You are on page 1of 8

Common Core Aligned Lesson Plan Template

Subject(s): Science Grade: Sixth


Teacher(s): Ms. Izzo School: Paularino Date: 11/19/15
Part I GOALS AND STANDARDS
1. ELD and State Content Standard Addressed (History/Social Science, Science, Physical Education, Visual
and Performing Arts):
S 6.6, 6.6.b: Sources of energy and materials differ in amounts, distribution, usefulness, and the time required for
their formation. As a basis for understanding this concept:
b. Students know different natural energy and material resources, including air, soil, rocks, minerals, petroleum,
fresh water, wildlife, and forests, and know how to classify them as renewable or nonrenewable.
2. Learning Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this
lesson?)

After class discussion students will be able to verbally classify renewable and
nonrenewable resources using evidence from the text and video.

STUDENT-FRIENDLY
TRANSLATION
I will be able to verbally classify
renewable and nonrenewable
resources using evidence from
the text and video.

3. Language Objective(s): (What is the type of language that EL's will need to learn and use in order to accomplish
the goals of the lesson? Ex) Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, Academic vocabulary, Language functions, Language
Learning Strategies)

Natural resource: Materials or substances such as minerals, forests, water, and fertile land that occur in nature and
can be used for economic gain.
Soil conservation: Any of various methods to achieve the maximum utilization of the land and preserve its resources
through such controls as crop rotation, prevention of soil erosion, etc.
Crop rotation: Is the practice of growing a series of dissimilar/different types of crops in the same area in sequenced
seasons. It also helps in reducing soil erosion and increases soil fertility and crop yield.
4. Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the
STUDENT-FRIENDLY
real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)
TRANSLATION
This lesson is relevant because fertile soil is needed for everything that lives on
I will understand the importance
land, including humans

of fertile soil.
5. Essential Questions:
Why is fertile soil considered a nonrenewable resource?
How can soil lose its value?
Why is it important to learn about conservation?
Part II STUDENTS INFORMATION
6. Class Information:
a. Total number - Twenty-six (Fourteen boys, twelve girls)
b. EL/Special Needs Eight ELs, Two Special Needs (RSP), One being mainstreamed (SCD (math only)) One
GATE
c. Academic background in content area - In the previous section students explored how soils from and
how soils can be classified. In this section, they will learn why fertile soil is a non-renewable resource.
d. Linguistic Fourteen EOs ,One Arabic, Four Spanish (R-FEP), Seven Spanish (EL)
e. Cultural/Health Two Religious Beliefs; Jehovah Witness that do not believe in celebrating any Holidays.
With this I will be sensitive to create an environment that contradicts others beliefs. For example not
celebrating Holidays in the class or decorating but instead having season neutral celebrations and
decorations.
f. Physical Boys begin adolescent growth spurt Adolescent growth spurt at peak for girls, with changes in
body proportions; may result in awkwardness in handling a rapidly changing body Pubescent stage for girls;
secondary sex
characteristics continue to develop, breasts develop, and menstruation begins Early physical maturing in boys and
girls is related to a more positive self-concept Improved motor development and coordination, especially for boys,
who excel in physical achievement
g. Social Needs opportunity to make decisions, Caregiver influence on childs behavior diminishing outside

the home, Childs occasional negativism or rebellion does not diminish importance for development of
values. Peers become source of behavior standards and models, Conforms to role assigned by group,
sometimes rigidly Boys and girls interests more divergent, Ones sexual role is a concern and information
from peers is actively sought Team games, popular, Crushes and hero worship common for same and
opposite sex Girls exhibit more social amenities than boys Boisterous behavior common
Self-consciousness creates anxiety about behavior Interests in opposite sex, although girls more interested in boys
than boys in girls
Faced with decisions regarding use of alcohol and drugs Peer group influence intensifies, May feel confused and
frightened by new school
setting; sees it as more complex and impersonal than elementary school, authority begins to be questioned and is
occasionally opposed School is the major setting for a variety of social experiences
e. Emotional Tends to lack self-confidence and may be self-conscious, shy, introspective Worries about others
opinionsprimarily peers
Sometimes moody and unpredictable but emotional outbursts less frequent Importance of conformity may result in
intolerance of others apparent differences Adult affection should continue, although the reaction may be rejection
or ambivalence Physical changes result in great emotional stress
f. Interests/Aspirations Video games, Mine craft, Art, Hanging out with friends, Music, and Sports
7. Anticipated Difficulties (Based on the information above, what difficulties do you think students may have with the
content?):

I anticipate that the ELs will have a hard time understanding the vocabulary, as well as the two with Special needs
Part III - LESSON ADAPTATIONS

8. Modifications/Accommodations (What specific modifications/accommodations are you going to make based on the
anticipated difficulties?)

I will define the vocabulary on a piece of chart paper, as well as show a short video on Soil Conservation
9. 21st Century Skills Circle all that are applicable
Communication

Collaboration

Creativity

Critical Thinking

Describe how the 21st century skill(s) you have circled will be observed during the lesson: In the
beginning of the lesson plan, the students will be places in groups where they will have to communicate with
one another on how to keep the soil from washing away using the materials they are given, they will also have
to collaborate together using different strategies, they will have to be creative with the materials they have,
and critically think about what will prevent the soil from washing away.
10.
Technology - How will you incorporate technology into your lesson?
I will show a short video in Soil Conservation

11.

Part IV - ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING


Assessment Criteria for Success: (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the

outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lessons
outcomes look like?)

a. Formative:
Public Service Announcement journal piece X26: Students will complete a journal entry like they do every day but
with a prompt that directly ties to the science standards.
b. Summative (if applicable):
N/A
c. (Attach rubric here, if applicable):
4) Student exceeds criteria in some way; for example, by referencing the Dust Bowl of the 1930s
3) Meets criteria
2) Includes only brief description of elements
1) Is incorrect and incomplete
Part V - INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURE
12.
Instructional Method: Circle one Direct Instruction
Inquiry
Cooperative Learning

13.

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

California Earth Science Teacher textbook X1


California Earth Science Student textbook X26
Chart paper with definition X1
Computer X1
Projector X1
Big bag of soil X1
Paper Pie Plates X5
Craft Sticks
Paper Clips
Pebbles
Strips of paper
Play dough X5
14.
Procedure (Include estimated times. Please write a detailed procedure, including questions
that you are planning to ask.):
OPEN:
I will access their prior knowledge by recapping the three prior sections to this lesson, talking about how soils
form and how soils are classified, then
I will state todays objective, S 6.6, 6.6.b: Sources of energy and materials differ in amounts, distribution,
usefulness, and the time required for their formation. As a basis for understanding this concept:
b. Students know different natural energy and material resources, including air, soil, rocks, minerals, petroleum,
fresh water, wildlife, and forests, and know how to classify them as renewable or nonrenewable.
I will allow students to break off into groups of five groups of five and one group of six, once they are situated I
will pass out the materials (that are already set up on individual group trays) and tell the students their job as
a group is to prevent the soil from washing away, using only the materials I have provided them (They will
have 10 minutes to build something to protect the soil from washing away)
Once the 10 minutes is up I will ask students to pour water over their soil, when they have finished that I will
ask the whole class, Based on your observations , what do you think is the best way to prevent soil on a slope
from washing away? I will give them 5 minutes to write down their response and have one person from each
group share their response aloud.
I will then summarize what each group said relating it to how they conserved soil in their groups by protecting
it, using the materials to prevent their soil from washing away

BODY:
I will then go into the lesson by playing this short video on Soil Conservation (https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=_UeVvUzgJAY)
I will then refer to my chart paper that defines the main vocabulary
Sod: The surface of the ground, with the grass growing on it.
Natural resource: Materials or substances such as minerals, forests, water, and fertile land that occur in nature and
can be used for economic gain.
Dust bowl: An area of land where vegetation has been lost and soil reduced to dust and eroded, especially as a
consequence of drought or unsuitable farming practice.
Soil conservation: Any of various methods to achieve the maximum utilization of the land and preserve its resources
through such controls as crop rotation, prevention of soil erosion, etc.
Contour plowing: Plowing along the contours of the land in order to minimize soil erosion.
Conservation plowing: Is a method of planting and harvesting crops where stalks and other residue from the previous
year are left on the ground into the next season. This reduces soil erosion and run-off, keeping soil healthy and able
to produce crops for
Crop rotation: Is the practice of growing a series of dissimilar/different types of crops in the same area in sequenced
seasons. It also helps in reducing soil erosion and increases soil fertility and crop yield.
I will then hit the key points by reading pages 74-76 of the Science text book, having the students follow along,
in these pages students will see the vocabulary in context by reading soil as a resource, soil damage and loss,
loss of top soil, soil loss in the dust bowl, and soil conservation.
CLOSE:
Then I will ask the first essential question Why is fertile soil considered a nonrenewable resource? And allow the
students to think pair share, and I will call on a volunteer to share the response of their partner
Moving on to question two think pair share How can soil lose its value?
Moving on to question three think pair share What are some ways that soil can be conserved?
Students will then work independently to write a Public Service Announcement: A severe drought in a farming
region threatens to produce another Dust Bowl. Write a paragraph about soil conservation to be read as a
Public Service Announcement on radio stations. The announcement should identify the danger of soil loss due
to soil erosion. It should also describe the steps farmers can take to conserve the soil.
I will then call on at least one volunteer and up to three if time permits to come read their announcement in
front of the class, as if they were on the radio
Part VI - REFLECTION

1. What instructional strategies did you use to help students achieve the lesson objective?
Instructional strategies that I used to help students achieve the lesson objective would be highlighting key terms,
writing them and posting them on the board. I also used a short video that recapped on what the students did in
their groups. This helped them make a connection to renewable and nonrenewable resources because the video
captured what they are by giving examples. I believe that the inquiry group activity was the most helpful in having
the students meet the objective because they did hands on experience working with peers to protect the soil from
washing away. Once the time was up, and I poured water on top of the pile of soil, I asked the students what it is that
they did to protect the soil from running over.
2. Were the students successful at achieving the lesson objective?
a) If so, provide student evidence.
The students were able to successfully achieve lesson object both verbally and in written form. The students
were asked to write in their journals The difference between a renewable and non-renewable resource, cite
evidence) Students were asked to first verbally share with a partner, then I called on a few volunteers to
share aloud with the class. Once answers were shared verbally I had the students write in 4-6 sentences
and cite evidence from the inquiry activity, video, or text.
b) If not, why do you think they were not able to achieve the lesson objective? What are your next steps?
N/A
3. What would you change about the lesson and why?
The inquiry activity worked greater than I could have imagined, they did a great job demonstrating the 21 st century
skills. They worked collaboratively in groups of five, they communicated allowing everyone to share their opinion,
they were creative in protecting the soil from running over, and they critically thought about how they could do that.
The only thing that I would change would be clearly listing on a piece of chart paper (like I did with the vocabulary)
what examples fall under renewable resources and nonrenewable. I felt like there were still a few students not sure
of what a renewable resource was. We had went over that soil is a nonrenewable resource, therefore we must protect
it from running over or blowing away (we even made connections to the dust bowl and to the California drought) but
they needed more clarification and connections to what a renewable resource was.

Classroom Lessons ONLY: After presenting your lesson in your BST classroom, please review and reflect on student
work related to this lesson. Make copies of student work for levels of high, middle, and low, and write your comments
on the copies.