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Running Record: REVIEW OF SUPPORTING ARTICLE

Artifact #3

Review of Supporting Article:


Improving Students Learning with Effective Learning Techniques: Promising Directions
from Cognitive and Educational Psychology
Veronica Sandoval
National University

In partial fulfillment for the requirements for


TED 690 Capstone
Professor Barbara Ray
October 14, 2015

Running Record: REVIEW OF SUPPORTING ARTICLE

Abstract
This article provides a reflection on how many students are being left behind by an educational
system. It states that in order to improve educational outcomes it will require the support and
effort of a learning community as part of a solution in helping students to better regulate their
learning through the use of effective learning methods. It is extremely important for teachers to
be reflective teachers. Something that works great for one class may not necessarily work well
for another. When teachers make the necessary adjustments the teachers demonstrates both the
willingness and the ability to reflect on what can be done to build bridges between what her
students know and can do and what they are capable of learning, given appropriate teaching
methods.

Running Record: REVIEW OF SUPPORTING ARTICLE

This article provides a reflection on how many students are being left behind by an
educational system that some people consider is in crisis. It states that in order to improve
educational outcomes it will require the support and effort of a learning community as part of a
solution in helping students to better regulate their learning through the use of effective learning
methods. Fortunately, cognitive and educational psychologists have been developing and
evaluating easy-to-use learning strategies that could help students achieve their learning
objectives. This article discusses 10 learning techniques in detail and offer recommendations
about their relative usefulness. This techniques are relative easy for students to use. Some
strategies like highlighting and rereading were selected because students report that they were of
such great value and rely on them for comprehension. Other strategies include techniques
include elaborative interrogation, self-explanation, summarization, highlighting (or underlining),
the keyword mnemonic, imagery use for text learning, rereading, practice testing, distributed
practice, and interleaved practice. This strategies were evaluated in accordance to the benefits
provided across four categories: learning conditions, student characteristics, materials, and
criterion tasks. Learning conditions include aspects of the learning environment in which the
technique is implemented, such as whether a student studies alone or with a group. Some
variables were also consider, this were age, ability, and level of prior knowledge. The material
used will vary in level from simple concepts to mathematical problems to more complex science
text. Standard tasks include different outcome measures that are significant to student
achievement, such as those tapping memory, problem solving, and comprehension.
The article also states that students often have to learn large amounts of information, which
requires them to identify what is important and how different ideas connect to one another. One
popular technique for achieving these goals includes having students write summaries of

Running Record: REVIEW OF SUPPORTING ARTICLE

chapters or lessons in the texts. Successful summaries identify the main points of a text and
capture the gist of it while excluding unimportant or repetitive material (A. L. Brown, Campione,
& Day, 1981) it is important to provide structure that guides the process of summarization. One
important step is to teach students the rule- based summarizing strategy. Which is to take out
material that is not important to understanding, take out words that repeat information, replace a
list of things with one word that describes them and find a topic sentence or create one if its
missing.
As educators we realize that many factors are responsible whenever a student fails to
achieve in school, but it is the responsibility of the learning community to enhance and
differentiated the teaching techniques to meet the learning needs of all our students.

Running Record: REVIEW OF SUPPORTING ARTICLE

Reference
John Dunlosky J., Rawson K. et.al. (2013) Improving Students Learning with Effective
Learning Techniques: Promising Directions from Cognitive and Educational Psychology,
Retrieved from

http://psi.sagepub.com/content/14/1/4.full.pdf+html?

ijkey=Z10jaVH/60XQM&keytype=r ef&siteid=sppsi