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Unit Plan Overview

Unit: We the Kids of The Potters House

Teacher: Erin Gibbs


Stage 1- Desired Results

Connections to Context:
Several students have strong political
opinions, and come from families that are
politically active, so this unit will touch on
that knowledge and experience. Other
students who have not had as much political
exposure have had the experience of
classroom voting, so they understand what
it means to vote. Still other students come
from families who have had experience with
government practices because they moved
to America from another country. They
likely hear about the types of things that are
involved with moving to a new country from
their parents.
One of the schools core values is to
(emphasize) the love of reading as a
catalyst for life-long learning
(pottershouseschool.org). This core value is
exercised in this unit with the research the
students will be conducting through reading
books, articles and websites. The
pre-established emphasis on love of reading
will assist the students in getting the most
out of their research and help them to learn
through reading informational texts. The
skill of learning from informational texts
will be one that they need for the rest of
their lives, tying into the life-long learning
portion of the core value.
Previous to this unit, the students learned
the other six amendments of the Bill of
Rights, making the lessons in the other four
relevant to the curriculum. They also have
been taking notes on the content in their
textbooks, so continuing to learn

Transfer
Students will be able to independently use their learning to
Use marginal note-taking, highlighting and sticky notes in future assignments
Use apps on electronic devices (iPad) to take notes and record source information
Correctly cite sources
Collaborate and create a project to be presented to peers
Apply concepts of amendments to their lives (neighborhoods, classrooms, etc.)
Reflect on how the amendments have affected our country

Meaning
UNDERSTANDINGS
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
Students will understand that
Students will keep considering

Amendments to the Constitution were


How does this impact us today?
necessary for making sure power was given not How is the Bill of Rights like a shield that protects
only to the central government but the people
individuals from government abuses?
as well.
What does it take to make an amendment to the
Note-taking is an important tool for
Constitution?
comprehending informational texts
What does it mean to be an active citizen?
What were the problems that caused the amendments to
be written?

Acquisition of Knowledge, Skill and Values/Commitments/Dispositions


Cognitive Objectives
Recall information about the
four amendments:
i. Name of each amendment
ii. Number of each amendment
iii. Ratification dates of each
amendment
iii. Summary of content/main idea

Physical Development Objectives


Type on an iPad
Articulate information in front of a
class (public speaking)
Create a presentation
i.Design a poster, write a skit or song
Integrate multiple texts to form
one conclusion

Socio-emotional Objectives
*many are general objectives for the
entire unit, not necessarily explicit in
specific lessons*
Commitment to active citizenship
The ability to work in groups and
collaborate effectively

Based on Wiggins and McTighe (2011)


The Understanding by Design Guide to Creating High-Quality Units
and Van Brummelen (2002)
Steppingstones to Curriculum

note-taking strategies will connect to their


larger curriculum. after this the unit, the
students will be learning about the
American Revolution and its causes.

Established Goals
Common Core State Standards
CCSS.ELALITERACY.L.5.4.C:
Consultreference
materials(e.g.,dictionaries,glossaries,thesauruses),both
printanddigital,tofindthepronunciationanddetermine
orclarifytheprecisemeaningofkeywordsandphrases.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.L.4.4.C:
Consultreference
materials(e.g.,dictionaries,glossaries,thesauruses),both
printanddigital,tofindthepronunciationanddetermine
orclarifytheprecisemeaningofkeywordsandphrases.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.SL.5.1.B:
Followagreedupon
rulesfordiscussionsandcarryoutassignedroles.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.SL.4.1.B:
Followagreedupon
rulesfordiscussionsandcarryoutassignedroles.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.RI.5.2:
Determinetwoor
moremainideasofatextandexplainhowtheyare
supportedbykeydetailssummarizethetext.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.RI.4.2:
Determinethemain
ideaofatextandexplainhowitissupportedbykey
detailssummarizethetext.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.RI.5.7:
Drawoninformation
frommultipleprintordigitalsources,demonstratingthe
abilitytolocateananswertoaquestionquicklyorto
solveaproblemefficiently.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.RI.5.9:
Integrateinformation
fromseveraltextsonthesametopicinordertowriteor
speakaboutthesubjectknowledgeably.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.RI.4.9:

Integrateinformation
fromtwotextsonthesametopicinordertowriteor
speakaboutthesubjectknowledgeably.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.RI.5.4:
Determinethe
meaningofgeneralacademicanddomainspecificwords
andphrasesinatextrelevanttoa
grade5topicorsubject
area
.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.RI.4.4:
Determinethe
meaningofgeneralacademicanddomainspecificwords
orphrasesinatextrelevanttoa
grade4topicorsubject
area
.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.L.4.2.D
Spellgradeappropriatewordscorrectly,consulting
referencesasneeded
.

Name three note-taking


strategies that can be used in
an article
i. Highlighting
ii. Sticky Notes
iii. Marginal Notes
Know the basic components of
a book, web, and print article
citation and how to locate them
i. Author
ii. Publication Date
iii. Title
Accurately use a highlighter
and place sticky notes in order
to mark important aspects of
articles
Show ability to write marginal
notes
Compose responses to prompts
and justify answers given
Predict what America would
look like without the Bill of
Rights
Interpret a rubric
Work cooperatively with a
group to:
i.
Evaluate and select the best mode

Use highlighters and sticky notes to


mark important aspects of articles
Type, write or draw final written
responses (lesson 5)

Attitude of respect for the


American government
Value the effort that goes into
teaching something to a group

of research for their group


ii. Select a presentation type
iii. Organize their notes to
generate a plan to execute a
presentation
iv. Design a project to be presented

Compare and contrast digital


and print note-taking

i. Relate lesson 1 strategies to


digital note taking

Recognize three types of


presentations:

Based on Wiggins and McTighe (2011)


The Understanding by Design Guide to Creating High-Quality Units
and Van Brummelen (2002)
Steppingstones to Curriculum

CCSS.ELALITERACY.L.5.2.E
:
Spell
gradeappropriatewordscorrectly,consultingreferences
asneeded.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.SL.4.5:
Addaudiorecordings
andvisualdisplaystopresentationswhenappropriateto
enhancethedevelopmentofmainideasorthemes.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.SL.5.5
:
Includemultimedia
components(e.g.,graphics,sound)andvisualdisplaysin
presentationswhenappropriatetoenhancethe
developmentofmainideasorthemes.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.L.4.1
:
Demonstratecommand
oftheconventionsofstandardEnglishgrammarand
usagewhenwritingorspeaking.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.L.5.1:
Demonstratecommand
oftheconventionsofstandardEnglishgrammarand
usagewhenwritingorspeaking.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.L.4.3:
Useknowledgeof
languageanditsconventionswhenwriting,speaking,
reading,orlistening.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.L.5.3
:
Useknowledgeof
languageanditsconventionswhenwriting,speaking,
reading,orlistening
.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.SL.4.2
:
Paraphraseportionsof
atextreadaloudorinformationpresentedindiverse
mediaandformats,includingvisually,quantitatively,and
orally.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.SL.5.2
:
Summarizeawritten
textreadaloudorinformationpresentedindiversemedia
andformats,includingvisually,quantitatively,and
orally.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.SL.4.4
:
Reportonatopicor
text,tellastory,orrecountanexperienceinanorganized
manner,usingappropriatefactsandrelevant,descriptive
detailstosupportmainideasorthemesspeakclearlyat
anunderstandablepace.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.SL.5.4
:
Reportonatopicor
textorpresentanopinion,sequencingideaslogicallyand
usingappropriatefactsandrelevant,descriptivedetailsto
supportmainideasorthemesspeakclearlyatan
understandablepace.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.W.4.1:
Writeopinionpieceson
topicsortexts,supportingapointofviewwithreasons
andinformation.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.W.5.1:
Writeopinionpieces
ontopicsortexts,supportingapointofviewwith
reasonsandinformation.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.W.4.3:
Writenarrativesto
developrealorimaginedexperiencesoreventsusing
effectivetechnique,descriptivedetails,andclearevent
sequences

Skit, Song, Poster

Based on Wiggins and McTighe (2011)


The Understanding by Design Guide to Creating High-Quality Units
and Van Brummelen (2002)
Steppingstones to Curriculum

CCSS.ELALITERACY.W.5.3:
Writenarrativesto
developrealorimaginedexperiencesoreventsusing
effectivetechnique,descriptivedetails,andclearevent
sequences.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.W.4.5:
Withguidanceand
supportfrompeersandadults,developandstrengthen
writingasneededbyplanning,revising,andediting.
CCSS.ELALITERACY.W.5.5:
Withguidanceand
supportfrompeersandadults,developandstrengthen
writingasneededbyplanning,revising,editing,
rewriting,ortryinganewapproach

GradeLevelContentExpectations

P4.2.2
Participateinprojectstohelporinformothers
C2.0.2
Explainhowtheprinciplesofpopular
sovereignty,ruleoflaw,checksandbalances,separation
ofpowers,and
individualrightsservetolimitthepowers
ofthefederalgovernmentasreflectedintheConstitution
andBillofRights
P2.3
Knowhowtofind,organize,interpretinformation
fromavarietyofsources.
U3.3.8
DescribetherightsfoundintheFirst,Second,
Third,
andFourthAmendmentstotheUnitedStates
Constitution.
P1.1
Useappropriatestrategiestoreadandinterpretbasic
socialsciencetables,graphs,graphics,mapsand
texts
P2.4
Useresourcesinmultipleforms
andfrommultiple
perspectivestoanalyzeissues.

Michigan Technology Standards


3-5.CC.1.
use digital communication tools (e.g.,
e-mail, wikis, blogs, IM, chat rooms, video
conferencing, Moodle, Blackboard) and online
resources for group learning projects
3-5.DC.2.
recognize issues involving ethical use of
information (e.g., copyright adherence,
source
citation
)

21st
Century Skills

Based on Wiggins and McTighe (2011)


The Understanding by Design Guide to Creating High-Quality Units
and Van Brummelen (2002)
Steppingstones to Curriculum

InformationalLiteracy:

Appropriateappliedresearchto
anygivenchallenge.Theabilitytofindusefuland
reliableinformation
.
Communication:
Theabilitytoproperlyread,write,
present,andcomprehendideasbetweenavarietyof
mediumsandaudiences.
Collaboration:

Workingtogethertoshare,advocate,and
compromiseonissuescriticaltoteamsuccess.
Problemsolving:
Experimentationofnewandfamiliar
conceptswhileprocessinginformation
Responsible Citizenship:
demonstration of proper
technology use
CreativityandInnovation:
Explorationofimagination.
Refiningandimprovingoriginalideas.

Evaluative Criteria
Groups will be evaluated on the following:
everyoneparticipated
everyonespokeloudlyandclearly,
nameandnumberofyour
amendmentclearlystated
telluswhatyouramendmentis
about(content)
It is most important that students are able to
demonstrate their knowledge of the names and
numbers of the amendments and give a basic
synopsis of them.

Stage 2- Evidence
Students will show their learning by
(summative assessment)
PERFORMANCE TASK(S):
Presentation of one amendment as a group

OTHER EVIDENCE:

Handing in completed research notes


Handing in an accurate, completed bibliography
Students will write a reflection of what America would look like if we didnt have these amendments

Based on Wiggins and McTighe (2011)


The Understanding by Design Guide to Creating High-Quality Units
and Van Brummelen (2002)
Steppingstones to Curriculum

Stage 3- Learning Plan


The pre-assessment for the unit is a short question and answer worksheet to gauge what they know about the Bill of
Rights as a whole, as well as about researching.
There will also be a pre-assessment for lesson 2. For this, the students will be given a survey to see what they know about technology and notetaking.
For lesson 1, the pre-assessment will be to ask students if they know why you would need a highlighter to do research and to
show a sample article on the document camera and have student volunteers highlight what they think are the main ideas.
(What pre-assessments will you use to check students prior knowledge, skill levels, and potential misconceptions?)

(Toward which goal does each


learning event build?)
Acquisition
the learning or developing of a
skill, habit, or quality
Research an
amendment
Note-taking in print
Digital note-taking
Meaning
Teacher presentation
on note-taking
Research an
amendment
Transfer
Write a paper that
takes what students
have learned and
expands on it as well as
allows them to apply it
to their own lives.

Learning Events
Student success at transfer, meaning, and acquisition depends upon their participation in
these learning events
Lesson 1: Note-Taking in Print
Teacher presentation on note-taking:
I will present three ways to take notes from an
article: highlighting, using sticky notes and marginal notes. There will be a practice article
for students to get their feet wet before diving into their research. A
technology
component is
involved as we will be using the document camera.
Take notes in print:
students will use what they learn from my presentation on note-taking
in print to take notes on articles given to them about their assigned amendment to research.
Lesson 2: Digital Note Taking
Teacher presentation on digital note-taking:
I will walk the students through ground
rules for using the iPads before beginning my presentation. Then, I will present Evernote, and
we will practice typing in the program, learning how to highlight and change word colors.

Self-evaluation
Digital Note-Taking:
Students will be given a list of websites that pertain to their
amendments and be asked to take at least two notes on the article they use. The notes must
be in the shared Evernote so I can view them and monitor progress.
Lesson 3: Project Introduction
Rubric Review:
I will explain how a rubric works to the students so that they know what
they will be graded on.

Progress Monitoring
Formative Assessment
I will be collecting their notes along the
way as exit tickets to monitor progress
toward meaning, transfer, and
acquisition. I will also be giving self and
group evaluations that will allow me to
see the development of socio-emotional
goals.

Self-monitoringformative
assessment
-Students will be given a checklist
during each research period that
they will be responsible for
completing as a way to monitor
their own progress toward goals of
meaning, transfer, and acquisition.
-They will also be given a rubric
before the start of the project
design phase so that they know
what they should know by the time
they present.

Rough Spots and Misunderstandings


The biggest rough spot that I am
anticipating is difficulty with the iPad
research. It is much more difficult and
there are far more distractions than
researching in print. There is also

Based on Wiggins and McTighe (2011)


The Understanding by Design Guide to Creating High-Quality Units
and Van Brummelen (2002)
Steppingstones to Curriculum

Project Design:
During a work time, they students will be taking their chosen method of
presenting and fleshing it out with their groups. They will write scripts of what to say and
decide who will do what in the presentation.
Self-evaluation:
At the end of the class period, students will complete a self-assessment that
will ask them questions about their performance working with a group.
Group Evaluation:
Students will complete an evaluation of their group members, answering
questions about the helpfulness and effectiveness of their group members
Lesson 4: Presentation Day!
Presentation of an Amendment:
Each group of students will be presenting their
amendment today according to the rubric in lesson 3.

more temptation to go off task when


using technology. Another rough spot
I am anticipating is being able to
integrate texts to find one underlying
theme to put into a presentation.
Feedback

Students will receive mainly oral


feedback during lessons when I am
walking around, answering questions and
observing. They will also receive written
feedback when I grade their
presentations. I will write comments on
the comments sheet I will attach to the
rubric.

Lesson 5: Applications in Writing


Writing an Application Paper:
Students will be given four writing prompts to respond to
with complete sentences.
Ongoing: Lessons 1 and 2
Research an Amendment:
Students will use lessons one and two to research an assigned
amendment from the Bill of Rights.

Based on Wiggins and McTighe (2011)


The Understanding by Design Guide to Creating High-Quality Units
and Van Brummelen (2002)
Steppingstones to Curriculum