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MAPA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

Department of Mathematics

VISION
Mapua shall be among the best universities in the world.
MISSION
a.
b.
c.

The Institute shall provide a learning environment in order for its students to acquire the attributes that will make them globally
competitive.
The Institute shall engage in economically viable research, development, and innovation.
The Institute shall provide state-of-the-art solutions to problems of industries and communities
PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

MISSION
b

Within the five years after graduation, the graduates of Civil Engineering program
shall have:
1
2
3
4

Undertaken, singly or in teams, projects that show ability to solve complex


engineering problems.
Had substantial involvement in projects that take into consideration safety,
health, environmental concerns and the public welfare, partly through
adherence to required codes and laws.
Demonstrated professional success via promotions and/or positions of
increasing responsibility.
Demonstrated life-long learning via progress toward completion of an advanced
degree, professional development/continuing education courses, or industrial
training courses.

Exhibited professional behavior and attitude in engineering practice.

Initiated and implemented actions toward the improvement of engineering


practice.

COURSE SYLLABUS
1.

Course Code: MATH30-5

2.

Course Title:

3.

Pre-requisite:

4.

Co-requisite: None

5.

Credit: 3 units

Course Title:
Probability and Statistics

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS


MATH23 / MATH23-1

Date Effective:
3rd Quarter SY
2014-2015

Date Revised:
January 2015

Prepared by:

Approved by:

Cluster IV

LD Sabino
(Subject Chair)

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6. Course Description:
The course covers topics in descriptive statistics such as measures of central
tendency, measures of variability, skewness, and kurtosis, principles of counting,
permutation, and combination; principles of probability, covering additive rules, conditional
probability, multiplicative rules, and Bayes rule; concepts of random variable and
mathematical expectation; discrete and continuous probability distributions; normal
distribution. It also designed to provide a working knowledge of the fundamental concepts
of inferential statistics for the understanding and interpretation of statistical results and
introduction to experimental designs as applied to Civil Engineering, Geology and other
related fields.

7. Student Outcomes and Relationship to Program Educational Objectives


STUDENT OUTCOMES
a
b
c

d
e
f
g
h

i
J
k
l

an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and


engineering
an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to
analyze and interpret from data
an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet
desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic,
environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety,
manufacturability, and sustainability, in accordance with
standards
an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
an ability to communicate effectively
the broad education necessary to understand the impact of
engineering solutions in the global, economic, environmental and
societal context
a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long
learning
a knowledge of contemporary issues
an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering
tools necessary for engineering practice
Knowledge and understanding of engineering and management
principles as a member and leader in a team, to manage projects
and in multidisciplinary environment

PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES


2
3
4
5
6

8. Course Outcomes (COs) and Relationship to Student Outcomes


Course Outcomes
After completing the course, the student must be able to:
1. Summarize the set of data using tables, graphs, and
numerical measurements such as measures of central
tendency, measures of variability, measures of position,
and measures of shape for univariate data and correlation
Course Title:
Probability and Statistics

Date Effective:
3rd Quarter SY
2014-2015

Date Revised:
January 2015

R D

Student Outcomes*
d e f g h i j
R

Prepared by:

Approved by:

Cluster IV

LD Sabino
(Subject Chair)

k
D

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and regression for multivariate data.


2. Compute the probability of events; and construct and apply
D
the probability distribution of a random variable for both
discrete and continuous data.
3. Develop real-life research and solve statistical problems by
applying the knowledge obtained from inferential statistics D D
such as estimation and hypothesis testing.
* Level: I- Introduced, R- Reinforced, D- Demonstrated

D D

D D

9. Course Coverage
Week

TOPICS

TLA

AT

COURSE
OUTCOMES

Mission and Vision of Mapua Institute


of Technology
Orientation and Introduction to the
Course
Discussion on COs, TLAs, and ATs of the
course
Overview on student-centered learning
and eclectic approaches to be used in the
course
1

Introduction to Statistics and Data


Analysis
Definition of Terms
Descriptive and Inferential Statistics
Population and Sample
Parameter and Statistic
Sampling Procedures
Random Sampling
Data Presentation
Stem-and-leaf plot
Frequency distribution tab
Graphical presentation

Teaching and
Learning Activity

Assessment
Tool

Reading and
Collaborative
Discussion

Homework1
Short Quiz1
CO 1

Univariate Analysis
Measures of Central Tendency
Classroom Discussion

Measures of Variability
Measures of Position
Measures of Shape
2

Multivariate Analysis
Regression : Method of Least Squares
Pearson Product Moment Correlation
Coefficient of Determination

Course Title:
Probability and Statistics

Date Effective:
3rd Quarter SY
2014-2015

Classroom Discussion

Date Revised:
January 2015

Prepared by:

Approved by:

Cluster IV

LD Sabino
(Subject Chair)

Page 3 of 8

Week

TOPICS
Preliminary Concepts on Probability
Sample Space
Operations on Events
Venn Diagram

Counting Sample Points


Multiplication Rule
Permutation
Unordered Partition
Combination

TLA

Classroom Discussion

Conditional Probability
Multiplicative Rule
Bayes Theorem

Classroom Discussion

Classroom Discussion
Collaborative Learning

Discrete Probability Distributions


Probability Mass Function
Cumulative Distribution
Mathematical Expectation
Mean and Variance

Classroom Discussion

Some Discrete Probability Distribution


Binomial Distribution
Poisson Distribution

Class Discussion
Collaborative Learning

Some Continuous Distribution

Course Title:
Probability and Statistics

Date Effective:
3rd Quarter SY
2014-2015

O1

Classroom Discussion

Classroom Discussion

Continuous Probability Distributions


Probability Density Function
Cumulative Distribution
Mathematical Expectation
Mean and Variance

LQ1

Classroom Discussion

Additive Rule
Complement Rule

Random Variables & Probability


Distributions

COURSE
OUTCOMES

Classroom Discussion

LONG QUIZ 1
Probability of an Event
Empirical Definition of Probability
Classical Definition of Probability
Axioms on Probability

AT

Homework2
Short Quiz2

Classroom Discussion
O2

Classroom Discussion

Date Revised:
January 2015

Prepared by:

Approved by:

Cluster IV

LD Sabino
(Subject Chair)

Page 4 of 8

Week

TOPICS

TLA

AT

COURSE
OUTCOMES

Normal Distribution: Properties


Classroom Discussion
Problem-Based
Activity

Normal Distribution
Application

O2

Joint Probability Distribution


Marginal Distribution
Conditional Probability
Statistical Independence
Covariance of Random Variables
LONG QUIZ 2
Classroom Discussion

Fundamental Sampling Distributions


Sampling Distribution

Principles of Estimation
Point Estimation
Interval Estimation

Classroom Discussion

Large-Sample Estimation
Population Mean
Proportion
Difference of Two Means
Standard Deviation and Variance

Classroom Discussion

Small-Sample Estimation
Population Mean
Difference of Two Means

Classroom Discussion

Tests of Hypotheses
Principles of Hypothesis Testing
Null and Alternative Hypothesis
Type I and Type II Error

Homework3
Short Quiz3

Classroom Discussion
Group Discussion

O3

Classical Method and P-value


Test Statistics for Large Samples:
Claims about Mean
Claims about Proportion
Claims about the Difference of
Two Population Means
Claims about the Difference of
Two Binomial Proportions
10

Test Statistics for Small Samples


Claims about the variance

Course Title:
Probability and Statistics

Date Effective:
3rd Quarter SY
2014-2015

Classroom Discussion

Date Revised:
January 2015

Prepared by:

Approved by:

Cluster IV

LD Sabino
(Subject Chair)

Page 5 of 8

Week

TOPICS

TLA

AT

COURSE
OUTCOMES

Claims about Mean


Claims about difference of two means
LONG QUIZ 3
11

CO3

Summative Assessment
Final Exam

CO1, CO2,
CO3

10. Opportunities to Develop Lifelong Learning Skill


Through the various concepts and applications of statistics and probability, students will develop their
logical thinking through analysis of the problems encountered in these areas of mathematics. Moreover,
students will be introduced to statistical research that will help them realize the usefulness of statistics in their
chosen field of studies.
11. Contribution of Course to Meeting the Professional Component
Engineering Topics
General Education
Basic Sciences and Mathematics

:
:
:

0%
0%
100%

12.

Textbook: Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers. Montgomery, Douglas and Runger, George.
John Wiley & Sons (Asia) Pte Ltd 2011

13.

Course Evaluation

Student performance will be rated based on the following:

Assessment Tasks

Weight

Quiz 1 (written)
Quiz 1 (on-line)
Short Quiz
Homework/Seatwork
Quiz 2
CO 2
Short Quiz
Homework/Seatwork
Quiz 3
Short Quiz
CO3
Homework/Seatwork
Statistical Paper
Summative Assessment:
Final Examination
TOTAL

12.6%
5.4%
1.5%
3
18%
1.5%
3%
14%
2%
4%
10%

CO1

CO 1

Course Title:
Probability and Statistics

Date Effective:
3rd Quarter SY
2014-2015

Minimum Average for


Satisfactory
Performance

15.75%

15.75%

21%

25%

17.5%

100%

Date Revised:
January 2015

70.0%

Prepared by:

Approved by:

Cluster IV

LD Sabino
(Subject Chair)

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The final grades will correspond to the weighted average scores shown below:
Average

Grade

Average

Grade

Below 70

5.00

83 85

2.00

70 72

3.00

86 89

1.75

73 75

2.75

90 92

1.50

76 79

2.50

93 95

1.25

80 82

2.25

96 100

1.00

Other Course Policies


a. Attendance
According to CHED policy, total number of absences by the students should not be more than
20% of the total number of meetings or 9 hrs for a three-unit-course. Students incurring more
than 9 hours of unexcused absences automatically gets a failing grade regardless of class
standing.
b. Submission of Assessment Tasks (Student Outputs) should be on time; late submittal of
courseworks will not be accepted.
c. Written Major Examination (Long Quiz and Final Exams) will be administered as scheduled. No
special exam will be given unless with a valid reason subject to approval by the Chairman of the
Mathematics Department.
d. Course Portfolio will be collected at the end of the quarter.
e. Language of Instruction
Lectures, discussion, and documentation will be in English. Written and spoken work may receive
a lower mark if it is, in the opinion of the instructor, deficient in English.
f.

Honor, Dress and Grooming Codes


All of us have been instructed on the Dress and Grooming Codes of the Institute. We have all
committed to obey and sustain these codes. It will be expected in this class that each of us will
honor the commitments that we have made.
For this course the Honor Code is that there will be no plagiarizing on written work and no
cheating on exams. Proper citation must be given to authors whose works were used in the
process of developing instructional materials and learning in this course. If a student is caught
cheating on an exam, he or she will be given zero mark for the exam. If a student is caught
cheating twice, the student will be referred to the Prefect of Student Affairs and be given a failing
grade.

g. Consultation Schedule
Consultation schedules with the Professor are posted outside the faculty room and in the
Departments web-page (http://math.mapua.edu.ph). It is recommended that the student first set
an appointment to confirm the instructors availability.

Course Title:
Probability and Statistics

Date Effective:
3rd Quarter SY
2014-2015

Date Revised:
January 2015

Prepared by:

Approved by:

Cluster IV

LD Sabino
(Subject Chair)

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14.

Other References
14.1
Books
a. Introduction to Probability and Statistics. Mendenhall, Beaver and Beaver. Duxbury press, 1999.
b. Modern Elementary Statistics, 9th ed. Freund and Simon. Prentice Hall International, Inc.,
Singapore, 1997.
c. Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists, 8th Ed. Walpole, Myers, Myers and Ye.
Prentice Hall International, Inc., Philippines, 2005.
d. Probability and Statistics for Engineering Students, Philippine Ed. Scheaffer, Mulekar, McClave.
Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning Asia Pte. Ltd., 2012
14.2 Websites
http://www.wileyplus.com

15. Course Materials Made Available


Course schedules for lectures and quizzes
Samples of assignment/Problem sets of students
Samples of written examinations of students
End-of-course self-assessment
Samples of Submitted Statistical Papers
16. Committee Members:
Course Cluster Chair
CQI Cluster Chair
Members

Course Title:
Probability and Statistics

: Richard T. Earnhart
: Joseph G. Santos
: Ronald L. Arciaga
Wyndell A. Almenor
Dan Andrew H. Magcuyao

Date Effective:
3rd Quarter SY
2014-2015

Date Revised:
January 2015

Prepared by:

Approved by:

Cluster IV

LD Sabino
(Subject Chair)

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