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Riley

Jennings
January 27, 2016
EDC 311

Guided Discovery

Is about

An approach to instruction where the teacher presents examples to show a topic and guides the students to an understanding of the topic.

Theory
The Guided Discovery Model is an
inquiry-based, constructivist learning
theory. The learner draws on his/her
past experience and existing knowledge
to find facts and relationships and new
findings to be discovered

Adaption

The structure for Guided Discovery is the


same for a ll learners at all
developmental levels; adaptions are
necessary when students are at different
developmental levels. An example is
spontaneous lesson, meaning the
teacher is a ble to come up with
questions on the spot and still guide the
students

Planning
-Identify the topic(s), then you can f ind
topics from standards, t extbooks,
curriculum guides and other sources.
-Specify learning objectives, these a re
statements that specify what students
should know understand, or be able to do
with respect to the topic.
-Prepare examples and non-examples, by
identifying differences b etween related
topics, learners are less likely to confuse
them

Implementing
-Review previous material a nd catch the
students a ttention and establish focus of
lesson
-Teacher presents examples and a llows
students to make observations and
comparison
-Teachers guide the students to an
understanding of the concepts or
generalization b y more specified
questioning

Assessment

Motivation

Guided Discovery can be assessed


from a variety of ways including
paper and pencil tests to
performance measures and
portfolios

High levels of involvement, success,


and a sense of the unknown
contribute to raising students
intrinsic motivation for learning the
lesson.

So What?? The teacher must have high-quality questions ready to ask the students so she knows what direction to guide them in to
form an understanding about the topic