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Unit/Lesson Title: 1.

Intro to Conflict In The Pacific


Lesson duration: 70 Minutes
Rationale:
Syllabus Outcomes:
1. Students need a deep understanding of
H1.1 describe the role of key features, issues,
Japan's attempts to build and empire which
individuals, groups and events of selected
assists comprehension of the relationships
twentieth-century studies
between Japan and the Western Powers in
H1.2 analyse and evaluate the role of key features,
the lead up to WWII. This also provides the
issues, individuals, groups and events of selected
background knowledge to the causes of
twentieth-century studies
WWII in the Pacific.
H2.1 explain forces and ideas and assess their
2. Students need to revise their knowledge
significance in contributing to change and
of how the Western nations and their
continuity during the twentieth century
relationship with Japan over territory
H3.1 ask relevant historical questions
played a major role in the cause of the war
H3.2 locate, select and organise relevant information
in the Pacific.
from different types of sources
3. Students need to comprehend the
H3.3 analyse and evaluate sources for their usefulness
differing motives, ambitions and strategies
and reliability
of the Japanese, The US and the British
H3.4 explain and evaluate differing perspectives and
which laid the framework for WWII.
interpretations of the past
H3.5 plan and present the findings of historical
investigations, analysing and synthesising
information from different types of sources
H4.1 use historical terms and concepts appropriately
H4.2 communicate a knowledge and understanding of
historical features and issues, using appropriate
and well-structured oral and written forms
Prior Knowledge:
Causes of World War 1, Boxer Rebellion, The Meiji
Restoration.

Stage: 6
Year: 12
Class: EMH442
Syllabus Content:
Conflict in the Pacific 1937-1951:
Students Learn to:
- ask relevant questions in relation to World War One
- locate, select and organise information from different
types of primary and secondary sources, including ICT,
about key features and issues related to World War One
- evaluate the usefulness, reliability and perspectives of
sources
- use historical terms appropriately
- Communicate an understanding of the features and
issues of World War I using appropriate and wellstructured oral and/or written and/or multimedia forms
including ICT.
Students Learn About:
Growth of Pacific tensions
- economic and political issues in the Pacific by 1937
- Japanese foreign policy 19371941
- US and British policies in the Pacific 19371941
- strategic and political reasons for bombing Pearl
Harbour

Risk Assessment:
WHS issues relating to student and teacher movement
around the room must be considered. Students must be
provided with a clear working space, all bags are to be
left outside of the room. Care must be taken when
moving around with the Learning Devices.

Resources:
Modern History Syllabus, Appendix 1,2,3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hceNfhDFWY
Intro Conflict Pacific SMART Notebook file,
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/88153851/imperialism--PowerPoint
Electronic SMARTBoard

Learning Outcomes
These should be precise
indicators of intended
student learning
Students will be
gaining an
understanding of the
requirements of Part
IV in the final section
of the study in Modern
History.

Time
Guide

5min

Content/Learning Experiences
Introduction (Engagement)
(Time allocation of activities are fluid in length)
Before students enter the room have the following clip playing on
the SMART board. The purpose of this is to draw their attention
and gain focus.
Roei no uta (Field Encampment Song) (2mins 44 seconds)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hceNfhDFWY
Welcome students and take roll. Explain to them that today they
are going begin our journey on the Conflict in the Pacific.

Teaching
Strategies

Explicit Teaching

Assessment
Techniques
What will you
use to assess
their learning

Whole Class
Individual Work

Inform the students that we shall also complete documentation


and receive a copy of the syllabus and assessment task and
acknowledgment of receiving sign sheet.
Questioning the
students at the
beginning,
during and at the
end of the lesson
will assess their
prior knowledge
and what they
have learnt from
the set activities.

Body (Exploration/Transformation/Presentation)
25min

Provide to each student a copy of the syllabus Hand-out 1 & 2,


request students to sign the page Acknowledgment of Receiving.
Write name of any student away on top of a set of syllabus and
assessment task to follow up on.
Show the students the full syllabus and the cut section provided to
them.
Read through the both hand outs with students, highlighting that
the Personality that we will study will be Emperor Hirohito 1901
1989.
Explain to the students that this topic is broken into 4 sections and
we plan to take two weeks on each. Starting with

Students will gain an


understanding of
clearly what will be
learnt throughout Part
IV

Class Organisation
Grouping & classroom
environment

Growth of Pacific tensions


- economic and political issues in the Pacific by 1937
- Japanese foreign policy 19371941
- US and British policies in the Pacific 19371941
- strategic and political reasons for bombing Pearl Harbor
Course of the Pacific War
- Japanese advance 19411942 and the impact of the fall of the
Philippines, Singapore, Burma and the Dutch East Indies
- turning points in the war: Battle of the Coral Sea, Battle of
Midway, Battle of Guadalcanal, New Guinea
- strategies used by Allied forces against Japan 19421945

Explicit Teaching

Observe and
engage groups in
conversation to
ensure they are
work together.

Civilians at war
- social, political and economic effects on civilians in occupied
territories in South-East Asia
- life under Occupation: collaboration and resistance, the use of
slave labour
- the effect of the war on the home fronts in Japan and Australia
End of the conflict
- reasons for the use of the A-bomb and the subsequent
controversy over its use
- reasons for the Japanese defeat
- War Crimes Tribunals and the status of the Emperor
Allied Occupation of Japan to 1951
Inform the students that document titled Introduction: Conflict in
the Pacific booklet will be completed mainly in students own time
and will assist in revision of knowledge and understanding.
30min
Open Intro Conflict Pacific SMART Notebook file, progress through
first three slides,
Second slide has an imbedded link 19th Century Imperialism.
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/88153851/imperialism--PowerPoint
Students to add own notes beside each slide, provided in hard
copy

10 min

Conclusion (Presentation/Reflection)
Provide students with approximately ten minutes to discuss points
covered thus far and to make notes in Introduction: Conflict in the
Pacific booklet.
Question the students what do they think the Natives of SE Asia
felt about European Dominance and to bring ideas to next lesson.

Explicit Teaching

Discussion
Questioning

Unit/Lesson Title: 2. Dominance and Growth of an Empire


Lesson duration: 70 Minutes
Rationale:
Syllabus Outcomes:
1. Students need a deep understanding of
H1.1 describe the role of key features, issues,
Japan's attempts to build and empire which
individuals, groups and events of selected
assists comprehension of the relationships
twentieth-century studies
between Japan and the Western Powers in
H1.2 analyse and evaluate the role of key features,
the lead up to WWII. This also provides the
issues, individuals, groups and events of selected
background knowledge to the causes of
twentieth-century studies
WWII in the Pacific.
H2.1 explain forces and ideas and assess their
2. Students need to revise their knowledge
significance in contributing to change and
of how the Western nations and their
continuity during the twentieth century
relationship with Japan over territory
H3.1 ask relevant historical questions
played a major role in the cause of the war
H3.2 locate, select and organise relevant information
in the Pacific.
from different types of sources
3. Students need to comprehend the
H3.3 analyse and evaluate sources for their usefulness
differing motives, ambitions and strategies
and reliability
of the Japanese, The US and the British
H3.4 explain and evaluate differing perspectives and
which laid the framework for WWII.
interpretations of the past
H3.5 plan and present the findings of historical
investigations, analysing and synthesising
information from different types of sources
H4.1 use historical terms and concepts appropriately
H4.2 communicate a knowledge and understanding of
historical features and issues, using appropriate
and well-structured oral and written forms

Stage: 6
Year: 12
Class: EMH442
Syllabus Content:
Conflict in the Pacific 1937-1951:
Students Learn to:
- ask relevant questions in relation to World War One
- locate, select and organise information from different
types of primary and secondary sources, including ICT,
about key features and issues related to World War One
- evaluate the usefulness, reliability and perspectives of
sources
- use historical terms appropriately
- Communicate an understanding of the features and
issues of World War I using appropriate and wellstructured oral and/or written and/or multimedia forms
including ICT.
Students Learn About:
Growth of Pacific tensions
- economic and political issues in the Pacific by 1937
- Japanese foreign policy 19371941
- US and British policies in the Pacific 19371941
- strategic and political reasons for bombing Pearl
Harbour

Prior Knowledge:
Causes of World War 1, Boxer Rebellion, The Meiji
Restoration, Imperialism and Nationalism

Resources:
Modern History Syllabus, Appendix 1,2,3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfYqssnrUYU
Intro Conflict Pacific SMART Notebook file,
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/88153851/imperialism--PowerPoint
Electronic SMARTBoard
Teaching
Class Organisation
Assessment
Strategies
Grouping & classroom Techniques
environment
What will you
use to assess
Students sitting at desks their learning

Learning Outcomes
These should be precise
indicators of intended
student learning

Time
Guide

5min

Risk Assessment:
WHS issues relating to student and teacher movement
around the room must be considered. Students must be
provided with a clear working space, all bags are to be
left outside of the room. Care must be taken when
moving around with the Learning Devices.

Content/Learning Experiences
Introduction (Engagement)
(Time allocation of activities are fluid in length)
Before students enter the room have the following clip playing on
the SMART board. The purpose of this is to draw their attention
and gain focus.
Arawashi no uta (2mins 43 seconds)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfYqssnrUYU
Turn of the display or use Smart tools to hide imagery.
Welcome students and take roll. Explain to them that today they
are going begin our journey on the Conflict in the Pacific.

Students will gain an


understanding of
difference between
Imperialism and
Nationalism

Students will gain and


understanding of the
setement that existed
in SE Asia towards
European dominance
in the region
Stduents will gain
understanding into the
rise and growth of the
Japanese Empire.

Body (Exploration/Transformation/Presentation)
10min

10min
30min

10min

Question the students as to what feelings of Imperialism do they


get from the song played?
Recap from previous lesson, question the students over the
different types of Imperialism, and examples (see
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/88153851/imperialism--PowerPoint ) Slide 29-35
Students to Brainstorm on board as class How did the Natives of
SE Asia feel about European dominance? (Slide 4)
Progress through slides 5-8 of SMART Notebook file Intro Conflict
Pacific.
Side 5 titled What solution did many natives of the Asia Pacific see
as an option to rid themselves of European Dominance?
Slide 6 European Imperialism in China
Slide 7 Chinese Treated Badly by Europeans
Slide 8 Growth of the Japanese Empire
Students are to take 5 minutes to write down in their books the
dates provided and to link the historical event for that period.
Students may discuss quietly with neighbour if required.
Students to share their timeline with remainder of class to
formulate correct result. Adjusting their own timeline if not
correct.

10min

Conclusion (Presentation/Reflection)
Students to spend ten minutes discussing points covered thus far
and to make notes in Introduction: Conflict in the Pacific booklet.

Questioning

Explicit Teaching

Questioning the
students at the
beginning,
during and at the
end of the lesson
will assess their
prior knowledge
and what they
have learnt from
the set activities.

Questioning
Explicit Teaching

Observe and
engage groups in
conversation to
ensure they are
work together.

Unit/Lesson Title: 3. 21 Demands and Impact of WW1


Lesson duration: 70 Minutes
Rationale:
Syllabus Outcomes:
1. Students need a deep understanding of
H1.1 describe the role of key features, issues,
Japan's attempts to build and empire which
individuals, groups and events of selected
assists comprehension of the relationships
twentieth-century studies
between Japan and the Western Powers in
H1.2 analyse and evaluate the role of key features,
the lead up to WWII. This also provides the
issues, individuals, groups and events of selected
background knowledge to the causes of
twentieth-century studies
WWII in the Pacific.
H2.1 explain forces and ideas and assess their
2. Students need to revise their knowledge
significance in contributing to change and
of how the Western nations and their
continuity during the twentieth century
relationship with Japan over territory
H3.1 ask relevant historical questions
played a major role in the cause of the war
H3.2 locate, select and organise relevant information
in the Pacific.
from different types of sources
3. Students need to comprehend the
H3.3 analyse and evaluate sources for their usefulness
differing motives, ambitions and strategies
and reliability
of the Japanese, The US and the British
H3.4 explain and evaluate differing perspectives and
which laid the framework for WWII.
interpretations of the past
H3.5 plan and present the findings of historical
investigations, analysing and synthesising
information from different types of sources
H4.1 use historical terms and concepts appropriately
H4.2 communicate a knowledge and understanding of
historical features and issues, using appropriate
and well-structured oral and written forms
Prior Knowledge:
Causes of World War 1, Boxer Rebellion, The Meiji
Restoration.

Stage: 6
Year: 12
Class: EMH442
Syllabus Content:
Conflict in the Pacific 1937-1951:
Students Learn to:
- ask relevant questions in relation to World War One
- locate, select and organise information from different
types of primary and secondary sources, including ICT,
about key features and issues related to World War One
- evaluate the usefulness, reliability and perspectives of
sources
- use historical terms appropriately
- Communicate an understanding of the features and
issues of World War I using appropriate and wellstructured oral and/or written and/or multimedia forms
including ICT.
Students Learn About:
Growth of Pacific tensions
- economic and political issues in the Pacific by 1937
- Japanese foreign policy 19371941
- US and British policies in the Pacific 19371941
- strategic and political reasons for bombing Pearl
Harbour

Risk Assessment:
WHS issues relating to student and teacher movement
around the room must be considered. Students must be
provided with a clear working space, all bags are to be
left outside of the room. Care must be taken when
moving around with the Learning Devices.

Resources:
Modern History Syllabus, Appendix 1,2,3
Intro Conflict Pacific SMART Notebook file,
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/88153851/imperialism--PowerPoint
Electronic SMARTBoard
Appendix Six
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYGsdC7Sg38

Learning Outcomes
These should be precise
indicators of intended
student learning

Time
Guide

Content/Learning Experiences

5min

Welcome students and take roll. Explain to them that today they
are going begin our journey on the Conflict in the Pacific.
Display on the board Appendix Six. Chinas acceptance to Japans
21 Demands

Students gain and


understanding about
the personality
Emperor Taisho and
the 21 Demands from
post-World War One
And events leading up
to and including the
Manchuria Incident
25min

15min

10min
15min

Introduction (Engagement)

Body (Exploration/Transformation/Presentation)
Slides 9-12
During Slide Nine
Inform students about Emperor Taisho whom during his reign
expanded its position in Asia, through the 21 Demands.
Display on SMART Board as well as provide copy to each student
Appendix Five.
Read each of the 21 Demands as a class, students are to write their
initial thoughts from the Chinese point of view, in their books on
each demand as it is read (Group) before reading the next,
students are to take no more than 3 minutes at a time to write.
Question students is there a common feeling shared by all
students.
Students are to outline the main features of the Twenty-One
Demands.
Students are to be informed of the historical significance of the 21
demands which cannot be underestimated, not only because it
was a prime example of that Japans dominance of China in that
period but also because of its chronological placement in East
Asian history. The event falls just four years after the fall of the
empire in China and during the first World War. Revisit Intro
Image Chinas acceptance of the 21 demands.
Students are to formulate a response to Japan regarding its 21
Demands. They are to write from a Chinese civilians point of view
who lives in Manchuria.
Students will be provided with the opportunity to read their
letters out to the class
Display Youtube clip
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYGsdC7Sg38
Question students to the main points from the clip
Students to write reflection notes in book.

Teaching
Strategies

Class Organisation
Grouping & classroom
environment
Students sitting at desks

Explicit Teaching

Assessment
Techniques
What will you
use to assess
their learning

Questioning the
students at the
beginning,
during and at the
end of the lesson
will assess their
prior knowledge
and what they
have learnt from
the set activities.
Observe and
engage groups in
conversation to
ensure they are
work together.

Conclusion (Presentation/Reflection)
Question the students about how the events of 21 Demands may
have led to the Manchuria Incident, and do they feel that by the
Europeans giving into Japan secretly in 1918 in hindsight
counterproductive.

Unit/Lesson Title: 4. Practice Essay


Rationale:
1. Students need a deep understanding of
Japan's attempts to build and empire which
assists comprehension of the relationships
between Japan and the Western Powers in
the lead up to WWII. This also provides the
background knowledge to the causes of
WWII in the Pacific.
2. Students need to revise their knowledge
of how the Western nations and their
relationship with Japan over territory
played a major role in the cause of the war
in the Pacific.
3. Students need to comprehend the
differing motives, ambitions and strategies
of the Japanese, The US and the British
which laid the framework for WWII.

Lesson duration: 70 Minutes


Syllabus Outcomes:
H1.1 describe the role of key features, issues,
individuals, groups and events of selected
twentieth-century studies
H1.2 analyse and evaluate the role of key features,
issues, individuals, groups and events of selected
twentieth-century studies
H2.1 explain forces and ideas and assess their
significance in contributing to change and
continuity during the twentieth century
H3.1 ask relevant historical questions
H3.2 locate, select and organise relevant information
from different types of sources
H3.3 analyse and evaluate sources for their usefulness
and reliability
H3.4 explain and evaluate differing perspectives and
interpretations of the past
H3.5 plan and present the findings of historical
investigations, analysing and synthesising
information from different types of sources
H4.1 use historical terms and concepts appropriately
H4.2 communicate a knowledge and understanding of
historical features and issues, using appropriate
and well-structured oral and written forms

Prior Knowledge:
Causes of World War 1, Boxer Rebellion, The Meiji
Restoration. Events leading to attack on Pearl
Harbour, Impact of War on Australias homefront,
War in Pacific strategies, major battles

Stage: 6
Year: 12
Class: EMH442
Syllabus Content:
Conflict in the Pacific 1937-1951:
Students Learn to:
- ask relevant questions in relation to World War One
- locate, select and organise information from different
types of primary and secondary sources, including ICT,
about key features and issues related to World War One
- evaluate the usefulness, reliability and perspectives of
sources
- use historical terms appropriately
- Communicate an understanding of the features and
issues of World War I using appropriate and wellstructured oral and/or written and/or multimedia forms
including ICT.
Students Learn About:
Growth of Pacific tensions
- economic and political issues in the Pacific by 1937
- Japanese foreign policy 19371941
- US and British policies in the Pacific 19371941
- strategic and political reasons for bombing Pearl
Harbour

Risk Assessment:
WHS issues relating to student and teacher movement
around the room must be considered. Students must be
provided with a clear working space, all bags are to be
left outside of the room. Care must be taken when
moving around with the Learning Devices.

Resources:
Modern History Syllabus, Appendix 1,2,3
Intro Conflict Pacific SMART Notebook file,
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/88153851/imperialism--PowerPoint
Electronic SMARTBoard
Appendix One.

Learning Outcomes
These should be precise
indicators of intended
student learning
Students will be
providing a detailed
response of their
understanding of
events. They will be
creating a essay
providing a balanced
response. Students will
be sharing information
in to the whole group
after the fact.

Time
Guide

Content/Learning Experiences

5min

Welcome students and inform them that today they need to


submit their prepared response and also during the lesson they
will write an essay from the provided list. Reminding students that
they cannot use any materials to assist.

Introduction (Engagement)

Teaching
Strategies

Class Organisation
Grouping & classroom
environment

Direct Instruction

Individual Work

Body (Exploration/Transformation/Presentation)

60min

Provide on the Electronic Smart board a copy of the possible


questions.
Advise the students that you will remind them when there is ten
minutes remaining and that whilst writing I will walk around the
room and see how they are going, and if need be offer suggestions.
Before they begin check that they are not doing the same question
as just submitted.
(a) To what extent was Japanese foreign policy from 1937 to 1941
responsible for the increasing tensions that eventually led to war?
(b) To what extent did Japanese nationalism lead to the bombing of
Pearl Harbor in 1941?
(c) Evaluate the view that the Battle of Midway was the most
significant turning point in the Pacific War?
(d) Assess the effectiveness of the strategies used by Allied forces
against Japan in the period 19421945.
(e) Assess the impact of the war on civilians in territories occupied by
Japan in South-East Asia.
(f) Assess the impact of the Pacific War on the home fronts in
Australia and Japan.
During this time read through the students other essays for range
of depth in their responses and during the lessons move to assist
students who may require.
Conclusion (Presentation/Reflection)

5min

In a discussion with the students question who did which question


and to provide one key point they discussed in their chosen
question.

Observation

Assessment
Techniques
What will you
use to assess
their learning

Questioning the
students at the
beginning,
during and at the
end of the lesson
will assess their
prior knowledge
and what they
have learnt from
the set activities.

Observation
whilst students
are completing
the work will
assess their skills

Unit/Lesson Title: 5. Pearl Harbour


Rationale:
1. Students need a deep understanding of
Japan's attempts to build and empire which
assists comprehension of the relationships
between Japan and the Western Powers in
the lead up to WWII. This also provides the
background knowledge to the causes of
WWII in the Pacific.
2. Students need to revise their knowledge
of how the Western nations and their
relationship with Japan over territory
played a major role in the cause of the war
in the Pacific.
3. Students need to comprehend the
differing motives, ambitions and strategies
of the Japanese, The US and the British
which laid the framework for WWII.

Lesson duration: 70 Minutes


Syllabus Outcomes:
H1.1 describe the role of key features, issues,
individuals, groups and events of selected
twentieth-century studies
H1.2 analyse and evaluate the role of key features,
issues, individuals, groups and events of selected
twentieth-century studies
H2.1 explain forces and ideas and assess their
significance in contributing to change and
continuity during the twentieth century
H3.1 ask relevant historical questions
H3.2 locate, select and organise relevant information
from different types of sources
H3.3 analyse and evaluate sources for their usefulness
and reliability
H3.4 explain and evaluate differing perspectives and
interpretations of the past
H3.5 plan and present the findings of historical
investigations, analysing and synthesising
information from different types of sources
H4.1 use historical terms and concepts appropriately
H4.2 communicate a knowledge and understanding of
historical features and issues, using appropriate
and well-structured oral and written forms

Prior Knowledge:
Causes of World War 1, Boxer Rebellion, The Meiji
Restoration. Events between 1937-39 Japan
Invading China, Marco Polo Bridge Incident.
Nanking Incident

Stage: 6
Year: 12
Class: EMH442
Syllabus Content:
Conflict in the Pacific 1937-1951:
Students Learn to:
- ask relevant questions in relation to World War One
- locate, select and organise information from different
types of primary and secondary sources, including ICT,
about key features and issues related to World War One
- evaluate the usefulness, reliability and perspectives of
sources
- use historical terms appropriately
- Communicate an understanding of the features and
issues of World War I using appropriate and wellstructured oral and/or written and/or multimedia forms
including ICT.
Students Learn About:
Growth of Pacific tensions
- economic and political issues in the Pacific by 1937
- Japanese foreign policy 19371941
- US and British policies in the Pacific 19371941
- strategic and political reasons for bombing Pearl
Harbour

Risk Assessment:
WHS issues relating to student and teacher movement
around the room must be considered. Students must be
provided with a clear working space, all bags are to be
left outside of the room. Care must be taken when
moving around with the Learning Devices.

Resources:
Modern History Syllabus, Appendix 1,2,3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hceNfhDFWY
Intro Conflict Pacific SMART Notebook file,
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/88153851/imperialism--PowerPoint
Electronic SMARTBoard
http://www.spiderscribe.net/
Username: craig.edwards21@det.nsw.edu.au
Password: 12345mod
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lK8gYGg0dkE

Learning Outcomes
These should be precise
indicators of intended
student learning
Students will be
researching and
forming an
understanding of
events. They will be
creating a comparison
table, glossary of
terms, finding
appropriate images
and maps and
uploading them to
Spider Scribe. Students
will be sharing
information in
pairs/groups and
working together as a
whole group. They will
be working towards
sharing research
through a fluid ICT
presentation with the
whole class.

Time
Guide

Content/Learning Experiences

Teaching
Strategies

Class Organisation
Grouping & classroom
environment

Teacher explanation

Individually at desks

5min

Welcome students and take roll. Explain to them that today they
are going explore the events directly leading up to Pearl Harbour.

Introduction (Engagement):
(Time allocation of activities are fluid in length)

Explain to the students that by the end of the lesson they will
understand why Japan felt that it needed to attack Pearl Harbour.
Explain that we will be working on multi lesson tasks. Inform the
students that they will be using the Web2.0 tool - Spider scribe to
create a mind map which will include a Glossary of key terms. Eg.
Tripartite Pact,

30min

Body (Exploration/Transformation/Presentation):
Students are asked to use their Learning Device and logon to the
website www.spiderscribe.net. While students logon they are to be
given the Inquiry Focus Question which they will begin to map
throughout the lesson on spider scribe.
Was attacking Pearl Harbour the right decision?
Students are to upload relevant information, maps, and video,
sound recordings (primary and secondary sources) as they
evaluate their usefulness, reliability to spider scribe.
Students are to work in pairs to create a comparison table in
Microsoft Word of the events leading up to the bombing of Pearl
Harbour. They are to included information about;
The Greater East Asia Co-Properity Sphere, French Indo-China, The
Tripartite Pact, Germany Invasion of Russia, Emporer Hirohito
declaration, Japanese reaction to war.
Students are then to upload the document to spider scribe for the
whole class to see. Students may use the class text books or
appropriate internet sites to obtain their response.

15min

Discuss with the students the events leading up to Pearl Harbour


which they have highlighted on the comparison table after it has
been uploaded to Spider Scribe. View the variety of responses on
the SMART board. Revisit opening question Was attacking Pearl
Harbour the right decision?
Students are to write a short essay response to the question, using
the evidence gathered to support their answer.
The students are to work Cooperatively in groups of 3 to 4. Assign
the students carefully to groups to accommodate abilities and

Use of graphic
organiser
Use of ICT
Skill Acquisition
and/or
development
Paired Work
Use of ICT
Skill Acquisition
and/or
development

Whole Group

Assessment
Techniques
What will you
use to assess
their learning
Questioning the
students at the
beginning,
during and at the
end of the lesson
will assess their
prior knowledge
and what they
have learnt from
the set activities.

Observation
whilst students
are completing
the work will
assess their skills
Observe how
each student is
working within
the group.
Teacher to look
up on Spider
Scribe at each
uploaded file.
Observe and
engage groups in
conversation to
ensure they are
work together

Group Work

10min

10min

social skills. The students are to investigate the tone of President


Roosevelts address to Congress on 8 December 1941, students are
to then express their response to the class.
The YouTube clip to be played on the electronic SMART Board.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lK8gYGg0dkE
Conclusion (Presentation/Reflection)
Question the students Was attacking Pearl Harbour the right
decision? Using the evidence that they have discovered this lesson.
Students are to hand in their short essay responses. Students are
informed that next lesson we will watch some footage of Pearl
Harbour being attacked and post reactions and commence our War
in the Pacific.

Catering for
multiple
intelligences

Discussion

Unit/Lesson Title: 6. Axis & Allies Pacific 1940


Lesson duration: 70 Minutes
Rationale:
Syllabus Outcomes:
1. Students need a deep understanding of
H1.1 describe the role of key features, issues,
Japan's attempts to build and empire which
individuals, groups and events of selected
assists comprehension of the relationships
twentieth-century studies
between Japan and the Western Powers in
H1.2 analyse and evaluate the role of key features,
the lead up to WWII. This also provides the
issues, individuals, groups and events of selected
background knowledge to the causes of
twentieth-century studies
WWII in the Pacific.
H2.1 explain forces and ideas and assess their
2. Students need to revise their knowledge
significance in contributing to change and
of how the Western nations and their
continuity during the twentieth century
relationship with Japan over territory
H3.1 ask relevant historical questions
played a major role in the cause of the war
H3.2 locate, select and organise relevant information
in the Pacific.
from different types of sources
3. Students need to comprehend the
H3.3 analyse and evaluate sources for their usefulness
differing motives, ambitions and strategies
and reliability
of the Japanese, The US and the British
H3.4 explain and evaluate differing perspectives and
which laid the framework for WWII.
interpretations of the past
4. This lesson will highlight the major
H3.5 plan and present the findings of historical
events of WWII in the Pacific. It will
investigations, analysing and synthesising
emphasize the two sides of WWII, the axis
information from different types of sources
and the allies, and will give students a
H4.1 use historical terms and concepts appropriately
better understanding of the course of the
H4.2 communicate a knowledge and understanding of
war.
historical features and issues, using appropriate
and well-structured oral and written forms
Prior Knowledge:
Causes of World War 1, Boxer Rebellion, The Meiji
Restoration. How to play Axis and Allies Pacific 1940
second edition.

Stage: 6
Year: 12
Class: EMH442
Syllabus Content:
Conflict in the Pacific 1937-1951:
Students Learn to:
- ask relevant questions in relation to World War One
- locate, select and organise information from different
types of primary and secondary sources, including ICT,
about key features and issues related to World War One
- evaluate the usefulness, reliability and perspectives of
sources
- use historical terms appropriately
- Communicate an understanding of the features and
issues of World War I using appropriate and wellstructured oral and/or written and/or multimedia forms
including ICT.
Students Learn About:
Growth of Pacific tensions
- economic and political issues in the Pacific by 1937
- Japanese foreign policy 19371941
- US and British policies in the Pacific 19371941
- strategic and political reasons for bombing Pearl
Harbour

Risk Assessment:
WHS issues relating to student and teacher movement
around the room must be considered. Students must be
provided with a clear working space, all bags are to be
left outside of the room. Care must be taken when
moving around with the Learning Devices.

Resources:
Modern History Syllabus, Appendix 1,2,3
Intro Conflict Pacific SMART Notebook file,
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/88153851/imperialism--PowerPoint
Electronic SMARTBoard
Axis and Allies Pacific 1940 second edition X 3 copies
Scissors

Learning Outcomes
These should be precise
indicators of intended
student learning

Time
Guide

Content/Learning Experiences

Students will gain an


understanding about
the vast distances of
the war in the pacific
and also the hard
decisions about where
to and how far to
stretch troops in
WWII.

5min

Students will be requested to move desks into to the side of the


room, and then place enough tables in 3 groups to allow players to
sit around them with their game pieces.
Students will then be asked to decide which country out of the list
provided (Japan, China, Australia, United Kingdom, United States)
who sided with whom in WWII.

Introduction (Engagement)

Teaching
Strategies

Class Organisation
Grouping & classroom
environment

Direct Instruction

Whole class with


students sitting in
pairs or small groups

Students will be broken up into depending on students present,


either pairs, threes or groups of four. Each student will pull a
country token out of the game box to work out which country they
are playing.

30min

25min

Students will setup the board game, based off the country they
depicted earlier they will represent those countries.
If students really wish to swap, then allow.
Read to class
It is spring, 1940, Japan is at war with China, but not with any
other country. Any attacks on British, Dutch, ANZAC, or American
territories or ships by the Japanese will be considered an act of
war by all of the remaining Allied powers. A British or ANZAC
attack on Japan, however, would not bring the U.S into the war.
The Japanese player can elect to go to war with the Allies
immediately. If Japan does, the United States will automatically
kick into its wartime economy. With tensions already high due to
Japans occupation of parts of China any further conquest in the
Pacific will force the United States to go to war with Japan. Should

Observation
whilst students
are completing
the work will
assess their skills
Observe how
each student is
working within
the group.

Body (Exploration/Transformation/Presentation)
Each table gets two pieces of cardboard, one colour for allies and
another for axis countries. The students are to cut their basic
shape of their country out.
On the cardboard they will write the major events that their
country took part in during WWII using their knowledge and notes
to complete. They may also use information from the internet
using laptops or smart devices.
Students will use approx. 2-3 minutes each to present their
country to the class. The cardboard will be hung up in the
classroom.
Students will be instructed to take notes during each short
presentation.

Assessment
Techniques
What will you
use to assess
their learning

Paired/Group Work
Use of ICT
Skill Acquisition
and/or
development

Direct Instruction
Scripted
Questioning

Questioning the
students at the
beginning,
during and at the
end of the lesson
will assess their
prior knowledge
and what they
have learnt from
the set activities.

Japan not attack immediately and use this time to better prepare
and position its forces?
Students will be advised that each round they will need to
document any changes in territory ownerships, major battles or
other significant events that occur whilst playing.

10min

The teacher/students is to take photos of each game board so it


can be completed another lesson. Students are to pack up each
board once recording is complete. Students are also requested to
return the tables and chairs to how they were when first entering
the room.

Direct Instruction

Conclusion (Presentation/Reflection)
Students are to share as a group a recount of the events that have
transpired so far in their game.
Students are to compare the events from each game and how they
differ from each other and then also to real life events.

Questioning