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SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CLAFLIN UNIVERSITY

UNIT WORK SAMPLE GUIDELINES EARLY CHILDHOOD & ELEMENTARY

Successful teacher candidates support learning by designing a Unit Work Sample that employs a range of
strategies and builds on each students strengths, needs and prior experiences. Through this performance
assessment, candidates provide credible evidence of their ability to facilitate learning by meeting the following
standards:
The candidate uses multiple assessment strategies and approaches aligned with learning goals to
assess student learning before, during and after instruction.
The candidate designs instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and
learning contexts.
The candidate uses regular and systematic evaluations of student learning to make instructional
decisions.
The candidate uses assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about
student progress and achievement.
The candidate reflects on his or her instruction and student learning in order to improve teaching
practice.
The candidate will create a Unit Work Sample to demonstrate its impact on student learning. The attached
template, which consists of several components, should be used to fulfill this requirement. Attach samples of
student work as an appendix.

Revised 2015

EDUC 450: PROFESSIONAL CLINICAL PRACTICE


SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CLAFLIN UNIVERSITY
UNIT WORK SAMPLE TEMPLATE EARLY CHILDHOOD AND ELEMENTARY
Section I:
Candidate: Rachel Troutman

Cooperating Teacher: Mary Pent

District: Orangeburg County School District 5


Subject: All Subjects

School: Dover Elementary

Academic Year: Spring 2016


Grade Level: First Grade

Dates of unit: from March 14, 2016 to March 18, 2016

Section II: Description of Students: Describe (1) the number of students, (2) demographics of the students, and (3)
any other special features or important information that you included in your Long Range Plan as you described your
students. Dont forget to include how you obtained your information about the students.

The student data that I have collected is essential in knowing how to teach my class. Every aspect of their
lives affects the classroom. The students reading levels, disabilities, interests, gender, and ethnicity all
factor in the way that I teach them.
My cooperating teacher, Mrs. Pent, has 21 students in her first grade class. The reading levels of
the students influence all of my instruction. I obtained reading level information from student data. If my
students cannot read on their grade level they may have difficulty learning in other content area. I have
noticed that if they cannot read on a first grade level they will most likely have a difficult time doing tasks
such as reading directions on an assessment. However, twenty percent of my students read on a high
average or high reading level, so I have to find reading material that will not bore them, but help them read
on an even higher level.
Certain conditions can hinder a students attention span. I obtained this information from student
records. A disability could also mean that a child is lacking in one subject and succeeding in another. A
disability could mean that a shadow is placed with the child to guide them throughout the school day. All of
the characteristics I have mentioned above are present in my classroom. I have students with a wide range
of disabilities. I have found it necessary to monitor and adjust when I notice that a student is struggling in a
content area. The student that is accompanied by a shadow makes impulsive sounds throughout the day. I
have learned that continuing with the lesson is usually the best way to deal with that situation.
Observing students to determine their interests can make a huge difference in planning. I observed
the students in centers to see what they like the best. Many of the students liked working with Legos,
modeling clay, and drawing. I have noticed that many of the students like tactile learning. So I have
incorporated tactile elements into my lessons. When teaching lessons I like to implement a hands-on
learning. I have had the students make moon craters by tossing rocks into a container filled with cocoa
powder and flour. When the students do writings, they illustrate what they are writing.
In the class, I have nine female students and twelve male students. Because of this, I have to be
careful to not have gender bias. When conducting a lesson and putting students into teams, I am careful not
to group boys with boys and girls with girls. Heterogeneous grouping works better to ensure no gender bias.
Currently in the classroom, there are twelve Caucasian students and nine African American students. I
found out this information during a teacher conference. There are two students in the class that are biracial.
Mrs. Pent explained that these students would be the nationality of their mother. Gender information can be
utilized to help determine lesson material. Since my classroom has different ethnicities I can work to make
the classroom one that is multicultural as a whole. I can achieve this through the lessons that I teach and
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the classroom organization.

Section III:

Contextual Factors: Describe the contextual factors, including the (1) relevant
student characteristics from Section II, as well (2) as other factors related to the community,
district, school, classroom or students, that are likely to impact instruction and/or student
learning with regard to the selected instructional unit. Include a (3) description of the ways in
which each of these factors will be taken into consideration during unit planning and
instruction.

Just as the students reading levels, disabilities, interests, gender, and


ethnicity all factor in the way that I teach them, other factors effect instruction and
learning. Factors that impact the community, district, school, classroom, and
students also make a difference in instruction and student learning.
According to http://www.townofnorth-sc.gov/ the town of North (where the
school is located) the most common jobs for people who live in this area are:
Education, Health and Social Services, Construction, and Manufacturing. I think this
gives a representation of the jobs of the parents whose students I teach. The
population of North is 754. It is a small town and I have found in my short amount
of time here, that in this town, the community wants to help its people.
This school resides in Orangeburg County School District Five. According to
http://www.ocsd5schools.org/?PN=AboutUs , Orangeburg Consolidated School
District Five is the largest of three public school districts in Orangeburg County,
serves approximately 7,000 students living in the city of Orangeburg and the
communities of Bowman and North. The district is also in very close proximity to
three institutions of higher learning (South Carolina State University, Claflin
University, and Orangeburg Calhoun Technical College) all of which the district has
numerous partnerships that enhance the educational opportunities of its students
and enhances the professional development of its faculty and staff. With all of that
being said, Orangeburg School District Five has a lot to offer its students.
Dover Elementary School has a positive school atmosphere and offers many
opportunities for student growth. The students are given an enormous amount of
opportunities to enhance learning. Since I have been at Dover Elementary, I have
experienced many extensions for learning on a daily basis. Since January, Dover
Elementary has hosted an African American History Program, Doctor Seuss Week,
Jump Rope for Heart, and a magic show that from Aiken Electric Cooperative that
focused on safety around electricity. I am thoroughly impressed with all that Dover
Elementary has to offer its students.
The classroom has 21 students. Many of the students have truly grown this
year in first grade. I have learned that first grade is a transition period after
kindergarten. The students are able to work together well. Mrs. Pent fosters a
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positive2015
learning environment for all of her students.
Individually each student is progressing through first grade well. There are

Section IV: The Unit Plan


Section IV A: Major Unit Objectives (1) List the unit objectives and (2) indicate the corresponding state standards.
(Remember objectives must contain 4 parts: performance, product, conditions and criterion.)

Unit Objectives

ELA 1: The student will identify the individual words used to form a
compound word.

2: The student will explore print and multimedia sources to


write opinion pieces that introduce the topic, state an opinion, give a
reason for the opinion, and provide a sense of closure

MATH 1: The student will determine the missing number in addition


and subtraction equations within 20.

2: The student will collect, organize, and represent data with


up to 3 categories using object graphs, picture graphs, t-charts and
tallies.

SCI. 1: The students will develop and use models (such as


drawings or maps) to describe patterns in the distribution of land
and water on Earth and classify bodies of water (including oceans,
rivers and streams, lakes, and ponds).

2: The students will learn that Natural resources are things


that people use that come from Earth (such as land, water, air, and
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Correlated
Standards/Expectations

1RL 10.4 Identify the


individual words used to
form a compound word
1W 1.1 Explore print and
multimedia sources to write
opinion pieces that
introduce the topic, state an
opinion, give a reason for
the opinion, and provide a
sense of closure.

1. ATO.8 Determine the


missing number in addition
and subtraction equations
within 20.
1.MDA.4 Collect, organize,
and represent data with up
to 3 categories using object
graphs, picture graphs, tcharts and tallies.
1.E.4A.2 Develop and use
models (such as drawings
or maps) to describe
patterns in the distribution of
land and water on Earth and
classify bodies of water
(including oceans, rivers
and streams, lakes, and
ponds).
1. E.4B. Natural resources
are things that people use
that come from

trees). Natural resources can be conserved.

SS
1: The students will summarize the contributions to
democracy that have been made by historic and political figures in
the United States, including Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson,
Dorothea Dix, Frederick Douglass, Mary McLeod Bethune, and
Franklin D. Roosevelt.

2: The students will identify ways that all citizens can serve
the common good in their communities.

Earth (such as land, water,


air, and trees). Natural
resources can be
conserved.
1-3.3 Summarize the
contributions to democracy
that have been made by
historic and political figures
in the United States,
including Benjamin Franklin,
Thomas Jefferson,
Dorothea Dix, Frederick
Douglass, Mary McLeod
Bethune, and Franklin D.
Roosevelt.
1-3.2 Identify ways that all
citizens can serve the
common good, including
serving as public officials
and participating in the
election process.

Section IV B: Instructional Plan


Describe your instructional plan that is, the (1) sequence of steps that you need to follow if your students are to achieve the
unit objectives. (2) Describe the key instructional activities, strategies, materials and resources including instructional
technology), and indicate the unit objectives (numbered according to the order in which they are listed in Section IV A) that
are addressed.
SUBJECT: English Language Arts
Scott Foresman

Unit Title: Unit 3, Week 2, Ruby in Her Own Time, Reading Street, South Carolina Grade 1
Length: 5 days

Instructional Plan for the Unit


Activities/Strategies/Materials/Resources
For the anticipatory set, the teacher will activate prior
knowledge. The students will form Think-Pair-Share
groups to discuss what we learn as we grow and
change. The students will communicate to the class to
discuss what they learn as they grow and change.
As direct instruction, The teacher will show the students
the Concept Talk Video. The students will then give
feedback on the video as instructed to by the teacher.
The students will then stand and move around to On
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Timeline

Unit
Objective
Number(s)

March 14,2016

Objectives 1
and 2

March 14, 2016

Objectives 1
and 2

Our Own Time Line. The teacher will do a read aloud


and introduce the reading strategy. The teacher will
discuss how to make connections: Text-to-text, text-toself, or text-to-world while you read. The teacher will
lead discussion of the reading strategy and story by
asking questions. 7. The teacher will use student book
pages 46-47 (TE pages 50c-50d) to help students
segment and blend phonemes. The teacher will use TE
page 50 to Model Blending Strategies for compound
words and Student Book page 50. The students will then
stand up and stretch before going to their desks to
complete their classwork.
To conclude the lesson, the teacher will instruct the
students to share with a partner about what they wrote.
March 14, 2016
The students will turn in their worksheet and writing with
illustration at the conclusion of the lesson.
Resources needed for the lesson are:
Student Book
Read Aloud: The Way Back Home by Oliver Jeffers
Concept Talk Video What do we learn as we grow and
change?
Sing With Me Big Book Song On Our Own Time Line
Computer and Projector
Writing paper/journals
Leveled Readers/worksheets
Pencils
Crayons

Objectives 1
and 2

March 14, 2016

Objectives 1
and 2

March 14, 2016

Objectives 1
and 2

Integration of the Arts: The students will use drawings to


help communicate thoughts, and ideas.
March 14, 2016
Integration of Health: The students will stand up and
stretch before moving from the rug to their desks.
March 14, 2016
Integration of Physical Education: The students will
illustrate what they have written.

SUBJECT: Mathematics
Length: Five Days
Revised 2015

Objectives 1
and 2
Objectives 1
and 2

Unit Title: Understanding Data and Determining The Missing Number

Instructional Plan for the Unit


Activities/Strategies/Materials/Resources
The anticipatory set will be the fluency cards needed for
this unit. The teacher will quickly show the cards to
students for a group response. Practice the elevator
fluency task card: counting up and counting down.

Timeline
March 14,2016

Unit Objective
Number(s)
Objectives 1
and 2

March 14, 2016


For direct instruction, the teacher will explain that the
class is going to look more closely at collecting data and
how to organize it. The teacher will ask everyone
questions, collect your answers, and create a picture
graph. The teacher will give the students information
about picture graph. The teacher will define picture
graphs as graphs that use pictures to represent and
organize data. The students will collect data on the
classs favorite ice cream. The students will draw a
picture of themselves eating their favorite ice cream.
Students complete the picture of themselves eating their
favorite ice cream. Teacher will make the graph from the
students drawing. The students will look at the class
graph and color to match it.
The students will receive a pretest on determining the
missing number in addition equations. The students
work on this skill throughout the unit. The students will
be given a posttest at the end of the unit.
To close the lesson, the students will finish their graph,
write about it, and turn it in for a grade. The students will
receive a unit pretest and posttest. Both tests will be
graded.
Materials needed for this lesson are: Students
consumable workbooks, teacher made worksheets, en
Vision Math, Common Core, Scott Foresman, pencils,
crayons, paper, and fluency cards.

Objectives 1
and 2

March 14, 2016

Objectives 1
and 2

March 14, 2016

Objectives 1
and 2

March 14, 2016

Objectives 1
and 2

March 14, 2016

Objectives 1
and 2

Integration of the Arts: Students drew their favorite ice


cream for the class pictograph.
Integration of Health: The students learned that ice
cream is a sweet treat that should be eaten in
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moderation.
Integration of Physical Education: Students came to the
board to post their interests.

SUBJECT: Science

Unit Title:

March 14, 2016

Objectives 1
and 2

Length: Four Days ( M W TH F)

Instructional Plan for the Unit


Activities/Strategies/Materials/Resources
The anticipatory set for this lesson will include a
question presented by the teacher. The teacher will ask
what is a natural resource is? The students will give
some of their ideas and the teacher will give an example
of a natural resource is water. Water fills our oceans.
Direct Instruction will include a Brain Pop Jr. video on
natural resources to help explain, visually, what a
natural resource is. The students will Pair and Share
about what natural resources are and which ones they
have seen. The students will then go to their desk and
complete the natural resources sorting activity.

Timeline

March 14, 2016March 16, 2016

March 14, 2016March 16, 2016

Unit Objective
Number(s)
Objectives 1
and 2

Objectives 1
and 2

The teacher will discuss how the ocean is valued natural


resource. The students will then write about what they
have learned about the ocean.
To close the lesson the teacher will ask each student to
tell the class what they have learned through this lesson
as the teacher is collecting papers.
The resources needed are:
Unit B, Chapter 4 and 5, Looking at Earth (South
Carolina Science/Macmillan/McGraw-Hill, first grade )
Projector
Computer
Pencils
Crayons
Revised 2015

March 14, 2016March 16, 2016

March 14, 2016March 16, 2016

Objectives 1
and 2

Objectives 1
and 2

Scissors
Brain Pop Jr Video on Natural Resources
Paper
Natural Resources Activity
Integration of the Arts: The students will illustrate what
they learned about the ocean.
Integration of Health: The students will learn how certain
natural resources, such as fruit, are good for our health.
Integration of Physical Education: The student will walk
around the classroom to see what natural resources are
present in the classroom.

SUBJECT: Social Studies

Unit Title:

March 14, 2016


-March 16, 2016
March 14, 2016
- March 16, 2016
March 14, 2016
- March 16, 2016

Objectives 1
and 2
Objectives 1
and 2
Objectives 1
and 2

Length: Four Days ( M W TH F)

Instructional Plan for the Unit


Activities/Strategies/Materials/Resources
The anticipatory set will include a question to assess
prior knowledge. The teacher will ask students
questions such as: What could we do to help our
community? Do you know anyone who has helped our
community?

For the direct instruction, the teacher will introduce


common ways in which we can help our community. The
teacher will stop to check for understanding before
introducing Frederick Douglass. The students will learn
about Frederick Douglass and how he helped his
community, his nation, and his world. He made a lasting
impact for many to come after him. The students will
write one thing that they will do to help their community.
The students will then begin to write and illustrate what
they learned about Frederick Douglass.
Revised 2015

Timeline
March 14, 2016

March 14, 2016

Unit Objective
Number(s)
Objectives 1
and 2

Objectives 1
and 2

To close the lesson, the students will tell what they


learned from the lesson as their ticket out the door.
Resources needed are:

March 14, 2016

Objectives 1
and 2

March 14, 2016

Objectives 1
and 2

March 14, 2016

Objectives 1
and 2

March 14, 2016

Objectives 1
and 2

Computer
Projector
PowerPoint
Paper
Pencils
Crayons
Integration of the Arts: The students will illustrate their
writings.
Integration of Health: The students will learn that we can
grow a vegetable garden our community.
March 14, 2016
Integration of Physical Education: The students will
learn that we can walk around our community.

Objectives 1
and 2

Reflect on the instructional plans for the units: How does this instructional plan (1) establish a balance between grade-level
academic standards and expectations and the needs, abilities and developmental levels of individual students? (2) Discuss
the strategies used to teach students on varying levels. (3) Discuss how you designed your instructional plan using students
characteristics, needs and learning contexts.

I feel that these instructional plans are aligned with South Carolina First Grade standards and
they meet the needs, abilities, and developmental levels of each student. I want to ensure that the
objectives are correlated with the standards and are thorough, significant, challenging, and clearly
stated. The instruction is adjusted to meet each students development, diversity, and special needs.
While instructing I strive to access students prior knowledge to enhance and add to what the
student may already know. I strive to engage students through allowing them to see the material
outside of the classroom. Just as they learned how Frederick Douglass helped those around him, the
students can help their community as well. I frequently check for understanding so that each student
is able to let me know that they comprehend the material well.
The instructional plan is greatly determined by students individual characteristics, needs, and
learning contexts. I know that some of my students do not write as well as others. Many times their
illustrations help me understand the context of their writing. One of my students has a shadow; I
follow what is outlined in his IEP. Some of my students complete their classwork ahead of others. I
have centers set up around the classroom with extension activities.

Revised 2015

Section V A: Unit Assessments - List the key unit assessments.

Key Unit Assessments

Type of Assessment
(Check one for each assessment)
Teacher-Made
Commercially
(A copy of each teacher
Available

made assessment must be


attached to this plan.)

ELA

MATH

SCIENCE

SOCIAL STUDIES

Reflect on the unit assessments: (1) How did you determine that your unit assessments are valid and reliable for all
students? (2) How did you use your prior understanding of students skills to plan your instruction?

The assessments are valid and reliable because they are aligned with the material that I taught
in the unit. These assessments cover all content areas. The assessments evaluate the real life
experiences given to the students throughout the unit. Pre-assessments allowed me to see where my
students were before starting the unit. Formative assessments allowed me to see how the class did
during the unit. Summative assessments gave me understanding on how well my students learned
the material of the entire unit. Each assessment allowed for student growth and my understanding of
where each student was academically.

Section V B: Other Assessments (1) Describe and attach the assessments for each unit objective. (2) Include
descriptions of any necessary accommodations. For each assessment, (3) include the evaluation criteria (i.e., describe
and/or attach each appropriate scoring rubric, observation checklists, rating scales, item weights and the like). (4)
Attachments must be clearly labeled to indicate their relationship to the elements in the table below.

Assessments
ELA
Unit Objective 1: Pre-Assessment(s)

Formative Assessment(s)
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Accommodations
Evaluation Criteria
All students will receive A=93-100
instructions
orally. B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =70Accommodations
76 ; F =-70
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the

Summative Assessment(s)

ELA
Unit Objective 2: Pre-Assessment(s)

Formative Assessment(s)

Summative Assessment(s)

assessment read by the


shadow.
All students will receive
instructions
orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.
All students will receive
instructions
orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.
All students will receive
instructions orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.

All students will receive


instructions orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.

Mathematics
Unit Objective 1: Pre-Assessment(s)
Revised 2015

All students will receive


instructions
orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.
All students will receive
instructions orally.
Accommodations

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

: Post-Assessment(s)

as outlined for students


with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.

: Other Assessment(s)

Mathematics
Unit Objective 2: Pre-Assessment(s)

Formative Assessment(s)

All students will receive


instructions orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

All students will receive


instructions orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow
All students will receive
instructions
orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

All students will receive


instructions orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

Summative Assessment(s)

All students will receive A=93-100


instructions
orally. B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =70Accommodations
76 ; F =-70
as outlined for students
Revised 2015

Science
Unit Objective 1: Pre-Assessment(s)

Formative Assessment(s)

with IEPs. Student with


shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.
All students will receive A=93-100
instructions
orally. B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =70Accommodations
76 ; F =-70
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.

Summative Assessment(s)

Science
Unit Objective 2: Pre-Assessment(s)

Formative Assessment(s)

Summative Assessment(s)

Revised 2015

All students will receive


instructions orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

All students will receive


instructions
orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.
All students will receive
instructions
orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.
All students will receive
instructions
orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

Social Studies
Unit Objective 1: Pre-Assessment(s)

Formative Assessment(s)

Summative Assessment(s)

Social Studies
Unit Objective 2: Pre-Assessment(s)

Formative Assessment(s)

Summative Assessment(s)

Revised 2015

All students will receive


instructions
orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.
All students will receive
instructions
orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.
All students will receive
instructions
orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.
All students will receive
instructions
orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.
All students will receive
instructions
orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.
All students will receive
instructions
orally.
Accommodations
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =7076 ; F =-70

All students will receive A=93-100


instructions
orally. B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ; D =70Accommodations
76 ; F =-70
as outlined for students
with IEPs. Student with
shadow may have the
assessment read by the
shadow.
Section V C: Data Analysis: After administering the pre-assessment(s), (1) analyze student performance relative to the
unit objectives. (2) Attach one or more clearly labeled tables, graphs, or charts that depict the results of the preassessment(s) in a format that allows you to find patterns of student performance relative to each objective. (3) Summarize
the results of the pre-assessment(s) and describe the implications of these results on instruction.

Results for Pre-Assessment and Post Assessment Math Objective 1


120
100
80
60
Student Scores on Assessments

Pre-Assessment
Post Assessment

40
20
0

Student

Section VI: Analysis of Student Learning)


Once you have completed the unit, analyze all of your assessments and determine your students progress relative to the unit
objectives. (1) Did the information increase your understanding of individual students performance?
(2) Attach clearly labeled tables, graphs or charts that depict student performance (strengths and weaknesses) for the entire
class, for one selected subgroup and for at least two individual students.
(3) For each visual representation, (3) provide a descriptive narrative that summarizes your analysis of student progress and
achievement.

Revised 2015

(4) Finally, explain the ways in which you have assigned student grades (or other indicators of student performance), and
what were the overall results?
(5) Based on the overall results, did the students gain from this unit all that you expected? Why or why not?
(6) Include a description of the ways in which these results have been recorded as well as how and to whom they have been
reported.
(7) Provide evidence to support the impact on student learning in terms of the number of students who achieved and make
progress toward the unit objectives.

The information of the table did allow me to better understand students progress relative to
unit objectives. The majority of the students did perform better on the post test.

Student
Student 1
Student 2
Student 4
Student 5
Student 6
Student 9
Student 10
Student 11
Student 14
Student 16
Student 19
Student 21

Revised 2015

Math Objective 1 Preassessment Results


100
75
88
100
100
88
88
100
88
100
100
100

Math Objective 1 Post


Assessment Results
100
88
100
100
100
75
100
100
88
100
100
100

Gender
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male

250

200

150

100

50

0
Student 11

Student 19
Pre-Test

Post-Test

I chose a subgroup based on gender. I chose male students for the subgroup. I also chose two
males in the classroom for another group. It is obvious that their families are involved in their learning
outside of the classroom.

I assigned grades based on how many questions the student answered correctly. If a student
answered in a way that was questionable (if they answered with a 6 that looked more like a zero) I

Revised 2015

would mark the answer wrong. Each question was worth 12.5 points. The assessment had 10
questions.
The students did gain all that I had expected. I expected for most of them to understand the
material in the pre-assessment, and the majority did. Only 19 percent scored lower than a 100 on the
post test.
These results follow evaluation criteria and are set up in the teacher gradebook on Power
teacher and are district wide for 1st through 12th grade. I have reported them to my cooperating
teacher.
The students achieved progress in learning unit objectives between the pre-test and the post
test. 43% of the 21 students scored below a 100 on the pre-test compared to 19% of the 21 students
scoring below a 100 on the post test.

Section VII. Reflection and Self-Assessment


(1) Reflect on and describe the relationship between your students progress and achievement and your teaching
performance.
(2) If you were to teach this unit again to the same groups of students, (2) what, instructional decisions would you make to
improve your students performance? What specific aspects of the instruction need to be modified?
(3) What activities were successful? Which were unsuccessful? Give reasons based on theory or research as to why you
believe the activities were successful or unsuccessful.

My students progress and achievement are directly related to my teaching performance. I


believe that if I am teaching effectively, the students are learning from my instruction. If I were to
teach this unit again I would have the students use manipulatives. I feel that would help validate what
I was showing them during instruction. The direct instruction of the unit could be modified.

Revised 2015

I feel that the way that the students graphed later in the unit was successful. I could use more
hands-on learning to help the students better understand the material. Constructivist Theory supports
the idea of discovery and hands on learning. This theory comes from Piaget and Vygotskys theories.

Section VIII: Sample Work (Attach)

Revised 2015

ELA Objective 1

Revised 2015

Science Objective 1

Revised 2015

Math Objective 2
Revised 2015

Revised 2015

Scienc
e
Objecti
ve 2

Social
Studi
es
Objec
tive 1

Revised 2015

EDUC 450
Name:
COMPONENT

UNIT WORK SAMPLE SCORING RUBRIC


Early Childhood/Elementary
TARGET (3)

ACCEPTABLE (2)

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Date:
UNACCEPTABLE/DEVELOPIN
G (1)

DESCRIPTION OF STUDENTS
Description of
Students
ACEI 3.1
NAEYC 1a
Contextual
Factors
collaborating
with others and
sources of
information
ACEI 3.5/NAEYC
5c
Contextual
Factors
ACEI 3.5/NAEYC
3b
Contextual
Factors
ACEI 5.2/NAEYC
2c

Describes students in-depth


according to ability, disabilities,
ethnicity/race, socioeconomic
status, student interests and
other relevant school factors that
could impact student learning;
list 5 or more factors.

Describes students according to


some differences, lists at least 4
factors that could impact
student learning

Does not include at least three


(3) types of descriptions;
displays minimal understanding
of addressing a variety of
student needs.

Uses substantial information from


descriptions of the students to
select standards to meet
students individual differences
and plan instruction and
assessment

Uses adequate information from


the descriptions to select
standards to meet students
differences and plan instruction
and assessments

Fails to use the information from


the descriptions to plan
instruction and assessments to
meet the needs of students

Data is collected from multiple


sources, including verbal,
nonverbal and media, etc.

Uses at least three (3) types of


sources to collect data

Uses only one data source


(records) to set standards and
plan assessments

Displays an understanding of the


importance of collaborative
relationships with families, school
colleagues and agencies in the
community.

Selected sources show the


importance of collaborative
relationships with families,
school colleagues, and agencies
in the community

Shows little or no importance of


collaborative relationships with
families, school colleagues, and
agencies in the community

Overall Rating

UNIT
Objectives
ACEI 3.3/NAEYC
5b
Revised 2015

All objectives are thorough,


significant and challenging, and
are clearly stated and correlated
with the SC State standards

PLAN

Objectives are challenging and


are clearly stated and correlated
with the SC State standards

Objectives are not given;


standards are used.

SCORE

Objectives
ACEI 3.2/NAEYC
5c
Objectives
ACEI 3.2/NAEYC
5c

Objectives are appropriate for the


development, prerequisite
knowledge, experiences,
diversity, and other student
needs
All objectives contain
performance, products,
conditions and criteria
components

Objectives are appropriate for


the development, prerequisite
knowledge and experiences, but
are limited in diversity or other
student needs.

Objectives are not given;


standards are used.

Objectives are measurable,


containing 2-3 components

Objectives are not measurable.

All content is paced and


sequenced so that it is covered in
the allotted time

Content is paced that it is


covered in the allotted times,
but there are some sequencing
issues

The content is not paced and


sequenced so that is covered in
the allotted time

All standards thoroughly display


knowledge, skills and dispositions

Standards are inclusive of


knowledge, skills and
dispositions

Standards are not inclusive of


knowledge, skills, and
dispositions

3 or more activities relate to real


world experiences

2 activities relate to real world


experiences

Activities do not relate to real


world experiences

The instructional plan aligns with


the objective(s) for each content
area.

The instructional plan aligns


with the objective(s) for at least
two or more content areas.

The instructional plan does align


with the objective(s) for any of
content areas.

Plans to assess each objective


domain through the assessment
plan.

Plans to assess most of the


objectives through the
assessment plan.

Does not plan to assess the


objectives through the
assessment plan

All assessments are congruent


with standards, content and
cognitive complexity.

Most assessments are congruent


with the standards, content, but
have limited cognitive
complexity.

Assessments are not congruent


with the standards, content, or
cognitive complexity.

Overall Rating
Instructional
Plan
NAEYC 5c
Instructional
Plan
NAEYC 5c
Instructional
Plan
NAEYC 5c
Instructional
Plan
NAEYC 5c
Overall Rating
Alignment with
Learning
Objectives and
Assessment
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3b
Alignment with
Learning
Objectives and
Assessment
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3b
Overall Rating
Revised 2015

Selection of
Strategies for
Varying Levels
ACEI 3.3/NAEYC
4b;4c
Design for
Instruction
ACEI 1.0/NAEYC
5c

Uses and justifies a variety of


strategies to teach students on
varying levels, including activities
that require students to think
critically and solve problems.

Uses a variety of strategies to


teach students on varying
levels, including activities that
require students to think
critically and solve problems.

Uses less than three (3)


strategies; does not
accommodate the varying levels
of students or activities that
require students to think
critically and solve problems.

Designs instruction for specific


learning standards using
students characteristics and
needs for learning contexts.

Designs most of the instruction


using the standards, but fails to
use students characteristics
and needs for learning contexts

Attempts to design the


instruction using the standards,
but the attempt lacks
congruency and fails to use
students characteristics and
needs for learning contexts.

ASSESSMENTS
Knowledge of
Students Skills
and Prior
Learning
ACEI 3.1
Multiple
Assessment
Modes
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3b
Multiple
Assessment
Modes/NAEYC 3b
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3b
Multiple
Assessment
Modes
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3b
Multiple
Assessment
Modes
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
Revised 2015

Displays specific understanding


of students skills and prior
learning that affect instruction.

Displays general understanding


of students skills and prior
learning that affect instruction.

Displays no understanding of
students skills and prior
learning that affect instruction.

All informal assessments are


completely aligned to the
objectives

Informal assessments are


aligned to adequate portions of
the standards

Does not use informal


assessments

All formal assessments are


completely aligned to the
objectives

Formal assessments are aligned


to adequate portions of the
standards

Does not use formal assessments

Uses more than one (1) authentic


assessment type

Applies an authentic assessment


type

Does not use authentic


assessments

Uses more than one (1) l


performance tasks and includes
the scoring rubric

Uses a performance task(s) but


does not use a scoring rubric

Does not use performance tasks

3b
Multiple
Assessment
Modes
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3b

Plans substantially for student


reflections

Plans adequately for student


reflections

Does not plan for student


reflections

All assessments are valid

Most assessments are valid

Assessments are not valid

All items or prompts are clearly


written and correct

Items or prompts are clearly


written, but exhibit minimal
errors

Items or prompts are not clearly


written

All directions and procedures are


clearly written and correct

Directions and procedures are


clearly written, but exhibit
minimal errors

Directions and procedures are


not clearly written

Thoroughly, but succinctly,


explains the scoring procedures
for all of the assessments

Adequately explains some of the


scoring procedures for the
assessments

Fails to explain the scoring


procedures for any of the
assessments.

Uses assessment data using


graphs, charts, tables, etc., to
profile student learning and
communicate information about
student progress and
achievement.
Thorough and accurate
interpretation is provided

Provides an appropriate
summary of assessment data to
explain student learning and
communicate information about
student progress and
achievement.
An adequate interpretation is
provided; contains few errors in
accuracy

Overall Rating
Validity of
Assessments
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3b
Validity of
Assessments
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3b
Validity of
Assessments
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3b
Overall Rating
Scoring
Procedures
Explained(Eval.
Crit)
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3b
Analysis of
Student Learning
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3b
Interpretation of
Data and
Student Learning
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
Revised 2015

Makes an inadequate attempt to


summarize or display student
learning and communicate
information about student
progress and achievement.
Interpretation is not accurate

3b
Interpretation of
Data and
Student Learning
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3b
Interpretation of
Data and
Student Learning
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3b
Overall Rating
Instructional
Decision-making
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3c
Effective
Instruction and
Assessment
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3c
Effective
Instruction and
Assessment
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3c
Overall Rating
Impact on
Student Learning
ACEI 4.0/NAEYC
3b
Clarity and
Accuracy of
Presentation/NA
Revised 2015

Meaningful, appropriate, and


data supported conclusions are
drawn

Meaningful and appropriate


conclusions are drawn with
limited inclusion of data

Conclusions are not meaningful


or supported by data

Provides relevant and detailed


hypotheses for all achieved and
unachieved learning goals.

Provides generalized hypotheses


for why students met or did not
meet the learning goals

Does not provide hypotheses as


to why the students did not meet
the learning goals

Uses ongoing analysis of student


learning to make instructional
decisions.

Uses intermittent analysis of


student learning to make
instructional decisions.

Provides no evidence of using an


analysis of student learning to
make instructional decisions.

Identifies successful and


unsuccessful activities and
assessments

Identifies unsuccessful and


successful activities , but not
assessments or vice versa

Does not identify successful or


unsuccessful activities or
assessments

Provides plausible reasons (based


on theory or research) for both
the success and lack thereof

Provides plausible reasons to


support why activities and
assessments were either
successful or not successful

Does not provide reasons to


support the success or
nonsuccess of activities or
assessments

Includes adequate evidence of


the impact on student learning
in terms of numbers of students
who achieved and made
progress toward the unit
objectives
Is easy to follow and contains
minimal errors in conventions or
grammar usage.

Includes incomplete or no
evidence of the impact on
student learning in terms of
numbers of students who
achieved and made progress
toward unit objectives
Is easy to follow and contains
numerous errors in conventions
or grammar usage.

Includes substantial evidence of


the impact on student learning in
terms of the number of students
who achieved and made progress
toward the unit objectives
Is easy to follow and contains no
errors in conventions or grammar
usage.

EYC 6b
Reflection/Self
Evaluation
ACEI 5.1/NAEYC
4d
Student Work

Reflects comprehensively on his


or her instruction and student
learning in order to improve
teaching practice.

Reflects adequately on his or her


instruction and student learning
in order to improve teaching
practice.

Reflects, but does not


adequately support ways to
improve teaching practice.

Ample student work attached

Appropriate student work


attached

No student work attached

TOTAL

Unacceptable/Developing (1)
Candidate demonstrates a limited amount of the
attributes of the standard. Performance indicates
that few competencies have been demonstrated.

Revised 2015

Acceptable/Meets (3)
Candidate demonstrates most of the attributes of
the standard. Performance indicates that the
competency has been demonstrated including
examples, extension, or enrichment.

POINTS

Target/Exceeds (5)
Candidate demonstrates all of the attributes of the
standard. Performance clearly indicates that the
competency has been mastered, including
examples, extension, and enrichment.