You are on page 1of 8

DESIGN ELEMENTS

LANDSCAPE AND ARCHITECTURE


Jack Johnson
N0497500

DESIGN ELEMENTS
TOPOGRAPHICAL STORIES
The reading raised the topic of
buildings built into the landscape as
well as aspects within that in where
they can be also separated from the
surroundings through use of materials
and texture.
This weeks focus of how landscape
integrates with architecture led me to
focus on a field that will relate to my
potential subject for the graphic essay;
subterranean architecture.
Usable roofing and earth sheltered
buildings will be the subject of this
presentation, and show underground
architecture harnessing and embracing
its surroundings.

DESIGN ELEMENTS
ALONI, ANTIPAROS ISLAND, GREECE
A slight valley allowed two external
walls to support a natural flow of
landscape over a half hidden dwelling.
plant life and natural surrounding
ground cover continues over the
building naturally and at one end flows
down into the building to a sunken
courtyard.
There are four courtyards in total which
maximise internal natural lighting
whilst keeping the top cover clear from
many windows and obstacles.
The architects (DecaArchitecture) say
they design the landscape to suit
inhabitation and I think that is key to
the integration of landscape and
architecture, having both aspects equal
in terms of prioritisation.

DESIGN ELEMENTS
EDGELAND HOUSE, AUSTIN, TEXAS, USA
From the outside this residence seems
to be hidden within a small mound but
upon further inspection opens out into
a small canyon-esque passage through
the core of the building.
This house was based upon vernacular
pit-houses used by Native Americans
throughout North America, and sees
the building aim to keep disturbance to
a minimal and encourage regeneration
on the plot where previously the
landscape had been scarred by pipeline
excavation.
the reintroduction of over 40 native
species of wildflower and grasses root
the building into its surroundings as
well as help the local wildlife and
improve biodiversity.

DESIGN ELEMENTS
ECO HOUSE, BOLTON, UK
These renders show the idea of an ecohome which - as with the first case
study - continues the landscape above
it, however in this case the building is
formed from 6 different dug out spaces
creating courtyards and an entrance.
two of the depressions flow into the
natural surroundings and incorporate
plant life into the building whereas
others are populated with simple
courtyards
and
furniture,
boldly
defining a difference between the house
and its surroundings.
The
appearance
and
proposed
construction of the walls matches its
contexts rural identity, however these
are met with unnatural materials such
as the crisp white render and large glass
curves, redefining the landscape as a
modern place to live peacefully with the
environment.

DESIGN ELEMENTS
KTIMA HOUSE, ANTIPAROS, GREECE
The straight and jagged walls of this
dwelling (taken from the idea of
Greeces order and chaos throughout
history) seemingly hold up the above
landscape, whilst maintaining common
Greek architecture styles of paths and
platforms throughout.
Since the building's interior spaces are
under the landscape, heating and
cooling systems are kept to a minimum
and
the
buildings
overall
environmentally friendly aspect is
favourable.
The idea of many trees was withheld in
accordance to the natural landscape of
the island, integrating the natural dry
bushes and grasses found in the
buildings surroundings.

DESIGN ELEMENTS
HOUSE IN PACHACAMAC, PERU
In response to the context of the site,
the architects decided to bury this
philosophers
house
into
the
surroundings in order to create a
balanced
dialogue
between
architecture and landscape.
A sense of protection was to be evoked
and an understanding and appreciation
of both the dark and the light, and its
effect on comfort within the spaces.
Local-looking materials form a lot of
the roofing and some of the supporting
structure, rooting itself like many of
these case studies, into the landscape in
which they sit.

DESIGN ELEMENTS
MALATOR, DRUIDSTON, PEMBROKESHIRE,
WALES
Two glass openings on either side of
seemingly a grass mound is the basic
look of this building, with solely the
chimney poking out the top.
This vision of future Welsh homes has
prefabricated interior elements as well
as a simple, one room interior, looking
out towards the sea.
The way the entrance window area is far
smaller than the sea-facing one helps
distinguish a focus for the eye and
draws the focus to a single side of the
interior space.
Linking it to its context materially is
the fact that it is totally covered in local
grasses and the colours help it melt into
the landscape.