Thoughts about Interledger, Ripple, XRP and 
cross­currency payments. 
 
Rafael Olaio Pereira 
CEO Rippex ­ Ripple Gateway 
rippex.net 
 

 

The Ripple Vision paper1  reaffirmed the concept of a multi­currency ledger where atomic 
cross­currency payments can occur, powered by XRP in many cases. 
Thinking about how this vision would interact with the Interledger Protocol2 (ILP), a question 
came up. How would an Interledger cross currency payment use the Ripple Consensus 
Ledger (RCL)? 
 
First, let’s see how a cross­currency payment would occur between two “ILP­enabled” 
ledgers with functioning connectors, according to the descriptions published in the ILP white 
paper3 . 
 
Connectors (liquidity providers between 2 or more ledgers) may accept a payment in ledger 
A in one currency, in exchange for delivering another currency in ledger B. So interledger 
validators or pathfinders would read this as an offer expressed it in a path, just like Rippled, 
the daemon that keeps the ripple network, does today, except that the ledgers that host the 
assets may be operated by any entity, not only the RCL. That’s great. 
 
 

 
 
 

 "Building Network Effects on Ripple." 2015. 2 Mar. 2016 <​
https://ripple.com/files/ripple_vision.pdf​

 "Interledger." 2015. 2 Mar. 2016 <​
https://interledger.org/​

3
 Thomas, S. "A Protocol for Interledger Payments." 2015. <​
https://interledger.org/interledger.pdf​

1
2

When thinking about RCL’s role in this scenario, the SusPay4 feature is the tool that enables 
XRP to be cryptographically escrowed ­ an escrow guaranteed by the entire ripple network. 
In an ILP payment using SusPay, RCL and XRP would play the following roles: 
 
­ RCL escrow would provide a trust­optimized escrow without a single counterparty, 
diminishing the need for trusting in a proprietary ledger. This can offer reliability, availability 
and accessibility to an escrow service that is cheaper than private services with similar 
characteristics. 
 
­ XRP would act as a bridge currency enabling paths to move value from one ledger to 
another using a multilaterally escrowed, digital counterparty­less asset as an intermediary 
step, that can optimize cash management and cost structure in payments operations5 . 
 
That’s awesome, but if we think that the RCL have many subledgers ­ let’s take 1 currency + 
issuer = 1 subledger ­ this implementation would enable only XRP subledger to participate in 
ILP payments, and ILP payments using more than one RCL subledger would not be 
possible. 
 
So XRP would be RCL’s connection to ILP, while non­XRP tokens (RCL­issuances) ­ would 
live one hop separated from it, unless SusPay is implemented for them. 
 
That said, let’s not discuss if SusPay should or shouldn't be added to all RCL’s subledgers, 
since there are ongoing discussions about that, and let’s look at an example of XRP taking 
part in ILP payments for USD/EUR: 
 
We need 2 connectors: 1 for XRP/USD and another for XRP/EUR 
Supposing Connector 1 asks 100 XRP/USD and Connector 2 asks 111.11 XRP/EUR, this 
would result in an approximate FX rate of 0.9 USD/EUR and the most probable way an ILP 
payment would use the RCL is like this: 
 

4

 

 “SusPay” 
https://github.com/ripple/rippled/blob/39b95903e36d32853c6e9ce5b6ee3d099c35ca11/src/ripple/app/tx/i
mpl/SusPay.cpp 
5
 "The Cost­Cutting Case for Banks ­ Ripple." 2016. 3 Mar. 2016 
<​
https://ripple.com/files/xrp_cost_model_paper.pdf​

1 ­ Using Universal Mode 
The escrows are prepared from the sender’s ledger to the recipient’s ledger, to reassure the 
next connector that the transaction is funded. 
In the Universal mode, execution phase releases one escrow each time, from the recipient to 
the sender, using a receipt signed by the recipient: 

 
 

 
 

 

2 ­ Using Atomic Mode 
In the atomic mode the execution is atomic, triggered by a trusted notary, or a trusted 
network of notaries, and all escrows are released at the same time: 

 
 
 
 
The concepts are really simple, yet they are powerful. Any ledger in the world be able to 
implement a standardized and secure way to communicate to other ledgers in order to 
perform value exchange between them. 
 

 

 

Going further ­ Unbundling the Ripple Network 
 
Bitcoin and Ripple protocols brought a vision that an “internet of value” is now 
technologically possible, because value can now be managed in a distributed manner. 
Nevertheless, scalability issues have been haunting the plans for a universal ledger. The ILP 
protocol solves scalability by allowing many independent ledgers to coexist interconnected, 
removing the need for a “big brother” protocol to watch all the transactions, and by allowing 
notaries to form ad­hoc networks to deliver pathfinding and transaction execution services. Is 
it viable? 
 

1 ­ Using Ripple’s decentralized validating and pathfinding network as a 
value proposition for notarizing ILP transactions 
 
Today, to create offers in the RCL, parties publish a commitment to exchange value between 
ledgers, under a certain condition, and rippled servers are allowed to perform the trade if 
they find a match, validating and writing the transaction in a brand new ledger. RCL’s novelty 
is about being decentralized, and decentralized refers to ledgers maintenance, transaction 
validation and changing the ledgers based on validated transactions. In other words, all RCL 
ledgers (i.e. currencies) are altered by inputs from the same network of validators ­ which 
also provide a pathfinding mechanism and up­to­date information about the network. 
 
In addition, Ripple is moving forward towards the decentralization of the validators network, 
and if it succeeds, it will be a very trustworthy infrastructure to verify financial transactions, 
because servers will be able to pick sets of trusted peers that are very unlikely to act 
maliciously in a colluded way. 
 
If such reliable multilateral network becomes a reality, it will mean that many players in the 
financial industry will be trusting the network they are part of to verify and perform 
transactions that will affect their assets, so they would be allowing the ripple network to 
change the state of some of their assets. 
 
If there is a network of validators that is trusted enough to change the state of a bank’s 
asset, it's not too stretchy to think that some banks could allow a network like this to act as 

notary and pathfinder for ILP transactions for their ledgers, with an onboarding process for 
connectors. 
 
From the moment a network like this achieves critical mass of qualified decentralization, it 
will offer a huge value proposition and will attract more members, and could scale to a top 
level worldwide participation. 
 
Now, with this vision in the mind, it's possible to admit that many ledgers in the world could 
be interconnected by ILP and a network of known notaries that use a Byzantine Fault 
Tolerance Protocol (BFTP) to increase reliability and security. In other words, a 
decentralized network of notaries (DNON). 
 
That accepted, an ILP­enabled DNON, which achieves to have enough connectors and 
ledgers plugged in, would have many similarities with a ripple network, but with improved 
amplitude, scalability and multiple privacy possibilities, because it would be able to move 
assets in public and private ledgers. The DNON would serve as pathfinder and payment 
validator just like rippleds serve today for the RCL. 
 

2 ­ Adding a Digital Counterparty­less Asset (DCA) to the equation 
 
In a scenario like this, with many ledgers where  “N” connectors may have “N” different 
desires and trading conditions, the value proposition of a bridge currency is undeniable. The 
desires’ matching would occur directly, like EUR to USD, or using more than one hop, like 
EUR to XRP to USD. That means that connector 1 and N may not have direct 
complementary conditions, but there may be complementary desires that will connect “1” to 
“N”. 
This profusion of different markets, desires and trading conditions suggests that, for the sake 
of efficiency, some “safe harbour” connectors would intermediate relationships between 2 or 
more other connectors that are not directly related to each other. 
 
In other words, any major correspondent bank would solve trust issues between smaller 
peers or market makers, or there would be a path at least as safe and as cheap that would 
not require keeping accounts in a major bank to escrow and release assets (this could be 
RCL and XRP, or bitcoin if it is ILP enabled). 
 

Let’s compare the 2 theoretical scenarios described above: 
 
1 ­ DNON + major bank “BANK” as the “Connector of connectors” (figure below). 
 
This isn’t hard to accept: Many connectors having accounts in BANK would connect 
payments that would hop through BANK’s ledgers to end up in another ledger. So, it's the 
correspondent bank model in steroids. 

 
 
2 ­ DNON + trust­optimized path (figure below). 
 
Let's say a “trust­optimized path” is a path where two separated connectors skip paying for 
correspondent bank’s fees but can enjoy the same security, reliability, liquidity and FX rate. 
They can use a decentralized network plus a digital counterparty­less asset (DCA) with 
cryptographic escrow enabled, like XRP. If XRP can make it and have a market for many 
other currencies, it would make sense considering it as a bridge currency for ILP payments. 
The first problem here is waiving USD’s stability and liquidity. XRP’s accessibility and 
holding cheapness is blurred by its volatility and lack of liquidity, so this must be tackled, not 
by eliminating volatility, but by bringing it to an acceptable level of predictability (i. e. more 

7
volume and demand/supply balance, derivatives). Recent news6,​
 confirmed that XRP 

derivatives and liquidity incentives are coming. 
 
These initiatives to subsidize XRP market makers and to create XRP derivatives may have 
an impact on mitigating the currency risk of buying large XRP positions, but for the sake of 
focus, let’s not not dive into market making specifics, but just assume a crypto­asset in a 
decentralized ILP­enabled ledger could reach the liquidity required to serve as an 
institutional bridge currency. 

 
 
In this second pic, there is no need for bank accounts abroad nor onboarding processes, nor 
minimum monthly volume, etc. The possibility of connection is open to anyone. 
 
To add to this discussion, Ripple recently published a paper8 comparing quantitatively the 
costs of using traditional assets and rails versus Ripple and XRP. The paper stated that this 
trust optimized path would sweep 33% of the international payment infrastructure costs. 
 

 "XRP Portal | Ripple." 2015. 1 Mar. 2016 <​
https://ripple.com/xrp­portal/​

 "Ripple Partners with Crypto Facilities for XRP Derivatives ..." 2016. 1 Mar. 2016 
<​
https://ripple.com/insights/ripple­partners­with­crypto­facilities­for­xrp­derivatives/​

8
 "The Cost­Cutting Case for Banks ­ Ripple." 2016. 1 Mar. 2016 
<​
https://ripple.com/files/xrp_cost_model_paper.pdf​

6
7

Ripple’s team vision makes sense and we could start seeing institutional volumes for a 
crypto­asset in the near future, and it could offer an excellent way to make paths shorter and 
cheaper. 
 

Critical Requirements for the viability of DNON + DCA + ILP
 
It is still early days in distributed ledgers’ land, but they are a powerful concept. One possible 
viable scenario for taking payments to the next level is ILP + DNON + Ripple + DCA (like 
XRP) enabling payments from many kinds of ledgers. The viability of such scheme would 
rely mainly in two factors: 
 
1 ­ DNON’s quality. Recent announcements9 made by Microsoft encouraged me to think that 
an extraordinary pack of independent notaries could one day be a reality and provide a high 
quality, extremely secure, reliable and decentralized validating network, which would be a 
huge value proposition for the consumers and providers of financial services. These 
networks could operate in public and private ledgers. 
 
2 ­ XRP’s (or similar) success as a bridge­currency. Without a super crypto­asset the most 
probable paths will kiss correspondent banks’ USDs and accounts. 
 

3 ­ RCL­issuances: What are the applications for issuances in the RCL, 
supposing they will not be upgraded to support SusPay. 
 
Extending SusPay to all RCL­issuances is not in Ripple’s roadmap for now10, but still RCL is 
a decentralized exchange where any kind of asset/liability can be issued, traded and used in 
payments. Such worldwide digital exchange is a new and powerful tool that will be indirectly 
connected to ILP via XRP + SusPay. The newness about issuing tokens in RCL is that they 
can be used in a decentralized network, even being centrally administered. The figure below 
shows the relation between ILP, XRP, RCL­issuances and other ledgers. 
 

9

 "Azure Blockchain as a Service update | Blog | Microsoft Azure." 2015. 1 Mar. 2016 
<​
https://azure.microsoft.com/en­us/blog/azure­blockchain­as­a­service­update/​

10
 "Ripple Forum • View topic ­ SusPay for IOU's?." 2015. 2 Mar. 2016 
<​
https://forum.ripple.com/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=15816​

 
 
So, what is the role of the green box in the ecosystem? Does the world need a public 
decentralized global exchange? I tend to think YES but maybe nowadays it is too soon to 
come to conclusions. In addition to its global exchange’s role, RCL­issuances may leverage 
from decentralized high quality transaction validation to play additional roles in still unveiled 
ecosystems. But what those could be? 
Maybe, before getting to the details, we should ask ourselves how the tokens in the green 
box differ from balances in centralized systems? 
Note: All use cases and features described below require using independent ripple accounts and keeping private keys
private.

Control 
Today, when using an exchange, people give 100% control over their assets and balances 
to the exchange’s administrator. When depositing USD at bitstamp or at a stock broker, the 
bank balances AND the exchange balances are totally controlled by the exchange 
administrator. A Ripple IOU concentrates more power on the IOU bearer, since only the key 
owner has the authority to create transactions, and after created, no single counterparty has 
the power to determine their outcome. 

The IOU issuer may prevent an unknown account holder to hold its balances using the 
RequireAuth11  flag and can also freeze the balances using the freeze feature12 , but even with 
this tools, there is a significant reduction in the level of control over the customer’s balances 
and in the participation on the transaction formation and validation. 
 

Accessibility, availability and security 
Today people must rely on a website’s or on server clusters’ capacity of avoiding problems 
like DDOS attacks, good management, etc, to have a reliable accessibility to their assets 
and to publish transactions. A decentralized exchange can offer much better availability and 
accessibility. 
Comparing RCL to the bitcoin protocol, which offers a secure payment rail and a bearer 
asset that users can keep totally private just by holding an alphanumeric sequence (Secret 
Key), ripple goes further and offers to its users a bearer asset, a payment rail ​
and a 
worldwide exchange​
, in which all the transactions are settled in 3.5 seconds. This means 
that users can pay XRP and RCL­issuances to each other and trade even if the issuance’s 
administrator is unavailable (due to DDOS attacks, or because it closes at 6pm, etc). So, for 
market makers these could be important features. 
Derivatives issued in the RCL may complete the needs for market makers that tolerate 
public activity to stay in the RCL. 
 

Data Losses 
An attack in a private exchange may result in permanent data loss ­ which may be 
catastrophic if the administrator doesn’t keep frequent offline backups ­ and in malicious 
transactions transferring value inadvertently, and may give access to many user’s funds at 
once. 
In a decentralized exchange, an attacker would have to crack each account separately in 
order to mess/steal user’s balances. A successful attack to a ripple gateway that do not store 
user’s keys would only be harmful to the extent of its hot wallet content and limited to the 
XRP liquidity in the timeframe between the attack and the assets being frozen. Also, 
because the ledgers are public, the odds of a fatal data loss that would prevent the gateway 

11

 "Gateway Guide ­ Ripple Developer Portal ­ GitHub Pages." 2016. 2 Mar. 2016 
<​
http://ripple.github.io/ripple­dev­portal/tutorial­gateway­guide.html​

12
 "Freeze | Ripple." 2016. 2 Mar. 2016 <​
https://ripple.com/build/freeze/​

to re­establish the pre­attack state of its RCL­issuances are very low, and the re­issuance 
would be auditable by anyone at anytime. 
 

Counterparty Risk management 
Today, when someone have balances in a centralized exchange, the only way to kill this 
specific counterparty risk is to withdraw all your money, what is totally controlled by the 
counterparty and can be very slow. In Ripple, all it takes to reduce counterparty risk to zero 
is to buy XRP, what can be done in 3.5 seconds. 
This is also valid for RCL­issuances in a scenario where a custodian suffers a severe money 
loss (i.e. a successful attack on custodied assets, or a regulatory freeze on bank accounts, 
etc) ­ in this case it is possible for the first movers to trade their debased RCL­issuances 
before they are frozen in the RCL. 
 

Trading Fairness and Impartiality 
The transaction ordering in the ripple protocol is supposed to be aleatory, what eliminates 
front running from the game. 
The conditions for a trade to succeed are equal to every participant and follow impersonal 
mathematical laws, providing a fair field for everyone to play. 
 

Geography, Boundaries and Network Effect 
Although there are some great financial service providers and custodians that can offer 
access to a diversity of assets, because of its openness and decentralization, ripple offers 
the possibility to hold balances from any ripple­integrated issuer, and in many cases it is 
possible to acquire foreign assets administered by foreign custodians using 
locally­administered ones, avoiding costly and cumbersome international wire­transfers. This 
creates accessibility to a variety of assets that will probably benefit from network effects to 
keep diversity increasing in greater rates than any private ledger provider. 
 

RCL supports Digital Cash issued by Central Banks 
We may not see this happening anytime soon, but the RCL offers the possibility for Central 
Banks to issue cash directly in an open ledger, creating a strong motive to use the RCL. 
 

Transparency for Government’s Financial Life 
Government’s transactions should be public and auditable, so it may be a good use case for 
governments and their public service providers to have accounts in a public ledger. It would 
make auditing much easier, fast and accessible to every citizen. 
Tax paying transactions could create public assets that would be followed until they are paid 
back to a private entity. 
 

Decentralized Cryptographic Escrow 
Although the current scenario suggests that only XRP will participate in ILP payments, it is 
possible to create decentralized cryptographic escrows in RCL using m­of­n13  accounts. One 
practical example is a 2­of­3 account where the buyer, the seller and a mediator have one 
key each ­ none of the parties have full control over the funds and an agreement is always 
necessary. 
The buyer funds the account with the amount necessary to make a purchase but only signs 
a payment to the seller after receiving the product, than the seller is able to co­sign the 
transaction and release the escrow and get the money. If there is a dispute, the mediator 
can intervene and move the funds with the help of the dispute’s winner. 
 

Other use cases 
There are still a lot of use cases that are not necessarily directly linked to value transfer, like 
digital identity for example, that can leverage from distributed ledgers technologies, ripple 
being one of the main public networks out there. 
 
I’m sure there are other use cases I’m missing here, like non­financial transactions, and 
some of the features can be achieved by a private ledger connected to ILP, but it seems that 
there are still some unique in a decentralized exchange. 
Another possible development is that many DCAs can be issued in a decentralized way, like 
a DApp that administrates BTC issuances in the RCL using an Ethereum smart contract, 
removing the need of a centralized agent. 
 

13

 "Multisign ­ Ripple Wiki." 2014. 12 Apr. 2016 <​
https://wiki.ripple.com/Multisign​

Conclusion 
The current financial ecosystem is changing, there is no doubt anymore among industry 
leaders if distributed ledger technologies will have an impact on how the world exchanges 
value, the remaining question is how. 
 
After unbundling the ripple network and considering ILP, it seems that ILP is a very palatable 
concept for the current mindset, and it is an inclusive technology that may fulfil the mission of 
creating an open standard for value exchange. 
 
DCAs have attracted great interest from traders, and are climbing their way to enter Wall 
Street’s gates. Their main use cases so far have been acting as a bridge currency, a 
speculation tool and a pseudonymous p2p cash. 
 
Because the internet of value increases exponentially the demand for digital and accessible 
bridge currencies and p2p transactions (and possibly machine­to­machine transactions), 
looks like a matter of time and regulation adaptations until they create strong roots and 
achieve the liquidity necessary to be used by big players. XRP is a good contender 
considering Ripple’s clear strategy and close relation to regulators and banks. 
 
RCL­issuances seem to be looking for a strong use case and more time is needed to see 
how their roles will evolve. A decentralized open and public exchange with a profusion of 
assets sounds like a very powerful concept, but a lot of paradigm shift is required for they to 
be part of our daily lives. End user applications and usage are not impossible, and we may 
see usage growth inversely proportional to its complexity. Standard Chartered Bank is 
developing a trade finance use case14, which may shed some light on how we think public 
centrally­administered issuances. 
 
More thoughts are needed to establish a clear difference between public and private 
issuances since private ledgers tend to become more interoperable and accessible in the 
distributed finance era. Its indeed an exciting time in the fintech world and the beginning of a 
new long trend that will create uncountable developments. 
 
I hope this article starts more discussions about this theme. 
14

 "How Standard Chartered is Using Ripple to Rethink Trade ..." 2016. 19 Mar. 2016 
<​
http://www.coindesk.com/how­standard­chartered­is­using­ripple­to­rethink­trade­finance/​

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful