You are on page 1of 10

JCPS Middle School Literacy

2015-2016

Kentucky Core Academic Standards Curriculum Map


JCPS Middle School English/Language Arts
Grade 7-Cycle 2
Big Idea How Do I Use What I Learn to Make Decisions?
TEACHER OVERVIEW

Cycle 2: Students focus on understanding how point of view and perspective affects the development of characters. Students analyze authors
approaches to a topic and how specific word choice impacts the meaning and tone, and write objective summaries based on information from
literature and informational texts. Students analyze various texts that present differing perspectives on a topic and distinguish one authors position
from that of others and evaluate the strength of argument by assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant to support
claims. They participate in discussion and debate using methods like Fishbowl or Scored Discussion to analyze perspectives and viewpoints and
to better understand the organization and elements of an effective argument. Students conduct research independently or with a partner or group on
topics of their choosing to develop informative and explanatory writing. They compare how two or more authors writing on the same subject
emphasize different evidence or interpretations and compare a written text to audio or video version to analyze how the delivery affects the impact of
words and how the dramatic version of a text is altered by techniques such as lighting, staging, or camera angle. Students use technology including
the internet to interact and collaborate with others and engage with complex, grade-level texts through Close Reading lessons that include writing to
convey understanding of the topic or content. Students continue to select books for independent reading and work toward reading independently
and proficiently in the grade 6-8 complexity band.
Danielson Framework for Teaching
The JCPS Curriculum Maps support teachers in planning and preparation for instruction. Therefore, these documents provide support for teachers
in the following areas of the Framework for Teaching:
Domain 1 - Planning and Preparation
Components A, C, D, E, F
Domain 3 - Instruction
Components Ai; Ci, iii, iv; and Di, ii

WRITING- FOCUS ON INFORMATIONAL/EXPLANATORY

Informational/explanatory writing conveys information accurately. This kind of writing serves several purposes: to increase readers knowledge of
a subject, to help readers better understand a procedure or process, or to provide readers with an enhanced comprehension of a concept. To
produce this kind of writing, students draw not only from their own background knowledge, but from multiple print and non-print texts as well. With
practice, students become better able to develop a controlling idea and to maintain focus on a topic. As students progress, they learn how to
combine the elements of other writing modes, including narrative structure, to produce complex and nuanced writing.

Informational/Explanatory defined (Appendix A,)


Student Samples: Grade 7, Informative/Explanatory Writing Samples (KCAS Binder, Appendix C.)
In Common Grade 7 Writing Student Examples: On-Demand Example Living Through the Great Depression
JCPS Writing Proclamation, JCPS Process Writing Criteria , JCPS Holistic Continuum for Writing
Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC) Rubrics
Prompts for On-Demand Writing Informational/Explanatory Gheens website ELA Middle Instructional Resources
Writing On-Demand

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT TASKS

Sample Performance Tasks


Performance tasks further clarify the meaning of the Standards and illustrate specifically the application of the Standards to texts of sufficient
complexity, quality, and range. See additional examples of performance tasks in Kentucky Core Academic Standards Binder: Appendix B. (Teachers
are encouraged to develop other performance tasks using excerpts from the exemplar libraries.)
For Literary Texts:
After reading and discussing a short story selection, students analyze the story to determine how the actions taken by the character(s)
affect the outcome of the story. Students should discuss inferences made and cite explicit textual evidence to support their analysis.
Essays should be written for an audience familiar with the story and should follow the conventions of Standard English, including standard
capitalization, comma usage, and spelling. (RL.7.3, RL.7.5, W.7.1 a-b, L.7.2)
Grade 7: Cycle
Page 1 of 10
Monday, June 01, 2015

Students explain how Ernesto Galarzas choice of words develops his point of view of in his autobiographical essay from Barrio Boy (Holt
and McDougal). Essays should be written following the conventions of Standard English, including capitalization, comma usage, varying
sentence structure and spelling. (RL.7.4, RL.7.6, W.7.4, W.7.9, L.7.1, L.7.2)
After reading and discussing Ernesto Galarzas autobiographical selection from Barrio Boy, students determine the figurative and
connotative meanings of words such as buxom superstructure, runty, and alien, as well as of phrases such as without further ado, safe
anchorage of the desks, not so much a melting pot as a griddle, and eyes wide open until they popped. They analyze how Galarzas
specific word choices impact the meaning and tone of his writing and the characterization of the individuals and places he describes.
Essays should be written for an audience that is familiar with the story and should follow the conventions of Standard English, including
standard capitalization, comma usage, and spelling. (RI.7.4, W.7.1a-b, L.7.2) (Holt and McDougal)

For Informational Texts:

After reading An Unforgettable Journey (Maijue Xiong Holt, pg. 403), an excerpt from CIA Operations in Laos: Supporting the Secret
War (online article) and watching excerpts from the video archives CIA's Secret War in Laos during the Vietnam War, write an essay that
discusses and evaluates the impact of the Secret War on the lives of the Hmong people. Support your position with evidence from the
texts and video.
After reading and discussing The War of the Wall by Toni Cade Bambara (McDougal, pp.110-116), write an essay analyzing the theme of
the story. Discuss how the theme would change if the story were told from the painters point of view? Cite specific details from the text to
support your response. Your essay should be written for an audience familiar with the story and should follow the conventions of Standard
English. (RL.7.1, RL.7.2, RL.7.6, W.7.2, W.7.4, W.7.9a, L.7.1, L.7.2)

Sample Activities
As you read Barrio Boy, use the Double Entry Response strategy to chart Ernesto Galarzas attitude toward school over time, beginning with
his first day of classes and his feelings at the end of first grade. (RI.7.1-3, RI.7.6, W.7.9)
After reading and discussing Ernesto Galarzas school experiences in Barrio Boy, research the meanings of the terms melting pot and
salad bowl as they are used in reference to cultures in the United States today. Then, in your Literacy Notebook, write an essay arguing
which of these terms best defines the culture of your school. (RL.7.1-2, RL.7.4, W.7.1, W.7.4, W.7.7, L.7.1-4, SL.7.1-3)
Before reading the excerpt from Homesick by Jean Fritz, create a Triple-Entry Vocabulary page for this passage in your Literacy Notebook. As
you read, choose unfamiliar words and write them on your page in your Literacy Notebook (include the context of the sentence(s) in which they
appear). After reading, work with a partner to determine a definition for each word using information from the text. (RL.7.1, L.7.4a-d, L.7.5a-c)
After reading A Matter of Honor (READ XL) by Barbara Seiger, write an essay analyzing how the author used dialogue to develop the
character Tina. Cite evidence from the text to support your analysis. (RL.7.1-3, RL.7.6, W.7.2, W.7.4, L.7.1-3)
After reading and discussing a narrative or informational passage of your choice, choose a variety of sentences or phrases from the text that
you would have crafted differently. Rewrite these sentences in your Literacy Notebook and explain why you worded/structured them the way
you did. (RL.7.1, RI.7.1, L.7.1a-c, SL.7.1)

Possible LDC Template Tasks

After researching (informational texts) on (content or topic), write a (report or substitute) that defines (term or concept) and explains (content).
Support your discussion with evidence from your research. What (conclusions or implications) can you draw? (Informational or
Explanatory/Definition)
[Insert question] After reading (literature or informational texts), write (essay, report, or substitute) that defines (term or concept) and explains
(content). Support your discussion with evidence from the text(s). What (conclusions or implications) can you draw? (Informational or
Explanatory Definition)
[Insert question] After reading (literature or informational texts) write (essay or substitute) that explains (content or concept). What conclusions
or implications can you draw? Cite at least (number) sources, pointing out key elements from each source. In your discussion, address the
credibility and origin of sources in view of your research topic. Identify any gaps or unanswered questions. (Optional: Include (e.g. bibliography).
(Informational or Explanatory/ Synthesis)

Grade 7: Cycle
Page 2 of 10
Monday, June 01, 2015

JCPS COMMON ASSESSMENTS

Refer to the JCPS Middle School ELA Assessment Calendar for assessment timelines. Use common assessments to formatively assess
students understanding of content. Use the data from this analysis for instructional planning and to guide and involve students in setting goals.
Regroup students as needed for intervention to address gaps in learning.

ONGOING STANDARDS
Ongoing KCAS Standards are embedded in instruction delivered throughout the year.
Strand
Ongoing
KCAS
Standards

Reading
Literature and
Informational
1 cite textual
evidence/make inferences
2 -- determine theme/central
idea, objective summary
3 analyze how individuals,
events and/or ideas develop
and interact in text
4 determine meanings of
words and phrases
10 range of reading

Writing

Language

4 clear, coherent
writing to task
5 writing process
9 draw evidence
to support
10 range of
writing

Speaking and Listening

1, 2 conventions of 1 prepare and participate


standard English in
2 integrate and evaluate
writing and speaking information presented
*Refer to
progressions for
interventions
achieve mastery by
end of year.
4, 5, 6 vocabulary
acquisition and use.

Click on this link for a printout of grade level Ongoing Standards


FOCUS STANDARDS AND LEARNING TARGETS

READING
KEY IDEAS AND DETAILS
LITERATURE

LEARNING TARGETS
I can

RL.7.2: Determine a theme or central


idea of a text and analyze its
development over the course of the
text; provide an objective summary of
the text

*
*
*
*

RL.7.3: Analyze how particular


elements of a story or drama interact
(e.g., how setting shapes the
characters or plot.)

define theme (a central idea or lesson the author is revealing Honesty is the best policy.)
determine key events over the course of the text that contribute to the
analyze plot (the events that happen) to determine a theme (authors overall message).
define summary (a shortened version of the text that states its key points).

* compose an objective summary stating the key points of the text without adding my own opinions or feelings.
* identify the elements of a story or a drama (e.g., plot, character, setting).
* explain how the elements of a story or drama interact and affect one another (e.g., Because the story is set
during a time of war, the characters may be called to fight.).
* recognize how making a change to one element of the story or drama could affect the other elements

INFORMATIONAL

I can

RI.7.2: Determine two or more central


ideas in a text and analyze their
development over the course of the
text; provide an objective summary of
the text.

*
*
*
*
*
*

RI.7.3: Analyze the interactions


between individuals, events, and
ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas
influence individuals or events, or
how individuals influence ideas or
events).

* explain how the individuals, events, and/or ideas in a text affect one another.
* analyze interactions between individuals, events, and/or ideas in a text.
* infer how interactions between individuals, events, and/or ideas would be different if one of these elements
changed.

Grade 7: Cycle
Page 3 of 10
Monday, June 01, 2015

define central idea (main point in text).


determine how an author uses details convey (make known) two or more central ideas in a text.
determine how an authors use of details conveys (makes known) two or more central ideas in a text.
analyze how central ideas are developed over the course of a text.
define summary (a shortened version of the text that states the main points).
compose an objective summary stating the key points of the text without adding my own opinions or feelings.

CRAFT AND STRUCTURE


LITERATURE
RL.7.4: Determine the meaning of words
and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative and connotative
meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes
and other repetitions or sounds (e.g.,
alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza
of a poem or section of a story or drama.
RL.7.5: Analyze how a dramas or
poems form or structure (e.g., soliloquy,
sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

RL.7.6: Analyze how an author develops


and contrasts the points of view of
different characters or narrators in a text.

I can
* define and identify various forms of figurative language (e.g., simile, metaphor, hyperbole,
personification, alliteration, assonance, onomatopoeia).
* distinguish between literal language (it means exactly what it says) and figurative language (sometimes
what you say is not exactly what you mean).
* recognize the difference between denotative meanings (all words have a dictionary definition) and
connotative meanings (some words carry feeling).
* analyze why authors use rhyme and repetition of sounds (alliteration and assonance) to impact the
reader and draw him/her to a particular section of the text.
* recognize the differences between the form/structure used in stories and the form/structure used in
dramas and poems.
* analyze the structure of a drama and explain how parts of the drama affect the overall meaning/message
(e.g., A soliloquy provides the reader with information not given to the other characters.)
* analyze the form/structure of a poem (e.g., rhyming, line breaks, free verse) and explain how a poets
choice of the form/structure affects the overall meaning.
* explain why authors choose different points of view in a text (first person, second person, third person
omniscient). first person (an inside narrator tells the story; I),
* contrast different points of view of different characters or narrators in a text.
* analyze how the author develops points of view of characters and narrators by revealing thoughts,
feelings, actions, and spoken words, actions, and spoken words.

INFORMATIONAL

I can

RI.7.4: Determine the meaning of words


and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative, connotative, and
technical meanings; analyze the impact
of a specific word choice on meaning and
tone.

* define and identify various forms of figurative language (e.g., simile, metaphor, hyperbole,
personification, alliteration, assonance, onomatopoeia).
* distinguish between literal language (it means exactly what it says) and figurative language (sometimes
what you say is not exactly what you mean).
* recognize the difference between denotative meanings (all words have a dictionary definition) and
connotative meanings (some words carry feeling).
* recognize words that have technical meaning and understand their purpose in a specific text (e.g., stem
in an article about flowers versus stem in an article about cell research).
*analyze why authors use words and phrases (tone) to create an overall meaning and mood for the reader.

RI.7.5: Analyze the structure an author


uses to organize a text, including how the
major sections contribute to the whole
and to the development of the ideas.
RI.7.6: Determine an authors point of
view or purpose in a text and analyze
how the author distinguishes his or her
position from that of others.

INTEGRATION OF KNOWLEDGE
LITERATURE

* analyze a text and determine the authors organizational structure.


* explain how authors organize a text and how the individual parts of a text (e.g., sections, chapters,
appendixes) contribute to the overall development of ideas.
* define point of view as how the author feels about the text.
* determine an authors point of view (What do I know about the authors opinions, values, and/or beliefs?)
and explain his/her purpose for writing the text.
* analyze how an author distinguishes his/her position as different from others by revealing his/her own
thoughts, feelings, actions, and/or spoken words.

I can

RL.7.9: Compare and contrast a fictional


portrayal of a time, place, or character
and a historical account of the same
period as a means of understanding how
authors of fiction use or alter history.

* define historical fiction (fictional story set in the past).


* identify a time, place, or character from history portrayed in an historical account in a fictional text.
* compare (analyze the similarities) and contrast (analyze the differences) an historical account of a time,
place, or event with that of a fictional account to see how authors sometimes alter or change history in a
literary text.
* analyze how authors use or alter historical facts to develop their own fictional stories.

INFORMATIONAL

I can

RI.7.8: Trace and evaluate the argument


and specific claims in a text, assessing
whether the reasoning is sound and the
evidence is relevant and sufficient to
support the claims.

* identify the side of an argument an author presents in a text.


* determine the credibility of the author and his/her purpose (who wrote it, when it was written, and why it
was written).
* identify claims that are supported by fact(s) and those that are opinions(s).
* evaluate an argument using the evidence an author provides and determine if the evidence is relevant
and sufficient enough to support the claim.
* recognize that authors present information differently based on their point of view.
* analyze how authors interpret and emphasize different evidence when writing about the same topic.
* compare and contrast (analyze the similarities and differences) how two authors communicate the same
topic.
*describe how one authors interpretation of a topic can be different from another authors depending on
the facts he/she chooses to emphasize.

RI.7.9: Analyze how two or more authors


writing about the same topic shape their
presentations of key information by
emphasizing different evidence or
advancing different interpretations of
facts.
Grade 7: Cycle
Page 4 of 10
Monday, June 01, 2015

WRITING STANDARDS
Text Type and Purpose
I can
W.7.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas,
concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant
content.
a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts,
and information, using strategies such as definition, classification,
comparison/contrast, and cause/ effect; include formatting (e.g., headings),
graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding
comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or
other information and examples.
c. Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among
ideas and concepts. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to
inform about or explain the topic.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style.
e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the
information or explanation presented.

* select a topic and identify and gather relevant information


(e.g., facts, definitions, details, quotations, examples) to
share with my audience.
* define common organizational/formatting structures and
determine a structure that will allow me to organize my
information best.
* analyze the information, identify vocabulary specific to my
topic, and organize information gathered using my
chosen structure(s).
* present my information in a formal style that includes an
introduction that previews what is to follow, supporting
details, transitions (to clarify and create cohesion when I
move from one idea to another), and provide a
concluding statement/section that supports the
information presented.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge


I can

W.7.7: Conduct short research projects to answer a


question, drawing on several sources and
generating additional related, focused questions for
further research and investigation.

W.7.8: Gather relevant information from multiple


print and digital sources, using search terms
effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of
each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and
conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and
following a standard format for citation.
W.7.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational
texts to support analysis, reflection, and research
a. Apply grade 7 Reading Standards to
literature (e.g., Compare and contrast a
fictional portrayal of a time, place, or
character and a historical account of the
same period as a means of understanding
how authors of fiction use or alter history).
b. Apply grade 7 Reading standards to
literary nonfiction (e.g., Trace and evaluate
the argument and specific claims in a text,
assessing whether the reasoning is sound and
the evidence is relevant and sufficient to
support the claims.).

Grade 7: Cycle
Page 5 of 10
Monday, June 01, 2015

* define research and distinguish how research differs from other types of writing.
* focus my research around a central question that is provided or determine my own research
worthy question (e.g., How did the writers life experiences influence his/her writing style?).
* choose several sources (e.g., biographies, non-fiction texts, online resouces) and gather
information to answer my research question.
* analyze the information found in my sources and determine if it provides enough support to answer
my question.
* create additional focused questions that relate to my original topic to further investigate my
research.
* determine the credibility and accuracy of a source by reviewing who wrote it, when it was
written, and why it was written.
* use search terms effectively to gather information needed to support my research.
* define plagiarism (using someone elses words/ideas as my own).
* determine when my research data or facts must be quoted (directly stated word for word) in
my writing.
* avoid plagiarism by paraphrasing (putting in my own words) and/or summarizing my research
findings.
* follow a standard format for citation to create a bibliography for sources that I paraphrased or
quoted in my writing.

* define textual evidence (word for word support).


* determine textual evidence that supports my analysis, reflection, and/or research.
* support my answer using textual evidence that demonstrates logical reasoning and my
understanding of the topic and/or the text.
* compose written responses and include textual evidence to strengthen my analysis, reflection,
and/or research.

LANGUAGE STANDARDS
Knowledge of Language
I can

L.7.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard


English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
a. Explain the function of phrases and clauses in general and
their function in specific sentences.
b. Choose among simple, compound, complex, and
compound-complex sentences to signal differing
relationships among ideas.
c. Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and
correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.

L.7.3: Use knowledge of language and its conventions when


writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
a. Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and
concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and
redundancy.

* define phrase (a group of words that functions as a single part of speech) and
clause (a group of words that contains a subject and a verb; may be dependent or
independent) and state their function in specific sentences (e.g., prepositional
phrase, adjective clause, adverb clause).
* use phrases and clauses to enhance my writing and/or speaking.
* identify simple sentence structures (sentence with one independent clause),
compound sentence structures (sentence with two or more independent clauses),
complex sentence structures (sentence with one independent clause and one or
more dependent clauses), and compound-complex sentence structures (two
independent clauses joined to one or more dependent clauses).
* choose different sentence structures to signal differing relationships among ideas.
* define misplaced modifiers (a word, phrase, or clause placed too far away from
the word in modifies) and dangling modifiers (a word, phrase, or clause that
modifies an unintended or non-existent word because of its placement in a
sentence).
* identify and correct misplaced/dangling modifiers in my writing and/or speaking.

* choose words, phrases, and clauses that express my ideas precisely and
concisely.
* recognize and eliminate areas of wordiness and/or redundancy to make
language clear and concise for the reader/listener.

*See ELA CCSS Appendix A, page 31 for Language Progressive Skills.

SPEAKING AND LISTENING


Comprehension and Collaboration

I can
SL.7.3: Delineate a speakers argument and
specific claims, evaluating the soundness of
the reasoning and the relevance and
sufficiency of the evidence.

*
*
*
*

identify the side of an argument a speaker presents.


determine the credibility of a speaker and his/her purpose.
identify claims that are supported by fact(s) and those that are opinion(s).
evaluate if a speakers argument is reasonable (sound) using evidence he/she provides to
support his/her claims.
* determine if a speaker has provided enough relevant evidence to support his/her claim or
argument.

PRESENTATION OF KNOWLEDGE AND IDEAS


I can
SL.7.4: Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient
points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent
descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use
appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear
pronunciation.
SL.7.5: Include multimedia components and visual displays
in presentations to clarify claims and findings and
emphasize salient points.

SL.7.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks,


demonstrating command of formal English when
indicated or appropriate.

* determine salient points (important/key) and emphasize them when presenting my


claims and/or findings.
* support my claims and/or findings with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and
examples that support the main idea or theme.
* present my information in a logical sequence using appropriate eye contact,
adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
* identify parts of my presentation, including claims, findings, and salient points that
could use clarification.
* clarify information using the appropriate media component or visual display.
* identify various reasons for speaking (e.g., informational, descriptive, formal,
informal).
* determine speaking tasks that will require a formal structure.
* compose a formal speech that demonstrates a command of grade 7 Language
standards.

Learning Targets adapted from The Common Core, Align, Assess, Achieve, LLC and Maryland Common Core State Curriculum Framework for ELA

Grade 7: Cycle
Page 6 of 10
Monday, June 01, 2015

KCAS BINDER AND KDE RESOURCES


Kentucky Core Academic Standards for English Language Arts Binder
Writing:

Informational/Explanatory (Appendix A, p.112)


Student Sample: Grade 7 Informational/Explanatory (Appendix
C, p.181)
Student Sample: Grade 7 Argument (Appendix C, p. 179)

Reading:
Range of Text Types for 6-12 (Standards for ELA 6-12 p. 57,
defines Literature and Informational Text, including Literary
nonfiction)
Text Exemplars (Appendix B)
Vocabulary (Appendix A, pp. 121-124) 3 Tiers of Vocabulary
defined (Link to supplemental information for Appendix A
http://tinyurl.com/co3bf8s )

Kentucky Department of Education

Addressing the Three Modes of Writing: Kentucky Core Academic Standards in the 21st Century
Kentucky On-demand Scoring Rubric
KDE Literacy Instructional Resources
Kentucky Literacy Link site for archived newsletters

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL TEXTS AND RESOURCES


Link to suggested units from HOLT
Link to suggested units from MCDOUGALL-LITTELL
Link to COLLECTIONS Crosswalk Document
Search texts and resources by TOPIC: Gheens website ELA Middle Instructional Resources Texts and
Resources by Topic

INTERDISCIPLINARY CONNECTIONS

Social Studies: Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome


Science: Resource Availability in an Ecosystem, Interactions in an Ecosystem, Cycling of Matter and Energy Flow in an Ecosystem
Math: Algebraic Reasoning

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS


ESL- INSIDE - ESL students will continue to use Inside (Levels B, C, and D)

READ 180 TEACHERS LINK TO CYCLE 2 RESOURCES HERE


INTERVENTION

Resources for Individual and Small-Group Instruction: In-Class RtI Intervention Resources
Interventioncentral.org: A full menu of interventions Response to Interventions strategies for literacy skills.
o "Click or Clunk?": A Student Comprehension Self-Check-Students periodically check their understanding of sentences,
paragraphs, and pages of text as they read. When students encounter problems with vocabulary or comprehension, they use a
checklist to apply simple strategies to solve those reading difficulties.
o Main-Idea Maps-This simple strategy teaches students to generate a graphic organizer containing the main ideas of an
expository passage.
o Reading Comprehension Fix-Up Skills: A Classroom Toolkit-Presented here are a series of fix-up skill strategies that can
help struggling students to better understand difficult reading assignments.
ReadWriteThink.com: Use a poem to help students understand cause and effect: Write a Gem of a Poem.
Literacyleader.com: A menu of interventions Response to Interventions strategies for literacy skills. Text Structures - Resources to
support student understanding of text structures.
McDougal: Additional resources for interventionMain Idea and Supporting Details, p. R7 (RL.7.1-2); Reading for Different Purposes, pp. R23 (RL and RI.7.6); Patterns of Organization, p. R6 (RL.7.5); Tracing an Argument, pp. R12-17 (RI.7.8)
Holt : Additional resources for interventionTheme and Supporting Details, pp. 236-237 (RL.7.1-2); Main Idea, pp. 187-189 and p. 480
(RL.7.2, RI.7.2); Summarizing, pp. 4-13 (RL.7.2) Authors Perspective, pp. 350-355 (RI.7.6); Argument, pp. 470-471 (RI.7.8); Structure,
pp. 120-121 (RI.7.5).

Grade 7: Cycle
Page 7 of 10
Monday, June 01, 2015

INDEPENDENT READING
During independent reading time, conduct one-on-one conferences with students to monitor and provide feedback on Student-Developed Reading
Plans. Allow students to revisit and revise plans to gradually increase the length and complexity of what they read, moving toward the level of text
complexity in the grade 6-8 text complexity band. Use information gleaned from conferences to identify students reading interests and guide
students in making book selections. (To view models of conferencing, go to: A best-practice tip about how to conference when teaching in
small groups - YouTube and Conferring with Student - YouTube.) NCTE/ILA position paper on independent/leisure reading

My Side of the Mountain (Jean Craighead George)


Stanford Wong Flunks Big-Time (Lisa Yee)
A Girl Named Disaster (Nancy Farmer)
The Schwa was Here (Neal Shusterman)
The Lightning Thief (Rick Riordan)
Drums, Girls, & Dangerous Pie (Jordan Sonnenblick)
Replay (Sharon Creech)

Ashes to Ashes: Uncovering Pompeii (Lindeen)


Chicken Soup for the Pet Lovers Soul (Canfield)
How Would You Survive as an Aztec (MacDonald)
At the Edge: Daring Acts in Desperate Times (Verstraete)
Growing Money, A Complete Investing Guide for Kids
(Karlitz)
The Election Book, The People Pick a President (Tamara
Henneman)
Crime Scene Investigators: Ten True Tales (Zullo)

KCAS KEY VOCABULARY

Analogy
Argument
Central Idea
Cite Sources
Claim
Cohesion
Collaborate
Connotation/Denotation
Credible
Explicit/Implicit

Inference
Informative/Explanatory writing
Intentional Word Choice
Literal
Logical Conclusion
Mood/Tone
Narrative Writing
Objective Summary
Organizational Structure
Paraphrase

Plot Structure (Exposition, Rising Action,


Climax, Falling Action, Resolution)
Point of View
Reflection
Relevant
Research
Synonym/Antonym
Technical Vocabulary
Theme

GROWTH MONITORING
Link to Progression of Standards for Content Gap Analysis
Teachers will
analyze the results of formative and summative assessments to determine next steps in content instruction and conference with students
to provide feedback on their progress.
collaborate with teachers in all content areas to conduct regular Literacy Reviews of students reading and writing growth.
conduct one-on-one reading conferences to monitor student growth/accountability with the focus on self-selected independent reading.
provide feedback (written and oral) on strengths and areas of growth in reading, writing, language, and speaking and listening.
Students will
establish personal learning goals, monitor growth with self-assessments, and track their progress toward specific goals and deadlines.
analyze results of formative and summative assessments to determine areas of strength and growth and use the information to revise
goals and take ownership of learning.

Grade 7: Cycle
Page 8 of 10
Monday, June 01, 2015

PLANNING SUGGESTIONS

Teacher Note: Link to Lesson Planning Template: Plan standards-based lessons using suggested texts, resources, and instructional strategies
provided on this map. Use classroom libraries to support independent reading.

Weeks 1-3

Weeks 4-6

Introduce the Cycle 2 Big Idea and weekly/daily learning targets.


Highlight the requirements of reading standards 7 and 9. Students will compare and contrast how authors approach similar topics
using different media. This includes how the film or stage version of a text is presented and how techniques (light, music, color, etc.)
are used to create effect.
Provide time for daily Independent reading and writing; include procedures for documentation of reading (reading logs, status of
the class, tracking charts, etc.) and reading/writing conferences (see Atwell video link).
Use Read Aloud/Think Aloud/Talk Aloud (RA-TA-TA) to model close reading strategies (see Professional and Instructional
Resources for access to close reading lessons). Incorporate informational texts of increasing complexity and length along with
text dependent questions to teach reading and writing standards (recommend 2 times per grading period).
Model a variety of approaches students might use to analyze a situation or issue introduced in an engaging text, and pose
critical thinking questions that require students to make a claim and provide support for their analysis using evidence from the
text.
Continue to use Literacy Notebook to capture students thinking about texts, develop seed ideas for informational/explanatory
writing, and to formatively assess writing progress.
Engage students in developing questions of interest that require deeper exploration. Review research skills by having students
conduct short research projects focused on a single question and identify topics of interest for more in-depth research and
informational/explanatory writing.
Students analyze and evaluate models of informative/explanatory texts from diverse media.
Use mentor texts (see examples from Mechanically Inclined and Everyday Editing) to continue teaching mechanics, use of
commas to separate adjectives, sentence structures, modifiers, and defining words in context.
Incorporate time for student collaboration/discussion to reinforce speaking and listening skills. Use standards specific rubric to
monitor and assess students progress toward mastery of the 7th grade speaking and listening standards. (Ongoing)
Use formative assessments (student work, results of daily assignments, writing-to-learn, teacher observations, etc.) to focus
lessons and differentiate instruction.
Revisit learning targets daily and weekly (What you will learn? Have you learned it?)

Refer to the writing and language standards to analyze and evaluate models of informative/explanatory texts and
media formats to build students understanding.
As they read, focus students attention on the difference between general academic and domain-specific words and
phrases. Focus on Tier 2 vocabulary as needed. Students should record new vocabulary in the Vocabulary section of
the Literacy Notebook.
Incorporate recommended literature to complement informational texts (paired texts).
Use topics of interest to guide students in narrowing their ideas for a topic to explore with informational writing.
Review the process students should use to develop questions to guide research for informational/explanatory writing.
Review how to access the credibility of sources using criteria (who wrote it, when it was written, and why it was
written). Evaluating Websites
Provide time for students to work independently and collaboratively to gather relevant information from multiple print
and digital sources and use criteria to assess credibility of sources.
Use prewriting activities and graphic organizers to help students organize information from research to begin rough
draft of informational/explanatory writing.
Conduct lessons on appropriate documentation formats to avoid plagiarism.
Provide instruction on the criteria of effective writing focused on KCAS standards
Use KCAS writing and language standards to involve students in the development of rubrics for effective
informative/explanatory writing. This will help reinforce their understanding of the criteria and allow them to selfevaluate their work.
Use formative assessments (student work, results of daily assignments, writing-to-learn, assessments, teacher
observations, etc.) to gauge students grasp of concepts and to adjust teaching as needed.
Collaborate with other ELA teachers through PLCs to address key findings from formative assessments focusing on
adjusting instructional practices to impact student learning.
Identify gaps in learning and provide small group instruction to address gaps.
Revisit learning targets daily and weekly.

Grade 7: Cycle
Page 9 of 10
Monday, June 01, 2015

Weeks 7-9

Continue close reading strategy lessons with text dependent questions to teach reading and writing standards using
recommended literature and informational texts resources.
Continue use of higher order thinking questions that require students to think at higher levels and use textual
evidence to support their answers.
Use Y-Charts to reinforce the criteria of a safe and respectful peer conference. Revisit procedures for self/peerconferencing and use of rubrics.
Focus teacher/student conferences on moving draft work toward publication quality.
Reinforce the use of rubrics and conferencing notes to revise and edit informative/explanatory writing in developing
final drafts.
Remind students to check for correct word usage, mechanics (i.e., use of commas to separate adjectives, sentence
structures, modifiers) in their writing.
Develop rubrics focused on the speaking and listening standards to assess students communication skills during
student conferences and presentation of writing (including various media products).
Administer appropriate formative and summative assessments (performance tasks, district/school created
diagnostics, RPA, etc.) and involve students in the analysis of results to self-monitor growth and revise goals as
needed.

Grade 7: Cycle
Page 10 of 10
Monday, June 01, 2015