
information from
print and digital
sources; take notes
and categorize
information, and
provide a list of
sources.
Language (L)

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Students will read


their paragraphs to
the class while
seated at their desk.
A rubric will be
used to grade this
assessment.

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20

ELACC4L1:
Demonstrate
command of the
convention of
standard English
grammar and usage
when writing or
speaking.
ELACC4L2:
Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of
standard English
capitalization,
punctuation, and
spelling when
writing.
Learning Goal

Learning Goal 3: Students will recall information from a story and systematically place the information
into paragraphs to become summaries.

4th Grade
Language Arts
Common Core
Georgia
Performance
Standards
Reading Literary
(RL)

Learning Objectives

ELACC4RL1:
Refer to details and
examples in a text
when explaining
what the text says
explicitly and when
drawing inferences
from the text.
ELACC4RL2:
Determine a theme
of a story, drama, or
poem from details in
the text; summarize
the text.
Reading
Informational (RI)
ELACC4RI1:
Refer to details and
examples in a text
when explaining

Objectives:
1. Students will be
able to identify the
story sequence in a
story.
2. Students will record
information from a
story onto a Story
Sequence Chart
(SSC).

Assessments

Pre-Assessment
Was given at the
beginning of the unit
and listed under
Learning Goal 1.

Formal
Formative
Assessments

3. Students will create


a Story Sequence
Outline (SSO)
based on the SSC.
4. Students will
summarize stories
from their SSO
internalizing the
components of a
well-constructed
paragraph.

Format of
Assessment

Note: There are no adaptations


for the pre-assessment in order
to correctly assess what
students already know.

Assessment 1:
Students will fill in
a SSC from a fable
and then create a
SSO based on the
SSC.
Assessment 2:
Students will use
their SSO to write a
rough draft ensuring
to include dress-ups.

Informal
Summative
Assessments

Page 20 of 82

Adaptation(s)

Assessment 1:
Students will work
in small groups
using their SSO to
create a
collaborative

Talented and Gifted (TAG):


students will be asked to use
their SSO as a guide to write
their own fable or fairy tale.
Special Education (SPED) &
English Language Learners
(ELL): students will be given a
SSC with bits of information
already written in from a
shorter fable or fairy tale.
Students can be paired up with
a TAG student to assist in their
SSO. Students will sit with the
teacher through the revising
processes.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

what the text says


explicitly and when
drawing inferences
from the text.

21

5. Students will revise


their summary to
include dress-ups.

summary using
techniques
addressed from the
first lesson through
current lesson.

ELACC4RI2:
Determine the main
idea of a text and
explain how it is
supported by key
details; summarize
the text.

Assessment 2:
Students will
exchange their
rough drafts with
another student for
peer editing.

Writing (W)
ELACC4W4:
Produce clear and
coherent writing in
which the
development and
organization are
appropriate to task,
purpose, and
audience.
ELACC4W5: With
guidance and
support from peers
and adults, develop
and strengthen
writing as needed by
planning, revising,
and editing.
ELACC4W8:
Recall relevant
information from
experiences or
gather relevant
information from
print and digital
sources; take notes
and categorize
information, and
provide a list of
sources.
Language (L)
ELACC4L1:
Demonstrate
command of the
convention of
standard English
grammar and usage

Page 21 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

22

when writing or
speaking.
ELACC4L2:
Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of
standard English
capitalization,
punctuation, and
spelling when
writing.
Learning Goal

Learning Goal 4: Students will learn to gather, organize, and place important information from a
reference source obtained at the library into an outline to create a rough draft.

4th Grade
Language Arts
Common Core
Georgia
Performance
Standards
Reading Literary
(RL)

Learning Objectives

ELACC4RL1:
Refer to details and
examples in a text
when explaining
what the text says
explicitly and when
drawing inferences
from the text.
ELACC4RL2:
Determine a theme
of a story, drama, or
poem from details in
the text; summarize
the text.
Reading
Informational (RI)
ELACC4RI1: Refer
to details and
examples in a text
when explaining
what the text says
explicitly and when
drawing inferences
from the text.

Objectives:
1. Students will be
able to create an
outline from a
reference source
found in the
library.
2. Students will create
a rough draft using
only their KWO.

Assessments

Format of
Assessment

Pre-Assessment
To be given at the
beginning of the
unit.

Formal
Formative
Assessments This
will serve as the
post-assessment.

3. Students will revise


their rough drafts
incorporating
dress-ups into their
writing.
4. Students will
practice
documenting
references and intext citations.

Informal
Summative
Assessments

ELACC4RI2:
Determine the main

Page 22 of 82

Adaptation(s)

Note: There are no adaptations


for the pre-assessment in order
to correctly assess what students
already know.

Post-Assessment:
Students will choose
a reference source
from the library to
create a KWO and
then a rough draft
that must consist of
3 paragraphs.
Students will revise
their writing,
incorporating dressups and correctly
document their intext citations and
references. Students
must have 2
references. A rubric
will be used to
determine scores.

Assessment 1:
Students will
exchange papers to
edit and check that
references are

Talented and Gifted (TAG):


students will choose a more
challenging story as a reference
source. Students will be
required to have 3 or more
references and in-text citations.
Special Education (SPED) &
English Language Learners
(ELL): students can use a digest
for their reference source and
create illustrations for their
writing. Their writing must
consist of 2 paragraphs and 1
reference.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

23

idea of a text and


explain how it is
supported by key
details; summarize
the text.

properly cited and


documented.
Assessment 2:
Students will come
dressed as a
character from their
story to read their
story to the class.

Writing (W)
ELACC4W4:
Produce clear and
coherent writing in
which the
development and
organization are
appropriate to task,
purpose, and
audience.
ELACC4W5: With
guidance and
support from peers
and adults, develop
and strengthen
writing as needed by
planning, revising,
and editing.
ELACC4W8:
Recall relevant
information from
experiences or
gather relevant
information from
print and digital
sources; take notes
and categorize
information, and
provide a list of
sources.
Language (L)
ELACC4L1:
Demonstrate
command of the
convention of
standard English
grammar and usage
when writing or
speaking.
ELACC4L2:
Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of

Page 23 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

24

standard English
capitalization,
punctuation, and
spelling when
writing.

Pre-Assessments
The pre-assessment designed for the unit in this teacher work sample must be given after
the first lesson has been discussed. While it is used to measure students previous knowledge,
there might be some confusion about how to complete a KWO, which makes it less suitable to
administer before the lesson. For the pre-assessment, students must read a short story consisting
of five sentences for which they will pull key information from to create their KWO Chart.
Students can only use three words from each sentence in their KWO that summarize the main
point of the sentence. They may use as many drawings, numbers, symbols, or abbreviations as
they wish as they are free and do not count as words. Their outlines must be numbered using
Roman numerals, with a number present for each sentence in the story. The purpose of this
assessment is two-fold: it measure previous knowledge of story theme, supporting details, and
plot, as well as students reading and comprehension levels. In order to obtain a clear image of
what students already know, there are no modifications or adaptations for this assessment. A
rubric will be used to determine students performance for which a score of 75 must be obtained
to pass. A large portion of their grade consists on the number of words students used in their
KWO. Points will also be rewarded for creative use of symbols and abbreviations.

Page 24 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

25

Pre-Assessment Data
Pre-Assessment Data Graph

Pre-Assessment Results
Used 3 or less words

Used more than 3 words

Wrote sentences

Demonstrated understanding

Does not demonstrate understanding

15

15
14
13

13

12

9
8

2
1

2
1

1
0

1st Period - 16
Students

2nd Period - 17
Students

3rd Period - 16
Students

4th Period - 16
Students

The graph above illustrates the pre-assessment results of all four language arts classes.
The results of the graph illustrate that there is prior knowledge of summarizing within all four
class periods. The fourth period presented a few more students that do not demonstrate
understanding of the concepts; however, this is due to the two ELL students within this class
period. A total of three students in all four periods combined wrote out sentences for their
KWO, which does not indicate a lack of understanding of the concept, but rather some confusion
of the instructions.

Page 25 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

26

Pre-Assessment Story

Sea Snakes
The most poisonous snake in the world is not the coral snake or the death
adder; it is the sea snake. Marine scientists estimate that the venom of a sea snake
is fifty times more powerful than that of the king cobra. Sea snakes, however, do
not always inject venom when they bite. Nobody is quite sure why this is so. The
poison is slow to take effect, but when it does, it will be fatal about 25% of the
time. Fisherman are the most likely to become victims, either by stepping on or
handling a snake carelessly. (Pudewa, 2012, p. 49)

Note: for SPED & ELL students remove the last sentence from the story to create a four
sentence paragraph. On the Key Word Outline Pre-Assessment remove Roman numeral V to
accommodate the story.

Page 26 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

27

Pre-Assessment Story for TAG Students

The Cocks and the Eagle


Once there were two cocks living in the same farmyard. They hated each
other so much that one day they flew up to fight it out, beak and claw. After a
terrible fight, once of them was beaten and crawled off to a corner to hide. The
cock that had won the battle flew to the top of the henhouse, where he flapped his
wings and crowed with all his might to tell everyone about his victory. Just then
an eagle was circling overhead. He heard the boasting rooster and swooped down
to carry him off to his nest. The rival cock saw the deed and coming out of his
corner, took his place as master of the farmyard. (Pudewa, 2012, p. 57)

Note: On the Key Word Outline Pre-Assessment add Roman numerals VI and VI to
accommodate the story.

Page 27 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

28

Key Word Outline


Name: _____________________________________________ Student #_______
Homeroom Teacher: _________________________________ Date: _________

Story Title: ________________________________________________________


Directions: Read the entire story two times. Use the blanks provided below to
create a key word outline. Each sentence in the story should have its very own line
below. There are five sentences in the story and five lines below. You may only
use three words for each line, but you may use as many symbols or abbreviations
you like. Please make sure that the ideas in the sentence are present in your key
words.

I. _________________________________________________________________
II. ________________________________________________________________
III. _______________________________________________________________
IV. _______________________________________________________________
V. ________________________________________________________________

Page 28 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

29

Formative Assessments
Formative assessments are used throughout this unit to ensure students are progressing on
track. Due to the complex nature of writing, it is imperative that students be continually assessed
through writing samples to indicate whether they are progressing toward the goals and objectives
laid forth in the unit. Each of the five formative assessments in this unit is a paper and pencil
assessments. Due to time constraints, a KWO, SSC, or SSO worksheet will be provided for
students to use as opposed to creating their own. Students should be meeting the requirements
and objectives for each learning goal, which should be reflected in their weekly formative
assessments. To demonstrate progression, students scores should improve with each assessment
with a minimum passing score of 75 on the first assessment. Prior to moving to the next
objective, students must obtain a score of 80 or better; however, it is expected that students
should be averaging 85 or better. Students with a score of 75 or lower are not progressing
enough to move on to the next more complicated objective, and should be permitted to take extra
time to grasp the concept being covered.
Summative Assessments
There are numerous summative assessments given at the end of key lessons throughout
the unit, which are designed to allow the teacher some freedom to assess students informally.
Students will have the opportunity to work in small collaborative groups for peer editing.
Students learn a tremendous amount of material through teaching concepts to others. Each of the
four learning goals contains a summative informal assessment that provides a chance for students
to teach each other in language they understand. This is very beneficial to ELL and SPED
students when introducing new concepts. For this reason their value is immeasurable in this unit
and they will be scored based on participation and understanding. The teacher will walk around

Page 29 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

30

the room and listen to the discussions held in the collaborative groups. Students that are
discussing the concepts and illustrate a level of mastery will receive a score of 100. Students
who illustrate a level of mastery but are not participating will receive a score of 75. Students
who do not illustrate a level of mastery but are participating will also receive a score of 75.
Students who do not show a level of mastery and are not participating will receive no score.
Post-Assessment
The post-assessment designed for this unit is a formal summative assessment that
measures students ability to summarize content from different sources while correctly citing any
references used. It is a culmination of each of the objectives listed for all four learning goals. It
will illustrate whether students have developed a solid foundation of summarizing key ideas
from a resource and create a summary from a key word outline. They should successfully be
able to edit their writing to include strong verbs and dress-ups utilizing correct grammar and
punctuation. Students will be required to choose a reference source obtained from the library to
create a KWO for which they will write a rough draft that must consist of three paragraphs.
They will edit their paragraphs and make any necessary revisions ensuring to incorporate dressups and correctly document any in-text citations and references. Students will be required to
have at least two references, which must be documented correctly using APA format. This postassessment does have a modification for both TAG, SPED, and ELL students. TAG students
will be asked to choose a more challenging story for their reference source, and be required to
have three or more references and in-text citations. SPED and ELL students have the option to
use a shortened or condensed version of a story such as a digest or one of Aesops Fables. Only
1 reference will be required for their writing, which must consist of two paragraphs. SPED and
ELL students will have the opportunity to create illustrations for their writing to demonstrate

Page 30 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

31

comprehension of their story. All students must receive a score of 75 to pass the post-assessment
for which a rubric will be used to determine students performance; however, because this is a
pre-assessment that students are not expected to score high on as it covers some concepts that
students might not have been previously introduced to.

Page 31 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

32

Post-Assessment

Key Word Outline


Name: _____________________________________________ Student #_______
Homeroom Teacher: _________________________________ Date: _________

Story Title: ________________________________________________________


Directions: Read your chosen resource story and create a Key Word Outline
below.

I. _________________________________________________________________
II. ________________________________________________________________
III. _______________________________________________________________
IV. _______________________________________________________________
V. ________________________________________________________________

Page 32 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

33

Story Sequence Chart


Name: _____________________________________________ Student #_______
Homeroom Teacher: _________________________________ Date: _________

Story Title: ________________________________________________________


Directions: Read the entire story two times. Use the blocks below to create your
Story Sequence Chart.
I.

Who-When-Where
Who is in the story?
What are they like?
When does it happen?

Where do they live or go?


II. What, Problem?
What do they need or want?
What do they think?
What do they say and do?
II. Climax, Resolution
How is the problem/need resolved?
What happens after?
What is learned?
Message?
Moral?
Epilogue

Page 33 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

34

Story Sequence Outline


Name: _____________________________________________ Student #_______
Homeroom Teacher: _________________________________ Date: _________

Story Title: ________________________________________________________


Directions: Use the Story Sequence Chart to complete this outline. Each Roman
numeral below will match the Roman numeral from the Story Sequence Chart.

I. _________________________________________________________________
1. ______________________________________________________________
2. ______________________________________________________________
3. ______________________________________________________________
II.________________________________________________________________
1. ______________________________________________________________
2. ______________________________________________________________
3. ______________________________________________________________
III.________________________________________________________________
1. ______________________________________________________________
2. ______________________________________________________________
3. ______________________________________________________________
4. ______________________________________________________________

Page 34 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

35

Instructional Design
The activities in this unit are based on the CCGPS, the goals, and the objectives found in
Table 1: Learning Goals, Learning Objectives, and Assessments. To determine the activities that
suit the needs of the students a pre-assessment was performed. The goal was to obtain a clear
picture of their prior knowledge of key word outlines and the concept of summarizing. To
proceed with the Use Your Words Wisely unit, the pre-assessment must illustrate that students
demonstrate a moderate to high level of mastery on key word outlining and summarizing.
Should students demonstrate a lower level of comprehension, a brief review unit on summarizing
will need to be given prior to beginning this unit.
Use Your Words Wisely is a six week unit covering the writing process. It begins with
key word outlines and culminates with citations and bibliographies. Students will learn how to
create a key word outline using only three key words from a sentence along with an unlimited
amount of symbols and numbers. They will test their outlines by retelling the story directly from
the outline in small groups or as a class. Students will also create a story sequence outline that
will be used to create a rough draft of their summary. During the revision and editing process,
students will replace uninspiring and dreary words with strong verbs and adverbs while checking
for banned words such as said, bad, and good. The proper usage of the homophones there, their,
theyre, two, too, and to are discussed and a worksheet and game are used as lesson activities to
further improve students understanding of their proper usage. Students will peer edit another
students work using the correct editing marks and annotations. Instructions for completing a
final draft are explained and demonstrated on the Smartboard for students to follow along and
use as a reference for future lessons. A formal summative post-assessment is given at the end of
the unit along with an informal final project. Table 2 below outlines the unit week by week

Page 35 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

36

detailing the CCGPS, learning goals, objectives, and adjustments for SPED, ESL, and TAG
students, and assessments.
Table 2: Unit Overview

Use Your Words Wisely


Week One: Assessment of Prior Knowledge & Introduction to Key Word Outlines
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Lesson Title

Pre-Assessment

Those Sneaky
Sea Snakes

Dates
Learning Goals
Addressed
Objectives
Addressed
Learning
Activity

9/29/14
Learning Goal 1

9/30/14
Learning Goal 1

What You
Should Know
About a KWO
10/1/14
Learning Goal 1

Objectives 1 & 2

Objectives 1 & 2

Objectives 1 & 2

Students will
complete a Key
Word Outline
(KWO) using
the short 5
sentence
paragraph titled
Sea Snakes to
assess prior
understanding of
KWO from third
grade writing
concepts.

Teacher
Activity:
Discuss with
students what
they know about
the writing
process.

Teacher
Activity 1:
Discuss the
concept of a
KWO with
students. Focus
on the outline
setup of Roman
Numerals and
maximum
allowance of
three key words
per sentence.
Discuss the
unlimited use of
symbols and
numbers in the
outline. Use
higher order
questioning to
engage students
to think
creatively.

Student
Activity 1: Read
the short 5
sentence
paragraph titled
Sea Snakes.
Student
Activity 2:
Create an
interactive
writing journal.
Create a Table
of Contents page
in writing
journal. Cut and
paste the Sea
Snakes
paragraph into
journal.

Teacher
Activity 2: Read
Sea Snakes
out loud to the
class. Lead
students in
completing a
KWO on the
Smart Board.
Choose students
to read one
sentence and

Page 36 of 82

Lets Talk About


It

Publicly
Speaking

10/2/14
Learning Goal 1

10/3/14
Learning Goal 1

Objectives 1, 2,
&3
Teacher
Activity 1:
Discuss with
students the
concept of
public speaking.
Explain the
requirements of
public speaking
as noted on the
Public Speaking
Handout, which
are: speaking in
complete
sentences, clear
pronunciation
and proper
intonation,
posture, and eye
contact.

Objectives 1, 2,
&3
Teacher
Activity 1: Give
each student a
Public Speaking
Rubric and have
them write their
name, student
number,
homeroom
teachers name,
and date on the
lines provided.

Teacher
Activity 2: Test
Sea Snakes
KWO by
retelling.
Explain to
students that
memorization of
the original story
is not the main
goal of a KWO.
Discuss the
concept of using
your own words
in sentences that

Teacher
Activity 2:
Grade students
performance
using the Public
Speaking Rubric
during their
retelling of their
KWO. Once
students have
retold their
KWO, collect
their journals for
grading of
previous days
formative
assessment.
Student
Activity 1:
Return the
Public Speaking
Rubric to the

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

37

then suggest the


key words from
the sentence to
be written in the
appropriate
place on the
KWO.
Student
Activity: Paste
in the interactive
journal KWO
sheet. Complete
the KWO as a
class during the
teacher lead
outline.

retell or
summarize the
original story.
Remove the
original story
and have the
class retell it
using their KWO
as a guide.
Student
Activity 1:
Complete
another KWO
from the story
Sea Snakes
individually
without
assistance from
the teacher or
peers. Paste the
KWO into
interactive
journal.

teacher prior to
beginning
student activity
2.
Student
Activity 2:
Test KWO
through retelling
while standing at
their desk.
Proper grammar
and sentence
structure must be
utilized. Upon
finishing turn in
interactive
journal to
teacher for
grading.

Student
Activity 2: Test
by retelling. As
a class, retell the
KWO by
verbalizing the
outline through
the use of
complete
sentences. The
original story
will be removed
from the
Smartboard and
the class
completed KWO
will be
displayed.
Adjustments
for TAG, ELL,
& SPED
Students

Note: There are


no adaptations
for the preassessment in
order to
correctly assess
what students
already know.

None

None

Talented and
Gifted (TAG):
Complete a
KWO Chart
from a 7-9
sentence
paragraph.
Special
Education
(SPED) &

Page 37 of 82

Talented and
Gifted (TAG):
Retell the
previous days
7-9 sentence
paragraph using
their KWO at
the front of the
class.
Special

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

Assessment To
Be Given

Key Word
Outline PreAssessment.

38

No assessment

No assessment

English
Language
Learners
(ELL):
Complete a 4
sentence
paragraph that
contains simple
sentences along
with a KWO that
has one of three
key words
already
provided.
Pictures can be
used for the
remaining two
key words.

Education
(SPED) &
English
Language
Learners
(ELL): Students
will retell their
KWO while
seated at their
desk.

Formal
Summative
Assessment:
KWO Chart
completed from
the Sea Snakes
5 sentence
paragraph story.

Informal
Formative
Assessment:
Students will
retell their KWO
Chart to the
class while
seated at their
desk. A Public
Speaking Rubric
will be used to
grade this
assessment.

Week Two: Creating the Rough Draft and Title


Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Lesson Title
Dates
Learning Goals
Addressed
Objectives
Addressed
Learning
Activity

Friday

Tell Me a Tale
10/6/14
Learning Goal 1

All About a Bird


10/7/14
Learning Goal 2

Strong Feelings
10/8/14
Learning Goal 2

It Makes Sense
10/9/14
Learning Goal 2

Whats In a Title
10/10/14
Learning Goal 2

Objectives 1, 2,
&3
Teacher
Activity 1:
Return graded
interactive
journals to
students along
with a copy of
Cocks and
Eagle to paste
in their journal.

Objectives 1 & 2

Objectives 1 & 2

Objectives 1 & 2

Teacher
Activity 1:
Discuss with
students what
they know about
the writing
process.
Complete a
KWO on the
Smartboard for
Cocks and
Eagle.

Teacher
Activity 1:
Display the
previous days
Cocks and
Eagle KWO.
Discuss with
students the
descriptive
adjectives and
strong verbs that
will help create
feeling and add
character to their

Objectives 1, 2,
&3
Teacher
Activity 1:
Discuss with
students tips and
tricks for
writing: doublespace, do not
erase because it
wastes time, and
make as few
changes as
possible.

Teacher
Activity2:
Review rules

Teacher

Page 38 of 82

Teacher

Teacher
Activity 1:
Discuss with
students the
creation of titles
in writing.
Teach them to
choose key
words from the
last sentence of
their writing.
Look for
dramatic words
from the last

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

and
requirements of
a KWO.
Teacher
Activity 3:
Introduce
Composition
Checklist to
students and
review proper
sentence
structure in
writing and the 5
requirements of
a complete
sentence:
capitalization,
punctuation,
subject, verb,
and makes sense
with every word.
Review
subject/verb
agreement.
Display
checklist and
play the
complete
sentence jingle.
Student
Activity 1: Paste
Cocks and
Eagle handout
in interactive
journal. Create a
KWO in journal
for Cocks and
Eagle ensuring
to stick to the
requirements of
a maximum of 3
key words and
the use of
Roman
Numerals.
Student
Activity 2:
Informal
summative
assessment
(listed below).

39

Activity 2: Use
the KWO to
recreate the
Cocks and
Eagle
paragraph
sentence by
sentence.
Discuss with
students double
spacing their
writing. Model
proper sentence
structure
ensuring to stop
and discuss
subject/verb
agreement and
the five
components of a
complete
sentence.
Student
Activity 1: Copy
teachers
paragraph from
the Smartboard
into interactive
journal ensuring
to skip lines on
their paper.

writing. Give
students the
Descriptive
Adjectives
Handout for
their interactive
journals.
Teacher
Activity 2:
Discuss the
concept of
banned words.
Display the
banned words
trash can slide
on the
Smartboard.
Brainstorm with
students
alternative
words for the
following
banned words:
said, see, saw,
go, and went.
Write the
alternative
words on the
Smartboard for
students to copy
in their journals.
Teacher
Activity 3: Look
for banned
words in KWO
for Cocks and
Eagle and
replace them
with the
alternatives.
Teacher
Activity 4:
Display writing
prompt images
on the
Smartboard and
have students
use descriptive
adjectives to
describe the
images.

Page 39 of 82

Activity 2: Recreate paragraph


on Smartboard
sentence by
sentence
modeling proper
structure using
Cocks and
Eagle KWO
from previous
day. This is the
first rough draft.
Teacher
Activity 3:
revise and edit
paragraph as a
class. Read the
rough draft to
make sure it
makes sense, the
sentences flow
well, and subject
and verb agree.
Student
Activity 1: Copy
the rough draft
completed as a
class into
interactive
journal.

sentence that
creates an image
or feeling.
Teacher
Activity 2: Use
rough draft of
Cocks and
Eagle from
previous day to
create a title as a
class.
Demonstrate
writing the
rough draft with
the addition of
the title on the
Smartboard.
Teacher
Activity 3: Give
students copy of
Boy and Nuts
to put in
interactive
journal for
homework
assignment (see
student activity 3
for instructions).
Give students
Composition
Checklist.
Student
Activity 1: Copy
the rough draft
with the title into
interactive
journal.
Student
Activity 2: Paste
Boy and Nuts
and Composition
Checklist into
interactive
journal.
Student
Activity 3
(Homework):
Write a KWO
for Boy and
Nuts. Create a

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

40

rough draft from


the KWO using
the Composition
Checklist as a
guideline. Create
a title for the
rough draft.

Student
Activity 1: Cut
and paste
Descriptive
Adjective
Handout into
interactive
journal.
Student
Activity 2:
Write banned
words and
alternatives in
interactive
journal.
Student
Activity 3: Use
descriptive
adjectives to
describe the
images
displayed on the
Smartboard.
Adjustments
for TAG, ELL,
& SPED
Students

Assessment To
Be Given

Special
Education
(SPED) &
English
Language
Learners
(ELL):
The previous
weeks KWO
from the
paragraph Sea
Snakes can be
used in place of
the 7 sentence
paragraph
Cocks and
Eagle.

None

None

Informal
Summative

No assessment

None

Talented and
Gifted (TAG):
students will be
required to
complete their
rough drafts
from a 9-10
sentence
paragraph story.
Special
Education
(SPED) &
English
Language
Learners
(ELL): The
previous weeks
KWO from the
paragraph Sea
Snakes can be
used in place of
the 7 sentence
paragraph
Cocks and
Eagle.

No assessment

Page 40 of 82

Anecdotal
Notes:

Formal
Summative

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

41

Assessment:
Students will be
placed in small
groups to retell
and peer edit
their KWO.

Check for
students
understanding
during the class
completion of
Cocks and
Eagle rough
draft.

Week Three: The Revising and Editing Process


Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Lesson Title
Dates
Learning Goals
Addressed
Objectives
Addressed
Learning
Activity

Muscle Man

Be a Good Cop

Dress it Up

Chilly Penguins

10/13/14
Learning Goal 2

10/14/14
Learning Goal 2

10/15/14
Learning Goal 2

10/16/14
Learning Goal 2

Objectives 1, 2,
&3
Teacher
Activity 1:
Display the
Analyze and
Revise Muscle
Man Handout on
the Smartboard.
Give each
student a copy of
the handout for
their interactive
journals.
Discuss with
students ARMS:
add, remove,
move, and
substitute.
Explain the
editing symbols
on the chart and
how to use them
in the editing
process.

Objectives 1, 2,
&3
Teacher
Activity 1:
Display the Edit
and Proofread
COPS Handout
on the
Smartboard.
Give each
student a copy of
the handout for
their interactive
journals.
Discuss with
students COPS:
capitals, order
and
organization,
punctuation, and
spelling. Give
students the
High Frequency
Word List to
paste in their
interactive
journal.

Objectives 1, 2,
&3
Teacher
Activity 1: Give
students
Penguins
story. Distribute
Composition
Checklist.

Objectives 1, 2,
&3
Teacher
Activity 1:
Review
Penguins with
students and
create a KWO
on the
Smartboard for
students to view.

Teacher
Activity 2: Play
the Said is Dead

Teacher

Teacher
Activity 1:
Introduce the
concept of style
in writing.
Distribute the
Stylistic
Techniques
Handout. Have
students write
strong verb in
line 4 under
Dress-Ups.
Explain to
students that just
like we improve
our appearance
when we dress
up, we can

Page 41 of 82

Teacher
Activity 2:
Review DressUp the Penguin
Worksheet with
students with the
Smartboard
Dress-Up the
Penguin game.
Student
Activity 1:
Work in small
groups to peer
revise and edit
rough drafts
form Penguins

Assessment:
Students will
construct a
rough draft
paragraph using
their KWO from
the 7 sentence
paragraph using
strong verbs
from their verbs
list in their
sentences.
Students will
check for banned
words in their
rough drafts and
create a creative
and catchy title.

Friday
Use Your Words
Wisely
10/17/14
Learning Goal 2
Objectives 1, 2,
&3
Teacher
Activity 1:
Collect students
journals for
Formal
Summative
Assessment.
Teacher
Activity 1: Use
the rest of the
class period to
discuss the use
of vocabulary in
writing.
Student
Activity 1:
Write one
sentence that
contains a strong
verb and one
vocabulary word
from the current
or a previous
vocabulary unit.
Write sentence

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

Game. Call out


a few dead
words (boring
words) and
alive words
(exciting words)
and have
students act out
whether they are
dead or alive to
correspond with
the word called
out.
Student
Activity 1: Play
the Said is
Dead game.
Student
Activity 2: Paste
the Analyze and
Revise Muscle
Man Handout in
interactive
journal.
Student
Activity 3:
Revise previous
weeks rough
draft of Cocks
and Eagle.

42

Activity 2:
Explain the
difference
between revising
and editing.
Teacher
Activity 3: Take
up journals and
grade revised
and editing
paragraphs. Use
Composition
Checklist in
journals for
grading.
Student
Activity 1:
Revise and edit
homework from
Friday of
previous week.
Turn in for
grade.

improve our
writing with
dress-ups.
Teacher
Activity 2:
Explain to
students that the
minimum rule
for dress-ups in
one dress-up
each per
paragraph. They
are to underline
their dress-ups
with a single
underline.
Student
Activity 1: Paste
Penguins story
and Composition
Checklist in
interactive
journal.
Student
Activity 2:
Complete the
Dress-Up the
Penguin
Worksheet.
Dress the
penguin with
strong verbs by
writing strong
verbs on the
penguin to
describe him.
Student
Activity 3: Read
the Penguins
story and
independently
create a KWO in
interactive
journal.
Brainstorm for
strong verbs and
write them on
Composition
Checklist pasted
in journal.

Page 42 of 82

story. Underline
strong verbs
dress-ups in
rough drafts.
Use composition
checklist to peer
review another
students rough
draft.
Student
Activity 2: After
revising and
edition is
complete, create
a final draft.

on the
Smartboard.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

43

Student
Activity 4:
Create a rough
draft and include
a title.
Adjustments
for TAG, ELL,
& SPED
Students

None

None

Talented and
Gifted (TAG):
Revise and edit
rough draft.
Special
Education
(SPED) &
English
Language
Learners
(ELL):
The previous
weeks KWO
from the
paragraph
Cocks and
Eagle can be
used in place of
Penguins.

Assessment To
Be Given

No Assessment

Formal
Formative
Assessment:
Students will
revise and edit
their rough draft
from Cocks and
Eagle and
create a title for
their writing.
The
Composition
Checklist will be
used for grading.

No Assessment

Special
Education
(SPED) &
English
Language
Learners
(ELL): Pair with
a TAG student.

None

Informal
Formative
Assessment:
Peer revising
and editing of
another students
rough draft.

Formal
Summative
Assessment:
Students will
create a KWO,
rough draft,
rough draft with
revisions and
editing marks,
and final draft.

Week Four: Summarizing Narrative Stories


Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Lesson Title
Dates
Learning Goals
Addressed
Objectives
Addressed
Learning
Activity

Dont Cry Wolf


10/20/14
Learning Goal 3

Opposite Day
10/21/14
Learning Goal 3

Said is Dead
10/22/14
Learning Goal 3

Objectives 1 & 2

Objectives 1, 2,
&3
Teacher
Activity 1:
Return graded
small group
KWOs to

Objectives 1, 2,
3&4
Teacher
Activity 1:
Display and
review the SSC
from yesterday.

Teacher
Activity 1: Give
students Story
Sequence Chart
(SSC) to paste in

Page 43 of 82

10/23/14

No School
Fall Break

Friday
10/24/14

No School
Fall Break

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

44

their journal.
Introduce the
concept of the
SSC. Display
the chart on the
Smartboard to
review with
students.

students. Have
students split
back up into
their groups
from yesterday
to prepare to test
their KWO by
retelling.

Teacher
Activity 2: Give
students The
Boy Who Cried
Wolf story to
paste in their
journal. Read
the story out
loud having
students follow
along.

Teacher
Activity 2:
Have students
open journals to
their Stylistic
Techniques
Handout and
write ly adverb
in line number 2.
Give students
the ly Adverb
List Handout to
paste in their
interactive
journal.

Teacher
Activity 3:
Answer SSC
questions as a
class having
students write
the answers in
their journal to
have as an
example for
future reference.
Teacher
Activity 4:
Complete a
KWO for The
Boy Who Cried
Wolf and
display on the
Smartboard
alongside the
SSC and
demonstrate how
the KWO
follows the SSC.
Explain to
students that the
key words in
parenthesis in
the KWO are the
elements of the
story that can be
altered.
Creativity is

Teacher
Activity 3:
Discuss with
students the use
of antonyms as
replacers for
words in their
KWO. Use the
KWO along with
the story to
complete an SSC
with students as
a class. Test the
outline by
calling on
students to retell
the KWO.
Student
Activity 1: Test
KWO by
retelling. Each
student will take
turns using their
altered KWO
only to test the
altered story by
retelling.

Create a Story
Sequence
Outline (SSO)
using the SSC
and KWO as a
class ensuring to
use parenthesis
for words that
can be altered
and underlining
words that must
remain the same.
Teacher
Activity 2: As a
class, create a
rough draft using
the SSO
modeling proper
writing
techniques and
including the
dress-ups
covered so far
(strong verbs
and ly adverbs.
Discuss using
quotations in
direct quotes to
show
conversations.
Student
Activity 1:
Smartboard
game of Dead
or Alive banned
words.
Student
Activity 2: Copy
rough draft into
interactive
journal to use an
example in the
future.

Student

Page 44 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

suggested with
these words.
Encourage
students to find
dress-ups for
those words in
parenthesis.
Explain that the
words that are
underlined are a
part of the plot
or problem and
must not be
altered.

45

Activity 2: Paste
ly Adverb
Handout in
interactive
journal.

Teacher
Activity 5: Pair
students into
groups of 3-4 to
brainstorm
possible
alternatives to
the story while
keeping the
same problem.
Student
Activity 1: In
small groups,
use the KWO for
The Boy Who
Cried Wolf
displayed on the
Smartboard and
brainstorm
alternatives to
the setting and
characters in the
story. The
problem of the
story must
remain the same.
On a sheet of
notebook paper,
write each group
members name
on the top, the
homeroom
teachers name,
and the date.
Write the
alternatives into
another KWO.
Rename the
story with a new

Page 45 of 82

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

46

title to be written
in the new
KWO. Turn the
KWO in for
grading.
Adjustments
for TAG, ELL,
& SPED
Students

Talented and
Gifted (TAG):
Students will be
paired with other
TAG students to
complete a
KWO for The
Elves and the
Shoemaker and
then brainstorm
alternatives to
the setting and
the characters.
Create a new
title and KWO
using the new
alternative
words.

None

None

No School
Fall Break

No School
Fall Break

No Assessment

No Assessment

No School
Fall Break

No School
Fall Break

Special
Education
(SPED) &
English
Language
Learners
(ELL): Replace
The Boy Who
Cried Wolf
with the shorter
story Whales.
Pair with a TAG
student.
Assessment To
Be Given

Formal
Formative
Assessment:
KWO with
alternative
words from
small group
brainstorming
student activity.

Week Five: Reworking a Summary


Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Lesson Title
Dates
Learning Goals

Its a Clincher

Youre Banned

Quality Style

10/27/14
Learning Goal 3

10/28/14
Learning Goal 3

10/29/14
Learning Goal 3

Page 46 of 82

R.I.P. Rip Van


Winkle
10/30/14
Learning Goal 3

Friday
Thats a Wrap
10/31/14
Learning Goal 3

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

Addressed
Objectives
Addressed
Learning
Activity

Objectives 1, 2,
&3
Teacher
Activity 1 Finish
the rough draft
from previous
week of The
Boy Who Cried
Wolf. Review
with students
that the title
should be a
repeat of the last
sentence in the
story or the final
clincher of the
story found in
the last sentence.
Teacher
Activity 2:
Display a final
clincher
sentence from
The Elves and
the Shoemaker
on the
Smartboard for
students to
create a title.
Teacher
Activity 3: Give
students
Transition
Words
Interactive
Handout for
their journal to
be completed
during class.
Explain to
students that
transition words
are words found
at the beginning
of a sentence to
help sequence
information and
move the story
along. Stress
that transition
words should be
followed by a

47

Objectives 1, 2,
3, & 4
Teacher
Activity 1:
Discuss the use
of firstly,
secondly, and
thirdly and their
avoidance in
writing. Have
students write
them in their
banned words
list.
Teacher
Activity 2: Use
the rough draft
of The Boy
Who Cried
Wolf to revise
and edit as a
class. Model
proper use of
transition word.
Use the
Composition
Checklist as a
guide for
revising and
editing.
Student
Activity 1:
Write the words
firstly, secondly,
and thirdly in
banned word list
in journal.
Student
Activity 2:
Rewrite the final
draft for The
Boy Who Cried
Wolf using the
rough draft
completed as a
class displayed
on the
Smartboard.
Student
Activity 3: With

Objectives 1, 2,
3, & 4
Teacher
Activity 1:
Collect The
Boy Who Cried
Wolf KWO,
SSC, SSO,
rough draft with
peer editing, and
final draft. Hand
out the There,
Their, and
Theyre
Worksheet to
complete as a
class. Display
the handout on
the Smartboard
to use as an
interactive
lesson. Call on
students to fill in
the blanks
testing their
words for
correction.
Discuss the use
of these
homophones.
Teacher
Activity 2:
Discuss the
importance of
quality
adjectives in
writing. Have
students write in
quality
adjectives in line
number 5 under
Dress Ups in
their Stylistic
Technique
Handout located
in their
interactive
journal.
Teacher
Activity 3:
Write the banned
words bad, good,

Page 47 of 82

Objectives 1, 2,
3, & 4
Teacher
Activity 1: Read
the story Rip
Van Winkle out
loud having
students follow
along. Create a
KWO as a class
displaying it on
the Smartboard.
Teacher
Activity 2:
Review with
students the
dress-ups
covered
previously:
strong verbs, -ly
adverbs, and
quality
adjectives.
Explain to
students that
they will be
recreating the
story Rip Van
Winkle by
changing the
characters and
the setting but
keeping the
problem.
Teacher
Activity 3:
Discuss the
homophones to,
two, and too.
Demonstrate
their correct
usage on the
Smartboard.
Student
Activity 1:
Create a SSO
using the KWO
displayed on the
Smartboard.
Choose
alternative

Objectives 1, 2,
3, & 4
Teacher
Activity 1:
Review the
importance of
transitions,
strong verbs, -ly
adverbs, quality
adjectives, and
antonym
replacers.
Review creative
titling and the
homophones
their, there,
theyre, two, to,
and too.
Teacher
Activity 2:
Distribute a
Composition
Checklist to each
student. Explain
that they will be
using the
checklist to peer
edit another
students rough
draft.
Student
Activity 1:
Create a rough
draft using SSO
of reworked
Rip Van
Winkle.
Student
Activity 2: Peer
edit another
students rough
draft. Use
correct editing
marks for any
needed changes.
Complete a
Composition
Checklist as part
of your peer
editing.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

comma.
Student
Activity 1:
Create a title
using the final
clincher
sentence
displayed on the
Smartboard.
Write the title on
a sheet of
notebook paper
to turn in for a
grade.
Student
Activity 2: Paste
Transition
Words
Interactive
Handout in
journal. Write
transition words
under the
corresponding
flaps to create a
reference list for
future use.

48

an assigned
partner,
proofread
partners final
draft by reading
it aloud and
listening for any
mistakes,
making
corrections as
needed using
proper editing
marks.
Student
Activity 4:
rewrite final
draft making any
necessary
corrections
found during
proofreading
exercise. Turn in
on Wednesday
for a grade. Can
be completed as
homework if
class time does
not allow for
completion.

and pretty on the


Smartboard for
students to copy
into their list of
banned words in
their journal.
Brainstorm as a
class alternative
words to replace
bad, good, and
pretty.
Teacher
Activity 4:
Distribute Rip
Van Winkle to
students.
Student
Activity 1:
There, Their,
and Theyre
Worksheet to
complete as a
class. Fill in the
correct answers
as completed.
Student
Activity 2: write
in quality
adjectives in line
number 5 under
Dress Ups in
their Stylistic
Technique
Handout located
in interactive
journal.
Student
Activity 3:
Write the banned
words bad, good,
and pretty on list
of banned words
in journal.
Brainstorm as a
class alternative
words to replace
bad, good, and
pretty.
Student
Activity 4: Paste

Page 48 of 82

characters and
setting keeping
the same
problem.
Student
Activity 2: Pair
up with another
student to test
the SSO by
retelling.
Brainstorm
alternative
words for the
new story with
partner.
Student
Activity 3: Play
To, Two, and
Too Smartboard
game.

Student
Activity 3:
Create a final
draft of
reworked Rip
Van Winkle to
be turned in for a
grade.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

49
the story Rip
Van Winkle
into interactive
journal.

Adjustments
for TAG, ELL,
& SPED
Students

None

Talented and
Gifted (TAG):
Students will be
using the story
The Elves and
the Shoemaker
to create a
KWO, SSC,
SSO, rough
draft, and final
draft on their
own.

None

None

Special
Education
(SPED) &
English
Language
Learners
(ELL): The
Ant and the
Grasshopper
can be substitute
for Rip Van
Winkle.

Special
Education
(SPED) &
English
Language
Learners
(ELL): Students
will be given a
SSC with bits of
information
already written
in from a shorter
fable or fairy
tale. Students
can be paired up
with a TAG
student to assist
in their SSO.
Teacher peer
revising and
editing. Students
may use their
story Whales
in place of The
Boy Who Cried
Wolf. Assist in
areas where
students might
be struggling.
Assessment To
Be Given

Formal
Formative
Assessment:
Create a title
from a final
clincher
sentence

Informal
Summative
Assessment:
Peer edited final
copy of The
Boy Who Cried
Wolf.

Talented and
Gifted (TAG):
students will be
asked to use
their SSO as a
guide to write
their own fable
or fairy tale.

Formal
Summative
Assessment:
Final draft of
The Boy Who
Cried Wolf.
KWO, SSC,

Page 49 of 82

None

Formal
Summative
Assessment:
Final draft for
rewritten story
of Rip Van
Winkle. KWO,

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

50

displayed on the
Smartboard.

SSO, rough draft


with peer
editing, and final
draft must be
turned in
together.

SSO, rough
draft, and final
draft must be
turned in
together.

Week Six: Citations and Bibliographies


Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Lesson Title

Whooping Crane

Dates
Learning Goals
Addressed
Objectives
Addressed
Learning
Activity

11/3/14
Learning Goal 4
Objectives 1
Teacher
Activity 1:
Distribute the
story Crazy
about Bach and
the Odds and
Ends Handout.
Teacher
Activity 2:
Explain the
topic/clincher
rule: the topic
sentence and the
clincher
(typically the
last sentence)
must repeat or
they must reflect
two to three key
words. Have
students copy
the rule as you
demonstrate it
on the
Smartboard.
I. Topic
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Clincher
Draw an arrow
from Topic and
round it out to
Clincher. Write

Youve Been
Cited
11/4/14
Learning Goal 4
Objectives 1, &
4
Teacher
Activity 1:
Create a KWO
for Crazy
About Bach as
a class. Display
on the
Smartboard. Test
by retelling.
Teacher
Activity 2:
Distribute the
Youve Been
Cited
Bibliography
Packet to each
student.
Introduce the
concept of a
bibliography and
citations using
the Powerpoint
presentation that
goes with the
packet. Walk
students through
their packet
discussing
example cards in
and text
demonstrating
citations.

Assess Me
11/5/14
Learning Goal 4
Objectives 1, 2,
3, & 4
Teacher
Activity 1:
Distribute
Citation and
Bibliography
Assessment.
Teacher
Activity 2:
Create a rough
draft
demonstrating
citations and
bibliography
from the KWO
of Crazy about
Bach: as a class.
Revise and edit
as a class.
Student
Activity 1:
Formal
formative
assessment.

Student
Activity 1:
Examine the
Youve Been
Cited

Page 50 of 82

Lets Take a
Trip
11/6/14
Learning Goal 4
Objectives 1, 2,
3, & 4
Teacher
Activity 1: Take
students to the
library to choose
a source text
from a list
provided that
includes short
articles or essays
from magazines
or digests.
Teacher
Activity 2:
Distribute
Composition
Checklist to
students to fill in
the top portion
with their name,
student number,
homeroom
teacher, date,
and title of
article chosen.
Teacher
Activity 3:
Explain to
students they
will be
completing a
KWO, SSO,
rough draft,
rough draft with
editing marks,
final copy with
citations and
bibliography

Friday
Unit Clincher
11/7/14
Learning Goal 4
Objectives 1, 2,
3, & 4
Teacher
Activity 1:
Collect PostAssessment and
Composition
Checklist to be
graded.
Student
Activity 1:
Formal
Summative PostAssessment.
Choose a
reference source
from the library
to create a KWO
and then a rough
draft that must
consist of 3
paragraphs.
Revise and edit
checking for
dress-ups.and
correctly
documented
citations and
bibliography.
Must have 2
references.
Student
Activity 2:
Prepare for final
project next
week.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

repeat, reflect, 23 key out to the


side.
Teacher
Activity 2: read
Crazy about
Bach out loud
having students
follow along.
Demonstrate
how to annotate
text noting
interesting facts
or details.

51

Bibliography
Packet while
teacher
demonstrates the
concepts.

written in their
neatest
handwriting in
pen for a unit
grade.
Teacher
Activity 4:
Explain that
students will be
completing a
final project over
the weekend and
will be given the
opportunity to
perform their
project the
following week.
Inform students
they will use
their reworking
of Rip Van
Winkle for their
project.
Distribute the
Project
Instructions to
each student.

Teacher
Activity 3:
Explain that they
will be limited to
5 to 6 lines of
detail for the
story regardless
of the number of
sentences in the
story. Only
three key words
will be allowed
per detail.

Student
Activity 1:
Choose source
text from list
provided.
Create a KWO
and SSO.

Student
Activity 1: Copy
annotations on
Crazy about
Bach as
displayed by
teacher on
Smartboard.
Paste into
interactive
journal.
Adjustments
for TAG, ELL,
& SPED
Students

None

None

None

Page 51 of 82

None

Talented and
Gifted (TAG):
Students will
choose a more
challenging
story as a
reference source.
Students will be
required to have
3 or more
references and
in-text citations.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

52

Special
Education
(SPED) &
English
Language
Learners
(ELL): Students
can use digests
for their
reference source
and create
illustrations for
their writing.
Their writing
must consist of 2
paragraphs and 1
reference.
Assessment To
Be Given

None

None

Formal
Formative
Assessment:
Citation and
Bibliography
Assessment.
Students will
correctly cite a
reference within
a given text and
create a
bibliography for
the reference.
Source
information will
be provided for
students to
create their
citation and
bibliography.

Page 52 of 82

Informal
Summative
Assessment:
Students will
exchange papers
to edit and check
that references
are properly
cited and
documented.

Informal
Assessment
Through a
Performance:
Students will
come dressed as
a character from
their story to
read their story
to the class next
week.
Formal
Summative
PostAssessment:
Students will
choose a
reference source
from the library
to create a KWO
and then a rough
draft that must
consist of 3
paragraphs.
Students will
revise their
writing,
incorporating
dress-ups and
correctly
document their
in-text citations
and
bibliography.
Students must
have 2

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

53

references. A
rubric will be
used to
determine
scores.

Elaboration of Learning Activities


Each lesson within this unit builds from the concepts of the preceding lesson to culminate
into a final project and a formative summative post-assessment. The unit begins with a preassessment to measure the mastery level of students in the concept area of key word outlines.
The pre-assessment was necessary to introduce the writing process to students. The results
indicated that students demonstrated a level of mastery in the area of key word outlines and
summarizing necessary to proceed to the first lesson in the unit titled Those Sneaky Snakes,
which addresses learning goal one, objectives one and two. No technology is used for this lesson
as it is a hands-on lesson where students will create an interactive journal that will be added to
over the course of the school year. A table of contents is created and the first story of the unit
titled Sea Snakes is pasted into the journal. Students will read the story independently with no
assistance from peers or the teacher. The subsequent lesson, What You Should Know about a
KWO, introduces students to the rules of creating a KWO as it applies to this unit.
The lesson, What You Should Know about a KWO, was designed as a result of the higher
level of mastery illustrated in the pre-assessment. No review of prior knowledge was required to
move on to this lesson, which addresses learning goal one, objectives one and two. The
Smartboard is used in the lesson to display the story Sea Snakes for the teacher to model for
students the correct procedure for completing a KWO. This lesson sets the stage for all
upcoming lessons in this unit. Without possessing the basic skills of creating a KWO, students
will not understand the process of summarizing without plagiarizing. There is no assessment for
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this lesson plan as students are completing the activity alongside the teacher. The teacher is
modeling the proper technique and procedures for creating a KWO along with asking higher
order thinking questions during the process to engage students in the thought process of choosing
important key words within text.
Week twos lesson plan, Tell Me a Tale, contains an activity that was designed to allow
students to demonstrate their knowledge of key word outlines and how to create them. Tell Me a
Tale is aligned with learning goal one, objectives one, two, and three. The Smartboard is used to
display the Composition Checklist, and the five requirements for a complete sentence jingle.
Students will paste the story Cocks and Eagle into their interactive journal to use in the
creation of a KWO. Students are instructed to adhere to the requirements of a maximum of 3
key words per sentence using Roman numerals as their numbering system. This lesson, along
with each of the lessons in this unit, is designed with the results of the pre-assessment in mind.
Students attained the scoring goal on the pre-assessment; therefore, there was little need for
extended instruction on creating a KWO. This allowed for more time on other writing concepts
such as the five requirements of a complete sentence. Students are given an informal summative
assessment that will require them to be placed in small groups to peer edit their KWO. Students
who might be struggling with this concept can benefit from the peer editing process because they
are able to witness other students set an example of how to properly execute the test by retelling
process. This lesson contains an adjustment for SPED and ELL students, which allows them to
use the story Sea Snakes from a previous lesson in lieu of the seven sentence paragraph
Cocks and Eagle.
One of the more challenging activities occurs in week three. The lesson, Use Your
Words Wisely, incorporates learning goal two, objectives one, two, and three, which requires

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students to complete a final draft to submit for a grade. Prior to completing a formal summative
assessment, students will participate in a class discussion on the importance of vocabulary in
writing. They will write a sentence that contains a strong verb along with one vocabulary word
from the current or previous vocabulary unit. Students will write their sentences on the
Smartboard. A formal summative assessment requires students to read the story Penguins and
create a KWO; write a rough draft, revise and edit the rough draft using editing marks; and create
a final draft. This is the first assessment that students will be graded on all four writing concepts
taught. Students must demonstrate understanding of all areas prior to moving forward to the next
weeks lessons. If students do not demonstrate understanding, the unit will be adjusted to allow
for additional time to re-visit previous lessons.
The unit culminates with two very important lessons: Lets Take a Trip and Unit
Clincher; both of which incorporate learning goal four and objectives one, two, three, and four.
In Lets Take a Trip, students go to the library to choose a source text from a list of short articles
or essays obtained from a magazine or digest. Students will use their knowledge obtained from
this unit to complete a formal summative assessment in the Unit Clincher lesson where they will
use their chosen article to complete a KWO, SSO, rough draft, rough draft with editing marks,
final copy with citations and bibliography written in pen in their neatest handwriting for a grade.
The final project is an informal summative assessment where students will use their reworking of
Rip Van Winkle from the lesson titled Thats a Wrap to tell their story to the class from the
perspective of one of the characters in the story. Students will come dressed as their character
and read their story to the class for a speaking grade.
This unit is long in length; however, it is essential to spend the time on these concepts to
ensure that students become detailed writers. Each lesson in this unit is designed to draw

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students attention to the important and key details in writing, which serve to train students to
pay attention to the details. In addition, students will gain life skills, such as recalling
information. By and large, the strategies and concepts learned in this unit will aid in the
improvement of individual writing skills. By the end of the unit students should have marked
improvement in each of the writing concepts, attention to details, and information recall.
Instructional Decision Making
To help all students achieve, teachers need to systematically and routinely use data to
guide instructional decisions and meet students learning needs (National Association of
Elementary Principals, n.d.). Decisions are continually made by teachers for the betterment of
students to increase their chances of success in the classroom. Data must be collected routinely
in order to have a clear image of students achievement. Data use is an ongoing cycle of
collecting multiple data sources, interpreting data to formulate hypotheses about strategies to
raise student achievement and implementing instructional changes to test hypotheses (National
Association of Elementary Principals, n.d.). Reflecting on the days lesson can assist teachers in
identifying any factors that might be motivational, and then use those motivational factors to
improve student performance. Teachers often become rushed in their instruction feeling the need
to ensure that they cover all planned concepts; however, It is important for teachers to slow
down and ask why during this phase of the cycle of instructional improvement (National
Association of Elementary Principals, n.d.).
On numerous occasions, students have caused a decrease in momentum of instructional
delivery causing me to question my teaching methods. There are two particular occasions that
caused a near halt to the instructional phase of my lessons. The first instance transpired during a
vocabulary lesson at the beginning of a new unit. The normal procedure for introducing new

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unit vocabulary words set forth by my cooperating teacher is to read the story from their
vocabulary book, which utilizes the vocabulary words within the context, and then discuss the
words as they appeared in the story. Although the curriculum calls for this method, I had my
doubts as to how well students would respond to this process. My concern was that students
would tune out during the reading and receive no benefit from my instruction. I decided to
follow protocol and informally assess students during my reading by looking at their faces and
posture to get a better idea of who is listening and paying attention and who has completely
zoned out. One paragraph in, I realized that at least 30% of the class had become disenchanted
with the lesson. An immediate directional change was needed in order to guide these students
back to the lesson at hand. Instead of reading the story, I decided to make it an interactive
reading lesson that included a vocabulary lesson to engage students and encourage them to
participate
Through informal assessment, I quickly realized that not only were the students
disenchanted, but they appeared somewhat perplexed with many of the vocabulary words. It
became evident that the students were perplexed with the use of the vocabulary words that they
were unfamiliar with. With the objective of immersing students in vocabulary across the
curriculum, it became evident that a change would need to take place. I firmly believe that the
more students are immersed in vocabulary, their understanding and knowledge will increase and
improve. In order to increase their vocabulary knowledge base, I decided to eliminate the
traditional delivery method of the story, and went with an interactive version that would allow
students to be part of the story. When I came to a vocabulary word within the story, which is
highlighted in bold for students to easily find, I asked for a volunteer to give me the definition of
the word as it is used in the story. The student would then have to give me the part of speech for

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the word as it relates to the story, a synonym, antonym, and alternative sentence for the word.
Students were then asked to choose a synonym for the word and reread the original sentence,
replacing the word with one of its synonyms. At the end of the story students were administered
an assessment on the Smartboard to see how much vocabulary knowledge they retained. A fly
swatter was used to swat flies on the board to reveal a vocabulary word from the unit. In order to
kill the fly, students must be able to give the definition, a synonym, an antonym, and be able to
use it in a sentence. While I would like to say that I came up with the fly swatting game
instantaneously, I cannot take credit for its creation. This Smartboard lesson was one that
already existed in Smart Exchange. All that was needed was a quick change out of the
vocabulary words and it was ready to be utilized with the current vocabulary words.
While student participation improved to 100%, I was curious to see the percentage of
correct responses. My initial hope was that students would be immersed in the vocabulary
through not just games, but through the creative thinking process. Higher order thinking enables
student progress in subject areas beyond what one can imagine. My goal was to have students
use past experiences to relate to the vocabulary words and create a connection that will help with
word recognition. When students identify with these words and draw connections to previous life
experiences, students take ownership of these words and create meaning to what they are reading
and learning. My suspicions were correct and students were truly immersed in their learning
through the relation of life experiences to the lesson. The initial responses of confusion from the
look on their faces quickly changed to confidence and excitement over their accomplishments. I
challenged students to use their words in sentences throughout each day and dazzle their parents
with their newfound knowledge. I charged students with the task of using at least one
vocabulary word in a sentence when speaking to their parents. If their parents could recognize

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the word and confirm that the student used the word correctly they would be rewarded with a
bonus point on their vocabulary assessment. The parents must fill out a prewritten note that
confirms they indeed identified the word and the student used it correctly in order to earn that
bonus point. An improvement was evident as their formal summative assessment scores
increased an average of 10 points.
One other noteworthy moment of instructional restructuring occurred during a grammar
lesson involving an Excellence in Writing KWO. At the beginning of the unit, a goal was set for
students to be able to create a KWO using only three key words from each sentence and as many
symbols and numbers that might be needed to be able to correctly retell the sentence. The
objective was for students to learn to summarize without copying the original text word for word.
The lesson was designed to teach the importance of being able to summarize a narrative text
without plagiarizing. As we completed a KWO together as a class on the Smartboard, it was
evident that students did not understand how to locate key words in a sentence. I removed the
entire story from the Smartboard and wrote the following sentence on the board: Once upon a
time there were three little pigs living in the same barnyard. While this sentence was not the
first sentence in the story, it was extremely similar. I asked the students to give me three key
words from the story. I received numerous answers of three little pigs, and an additional
response of time, little, and pigs.
Realizing that students had little knowledge of what makes a key word, I decided to
discuss sentence classification. I began with having students identify the subject noun in the
sentence. The majority of students correctly responded, and a few responded with three little
pigs. Next, we discussed the verb in the sentence and whether or not that might be important to
the KWO. We then identified the adverbs and adjectives in the sentence and found that we could

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use symbols and numbers to represent them in the KWO; therefore, eliminating the possibility of
using them as one of our three key words. Prepositions and object of the preposition was
covered last. Revisiting the parts of speech through sentence classification was just what was
needed to assist in understanding how to choose those three key words for their KWO.
It was evident that students must have an understanding of the importance of each part of
speech in a sentence in order to find those three important words to use in their KWO. Teaching
students that adjectives and adverbs can be represented through the use of symbols and numbers
created a better understanding of their task of choosing those three key words. The story was
redisplayed on the Smartboard to make a second attempt at creating a KWO. Students were
asked to classify the first sentence prior to choosing their three words. They came to the
understanding that the subject of the sentence must always be included along with the main verb
and any other preposition, adjective, or adverb that could not be represented by using a symbol
or number. By classifying sentences first, students greatly improved their ability to choose three
words.
After informally assessing students while walking around the room during the KWO
creation process, it became clearly evident that students did not have a knowledge base of
commonly used and recognized symbols. A reference of symbols was going to have to be
created for students to refer to while creating their KWO. Rather than typing up a sheet for them
to place in their notebook, I decided to have students be part of the creating process and allow
them to have that sense of ownership of their work. As a class, we created a reference sheet on
the Smartboard, and we played a game of I write, you write where we created our own symbols
for commonly used adjectives, adverbs, and verbs. Some of the symbols used are ones that can
be commonly found on street signs, in books, and in magazines. Others are not so commonly

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used, but evident as to their meaning. My intent is for students to be able to comprehend
something that was created by them to address their level of learning with the initial objective of
creating a KWO in mind.
The symbols created by the students were copied and distributed to all four fourth grade
language arts classes. Students were permitted to use these whenever they were given the task of
creating a KWO. A marked improvement on their KWOs was almost immediate, and students
began to retell their narratives using their KWO as a guideline. Rough drafts were written and
peer edited prior to writing a final draft. Rough drafts were turned in prior to writing a final draft
to allow me to assess their ability to summarize a written narrative without plagiarizing. I was
amazed at how their stories contained the ideas set forth in the original text, yet they did not
contain any plagiarism. Being able to be flexible and quickly adapt a lesson when instructional
methods planned were not as engaging as anticipated, is the sign of a reflective and caring
teacher. Margaret J. Wheatley once stated, Without reflection, we go blindly on our way,
creating more unintended consequences, and failing to achieve anything useful (Brainy Quote,
2014).
Analysis of Learning Results
Analyzing learning results is a critical part of the teaching process, for it provides a way
to assess what students are learning, comprehending, and retaining, as well as the degree to
which they are making progress. The practice of monitoring student learning is an essential
component of high-quality education. The careful monitoring of student progress is shown in
literature to be one of the major factors differentiating effective schools and teachers from
ineffective ones (Education Northwest, 1988). To obtain a picture of how successful this unit
was on delivering the content effectively to the students, data was analyzed reporting the

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performance of the entire class, subgroups, and two individual students. Visual representations
and narratives that profile student performance were used to illustrate the results of each group.
To acquire a better understanding of how well the entire class attained all learning goals
and objectives for this unit, aggregated data was used to generate a graphic representation to
compare the pre- and post-assessment results. Each learning goals assessment results will be
illustrated through the use of a graph, which will be followed by a brief explanation of the graph
and the results that it illustrates. The pre-assessment for all four learning goals consisted of one
formal assessment given at the beginning of the unit, which is included within the first
instructional lesson plan. Its purpose was to analyze the amount of content knowledge pertaining
to KWOs that students possessed prior to beginning the unit. The post-assessment, while much
more extensive, was used to measure the progress in content knowledge of each student based on
a much more extensive reference source list that consisted of more complex writings. Students
were to choose a reference source from the library to create a KWO and rough draft consisting of
three paragraphs. Once the rough draft was complete, students revised and edited their writing
ensuring to incorporate the required dress-ups and correctly document their in-text citations and
references, for which there must be at least two credible sources. These same assessments and
their data will be used to discuss the results of the whole class, subgroups, and individuals.
Whole Group Teaching
For learning goal one, students were expected to illustrate their writing foundations
through the creation of a KWO, and then be able to test their outlines by retelling using complete
sentences. There were three objectives that students must meet: use various source texts to
compose and test a KWO, summarize the source by formulating a KWO, and test the KWO by
retelling using complete sentences. For this specific learning goal there were two different

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assessments given, one of which was the formal pre-assessment. The second assessment
consisted of an informal summative assessment that required students to test a KWO through
retelling while seated at their desk.
The various charts below illustrate the aggregate data analysis of student performance for
learning goal one, which consist of two different assessments. Charts 1 and 2 show the class
grade percentages for the pre- and post-assessment for all four classes, while Charts 3 through 6
illustrate the assessment results for each class period individually.
Chart 1

Chart 2

Pre-Assessment Results
80 or below

23%

81 - 90

Post- Assessment Results

91 and above

80 or below

81 - 90

91 and above

0%

14%

44%
56%
63%

As the graph in Chart 3 demonstrates, there were minimal scores below 80%, with the
majority of students scoring an 80 or above on the pre-assessment. The informal assessment
scores were considerably higher than the pre-assessment scores for this class period. This can be
a result of the diversity of the students in this class, or the comfort level among the students to
speak in front of their peers. The lower pre-assessment scores can be attributed to the students
prior knowledge of KWOs and summarization skills. This group of fourth grade students

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contains one student with dyslexia and three other students with questionable learning
disabilities.
Chart 3

Assessment Results of LG 1 - 1st Period


100
90
80

93
90 8892 89
89
83

81
76

95
95
92 90
90
90
88
86

98
95 94
9496
91

94
91
84
79

82

90
84

73

70

70

PreAssessment
Scores

60
S
c
o
r
e

50
Informal
Summative
Assessment

40
30
20
10
0

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

Student ID #

Chart 4, which contains the results for second period, paints a different image of student
understanding of writing concepts as they pertain to this unit. There were a greater percentage of
students scoring below 90% on the pre-assessment with none falling below 82%. The results of
the informal assessment are greater for this period when compared as percentages. The general
speaking skills of the students in this period are far greater and commanding, which results in
higher assessment score averages. Another contributing factor to the higher average of informal
assessment scores is the number of kinesthetic learners in this group. Kinesthetic learners fare
better on an assessment that allows them to stand and speak than one that requires them to sit and
write, which is clearly illustrated in Chart 4.

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Chart 4

Assessment Results of LG 1 - 2nd Period


100

98

97

95
95
S
c
o
r
e

98
96

96

94

92

92

97

96
93

92

94
89

90

98

95

94
92

89

90

98

91

95

92
88

87

88
86
85

85
83

85

83

82

80
75
70
1

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

Student ID #
Pre-Assessment Scores

Informal Summative Assessment

Chart 5 shows that students in this class are consistent in their informal assessment
scores, demonstrating a solid foundation in speaking skills. The majority of students scored an
85% or higher on the pre-assessment, which lead me to believe these students had prior contact
with a KWO. This group also scored high on the informal assessment, and they demonstrated a
level of ease when delivering their retelling of their KWO. There are three students in this group
with learning disabilities that include dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). The
student with dyslexia was sent to the resource room to have the test administered by a special
needs teacher who can assist in delivering the instructions orally to the student. Students were
not sent to the resource room for the informal assessment; they were required to perform their
speech in the regular classroom. Due to the nature and content of the pre-assessment, there were
no modifications made for the SPED students.

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Chart 5

Assessment Results of LG 1 - 3rd Period


100
90
S
c
o
r
e

98
96 98
96
94
93
93 94 93
91
89 88 90
88
86
85 85
85

88

98
91

97
96
92
90
90
89
86
82
77
75

11

12

76

80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
1

10

13

14

15

16

Student ID #
Pre-Assessment Scores

Informal Summative Assessment

Chart 6, the final chart, illustrates the scores for the fourth class period, which is the only
class to have a student score a 100 on the informal assessment. This particular student is
considered to be advanced in all concept areas of language arts. This class also has the highest
percentage of students that are visual learners. Students in this class performed better on average
on the pre-assessment as it is more visual learning based than the informal assessment for this
particular learning goal. Students in this group also scored well on the informal assessment and
showed a higher comfort level of public speaking. There is a student in this group that is easily
distracted, and while his pre-assessment grade might be reflective of a student with a learning
disability, his informal assessment paints a different image. After observing this student and
reflecting on his assessment performance, testing accommodations were given to him for his

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informal assessment. He was given his informal assessment one-on-one as opposed to publicly
to the entire class.
Chart 6

Assessment Results of LG 1 - 3rd Period

120
100
S
c
o
r
e

97

97

92

90
81

85

89

100
95 93

97

95

88
82

95

94
86

96

94
88

87
76

80

80

91

96

85

97

96
88

85

95
82

60
40
20
0
1

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

Student ID #
Pre-Assessment Scores

Informal Summative Assessment

Learning goal 2 required students to develop their writing foundations by converting


outlines into a written paragraph. The three objectives that students needed to meet included
restating a story in complete sentences using a KWO, constructing a rough draft from a KWO
integrating strong verbs into the sentences, and edit and revise their writing checking for spelling
and grammatical errors. Two assessments were initially planned, which covered the objectives
for this learning goal: a rough draft paragraph, and test by retelling. Students were required to
construct a rough draft paragraph using their KWO from a seven sentence paragraph, for which
strong verbs were to be incorporated into the rough draft. The second assessment consisted of

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students testing their rough draft by retelling it to the class while standing at their desk. After
reviewing the assessment scores for the first assessment, I decided to detour from the original
lesson plan and review the revising and editing process with students. The first assessment was
then re-administered and scores were reviewed to ascertain whether students were ready to move
forward with the planned lessons.
Chart 7 gives the scores of the rough draft assessment for all four class periods based on
percentages of students who scored an 80 or below, an 81 to 90, and a 91 and above.

The

results demonstrate a high percentage of students that have difficulty with writing a rough draft
along with the editing and revising process. After reflecting upon the grades for this assessment,
it became apparent that a detour was needed to improve the students content knowledge of the
revising and editing process. Chart 8 shows the results of the re-test, which is a marked
improvement from the first assessment scores. It was evident that students did not have much
experience with the editing and revising process. They had a firm grasp on completing a KWO;
however, their skills for correcting spelling and grammar errors along with removing dead verbs
and replacing them with strong verbs were lacking.
Chart 7

Chart 8

Rough Draft Assessment


Results - Assessment 1
80 or below

81 - 90

Rough Draft Assessment


Results - Assessment 2

91 and above

80 or below

14%

81 - 90

21%

32%

54%

5%

74%

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Chart 9 compares the informal assessment scores from this learning goal compared to the
results of the public speaking assessment from learning goal 1. It is clear that students in all four
class periods are fairly comfortable speaking in front of their peers. The assessment scores from
the first learning goal informal assessment were fairly high leaving little room for improvement;
however, scores did improved slightly, which can be attributed to having previously completed a
public speaking assessment.
Chart 9

Informal Assessment Scores Comparison


70
#
60
o
f

58
52

50

LG 1
Assessment
Scores

40
S
t
u
d
e
n
t
s

30
20
13
8

10

LG 2
Assessment
Scores

0
80 or below

81 - 90

91 and above

Scores

For learning goal 3, students recalled information from a story and systematically placed
the information into paragraphs to become summaries. Objectively, they would be able to
identify the story sequence with in a story, record information from a story onto a SSC, create a
SSO based on the SSC, summarize stories from their SSO internalizing the components of a
well-constructed paragraph, and then revise and edit their summary to include required dressups. There were four different assessments given within this learning goal; two formal and two
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informal. The results for these assessments, as demonstrated in the graphs, vary tremendously.
As the unit progresses and students are introduced to more difficult concepts, the formal
assessment scores take a substantial dive. Each assessment will be discussed further along with a
visual representation of their results.
Chart 10 shows the assessment scores for the first and second formal assessments where
students were to fill in an SSC from an assigned fable, and then create an SSO based on their
SSC. This assessment, as you will see, gave students some difficulty. The introduction of the
SSC in this part of the unit was much more extensive than the simple KWO students were
introduced to in the beginning. For the SSC, students were challenged through the three sections
that required them to find out information from the story such as who, when, where, what
problem, climax, and resolution. Some of the fables did not clearly state all of this information,
causing students to make inferences on their answers. From this SSC, students had to create a
SSO, which is simply a longer version of a KWO. This is where the difficulty began for the
majority of students. The results were consistent across the four different class periods, which
have been combined on this chart to give a clearer picture of the results. Due to such low
assessment scores, the lesson was extended reviewed for two additional days.
The results of these two assessments were disheartening; however, the scores did
exemplify the need to review the transformation of information from a SSC to a SSO as well as
what makes a well-constructed paragraph. Extra time was needed to work with those students
with learning disabilities to guarantee that students would be successful on learning goal threes
assessments. Those students with dyslexia were pulled from the class and sent to the resource
room to complete their assessment with a special needs teacher who read the instructions and the

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fable to the students so that students would be able to fully comprehend the fable and its
components.
Chart 10

LG 3 Aggregate Data Analysis of Student


Performance
Correctly revises and edits summary to include required dress-ups.
Demonstrates a well-constructed paragraph.
Correct use of symbols in SSO.

Uses only three words on SSO.


Transfers information from the SSC into an SSO.
Correctly identifies the Climax and the Resolution.
Correctly identifies the What and the Problem.

Cummulative Group Scores

Correctly labels the Who-When-Where component of the SSC.

45
38
58
53
30
46

43
45
Number of Students Demonstrating a Score of 80% or Higher

For the informal assessments, students worked in small groups to create an SSO and a
collaborative summary to include techniques addressed from the first lesson through the current
lesson. Students exchanged their rough drafts with another student for peer editing for the
second informal assessment. The scores for these two informal assessments are combined into
chart 11; there results show a slight improvement over the formal assessments. This could be
due to the additional time spent reviewing the information after such low scores on the formal
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assessment, or it could be said that students are benefitting from collaborative work where they
can receive additional help when concepts are not fully understood.
Chart 11

Informal Assessment Scores


80% or Higher
SSO Complete

Number of Students Scoring 80% or Higher

16
14

Collaborative
Summary

12

Rough Draft

10

Peer Edits
Correctly

Included Dress-Ups

6
4

Included Dress-Ups
Peer Edits Correctly

Rough Draft
Collaborative Summary

0
1st Period

2nd Period

SSO Complete

3rd Period

4th Period

The fourth and final learning goal was by far the most difficult for students to master.
They were required to gather, organize, and place information from a reference source obtained
at the library into a KWO to create a rough draft. There were three vital objectives that students
were to complete: create an outline from a reference source found in the library, create a rough
draft incorporating dress-ups into their writing, and practice documenting references and in-text
citations. The formal summative post-assessment was administered as a part of learning goal 4,

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and was given prior to the informal assessment in this learning goal to allow students a second
opportunity to have their paper edited and revised prior to submitting their work for final
grading. With the addition of references and citations, students would need an extra edit and
revising opportunity to ensure they were submitting their best work possible. For their postassessment, students had to choose a reference from the library to create their KWO. A rough
draft was to be completed that consisted of three paragraphs, for which students had to revise and
edit to check for correct use of dress-ups, in-text citations, and correctly documented references,
for which there was a requirement set of two references. Prior to submitting their work, students
completed the informal assessment where they exchanged papers to peer edit, checking for
properly cited and documented references along with the usual editing and revision process.
Chart 12 combines the formal post-assessment results with the informal assessment
results for all four class periods. A score of 80% or higher is needed to be considered as mastery
of the concepts taught in this unit. Those scores that fall below 80% are comprised mostly of
those students labeled with learning disabilities. While the test scores for the pre-assessment
were generally higher than the post-assessment scores, they are not indicative of the results of the
post-assessment scores. The concepts progressed in difficulty as the lessons reached the end of
the unit. Students were expected to complete more extensive KWOs along with detailed
summaries and the incorporation of in-text citations and references. My expectations of scores
for the post-assessment were reached with a few students excelling beyond what I anticipated.

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Chart 12

LG 4 Post-Assessment &
Informal Assessment Scores
KWO Complete.
Rough draft complete.
Rough draft contains three paragraphs.
Correctly revises and edits own paper.
Included at least two in-text citations.
Correctly lists references.
Included two references
Correctly peer edits another students summary.

Cummulative Group Scores

66
66
66
57
54
52
53

59
Number of Students Demonstrating a Score of 80% or Higher

Subgroup Analysis
The subgroup analysis consists of three very unique individuals that are considered to be
lower-level learners and will be referred to as Student A, B, and C throughout this subgroup
analysis. All three students are very different, yet they share similarities when it comes to
learning capabilities. All three students are labeled with a learning disability and struggle in

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class to complete assignments. Each student is removed from the general classroom and sent to
the resource room to complete assessments with a special education teacher who assists them
with their individual assessment needs.
Student A suffers from dyslexia and (ADD), and has learned to cope with both disorders
quite successfully. There are moments where he gazes and appears to be off task; however,
when asked a question he can correctly respond. During lesson plan delivery throughout this
unit, I found that staying within close proximity to him helped keep him focused on the task at
hand. His test scores are not reflective of a student diagnosed with dyslexia and ADD. His
scores will not be reflective of a student suffering from his learning disabilities. His scores
remained consistent throughout the unit with scores ranging from 80% to 98%.
Student B has been recently diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
(ADHD). He is very athletic, participating in triathlons on a regular basis. His parents seem
concerned more with his ability to complete a triathlon than in his ability to complete
assignments. He rarely turns in homework assignments, yet when he does they are typically
scored at 90% or above. He is not removed from the room to take assessments; however, he is
moved to a different desk in the room to complete them. He does like to be the center of
attention, and will often act out to receive that attention. I have discussed his behavior with him
at length and decided to relocate him closer to my desk.
Student C has been labeled with ADD, and represents with the classic symptoms as
defined by the American Academy of Pediatrics. His assessment scores reflect his struggles with
ADD ranging from 76% to 80%. He rarely completes an assessment during the allotted time, so
he is required to stay in during recess to complete them. After observing him complete
assessments in an empty classroom, recommendations were given to his parents to consider

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having him removed from the classroom and sent to the resource room to take his assessments
where he can be free to focus without the added distractions in the general classroom.
It is essential to understand the learning of this particular subgroup in relation to learning
goals one and four, which contain the pre- and post-assessments, in order to reveal the
improvement of content knowledge of this unit, which was designed to be taught to all students.
These three students were chosen because they are considered to have the most extreme cases of
dyslexia, ADD, and ADHD out of the 66 students in fourth grade. Their scores indicate that
adaptation of any lesson can lead to successful student performance and achievement of higher
level thinking. With minimal adaptations, these three students were able to successfully
complete the pre- and post-assessments contained in learning goal one and learning goal four,
with the post-assessment being the most difficult and complex of the two assessments. While I
would like to take credit for the high assessments scores of these students, I cannot solely
attribute their success to my doings. These students, when given the proper tools and adaptations
to fit their needs were successfully able to focus to complete the same assessments given to the
general classroom.
Chart 13 illustrates the three students individual scores on the pre-assessment and the
post-assessment for each category they were graded on. These two assessments are combined as
they were not identical assessments and required different content to be completed. By
combining the two assessments into one graph it is much easier to grasp the ability of these
students to perform at a higher level. Students A, B, and C successfully completed the pre- and
post-assessment with few modifications at a level comparable to other students in the classroom
not labeled with learning disabilities. Their achievements are astounding when considering the
learning obstacles and hurdles they have had to overcome.

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Chart 13

Pre- and Post-Assessment Scores of Subgroup


92
90

Assessment Scores

88
86
84

90
89
88
86
85
84

91
90

88
87
86

89
86

References

84

82

82
81
80
79

80
78

Peer Edited

In-Text Citations
Revision & Editing
Rough Draft
Pre-Assessment

76
74
72

Student A

Student B

Student C

Individual Analysis
Two students were chosen to complete an individual analysis for further examination of
learning skills to possibly gain more insight into improving this unit for future students
possessing learning disabilities. One student with a confirmed diagnosis of ADD was chosen
along with another student not diagnosed with any form of learning disability, yet the test scores
from this unit indicate further examination and a formal evaluation might be needed to
understand the low test scores this student has received.
Student C from the previous subgroup was chosen for further analysis based on his
learning disability and rather high assessment scores. Focusing on learning goal 2 and learning
goal 3, an analysis of assessment scores was completed to draw conclusions on the extent to
which he was able to meet those goals and objectives. Student C was specifically chosen for his
characteristically low level of attention and his ease of distraction during learning. The
assessment data for learning goal 2 and 3 were separated and categorized in order to track the
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growth that Student C made from one goal to the next. While each goal does grow more
complex in nature, there is visible growth to be seen. Chart 14 shows the growth Student C
experienced from one goal to the next for each of the objectives within the goal. From this chart
it is evident that Student C can make progress when given the opportunity. For these two
learning goals the same modifications were made is previously discussed within the subgroup
analysis.
Chart 14

Student C Trend in Learning


Revise summary to include dress-ups.
Summarize story from SSO into a well-constructed paragraph.
Create SSO based on SSC.

Record information onto a SSC.


Identify Story Sequence.
Edit & revise correctly.
Construct rough draft from KWO integrating strong verbs.
Restate story using a KWO.

82

88

84
85

LG 3

87

LG 2
86
Learning Objective Scores

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The second student chosen for individual analysis, Student D, was selected for her high
assessment scores. It is my opinion that this students should be recommended for the gifted
program; however, the parents are not willing to have her assessed. I compiled this data to
represent her abilities and talents in order to persuade her parents to enroll her into a program
that will challenge her to excel in ways that the general classroom cannot. She is an extremely
bright individual who never rushes through her assignments, and displays exemplary learning
skills that have proven to be an asset to the other students in the classroom. Her assessments
throughout this unit have been used as examples for other students to use.
As the chart will indicate, Student D is strong in each of the objectives of learning goals 2
and 3. Her performance on assessments is always high, and she can be seen thoroughly
reviewing each question prior to turning in her work. She has been paired with lower level
learners to assist with review of concepts as well as answer questions that students have
pertaining to the concepts being taught. She has truly been a help in the learning process of the
remaining students during this unit. Chart 15 will illustrate her consistent high level of scores for
all the objectives in learning goals 2 and 3. There will be not growth demonstrated, for there are
simply no adaptations within this unit to accommodate her abilities.
Due to the nature of Prince Avenue Christian Schools strict privacy policy, no examples
of student work will appear in within this sample. Permission to include work samples from the
students was not granted by the school or the parents. While there are no samples to view, the
charts and graphs do demonstrate the capabilities of the students addressed along with any
learning disabilities and talents that the students posses. So with respect to the privacy policy of
the school, I have complied and left out any work samples from students.

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Chart 15

Student D Trend in Learning


100100

100100

100

Restate story using a KWO.


Construct rough draft from KWO
integrating strong verbs.
Edit & revise correctly.
Identify Story Sequence.

99

99

99

Record information onto a SSC.


Create SSO based on SSC.
Summarize story from SSO into a
well-constructed paragraph.

LG 2

LG 3

Reflection and Self-Evaluation

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Revise summary to include dressups.

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References
Areavibes. (2014). Bogart, Georgia crime rates. Retrieved from
http://www.areavibes.com/bogart-ga/crime/
Brainy Quote. (2014). Reflection quotes. Retrieved from
http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/reflection.html
City-Data. (2014). Bogart, Georgia. Retrieved from http://www.city-data.com/city/BogartGeorgia.html
City-Data. (n.d.). Bogart, Georgia profile. Retrieved from http://www.citydata.com/cityw/Bogart-GA.html
Education Northwest. (1988). Monitoring student learning in the classroom. Retrieved from
http://educationnorthwest.org/sites/default/files/monitoring-student-learning.pdf
Georgia Standards. (2011, July 15). 4th grade English language arts common core Georgia
performance standards. Retrieved from https://www.georgiastandards.org/CommonCore/Common%20Core%20Frameworks/CCGPS_ELA_Grade4_Standards.pdf
National Association of Elementary School Principals. (n.d.). Student assessment. Retrieved
from http://www.naesp.org/sites/default/files/Student%20Achievement_blue.pdf
Prince Avenue Baptist Church. (2014). WSML radio 88.9fm. Retrieved from
http://www.pabc.org/ministries/wmsl-radio
Prince Avenue Christian School. (n.d.). Barnabas student ministry. Retrieved from
http://www.princeave.org/discipleship/barnabas-student-ministry
Prince Avenue Christian School. (n.d.). School profile. Retrieved from
http://www.princeave.org/about-us/school-profile

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Pudewa, A. (2012). Institute for Excellence in Writing. Atascadero, CA: Institute for Excellence
in Writing.
Slowbuddy. (2014). 30 fabulous quotes about learning. Retrieved from
http://slowbuddy.com/quotes/30-fabulous-quotes-about-learning/
Sunny Orange. (n.d.). Assessment quotes. Retrieved from
http://www.sunyorange.edu/assessmentapa/docs/AssessmentQUOTES.pdf

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