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Environmental Management System

Executive Summary
Corporate environmental responsibility is an increasing concern for our customers. To fulfill our
obligations to the environment and to satisfy the community that we are engaged with the
environment, this Environmental Management System (EMS) has been created. All aspects of
Starbucks business were examined at Starbucks store 19841, at 343 Glendale Avenue and this
store will serve as a pilot for environmental changes for the company and ensure that environmental
responsibilities are met while also maintaining operations and profitability. The EMS ensures
conformance with ISO 14001 standards, giving Starbucks Canada the choice to seek ISO 14001
certification.
It is generally recommended that an Initial Environmental Review (IER) be conducted to highlight any
deficiencies in current operations. Its completion would create a baseline understanding of
environmental practises currently taking place and other potential competitor companies to
benchmark with against. ISO 14001 first requires the company have a policy related to its
environmental influences. After identifying areas of improvement in the IER, an environmental policy
was created to give a general commitment to objectives of ISO 14001.
Secondly, ISO 14001 requires that the organization be compliant with environmental laws and
regulations. Since the pilot store location is in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada; municipal, provincial
and federal laws were examined and waste regulations 102/94 and 103/94 were identified as
regulations that would require consistent attention to ensure compliance.
In addition to identifying lawful requirements, the ISO standard also requires that the environmental
aspects be identified so that appropriate mitigation measures and action plans can be taken to
reduce harmful environmental impacts. Significant environmental aspects were identified in this
EMS relating to water consumption, waste generation, and energy use based on the activities,
products and services provided at the Starbucks location. An action plan was created for addressing
each significant concern and a training and awareness program was developed for the creation and
maintenance of the plan.
While there are costs associated with adopting the measures discussed in the action plan and the
implementation of further training for employees, changes in energy use and water consumption will
overall provide savings in the long-term. Furthermore, by committing to environment change not only
can Starbucks become a prime example for environmental concern in the industry, but also,
employees will be proud to work for a company committed to environmental management.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.

Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1

2.

Initial Environmental Review ............................................................................................................... 1


2.1.

Benchmarking .............................................................................................................................. 2

3.

Environmental Policy ........................................................................................................................... 2

4.

Legal Obligations.................................................................................................................................. 3
4.1.

Federal .......................................................................................................................................... 3

4.2.

Provincial ...................................................................................................................................... 4

4.3.

Municipal ...................................................................................................................................... 4

5.

Significant Environmental Areas ......................................................................................................... 5

6.

Objectives and Targets ........................................................................................................................ 7

7.

Action Plan ............................................................................................................................................ 8


7.1.

Water Consumption ..................................................................................................................... 8

7.2.

Energy Consumption .................................................................................................................... 8

7.3.

Waste Generation ........................................................................................................................ 9

7.4. Wastewater Generation ................................................................................................................... 9


8.

Training and Awareness ...................................................................................................................... 9


8.1.

EMS Training ................................................................................................................................ 9

8.2.

EMS Awareness......................................................................................................................... 10

9.

Additional Requirements .................................................................................................................. 11


9.1 Emergency Planning....................................................................................................................... 11
9.2 communication Plan ...................................................................................................................... 11
9.3 Audits .............................................................................................................................................. 12

10.

Appendices .................................................................................................................................... 13

Appendix A ............................................................................................................................................. 13
Appendix B............................................................................................................................................. 17
Appendix C ............................................................................................................................................. 23

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1. INTRODUCTION
Environmental sustainability is becoming an increasingly important part of a business operations.
More and more, environmental awareness is growing and businesses are finding the need to
illustrate their responsible environmental management and performance gain a competitive
advantage. To assist organizations with their efforts to become more environmentally sound, the ISO
14001 framework for Environmental Management Systems (EMS) was developed. According to the
ISO, this standard is specifically designed to help organizations both to manage better the impact of
their activities on the environment and to demonstrate sound environmental management.
In order for an organization to have an EMS that conforms to ISO 14001, it is recommended that the
organization complete an Initial Environmental Review (IER) of their operations. The IER is a useful
tool to establish a benchmark level for an organizations environmental performance. It should
investigate all existing systems and processes that an organization has in place in order to identify
the strengths, weaknesses, challenges, and risks that the organizations faces with respect to its
environmental performance.
This EMS was carried out on the Starbucks Coffee Shop located at 343 Glendale Ave, St. Catharines,
Ontario. It has identified the companys environmental policy, backed by Starbucks Canada
President Annie Young-Scrivner, vowing to identify and improve any negative impacts the company
and its operations have on the environment. Environmental legislation was also examined to ensure
that Starbucks would remain compliant with all of its legal obligations.
After thoroughly analyzing Starbucks operations, a list of all of the companys activities, products,
and services was developed to determine where any significant environmental areas of concern
might be. For those significant environmental areas, objectives and targets were established to
mitigate impacts associated with those operations. As well, an action plan was developed to
implement these objectives and targets.
2.

INITIAL ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW

A typical IER studies an organizations operations to assess any potential environmental impacts that
could occur based on the operations. The IER also examines the current practices of the organization
to outline any existing environmental policies and procedures the organization already has in place.
Additionally, IERs examine previous environmental challenges that an organization has faced,
including any spills and accidents that may have occurred. Finally, the IER assists an organization
with identifying any aspect of their operations that may have legal permitting requirements.
For this EMS, an IER checklist was developed (Appendix A) that examined the policies and operations
of the Starbucks store, 19841, at 343 Glendale Avenue. The checklist also examined the different
material and energy usages that occur at the store to try and highlight any areas that could have an
environmental impact. The checklist also covers aspects like water usage, air emissions, and waste
generation and the activities that contribute to their production, so that reduction measures can be
developed.

A Mass Balance (Appendix B) was also created to more easily identify the inputs and outputs for the
stores processes and operations. It provides a simplified version of the stores operation and what
end-products result from regular operation. Using the information contained in the checklist and the
mass balance, a table was created that better shows all of the environmental aspects of the stores
activities, products, and services (APS) found in Appendix B.
Using the APS chart, the store is able to identify the significant environmental areas that it should
focus its efforts on (See Section 5).

2.1. BENCHMARKING
For examining environmental measures already in place, the following companies could provide
benchmarking information:

Tim Hortons
Second Cup
Coffee Culture
Williams Fresh Cafe
Timothys World Coffee
Van Houtte Inc.
Country Style

With the findings of the report highlighted in Table 1, the benchmarking companies could be
examined to see if they observed and overcame similar environmental issues in the past.
Furthermore, it would allow for understanding and separating which environmental initiatives are
new to the coffee industry and which may already be in place, so that new initiatives could place
Starbucks above its competitors.
3. ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY
As required for ISO certification, an environmental policy must be created and implemented for a
public display of the environmental commitments a company is making. The policy below outlines
the commitment Starbucks is willing to make for environmental improvement:
Starbucks Canada
Environmental Policy
Starbucks Canada is committed to making our stores more environmentally conscious and reduce
impacts while ensuring the same quality service expected at each location. With the world becoming
more environmentally aware and our industry depending on the continued worldwide cultivation of
coffee beans, Starbucks Canada wishes to do their part in reducing environmental impacts by
improving its environmental performance. We will continue to improve on recycling, energy, water,
green building and climate change initiatives already in place and make further commitments to
improve environmental performance from the coffee plantations where our beans are harvested, to
the stores that serve our customers.
Below lie our commitments backed by the president of Starbucks Canada, Annie Young-Scrivner and
from our partners, which vow to:

Ensure all operations lie within environmental laws and regulations where applicable.
Continue to practice under environmental measures of ISO 14001 and improve upon areas
where we can make the greatest improvements in our operations.
Improve the management of recyclable wastes in store and seeking access to recycling
waste streams where possible.
Integrate waste management into training practices for all employees and allow for
employees to communicate new and innovative ways to manage waste at their operations.
Continue Cocoa Practices policy for purchasing from farmers that practice sustainable
farming and continue to look for improvements.
Identify efficiencies in transportation to prevent unnecessary pollution.
Identify environmental aspects and impacts to allow for continual environmental goals to be
established and continuing to monitor processes to witness results.
Improve packaging of products to minimize waste generation and recyclable alternatives
where possible.
Seek a compostable alternative to current hot beverage containers to replace current
containers and continue to promote reusable cup use by customers.
Lower carbon footprint by reducing energy uses at stores and offices.
Communicate environmental goals and milestones to stakeholders.
Add environmental commitments for stores to current audit practices.

Starbucks Coffee Canada pledges to being an example for the global Starbucks Coffee Company and
continuing to follow-through and improve upon our commitments.
As president of Starbucks Coffee Canada, I will standby the Starbucks Canada Environmental Policy.
Annie Young-Scrivner
President of Starbucks Coffee Canada

Date: February, 25th, 2016

4. LEGAL OBLIGATIONS
An important part of conforming to the ISO 14001 standard is ensuring that the store follows all
applicable environmental laws and regulations. Not only is it important to adhere to applicable
legislation for the ISO standard, but by doing so, the store can avoid paying potentially hefty fines for
breaking laws.

4.1. FEDERAL
Federal legislation is contained within the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA). Within
CEPA is the National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) requirements that are administered by
Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC). These requirements compel companies that
produce or use specific substances to report their release into the environment. This store does not
meet these requirements, therefore this legislation does not apply.
Additional legislation, including the Fisheries Act, does not apply, since the store is connected to the
municipal water system and does not release any toxic substances into a water course.

4.2. PROVINCIAL
Air
Provincial legislation dealing with air pertains to emissions of contaminants into the surrounding
atmosphere. Contaminants described in Ontarios Environmental Protection Act and Ontario
Regulation (O. Reg.) 419/05 include not only toxic substances, but also heat, sound, and vibrations
that may end up causing harm to the natural environment. The store does not produce any toxic
substances, noise, vibration, or heat that meets the requirements set out in the legislation, therefore
it does not apply. While there is some heat produced from heating the premises and from some
appliances within the premises, it environmental impact is negligible and is not covered by the
legislation.
Energy
There are energy efficiency laws in place, but they only pertain to new construction. These laws
would have been applied as the store was being constructed.
Waste
There are two key pieces of waste legislation in Ontario that affect this store. Ontario Regulation
102/94: Waste Audits and Waste Reduction Work Plans, and O. Reg. 103/94: Industrial,
Commercial, and Institutional Source Separation Programs. Section 36(4) of O. Reg 102/94 and
section 11(4) of O. Reg 103/94 both state:
This Part does not apply to an owner of a restaurant in a particular calendar year if,
a) During the two preceding calendar years there was no year in which the gross sales for all
restaurants operated by the owner in Ontario equalled or exceeded $3,000,000; and
b) The owner is able to demonstrate this fact, within seven days of a request from the Director,
through evidence satisfactory to the Director.
Since this Starbucks location is part of the corporation and which is an amalgamation of many
Starbucks locations, their gross sales exceed that specified in the regulations, and so the regulations
apply. As a result, the store must conduct an annual waste audit and have a waste reduction work
plan on file, and it must have a source separation program to separate its waste into different waste
streams.
Water
The province of Ontario does have strict legislation surrounding the use of water. However, since the
store is connected to the municipal water system, it does not take any water from the environment
nor does it release anything back into the environment. As a result, no legislation applies.

4.3. MUNICIPAL
The City of St. Catharines does have environmental bylaws related to sewage, however they would
have been applied during construction of the building. As a result, there is no municipal legislation
that applies to the store.

5. SIGNIFICANT ENVIRONMENTAL AREAS


Environmental aspects are defined as activities products or services (APS) that interact or have the
potential to interact with the environment. In order to successfully implement an environmental
management system, Starbucks must identify all of its environmental aspects, whether or not they
can be controlled and what is each aspects subsequent environmental impact. Once all of the
environmental aspects, impacts and control measures are identified for each activity, product and
service, a significance rating is allocated to each one. Significance ratings were subdivided into three
categories and given a range between one and five. The full APS table is presented in Appendix B.
The category and range of each significance rating is summarized below.
The scale of the impact was the first significance parameter quantified. A rating of one (1) was given
to any environmental aspect that affects between 0-29% of customers and employees daily. A rating
of three (3) was given to any environmental aspect that affects between 30-64% of customers and
employees daily. A rating of five (5) was given to any environmental aspect that affects between 65100% of customers and employees daily.
The second significance parameter quantified was the efficiency of each method of control. A rating
of one (1) was given to any environmental impact which had a method of control resulting in little
savings or reductions. A rating of three (3) was given to any environmental impact which had a
method of control resulting in moderate savings or reductions. A rating of five (5) was given to any
environmental impact which had a method of control resulting in high savings or reductions.
The effect of change on other activities and processes was the last significance parameter
quantified. A rating of one (1) was given to any environmental aspect which has a large effect on
store operations. A rating of three (3) was given to any environmental aspect which has a moderate
effect on store operations. A rating of five (5) was given to any environmental aspect which has little
to no effect on store operations.
The average rating from all three categories was summed for each environmental impact, making up
the Average Significance Rating (ASR). Each environmental impact was determined to be significant
if it was assigned an ASR greater than 4. In total, ten environmental impacts were determined to be
significant. The table outlining each significant environmental impact is presented in Appendix B.
Additionally, each significant environmental impact was subdivided into either water, waste or energy
to help facilitate the implementation of proper control measures, which may be comparable for
similar environmental impacts. Each significant environmental impact is outlined below.
Water:
Washroom Water Consumption
o Washroom water consumption was determined to be significant as Starbucks has
little control over the amount of water used by customers in washrooms. Properly
implemented control measures, such as, dual flush and timed faucets, could
decrease washroom water consumption and reduce water bill costs.
Waste:
Coffee Beverage Waste Generation
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Coffee beverage waste generation was determined to be significant as the majority of


coffee cups sold are disposable. Disposable cups lead to increased costs, increased
demand on landfills, as well as the possibility of litter generation.
Tea Beverage Waste Generation
o Tea beverage waste generation was determined to be significant as the majority of
tea cups sold are disposable. Disposable cups lead to increased costs, increased
demand on landfills, as well as the possibility of litter generation.
Packaged Beverage Waste Generation
o Packaged beverage waste generation was determined to be significant as all
packaged beverage containers are disposable. Although the majority can be recycled,
Starbucks has no control over whether or not our customers actively recycle used
beverage containers.
Drink Crafting Waste Generation
o The waste generated from crafting drinks was determined to be significant as some
beverages require many ingredients which all originate from disposable containers.
Drinks which have been made incorrectly end up as waste, resulting in increased
reliance on landfills/water treatment facilities. Furthermore, lack of recycling
containers prevents the ability to recycle recyclable wastes.
o

Energy:
Building Heating and Cooling Energy Consumption
o Building heating and cooling was determined to be significant because of the energy
demand and the production of greenhouse gasses from our heating and cooling
systems. Building heating and cooling is imperative during the hot and cold months,
however the implementation of seasonal based control methods could reduce energy
and natural gas usage.
Hot Water Tap Energy Consumption
o Hot water tap energy consumption was determined to be significant as the basis of
our business relies on the instantaneous availability of high temperature water. The
high demand of hot water requires increased energy and natural gas demands in
order to keep water hot.
Lighting Energy Consumption
o Building lighting energy consumption was determined to be significant the building
requires constant lighting during operation. Lighting control methods can be cheap,
easily implemented and have the ability to majorly reduce energy usage, especially in
the daytime when lighting is not usually required.
Coffee Brewing Energy Consumption
o Coffee brewing energy consumption was determined to be significant as our industry
demands industrial sized coffee brewing systems to be operational during the entire
business day. Coffee brewing systems require energy even when not in operation
which increases demand on the power grid.

6. OBJECTIVES AND TARGETS


The environmental objectives and targets set out herein are a reflection of Starbucks Canadas
environmental policy and display our commitment to reducing the environmental impacts of our
stores and operations. The targets are based off of the specific environmental aspects deemed of
most concern at Starbucks Canada store locations.
Table 1: Objectives, targets and control methods for the significant environmental aspects.
Objective
Target
Control Methods
Reduce Water
15% below 2015 base level by
Maintaining LEEDConsumption
2018 Monitor annually
certification standards
Water efficient sinks
Sensors on faucets
Water conservation
strategies
Dual Flush Toilets
Reduce Energy
Reduce 15% below 2015 base
Using energy efficient
Consumption
level by 2020 Monitor annually
light
fixtures/appliances
Use natural lightning
when available
Optimize heating and
cooling
Achieve LEED
certification in stores
without it
Reduce Waste
5% of beverage sales from
White Cup contest
Generation
customer brought or purchased in
(incentive)
store, reusable
Sell and market
mugs/cups/tumblers
reusable mugs in store
Charge 10% less to
customers using
reusable mugs
Create More
Make all aspects of disposable
Change in supply-chain
Recyclable/Compostable cups sold 100%
Pressuring Starbucks
Products
compostable/recyclable by 2018
senior management
Act as a pilot-store to
test feasibility
Reduce Wastewater
Reduce 10% below 2015 levels
Only use dishwashers
Generation
by 2018
when full
Environmental friendly
appliances
Starbucks Canada believes these objectives are paramount to their overall environmental goals and
are in line with the Environmental Policy in place. It is felt the targets set are realistic and achievable
within their time-frame, and address the environmental aspects of most concern at this specific
location in St. Catharines, Ontario. However, these objectives and targets will only be achieved
through implementing both technological and behavioural changes for employees and management.
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7. ACTION PLAN
In order to accomplish the above targets, certain initiatives and a series of changes need to be
implemented by management to address all of the identified SEAs. Some of these changes will be
implemented in steps, or gradually over time. It is also recognized that some of these changes are
beyond what is capable for a nation-wide change and involve first using a pilot-test program at a
select store before implementing nation-wide. Certain training may also be required for new
technologies, as well as training and reminders for behavioural changes. Periodically an
environmental lawyer will be called upon to ensure that none of the changes breach compliance with
environmental legislation that pertain to each location. The following sections will briefly outline the
proposed actions that will be taken to ensure the set objectives and targets are met.

7.1. WATER CONSUMPTION


The main areas of water consumption are located in the washrooms and dishwashing area, through
toilets, sinks, and dishwashers. Specific changes are recommended for each of them. A bi-annual
external water audit will determine the specific water usages for baselining. Water bills will be
reviewed annually to allow for progress reports on the success of the implemented changes in order
to reach the set out targets.
Washrooms
Both the public and private washrooms retrofitted with dual flush toilets to reduce daily water
consumption from this source. Low flow toilets could also be considered for the private
washroom;
Washroom faucets retrofitted with automatic sensors to deactivate when not in use and to
avoid taps being left on by customers.
Dishwashing Area
Kitchen sinks retrofitted with eco-friendly sinks with multi-function spray modes with water
saving settings;
Water efficient sanitizing machine installed;
A diagram or sticker can be placed on the dishwasher titled Every Drop Counts, displaying
how much detergent water should be used for the amount of dishes and tips for organizing
the dishes efficiently for the sanitizing machine.

7.2. ENERGY CONSUMPTION


The primary energy use comes from lighting, heating and cooling, and the use of appliances. A biannual energy audit conducted would establish future baselines and provide details on specific
energy use. Energy bills will also be assessed annually for progress updates. The following specific
changes will also be implemented:
Lighting
Change light bulbs to LED;
Install motion sensors in bathrooms so lights are not on when not in use;
Use natural lighting when available.
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Heating/Cooling
Monitor heating and cooling energy bills to develop optimized use practices.
Appliances
Upgrade appliances to most efficient available.

7.3. WASTE GENERATION


The objectives outlining reducing waste generation and creating more recyclable and compostable
products will go hand-in-hand to reduce the amount of waste going to landfills. Bi-annual waste
audits will allow for an assessment of diversion rates and to determine specifically what products are
going to landfill. A major contributor to reducing waste generation is the sale of reusable mugs, for
which the following actions should be immediately taken:
Implement white cup contest incentive to purchase reusable cup/mug by giving them a
free drink with the use of their cup;
Charge less to customers using a reusable mug;
Market and advertise purchasable reusable mugs.
Having more recyclable and compostable products will also greatly reduce waste generation,
however this is also depends on the consumer disposing of the product properly. This level of change
is beyond the scope of this specific franchises control, however the following should be pitched to
upper management:
Pressure senior management to make all parts of all cups and lids 100% recyclable and/or
compostable;
Request to act as a pilot store test-program for this initiative, to assess the feasibility and
consumer acceptance.
7.4. WASTEWATER GENERATION
Bi-annual water audits can assess wastewater generating practices and where reductions can be
made. It is estimated that the majority of this will come from dishwasher use, and as such the
installation of energy and water efficient dishwashers should begin to immediately have a positive
impact on this issue. Workers can be trained and monitored to only use dishwashers when they are
at maximum capacity.
8. TRAINING AND AWARENESS

8.1. EMS TRAINING


Since employees are required to learn about the Starbucks Corporation as part of their training,
incorporating EMS initiatives that they have direct influence on, is an essential part to allow the EMS
to succeed. There are three ways that have been identified to incorporate the EMS into training. They
include:

Incorporating actions and teaching of ways workers can perform their duties while keeping
EMS goals in mind;
Incorporating waste identification and correct waste disposal into semi-annual rallies for all
stores;
Keeping up-to-date documentation of training and holding managers accountable for waste
management training.

To ensure that stores operate timely and with ease, many of the actions workers must perform, have
been regimented and follow routines. As part of training, an extra step could be incorporated for
workers to actively choose where their waste is going when they are disposing and changing product
on the floor. Teaching the importance of such actions as part of barista training, can promote its
importance from the early stages of worker development.
For those workers who are already seasoned in their work, incorporating waste identification and
disposal can be incorporated into the semi-annual rallies that take place in the spring and fall across
the nation. By creating games or schematics that teach and refresh workers on what waste goes
where, waste management will be kept in mind as workers perform their duties.
Creating accountability will be pivotal to perpetuating the EMS for years to come. This can be created
by keeping documentation up to date, holding employees accountable for following training, and
holding managers accountable for providing training and ensuring employees follow that training.
By implementing these educational measures, the EMS can be extended to the workers and the next
step is to ensure the corporation remains aware of the goals the EMS hopes to achieve.

8.2. EMS AWARENESS


In order to establish, maintain and improve awareness of the EMS into the daily workplace, the
following actions will be performed:

Creation of signage and information posters with graphical representations of goals and
habits learned in training;
Annual waste audits to create a baseline for continual improvement for capture ratio and
diversion rate;
Store incentives for improvement or continual commitment to environmental initiatives;
Bonuses for breakthroughs in compostable and recyclable products leading to creation,
design and implementation, as well as, identification of energy efficient alternatives to
current appliances.

These actions target the areas within the corporation that are dependent on the success and
motivation of the workers to ensure success. They will be explained in more detail below.
The creation of signage and graphics for stores backroom poster board can help maintain a
continual awareness of the EMS initiatives Starbucks wishes to improve upon. These posters will
reinforce structures and goals that are being put in place for the success of the EMS. Allowing
workers easy access to information will better spread awareness and target the workers, who can
create the largest impact for waste reduction goals. Additionally, a checklist for store managers has
been created and can be seen in Appendix C to create accountability for EMS procedures to be
followed through.

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Monitoring waste creation and diversion is a pivotal step to continually improving and setting new
goals for the future. To achieve success, a baseline must first be created and a commitment to
annual monitoring will be made through the implementation of annual waste audits. By doing so,
Starbucks will be able to make realistic and manageable goals for the future in relation to its waste
generation.
The first year the EMS is implemented will create a baseline for diversion and capture rates, future
incentives could be created to promote a more positive attitude towards waste management and
drive further positive changes to Starbucks waste management strategy. Incentives could be given
to stores for greatest improved store, or stores consistently committed to waste diversion will help to
keep environmental goals in the minds of workers during their work.
Lastly, the tasks of identifying and implementing more recyclable and compostable materials, as well
as finding more energy efficient alternatives to current appliances, is understood to be a major task.
Therefore, in order to create continued motivation towards finding and implementing alternatives to
present materials and appliances, monetary bonuses will be given when the collective departments
successfully produce a change that can be implemented nationwide.
The mentioned actions above do not address the awareness of EMS changes for dual-flush toilets
and light sensors for reduction in water consumption and energy, respectively, because their success
is not heavily dependent on worker awareness. For this reason, they are not a main focus in training
or awareness, but will continue to be monitored for success and improvement.
9. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS
9.1 EMERGENCY PLANNING
Two plausible environmental emergencies have been identified for Starbucks:

Sewage backups
Car accidents & spills of motor fluids

For sewage backups, emergency services should be notified in order to help prevent the migration of
sewage into surrounding properties and a full clean-up will be undertaken by hired professionals.
Employees must notify customers that the store is closed and prevent entry of any further customers
when the backup is observed.
As for car accidents, emergency services should also be contacts to assist those who may be injured
and prevent the spread of any spilt chemicals.
9.2 COMMUNICATION PLAN
The environmental policy from the EMS will be posted on the Starbucks website, and any inquiries on
further information will be given access to the rest of the report.

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9.3 AUDITS
Audits will be performed annually. Quality Assurance Standards Assessment (QASA), audits
Starbucks locations for health & safety standards, which could be altered to include environmental
standards, allowing 3rd party auditing of Starbucks locations. Additionally, an audit can be conducted
by store managers with the document found in Appendix C, which will be required to be completed
annually.

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10. APPENDICES
APPENDIX A
Initial Environmental Review Checklist
Starbucks
343, Glendale Ave, St. Catharines, ON.

1) General Information
Has the organization established and
maintained an environmental management
system consistent with the requirements
contained in ISO 14001?

Starbucks Japan Ltd. has been ISO 14001


certified, however, other branches have not
been shown to have the same certification.

Environmental Aspects Impacted:

Water Consumption, Waste Generation, EnergyUse, Land-Use, GHG Emissions, Wastewater


Generation
Audits take place for the stores health and
safety environment, but not for environmental
impacts. The last commitment to reducing
environmental impacts can be found in the
2014 Global Responsibility Report.

Has the organization established and


maintained documented procedures to monitor
and measure, on a regular basis, the key
characteristics of its operations and activities
that can have a significant impact on the
environment?
QUESTION
No. of employees
Environmental coordinator
Type of facilities
Type of appliances/electronics

Types of goods produced/sold

COMMENTS

>16000
N/A
Washroom, Retail Floor, Patio, Dishwashing,
Parking
Four Refrigerators, Two Espresso Machines,
Cooling Bunker, Heating/Cooling Units, Freezer,
Dish Sanitizer, Computer, Surveillance,
Wireless Router, Two Cash Registers, Two
Blenders, Coffee Grinder, Oven, Alarm System,
Water Filtration System, Coffee Brewer, Three
Coffee Stands & Ice Maker
Packaged Coffee, Packaged Tea, Mugs,
Granola Bars, Reusable Cups, Pastries,
Sandwiches, Yogurts, Drinks (Coffee/Noncoffee), Plastic Food Boxes, Bananas,
Newspapers, Chips, Popcorn, Packaged
Almonds, Packages Crackers, Packaged
13

Chocolate, Gift Cards, Packaged Salad, Wraps


& Oatmeal

2) Environmental Policy
Has top management defined the
organizations environmental policy?
Is the environmental policy appropriate to the
nature, scale, and environmental impacts of
the organizations activities, products, or
services?
Is the environmental policy documented,
implemented, and maintained and
communicated to all employees?
Is the environmental policy available to the
public?

No written environmental policy is present, but


environment initiatives and goals can be found
online
N/A because of absence of policy

N/A because of absence of policy

N/A because of absence of policy

3) Materials and Energy Usage and Control


QUESTION
Major materials consumed and quantities

Materials usage control and/or recycling


practices
Major water usage group (s)
Water control policy or conservation measure
Major electricity usage group(s)
Electricity conservation measures
Type of fuel consumed and quantity
Major fuel usage group(s)
Fuel conservation measures

COMMENTS
Quantities not attainable. Major materials are:
Plastics, cardboard, food waste, and paper
waste
Only cardboard is recycled
Washrooms, Dishwashing, & Coffee Brewing
No policies in place
Lights, Appliances/Electronics, AC/Heating
Thermostat
Quantity not known. Natural Gas.
Hot Water Heater
None

4) Materials Storage and Handling


QUESTION
Types and quantity of materials stored
Specifications
Material inventory control
Expired / off-specification products records
Spill / leakage record, time
Spill kits / tools

COMMENTS
Detergent, Sanitizer Solution, Bleach, Stainless
Steel Polish, All-Surface Cleaner
MSDS
Inventory managed by Store Manager
Materials dealt with as required.
No spills or leaks recorded
No spill kits necessary

14

5) Wastewater Management
QUESTION
Wastewater sources
Characteristics of wastewater
Wastewater recycling / reuse / minimization
measures
Wastewater discharges to
Relevant discharge licenses and regulatory
requirements
Records of wastewater discharges

COMMENTS
Washrooms, Dishwashing, Sinks
Milk & Beverages, Sewage, Detergent &
Sanitizer Wastewater.
None
Municipal Sewer System
None
None.

6) Air Emission Management


QUESTION
Air emission sources
Characteristics of air emissions
Records of air emission

COMMENTS
HVAC, Car Emissions
Greenhouse Gases
None.

7) Chemical Waste Management


QUESTION
Chemical waste sources
Characteristics of chemical waste
Chemical waste handling / treatment method
Chemical waste recycling / minimization
measures
Chemical waste disposal
Relevant disposal licenses and regulatory
requirements
Records of chemical waste disposal

COMMENTS
Cleaning products
Cleaning products
Typically gets washed down the drain with
water
None
Typically gets washed down the drain with
water
None
None

8) Solid Waste Management


QUESTION
Major types of solid waste

COMMENTS
Organics (coffee grounds, filters,
fruits/vegetables), Cups, Cardboard Packaging,
15

Generation quantity
Waste disposal method
Waste reduction / recycling measures
Relevant regulatory requirements on waste
disposal / licenses
Record of solid waste disposal

Plastic Packaging, Plastic/Glass Bottles,


Garbage Bags, Milk Cartons/Bags,
Newspapers, Paper Towel/Napkin
Variable depending on amount and type of
products sold, dine in/take out.
Landfill, Recycling
Coffee Grounds Recycling Program (6
month/year)
None
None

9) Environmental Incidents / Accidents


QUESTION
Nonconformity (e.g. material leakage,
complaint, warning, non-compliance record)
Date and time of occurrence
Causes of nonconformity
Corrective action

COMMENTS
No records of non-conformance
N/A because no incidents occurred
N/A because no incidents occurred
N/A because no incidents occurred

10) Environmental Training


QUESTION
Existing environmental training programmes
(name, time, target staff)

COMMENTS
No environmental training takes place

11) Environmental Audit


QUESTION
Any environmental audit conducted
Auditing scope, location
Auditor / auditing firm

COMMENTS
No
N/A because no audits are conducted
N/A because no audits are conducted

12) Supplier and Contractor Consideration


QUESTION
List of major suppliers and contractors

COMMENTS
Gordon Food Service, Teavana, Kind, Jones
Soda, Rhythm Superfoods, O.N.E., Rip van
Wafels, Kiju Organic, & Evolution Fresh

16

APPENDIX B
Mass Balance:

Inputs
Customers
Food Products
Coffee Products
Tea Products
Drink Products
Municipal Water
Packaging/Bags
Electricity
Cleaning
Products
Plastic/Paper
Cups

Processes/Operations
Beverage
Crafting
Customer
Service
Washrooms
Cleaning
Waste
Management
Dishwashing
Food/Drink
Storage
Coffee Brewing
Food Heating
Coffee Grinding

Outputs
Waste
Wastewater
Sewage
Customers With
Products
Coffee Grinds
Dirty Aprons &
Cloths

17

Activities, Products and Services (APS) Table:


APS
(Activities,
Products &
Services)
Washrooms

Parking

Coffee
Beverages

Environmental
Aspects
Water
Consumption

Direct or
Indirect (D/I)
I

Waste
Generation
Cleaners Used

Energy
Consumption

Sewage
Production

Land use

Salt use

Gas Emissions

Car Leaks (oil,


coolant, etc.)

Waste
Generation

Increased waste
to landfills

Energy
Consumption

Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production

Environmental
Impacts
Increased water
use could lead
to increased
erosion in the
environment
Increased waste
to landfills
Chemicals
entering the
environment
could harm the
environment
Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production
Increased
sewage demand
on system and
chance for spills
if system is
overloaded
Land used for
the parking lot
could destroy
habitat
Salt use alters
the chemistry of
the
environment

Emissions
contribute to
GHGs
Contamination
of soil and
potentially
groundwater

The
scale
of the
impact
3

Efficiency
of control
measure
5

Effect of
change
on other
activities
and
processes
5

Limit access to
waste products
Find less toxic
alternatives

Install sensors to
turn off lights
when not in use

Low flow or dual


flush toilets

Parking garages
reduce the area
of land required
for parking
Reduce the
amount of salt
dispersed in the
winter. The use
of salt
alternatives such
as sand or beet
juice.
Incorporate
hybrid specific
parking spaces
Cannot control;
have numbers
for who to
contact in case
of spill ready
Compost coffee
grinds, ensure all
coffee cups are
compostable or
recyclable

Ensure coffee
making
equipment is
maintained and
energy efficient

Methods of
Control
Low flow toilets
or dual flush
toilets and
controlled taps

Average
Significance
Rating
(ASR)

Significant?
(ASR>4,
TSR>12)
Significant

4.33
Insignificant
3
Insignificant

1.67
Insignificant

3
Insignificant

3
Insignificant

2.33
Insignificant

2.33
Insignificant
1.67
Insignificant

0.67
Significant

5
Insignificant

3.67

18

Tea
Beverages

Waste
Generation

Increased waste
to landfills

Compost leftover
tea bags, ensure
all tea cups are
compostable or
recyclable

Energy
Consumption

Energy
Consumption

Garbage
Disposal

Waste
Generation

Dishwashing

Water
Consumption

Increased water
use could lead
to increased
erosion in the
environment

Energy
Consumption

Waste Water
Generation

Reduce the
amount of water
used in the
dishwasher

Waste
Generation

Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production
Increased
demand on
wastewater
treatment
infrastructure
Increased waste
to landfills

Ensure tea
making
equipment is
maintained and
energy efficient
Produce the
minimum
amount of food
required to
match sales
Use energy
efficient
refrigerators and
coolers for the
pastries
Reduce the
amount of waste
produced
Increase
efficiency by
making sure
dishwasher is at
capacity before
operation.
Reduce the
amount of water
used
Ensure
dishwasher is
maintained and
energy efficient

Waste
Generation

Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production
Increased waste
to landfills

Energy
Consumption

Use more
recyclable or
compostable
containers
Use energy
efficient ovens

Packaged
Beverages

Waste
Generation

Packaged
Snacks

Waste
Generation

Use more
recyclable or
compostable
containers and
create a dual
purpose garbage
bin for
separating waste
and recyclables
on the work floor
Use more
recyclable or
compostable
containers

Pastries

Ready-Made
Food

Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production
Increased waste
to landfills

Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production
Increased waste
to landfills

Increased waste
to landfills

Significant

4.33
Insignificant

3.67
Insignificant

3
Insignificant

1.33
Insignificant
3.67
Significant

4.33
Insignificant

3
Insignificant

3
Insignificant

3
Insignificant

3
Significant

4.33
Insignificant

3.67

19

Electrical
Outlets

Energy
Consumption

Wi-Fi

Energy
Consumption

Filtered
Water Tap

Water
Consumption

Energy
Consumption

Packaged
Coffee

Waste
Generation

Packaged
Tea

Waste
Generation

Increased waste
to landfills

Crafting
Drinks

Water
Consumption

Waste
Generation

Increased water
use could lead
to increased
erosion in the
environment
Increased waste
to landfills

Energy
Consumption

Heating/
Cooling

Energy
Consumption

Hot Water
Tap

Water
Consumption

Energy
Consumption

Energy
Consumption

Lighting

Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production
Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production
Increased water
use could lead
to increased
erosion in the
environment
Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production
Increased waste
to landfills

Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production
Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production
Increased water
use could lead
to increased
erosion in the
environment
Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production
Increased
demand on
power grid.

Cannot control
customer's usage

Cannot control
as it is a service
to customers

Continue using
standards to
water amounts
in drinks

Use filtration
methods that
have little or no
energy demand

Use more
recyclable or
compostable
containers
Use more
recyclable or
compostable
containers
Continue using
standards to
water amounts
in drinks

Create facilities
for both
customers and
staff to recycle
recyclable
materials used
Use energy
efficient
refrigerators and
espresso
machines
Keep the
thermostat at a
lower or higher
temperature
depending on
the season
Continue using
standards to
water amounts
in drinks

Use the most


energy efficient
method to heat
and keep water
at a high
temperature
Install a light
sensor to reduce
the use of lights
during the day

Insignificant

1
Insignificant

1
Insignificant

3.67
Insignificant

2.33
Insignificant

3.67
Insignificant

3
Insignificant

3
Significant

4.33
Insignificant

3.67
Significant

5
Insignificant

3
Significant

4.33
Significant

4.33

20

Increased GHG
production
Delivery of
Goods

Gas Emissions

Increased GHG
production

Coffee
Brewing

Energy
Consumption

Water
Consumption

Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production
Increased water
use could lead
to increased
erosion in the
environment

Keep things
organized at
stores so
deliveries are as
quick as possible
Use energy
efficient coffee
brewers

Avoid brewing
more coffee than
needed

Insignificant

3.67
Significant

4.33
Insignificant

3.67

APS Legend:

The scale of the


impact
1 - Aspect affects
0-29% of
customers/
employees
3 - Aspect affects
29-64% of
customers/
employees
5 - Aspect affects
64-100% of
customers/
employees

Efficiency of Each
Method of Control

Effect of change on
other activities and
processes

1 - Little reduction or
savings

1- Has a large effect


on store operations

3 - Moderate reduction
or savings

3 - Has a moderate
inconvenience to
operations of store

5 - Great reduction or
saving

5 - Little to no effect
on store operation

Significant Environmental Aspects Table:


APS (Activities,
Products &
Services)

Environmental Direct/ Environmental


Aspects
Indirect Impacts
(D/I)

Washrooms

Water
Consumption

Methods of Control

The
scale
of the
impact

Increased water Dual flush toilets and 3


use could lead to controlled taps
increased
erosion in the
environment

The
severity
of
impact

Effect of
change on
other
activities
and
processes

Average
Significance
Rating
(ASR)

4.33

21

Coffee
Beverages

Waste
Generation

Increased waste Compost coffee


to landfills
grinds, ensure all
coffee cups are
compostable or
recyclable

Tea Beverages

Waste
Generation

Increased waste Compost leftover tea 3


to landfills
bags, ensure all tea
cups are
compostable or
recyclable

4.33

Dishwashing

Water
Consumption

Increased water
use could lead to
increased
erosion in the
environment

4.33

Packaged
Beverages

Waste
Generation

Increased waste Use more recyclable


to landfills
or compostable
containers

4.33

Crafting Drinks Waste


Generation

Increased waste Create facilities for


5
to landfills
both customers and
staff to recycle
recyclable materials
used (Create a dual
purpose garbage bin
for separating waste
and recyclables on
the work floor)

4.33

Heating/Cooling Energy
Consumption

Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production

Keep the thermostat 5


at a lower or higher
temperature
depending on the
season

Hot Water Tap

Energy
Consumption

Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production

Use the most energy 3


efficient method to
heat and keep water
at a high
temperature

4.33

Lighting

Energy
Consumption

Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production

Install a light sensor 5


to reduce the use of
lights during the day

4.33

Coffee Brewing

Energy
Consumption

Increased
demand on
power grid.
Increased GHG
production

Use energy efficient


coffee brewers

4.33

Increase efficiency by 5
making sure
dishwasher is at
capacity before
operation. Reduce
the amount of water
used

22

APPENDIX C
Manager EMS Audit Document

23

Starbucks Environmental Management System


Store Checklist

Store Number:
Store Manager:
Date:

The following document is to ensure awareness of the EMS system at your store location and upto-date. Please check all boxes that apply to your store below:
Light sensor for store lighting is operational and working properly
All employees are aware of the EMS and environmental policy
All employees have been trained in waste separation and practising waste separation on work
floor
Training for waste separation and Every Drop Counts dishwashing are up-to-date
Signage for waste separation bins and dual flush are clearly in sight for customers
Thermostat is working properly and set for operating hours

Information about the EMS is easily available for employees


Reasons For Unchecked Boxes

Corrective Action Taken

Signature of Store Manager:

24