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Lesson Planning Form for Accessible Instruction Calvin College Education Program

Teacher

Jana Dykhuis

Date

Subject/ Topic/ Theme

Surprise Symphony- Lesson 3

Grade _______4________

I. Objectives
How does this lesson connect to the unit plan?
This is the third lesson in the listening unit on the Surprise Symphony. Knowledge of theme and variation is reinforced by looking at variation 3 and doing activities
centered around arranging a choral reading of a poem similar to how the composer arranged the different variations for different instruments.
cognitiveR U Ap An E C*

Learners will be able to:

Recognize the theme and first two variations of the Surprise Symphony.
Use solfege syllables to sing both the major theme and minor variation.
Implement skills of arranging through use of dynamics, rhythm, instruments, and choices through a choral reading of a
poem.
Perform their own arrangement of a choral reading of a poem and, if time allows, critique it.

RU
R U Ap
Ap An E
C
Ap An E

physical
development

socioemotional

X
X

Common Core standards (or GLCEs if not available in Common Core) addressed:

MU:Cr2.1.4a Demonstrate selected and organized musical ideas for an improvisation, arrangement, or composition to express intent, and explain connection
to purpose and context.
MU:Cr2.1.4b Use standard and/or iconic notation and/or recording technology to document personal rhythmic, melodic, and simple harmonic musical ideas.
MU:Cr3.2.4a Present the final version of personal created music to others, and explain connection to expressive intent.
MU:Pr6.1.4a Perform music, alone or with others, with expression and technical accuracy, and appropriate interpretation.
MU:Pr4.2.4a Demonstrate understanding of the structure and the elements of music (such as rhythm, pitch, and form) in music selected for performance.
MU:Pr4.3.4a Demonstrate and explain how intent is conveyed through interpretive decisions and expressive qualities (such as dynamics, tempo, and timbre).
MU:Re7.1.4a Demonstrate and explain how selected music connects to and is influenced by specific interests, experiences, purposes, or contexts.
MU:Re7.2.4a Demonstrate and explain how responses to music are informed by the structure, the use of the elements of music, and context (such as social
and cultural).
MU:Re8.1.4a Demonstrate and explain how the expressive qualities (such as dynamics, tempo, and timbre) are used in performers and personal
interpretations to reflect expressive intent.
MU:Cn11.0.4a Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life.

(Note: Write as many as needed. Indicate taxonomy levels and connections to applicable national or state standards. If an objective applies to particular learners
write the name(s) of the learner(s) to whom it applies.)
*remember, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate, create

II. Before you start


Identify prerequisite
knowledge and skills.

Students will know routine entrance songs, basic 5-note scale solfege, and be familiar with the theme
and first two variations of the Surprise Symphony.
Pre-assessment (for learning):

Review theme and variation through questions and prompts.


Formative (for learning):

Outline assessment
activities
(applicable to this lesson)

Ask guided questions about listening exercises. Evaluate students abilities to echo solfege patterns
and adjust pattern difficulty accordingly. Decide whether students creative choices indicate an
understanding of connection between music and poetry.
Formative (as learning):

Perform choral reading of the poem.


Summative (of learning):
What barriers might this
lesson present?
What will it take
neurodevelopmentally,
experientially,
emotionally, etc., for your
students to do this lesson?

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Provide Multiple Means of


Representation
Provide options for perceptionmaking information perceptible

Aural examples and reading

Visual listening maps and


projected poems

Provide Multiple Means of Action


and Expression
Provide options for physical actionincrease options for interaction
Body percussion, playing
Orff instruments

Provide Multiple Means of


Engagement
Provide options for recruiting
interest- choice, relevance, value,
authenticity, minimize threats
Provide guidelines from
which students can choose
when arranging poem
Have a performance
opportunity at the end for
students to show their
creation

Provide options for language,


mathematical expressions, and
symbols- clarify & connect
language

Draw and write in


arrangement choices on
poem

Provide options for comprehensionactivate, apply & highlight


Have students do composing
and arranging to better
understand the mystery
musician

Materials-what materials
(books, handouts, etc) do
you need for this lesson
and are they ready to
use?

How will your classroom


be set up for this lesson?

Provide options for expression and


communication- increase medium
of expression

Use reading, singing,


sound effects, Orff
instruments

Provide options for executive


functions- coordinate short & long
term goals, monitor progress, and
modify strategies
Adjust instructions and
guidelines based on students
ability when making
compositional choices

Provide options for sustaining effort


and persistence- optimize
challenge, collaboration, masteryoriented feedback
Collaborate with peers in
composition
Create and watch a video of
performance of material
Provide options for self-regulationexpectations, personal skills and
strategies, self-assessment &
reflection
Watch video of performance
and reflect

Music (iPod, stereo)


Projector with listening map
Mystery musician clue
Spring poem in document form to project
White erase markers
Orff instruments (optional)
There is an area to sit around the stereo up front.
The projector displays onto the white board, and the students have a duct tape line to sit behind.
There is an area to sit around the piano up front.
Curwen hand signs, dynamics, and the mystery musician clues are posted around the room.
Student area to sit on the floor will be clear.

III. The Plan


Time

Components
Motivation
(opening/
introduction/
engagement)

Development
(the largest
component or
main body of
the lesson)

Describe teacher activities


AND
student activities
for each component of the lesson. Include important higher order thinking questions and/or
prompts.
Meet students in the hall, and bring them
Enter the classroom and go to the stereo
into the classroom to the stereo with the
while singing the Follow Me song.
Follow Me song.
Continue with Lets Sing Hello Together.
Continue with Lets Sing Hello Together.
Greet students and begin with the third
Read first Mystery Musician hint (pinned on
Mystery Musician hint (pinned on a bulletin
a bulletin board on the side of the room).
board on the side of the room).

The hint reads: Hint 3: In addition to his

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famous symphonies and string quartets, he


also wrote music that included voices, like
his oratorios, The Creation, The Seasons,
and The Seven Last Words of Christ.
Play an excerpt of a recording of Spring Komm Holder Lenz, from The Seasons
without telling them the title. Before playing
it, ask students to listen for which season the
composer was trying to represent.
Guided listening questions: 1) Which season
did you think this piece represented? Why?
2) Was it instrumental or choral? (choral) 3)

The hint reads: Hint 3: In addition to his

famous symphonies and string quartets, he


also wrote music that included voices, like
his oratorios, The Creation, The Seasons,
and The Seven Last Words of Christ.
Listen to an excerpt of a recording of
Spring - Komm Holder Lenz, from The
Seasons and try to guess which season the
composer was trying to represent.
Answer Guided Listening Questions

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What language do you think they were


singing in? (German)
Tell students that today, we are going to
continue looking at The Surprise
Symphony, which was also written by our
Mystery Musician.
Display the listening map on the projector.
Sing so-la-so-fa-mi-re-ti-do to establish
tonality, and then have them echo you on the
theme using solfege and hand signs (do-domi-mi-so-so-mi).
When it comes to form, ask what the excerpt
you sang is called. (theme)
Point to the surprise and ask them what the
picture represents. Ask what dynamic level
the surprise was.
Look at the first variation. Remind them of
what instruments were used and the pizza
metaphor. (Theme: cheese pizza, Variations:
still pizza, but with toppings.)
Look at the second variation and ask why
there is a thundercloud. (major/minor
tonality.) Sing the major theme and the
minor theme with solfege and handsigns.
(major: introduce by singing so-la-so-fa-mire-ti-do to establish tonality.) do-do-mi-miso-so-mi and (minor: introduce by singing
mi-fa-mi-re-do-ti-si-la to establish
tonality.) la-la-do-do-mi-mi-do.
Transition to Variation 3, asking students to
listen to what is different than the main
theme played by violins.
Guided listening question: Did you notice
any differences? Instruments? Rhythms?
Tell students that composers are not the only
people allowed to take something and
arrange it in a new way. Today, we listened
to Spring by our composer, and I have a
poem about spring for you.
Display poem on the whiteboard using the
projector.
Read the poem together.
Mention that, like our composer, we get to
do an arrangement called a choral reading of
the poem.
Lay out the guidelines for ways that we can
arrange a poem, or make it more exciting,
like how the composer took a theme and
changed it up, or how he uses different
amounts of singers to achieve different
effects.
Guidelines for choral readings (perhaps
write these on the white board on the side of
the poem): 1) who is reading? (boys and
girls, whole class, half the class, one person,
etc.), 2) dynamics and expression, 3) sound
effects (body percussion, animal noises, orff
instruments, etc.)
Go line by line. Ask a student whether they
would like to change who is reading, the

Look at listening map


Echo teacher on the theme using solfege and
hand signs (do-do-mi-mi-so-so-mi).

Recognize the theme as just sung.

Recognize the surprise and recall what


dynamic level it was.

Discuss why there is a thundercloud for the


second variation. Sing the major theme and
the minor theme with solfege and handsigns.
major: do-do-mi-mi-so-so-mi and minor:
la-la-do-do-mi-mi-do.

Pick out the variation in the third section.

Answer guided listening questions.

Look at the poem, Spring on the


whiteboard.
Read the poem.

Listen to directions

One student decides whether they would like


to change who is reading, the dynamics and


Closure
(conclusion,
culmination,
wrap-up)

Ask the students to perform the poem for


you, for a cooperating teacher, or for a video
camera. If videoed, email it or hook it up to
a projector and watch it together.
Ask if they enjoyed arranging a choral
reading. Ask whether they think the
composer enjoyed arranging the Surprise
Symphony and using different instruments
during variations. Have students reflect on
what considerations they had to make while
they were arranging (balance, textual
associations, musicianship, etc.)

The students perform the poem for you, for a


cooperating teacher, or for a video camera. If
videoed, email it or hook it up to a projector
and watch it together.
Students decide if they enjoyed arranging a
choral reading and whether they think the
composer enjoyed arranging the Surprise
Symphony and using different instruments
during variations. They reflect on what
considerations they had to make while they
were arranging (balance, textual
associations, musicianship, etc.)

Your reflection about the lesson, including evidence(s) of student learning and engagement, as well as ideas for improvement
for next time. (Write this after teaching the lesson, if you had a chance to teach it. If you did not teach this lesson, focus on the
process of preparing the lesson.)
This lesson has been the most involved so far. Students received as always a refresher about the composer, his work, and the
Surprise Symphony. Much of this lesson also has Spring as common ground, which is a nice connection and makes for easier
transitions. Choral readings, however, are a difficult thing. First, a tremendous barrier is classroom management. I attempted to lay
out reminders of our rules and clear guidelines as to the choices we would be making before even starting. As I went, limiting student
choices to maintain pacing and giving reminders about instrument technique and etiquette improved. This is something that I might
focus on more specifically in my lesson plan next time, though. Student learning was shown through the musical decisions the
students made. Asking them about dynamics and who they wanted to read at what times was a fruitful reinforcement of the overall
flow and structure. We have been talking a lot about the mood of various selections, and many groups correctly assigned a mood
such as excited to the reading. Instruments seemed to correspond to the text in terms of trying to pair a sound to an animal, for
example. Performance technique could have been included more on my end, but aside from a couple waves and funny faces at the
camera, it was not bad. This was measurable by the rubric which focused on their reading and playing instruments in terms of timing
and technique. Since we have the videos, I hope to revisit them next time and review what musical concepts we learned and
exemplified in our arranging and composing.

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