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Power System Control and Stability

Second Edition

P. M. Anderson
San Diego, California

A. A. Fouad
Fort Collins, Colorado

IEEE Power Engineering Society, Sponsor

IEEE Press Power Engineering Series Mohamed E. El-Hawary, Series Editor

IEEE PRESS

A JOHN WlLEY & SONS, INC., PUBLICATION

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Contents

Preface Part I Introduction P. M. Anderson and A. A. Fouad

xi11

...

Chapter 1. Power System Stability


1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

Introduction Requirements of a Reliable Electrical Power Service Statement of the Problem Effect of an Impact upon System Components Methods of Simulation Problems

3
4

8
10 11

Chapter 2. The Elementary Mathematical Model


2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 2.10 2.1 1 2.12

Swing Equation Units Mechanical Torque Electrical Torque Power-Angle Curve of a Synchronous Machine Natural Frequencies of Oscillation of a Synchronous Machine System of One Machine against an Infinite Bus-The Classical Model Equal Area Criterion Classical Model of a Multitnachine System Classical Stability Study of a Nine-Bus System Shortcomings of the Classical Model Block Diagram of One Machine Problems References

13 15

16
20

21
24 26 31 35 37 45 47 48 52

Chapter 3. System Response to Small Disturbances


3.1 3.2

3.3
3.4 3.5

Introduction Types of Problems Studied The Unregulated Synchronous Machine Modes of Oscillation of an Unregulated Multimachine System Regulated Synchronous Machine

53 54 55 59

66
vi i

viii

Contents

3.6

Distribution of Power impacts Problems References

69 80 80

Part I1 The Electromagnetic Torque P. M. Anderson and A. A. Fouad

Chapter 4. The Synchronous Machine


4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 4.9 4.10 4.1 1 4.12 4.13 4.14 4.15 4.16 Introduction Parks Transformation Flux Linkage Equations Voltage Equations Formulation of State-Space Equations Current Formulation Per Unit Conversion Normalizing the Voltage Equations Normalizing the Torque Equations Torque and Power Equivalent Circuit of a Synchronous Machine The Flux Linkage State-Space Model Load Equations Subtransient and Transient Inductances and Time Constants Simplified Models of the Synchronous Machine Turbine Generator Dynamic Models Problems References 83 83 85 88 91 91 92 99 103 105 107 109 114 122 127 143 146 148

Chapter 5. The Simulation of Synchronous Machines


5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4

Introduction Steady-State Equations and Phasor Diagrams Machine Connected to an Infinite Bus through a Transmission Line Machine Connected to an Infinite Bus with Local Load at Machine Terminal 5.5 Determining Steady-State Conditions 5.6 Examples 5.7 Initial Conditions for a Multimachine System 5.8 Determination of Machine Parameters from Manufacturers Data 5.9 Analog Computer Simulation of the Synchronous Machine 5.10 Digital Simulation of Synchronous Machines Problems References

150 150 153 154 157 159 165 166 170 184 206 206

Chapter 6. Linear Models of the Synchronous Machine


6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 Introduction Linearization of the Generator State-Space Current Model Linearization of the Load Equation for the One-Machine Problem Linearization of the Flux Linkage Model Simplified Linear Model 208 209 213 217 222

Contents

IX

6.6 6.7

Block Diagrams State-Space Representation of Simplified Model Problems References

23 1 23 1 232 232

Chapter 7. Excitation Systems

7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.10 7.1 1

Simplified View of Excitation Control Control Configurations Typical Excitation Configurations Excitation Control System Definitions Voltage Regulator Exciter Buildup Excitation System Response State-Space Description of the Excitation System Computer Representation of Excitation Systems Typical System Constants The Effect of Excitation on Generator Performance Problems References

233 235 236 243 250 254 268 285 292 299 304 304 307

Chapter 8. Effect of Excitation on Stability


8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 Introduction Effect of Excitation on Generator Power Limits Effect of the Excitation System on Transient Stability Effect of Excitation on Dynamic Stability Root-Locus Analysis of a Regulated Machine Connected to an Infinite Bus 8.6 Approximate System Representation 8.7 Supplementary Stabilizing Signals 8.8 Linear Analysis of the Stabilized Generator 8.9 Analog Computer Studies 8.10 Digital Computer Transient Stability Studies 8.1 1 Some General Comments on the Effect of Excitation on Stability Problems References 309 311 315 321 327 333 338 344 347 353 363 365 366

Chapter 9. Multimachine Swtems with Constant Impedance Loads


9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 9.8 9.9 9.10 9.1 1 Introduction Statement of the Problem Matrix Representation of a Passive Network Converting Machine Coordinates to System Reference Relation Between Machine Currents and Voltages System Order Machines Represented by Classical Methods Linearized Model for the Network Hybrid Formulation Network Equations with Flux Linkage Model Total System Equations 368 368 369 313 374 317 378 381 386 388 390

Contents
392 396 397

9.12 Multimachine System Study Problems References

Part I11 The Mechanical Torque Power System Control and Stability P. M.Anderson

Chapter 10. Speed Governing


10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.6

The Flyball Governor The Isochronous Governor Incremental Equations of the Turbine The Speed Droop Governor The Floating-Lever Speed Droop Governor The Compensated Governor Problems References

402 408 410 413 419 421 428 428

Chapter 11. Steam Turbine Prime Movers


11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.10

Introduction Power Plant Control Modes Thermal Generation A Steam Power Plant Model Steam Turbines Steam Turbine Control Operations Steam Turbine Control Functions Steam Generator Control Fossil-Fuel Boilers Nuclear Steam Supply Systems Problems References

430 432 435 436 437 444 446 458 46 1 476 480 48 1

Chapter 12. Hydraulic Turbine Prime Movers


12.1 Introduction 12.2 The Impulse Turbine 12.3 The Reaction Turbine 12.4 Propeller-Type Turbines 12.5 The Deriaz Turbine 12.6 Conduits, Surge Tanks, and Penstocks 12.7 Hydraulic System Equations 12.8 Hydraulic System Transfer Function 12.9 Simplifylng Assumptions 12.10 Block Diagram for a Hydro System 12.1 1 Pumped Storage Hydro Systems Problems References 484 484 486 489 489 489 498 503 506 509 510 511 512

Contents

xi

Chapter 13. Combustion Turbine and Combined-Cycle Power Plants


13.1 Introduction 13.2 The Combustion Turbine Prime Mover 13.3 The Combined-Cycle Prime Mover 513 513 518 527 527 529 53 1 545 555 582 590 614 622 63 1 640 65 1

Problems References Appendix A. Appendix B. Appendix C. Appendix D . Appendix E. Appendix F. Appendix G. Appendix H. Appendix I. Appendix J. Index Trigonometric Identities for Three-phase Systems Some Computer Methods for Solving Differential Equations Normalization Typical System Data Excitation Control System Definitions Control System Components Pressure Control Systems The Governor Equations Wave Equations for a Hydraulic Conduit Hydraulic Servomotors

Preface
It is well over thirty years since some of the early versions of this book were used in our classes, and it is more than a quarter of a century since the first edition appeared in print. Normally, one would have expected users of the book to almost give it up as old-fashioned. Yet, until very recently the questions the authors were frequently asked explained the rationale for the added material in this edition, especially by new users: When will the Second Edition be out? Over these past thirty years the size of the systems analyzed in stability studies, the scope of the studies (including the kind of answers sought), the duration of the transients analyzed, and the methods of solution may have varied, but central to all is that the proper system model must be used. Such a model must be based on description of the physical system and on its behavior during the transient being analyzed. This book has focused on modeling the power system components for analysis of the electromechanical transient, perhaps with emphasis on the inertial transient. The one possible exception reflects the concern of the time the book came into being, namely analysis of the linear system model for detection and mitigation of possible poorly damped operating conditions. Since the 1970s, several trends made stability of greater concern to power system engineers. Because of higher cost of money and delay of transmission construction because of environmental litigations, the bulk power system has experienced more congestion in transmission, more interdependence among networks, and so on. To maintain stability, there has been more dependence on discreet supplementary controls, greater need for studying larger systems, and analysis of longer transients. Since then, additional models were needed for inclusion in stability studies: turbine governors, power plants, discrete supplementary controls, etc. Thus, the need for modeling the power system components that make up mechanical torque has become more important than ever. The authors think it is time to meet this need, as was originally planned. Now that the electric utility industry is undergoing major restructuring, the question arises as to whether the trend that started in the 1970s is likely to continue, at least into the near future. Many power system analysts believe that the answer to this question is yes. Since the revised printing of this book appeared, the electric utility industry has undergone a significant restructuring, resulting in heavier use of the bulk power transmission for interregional transactions. It is expected that new engineering emphasis will be given to what engineers refer to as mid-term or long-term analysis. We believe that in the restructured environment, this type of analysis will continue be needed because there will be greater emphasis on providing answers about system limitations to all parties involved in the various activities as well as in the interregional transactions. Modeling of mechanical torque will be important in conducting these studies. The material on the mechanical torque presented in Chapters 10 through 13 and in Appendices F through J are the work of author Paul Anderson and he should be contacted regarding any questions, corrections, or other information regarding these portions of the book. This material is a bit unusual to include in a book on power system stability and control, but we have recognized that a complete picture of stability and the supporting mathematical models cannot
Xlll

...

xiv

Preface

be considered complete without a discussion of these important system components. The models presented here can be described as low-order models that we consider appropriate additions to studies of power system stability. This limits the models to a short time span of a minute or so, and purposely avoids the modeling of power plant behavior for the long term, for example, in the study of economics or energy dispatch.

P. M. ANDERSON A. A. FOUAD Sun Diego, California Fort Collins, Colorado

Part I

Introduction

P. M. Anderson A. A. Fouad

chapter

Power System Stability

1.1

Introduction

Since the industrial revolution mans demand for and consumption of energy has increased steadily. The invention of the induction motor by Nikola Tesla in 1888 signaled the growing importance of electrical energy in the industrial world as well as its use for artificial lighting. A major portion of the energy needs of a modern society is supplied in the form of electrical energy. Industrially developed societies need an ever-increasing supply of electrical power, and the demand on the North American continent has been doubling every ten years. Very complex power systems have been built to satisfy this increasing demand. The trend in electric power production is toward an interconnected network of transmission lines linking generators and loads into large integrated systems, some of which span entire continents. Indeed, in the United States and Canada, generators located thousands of miles apart operate in parallel. This vast enterprise of supplying electrical energy presents many engineering problems that provide the engineer with a variety of challenges. The planning, construction, and operation of such systems become exceedingly complex. Some of the problems stimulate the engineers managerial talents; others tax his knowledge and experience in system design. The entire design must be predicated on automatic control and not on the slow response of human operators. T o be able to predict the performance of such complex systems, the engineer is forced to seek ever more powerful tools of analysis and synthesis. This book is concerned with some aspects of the design problem, particularly the dynamic performance, of interconnected power systems. Characteristics of the various components of a power system during normal operating conditions and during disturbances will be examined, and effects on t h e overall system performance will be analyzed. Emphasis will be given to the transient behavior in which the system is described mathematically by ordinary differential equations.
1.2

Requirements of a Reliable Electrical Power Service

Successful operation of a power system depends largely on the engineers ability to provide reliable and uninterrupted service t o the loads. The reliability of the power supply implies much more than merely being available. Ideally, the loads must be fed at constant voltage and frequency at all times. In practical terms this means that both voltage and frequency must be held within close tolerances so that the consumers
3

Chapter 1

equipment may operate satisfactorily. For example, a drop in voltage of l0-15% or a reduction of the system frequency of only a few hertz may lead to stalling of the motor loads on the system. Thus it can be accurately stated that the power system operator must maintain a very high standard of continuous electrical service. The first requirement of reliable service is to keep the synchronous generators running in parallel and with adequate capacity to meet the load demand. If at any time a generator loses synchronism with the rest of the system, significant voltage and current fluctuations may occur and transmission lines may be automatically tripped by their relays at undesired locations. I f a generator is separated from the system, it must be resynchronized and then loaded, assuming it has not been damaged and its prime mover has not been shut down due to the disturbance that caused the loss of synchronism. Synchronous machines do not easily fall out of step under normal conditions. If a machine tends to speed up or slow down, synchronizing forces tend to keep it in step. Conditions do arise, however, in which operation is such that the synchronizing forces for one or more machines may not be adequate, and small impacts in the system may cause these machines to lose synchronism. A major shock to the system may also lead to a loss of synchronism for one or more machines. A second requirement of reliable electrical service is to maintain the integrity of the power network. The high-voltage transmisssion system connects the generating stations and the load centers. Interruptions in this network may hinder the flow of power to the load. This usually requires a study of large geographical areas since almost all power systems are interconnected with neighboring systems. Economic power as well as emergency power may flow over interconnecting tie lines to help maintain continuity of service. Therefore, successful operation of the system means that these lines must remain in service if firm power is to be exchanged between the areas of the system. While it is frequently convenient to talk about the power system in the steady state, such a state never exists in the true sense. Random changes in load are taking place at all times, with subsequent adjustments of generation. Furthermore, major changes do take place at times, e.g., a fault on the network, failure in a piece of equipment, sudden application of a major load such as a steel mill, or loss of a line or generating unit. We may look at any of these as a change from one equilibrium state to another. I t might be tempting to say that successful operation requires only that the new state be a stable state (whatever that means). For example, if a generator is lost, the remaining connected generators must be capable of meeting the load demand; or if a line is lost, the power it was carrying must be obtainable from another source. Unfortunately, this view is erroneous in one important aspect: it neglects the dynamics of the transition from one equilibrium state to another. Synchronism frequently may be lost in that transition period, or growing oscillations may occur over a transmission line, eventually leading to its tripping. These problems must be studied by the power system engineer and fall under the heading power system stability.
1.3
Statement of the Problem

The stability problem is concerned with the behavior of the synchronous machines after they have been perturbed. I f the perturbation does not involve any net change in power, the machines should return to their original state. I f an unbalance between the supply and demand is created by a change in load, in generation, or in network conditions, a new operating state is necessary. In any case all interconnected synchronous machines should remain in synchronism if the system is stable; i.e., they should all remain operating in parallel and at the same speed.

Power System Stability

The transient following a system perturbation is oscillatory in nature; but if the system is stable, these oscillations will be damped toward a new quiescent operating condition. These oscillations, however, are reflected as fluctuations in :he power flow over the transmission lines. If a certain line connecting two groups of machines undergoes excessive power fluctuations, it may be tripped out by its protective equipment thereby disconnecting the two groups of machines. This problem is termed the stability of the tie line, even though in reality it reflects the stability of the two groups of machines. A statement declaring a power system to be stable is rather ambiguous unless the conditions under which this stability has been examined are clearly stated. This includes the operating conditions as well as the type of perturbation given to the system. The same thing can be said about tie-line stability. Since we are concerned here with the tripping of the line, the power fluctuation that can be tolerated depends on the initial operating condition of the system, including the line loading and the nature of the impacts to which it is subjected. These questions have become vitally important with the advent of large-scale interconnections. I n fact, a severe (but improbable) disturbance can always be found that will cause instability. Therefore, the disturbances for which the system should be designed to maintain stability must be deliberately selected.
1.3.1
Primitive definition of stability

Having introduced the term stability, we now propose a simple nonmathematical definition of the term that will be satisfactory for elementary problems. Later, we will provide a more rigorous mathematical definition. The problem of interest is one where a power system operating under a steady load condition is perturbed, causing the readjustment of the voltage angles of the synchronous machines. If such an occurrence creates an unbalance between the system generation and load, it results in the establishment of a new steady-state operating condition, with the subsequent adjustment of the voltage angles. The perturbation could be a major disturbance such as the loss of a generator, a fault or the loss of a line, or a combination of such events. It could also be a small load or random load changes occurring under normal operating conditions. Adjustment to the new operating condition is called the transient period. The system behavior during this time is called the dynamic system performance, which is of concern in defining system stability. The main criterion for stability is that the synchronous machines maintain synchronism at the end of the transient period.
Definition: If the oscillatory response of a power system during the transient period

following a disturbance is damped and the system settles in a finite time to a new steady operating condition, we say the system is stable. If the system is not stable, it is considered unstable. This primitive definition of stability requires that the system oscillations be damped. This condition is sometimes called asymptotic stability and means that the system contains inherent forces that tend to reduce oscillations. This is a desirable feature in many systems and is considered necessary for power systems. The definition also excludes continuous oscillation from the family of stable systems, although oscillators are stable in a mathematical sense. The reason is practical since a continually oscillating system would be undesirable for both the supplier and the user of electric power. Hence the definition describes a practical specification for an acceptable operating condition.

6
1.3.2

Chapter 1

Other stability problems

While the stability of synchronous machines and tie lines is the most important and common problem, other stability problems may exist, particularly in power systems having appreciable capacitances. In such cases arrangements must be made to avoid excessive voltages during light load conditions, to avoid damage to equipment, and to prevent self-excitation of machines. Some of these problems are discussed in Part 111, while others are beyond the scope of this book.
133 ..
Stability of synchronous machines

Distinction should be made between sudden and major changes, which we shall call large impacts, and smaller and more normal random impacts. A fault on the highvoltage transmission network or the loss of a major generating unit are examples of large impacts. I f one of these large impacts occurs, the synchronous machines may lose synchronism. This problem is referred to in the literature as the transient stability problem. Without detailed discussion, some general comments are in order. First, these impacts have a finite probability of occurring. Those that the system should be designed to withstand must therefore be selected a priori. Second, the ability of the system to survive a certain disturbance depends on its precise operating condition at the time of the occurrence. A change in the system loading, generation schedule, network interconnections, or type of circuit protection may give completely different results in a stability study for the same disturbance. Thus the transient stability study is a very specific one, from which the engineer concludes that under given system conditions and for a given impact the synchronous machines will or will not remain in synchronism. Stability depends strongly upon the magnitude and location of the disturbance and to a lesser extent upon the initial state or operating condition of the system. Let us now consider a situation where there are no major shocks or impacts, but rather a random occurrence of small changes in system loading. Here we would expect the system operator to have scheduled enough machine capacity to handle the load. We would also expect each synchronous machine to be operating on the stable portion of its power-angle curve, i.e.. the portion in which the power increases with increased angle. In the dynamics of the transition from one operating point to another, to adjust for load changes, the stability of the machines will be. determined by many factors, including the power-angle curve. I t is sometimes incorrect to consider a single power-angle curve, since modern exciters will change the operating curve during the period under study. The problem of studying the stability of synchronous machines under the condition of small load changes has been called steady-state stability. A more recent and certainly more appropriate name is dynamic stability. I n contrast to transient stability, dynamic stability tends to be a property of the state of the system. Transient stability and dynamic stability are both qoestions that must be answered to the satisfaction of the engineer for successful planning and operation of the system. This attitude is adopted in spite of the fact that an artificial separation between the two problems has been made in the past. This was simply a convenience to accommodate the different approximations and assumptions made in the mathematical treat-

I . I n the United States the regional committees of the National Electric Reliability Council ( N E R C ) specify the contingenciesagainst which the system must be proven stable.

Power System Stability

ments of the two problems. I n support of this viewpoint the following points are pertinent. First, the availability o f high-speed digital computers and modern modeling techniques makes it possible to represent any component of the power system in almost any degree of complexity required or desired. Thus questionable simplifications or assumptions are no longer needed and are often not justified. Second, and perhaps more important, in a large interconnected system the full effect of a disturbance is felt at the remote parts some time after its occurrence, perhaps a few seconds. Thus different parts of the interconnected system will respond to localized disturbances at different times. Whether they will act to aid stability is difficult to predict beforehand. The problem is aggravated if the initial disturbance causes other disturbances in neighboring areas due to power swings. As these conditions spread, a chain reaction may result and large-scale interruptions of service may occur. However, in a large interconnected system, the effect of an impact must be studied over a relatively long period, usually several seconds and in some cases a few minutes. Performance of dynamic stability studies for such long periods will require the simulation of system components often neglected in the so-called transient stability studies.
1.3.4

Tie-line oscillations

As random power impacts occur during the normal operation of a system, this added power must be supplied by the generators. The portion supplied by the different generators under different conditions depends upon electrical proximity to the position of impact, energy stored in the rotating masses, governor characteristics, and other factors. The machines therefore are never truly at steady state except when at standstill. Each machine is in continuous oscillation with respect to the others due to the effect of these random stimuli. These oscillations are reflected in the flow of power in the transmission lines. I f the power in any line is monitored, periodic oscillations are observed to be superimposed on the steady flow. Normally, these oscillations are not large and hence not objectionable. The situation in a tie line is different in one sense since it connects one group of machines to another. These two groups are in continuous oscillation with respect to each other, and this is reflected in the power flow over the tie line. The situation may be further complicated by the fact that each machine group in turn is connected to other groups. Thus the tie line under study may in effect be connecting two huge systems. I n this case the smallest oscillatory adjustments in the large systems are reflected as sizable power oscillations in the tie line. The question then becomes, To what degree can these oscillations be tolerated? The above problem is entirely different from that of maintaining a scheduled power interchange over the tie line; control equipment can be provided to perform this function. These controllers are usually too slow to interfere with the dynamic oscillations mentioned above. To alter these oscillations, the dynamic response of the components of the overall interconnected system must be considered. The problem is not only in the tie line itself but also in the two systems it connects and in the sensitivity of control in these systems. The electrical strength (admittance) or capacity of the tie cannot be divorced from this problem. For example, a 40-MW oscillation on a 400-MW tie is a much less serious problem than the same oscillation on a 100-MW tie. The oscillation frequency has an effect on the damping characteristics of prime movers,

Chapter 1

exciters, etc. Therefore, there is a minimum size of tie that can be effectively made from the viewpoint of stability.
1.4

Effect of an Impact upon System Components

In this section a survey of the effect of impacts is made to estimate the elements that should be considered in a stability study. A convenient starting point is to relate an impact to a change in power somewhere in the network. Our "test" stimulus will be a change in power, and we will use the point of impact as our reference point. The following effects, in whole or in part, may be felt. The system frequency will change because, until the input power is adjusted by the machine governors, the power change will go to or come from the energy in the rotating masses. The change in frequency will affect the loads, especially the motor loads. A common rule of thumb used among power system engineers is that a decrease in frequency results in a load decrease of equal percentage; i.e., load regulation is 100%. The network bus voltages will be affected to a lesser degree unless the change in power is accompanied by a change in reactive power.

I
Time, s

) .

Fig. 1.1.

Response of a four-machine system during a transient: (a) stable system. (b) unstable system.

Power System Stability

1.4.1

Loss of synchronism

Any unbalance between the generation and load initiates a transient that causes the rotors of the synchronous machines to swing because net accelerating (or decelerating) torques are exerted on these rotors. If these net torques are sufficiently large to cause some of the rotors to swing far enough so that one or more machines slip a pole, synchronism is lost. To assure stability, a new equilibrium state must be reached before any of the machines experience this condition. Loss of synchronism can also happen in stages, e.g., if the initial transient causes an electrical link in the transmission network to be interrupted during the swing. This creates another transient, which when superimposed on the first may cause synchronism to be lost. Let us now consider a severe impact initiated by a sizable generation unbalance, say excess generation. The major portion of the excess energy will be converted into kinetic energy. Thus most of the machine rotor angular velocities will increase. A lesser part will be consumed in the loads and through various losses in the system. However, an appreciable increase in machine speeds may not necessarily mean that synchronism will be lost. The important factor here is the angle diference between machines, where the rotor angle is measured with respect to a synchronously rotating reference. This is illustrated in Figure I . I in which the rotor angles of the machines in a hypothetical four-machine system are plotted against time during a transient. In case (a) all the rotor angles increase beyond K radians but all the angle differences are small, and the system will be stable if it eventually settles to a new angle. I n case (b) it is evident that the machines are separated into two groups where the rotor angles continue to drift apart. This system is unstable.
1.4.2

Synchronous machine during a transient

During a transient the system seen by a synchronous machine causes the machine terminal voltage, rotor angle, and frequency to change. The impedance seen looking into the network at the machine terminal also may change. The field-winding voltage will be affected by:
I . Induced currents in the damper windings (or rotor iron) due to sudden changes in armature currents. The time constants for these currents are usually on the order of less than 0.1 s and are often referred to as subtransient effects. 2. Induced currents in the field winding due to sudden changes in armature currents. The time constants for this transient are on the order of seconds and are referred to as transient effects. 3. Change in rotor voltage due to change in exciter voltage if activated by changes at the machine terminal. Both subtransient and transient effects are observed. Since the subtransient effects decay very rapidly, they are usually neglected and only the transient effects are considered important.

Note also that the behavior discussed above depends upon the network impedance as well as the machine parameters. The machine output power will be affected by the change in the rotor-winding EMF and the rotor position in addition to any changes in the impedance seen by the machine terminals. However, until the speed changes to the point where it is sensed and corrected by the governor, the change in the output power will come from the stored energy in the rotating masses. The important parameters here are the kinetic energy in M W - s per u n i t MVA (usually called H) or the machine mechanical time constant rj, which is twice the stored kinetic energy per MVA.

10

Chapter 1

When the impact is large, the speeds of all machines change so that they are sensed by their speed governors. Machines under load frequency control will correct for the power change. Until this correction is made, each machine's share will depend on its regulation or droop characteristic. Thus the controlled machines are the ones responsible for maintaining the system frequency. The dynamics of the transition period, however, are important. The key parameters are the governor dynamic characteristics. I n addition, the flow of the tie lines may be altered slightly. Thus some machines are assigned the requirement of maintaining scheduled flow in the ties. Supplementary controls are provided to these machines, the basic functions of which are to permit each control area to supply a given load. The responses of these controls are relatively slow and their time constants are on the order of seconds. This is appropriate since the scheduled economic loading of machines is secondary in importance to stability.
1.5
Methods of Simulation

I f we look at a large power system with its numerous machines, lines, and loads and consider the complexity of the consequences of any impact, we may tend to think it is hopeless to attempt analysis. Fortunately, however, the time constants of the phenomena may be appreciably different, allowing concentration on the key elements affecting the transient and the area under study. The first step in a stability study is to make a mathematical model of the system during the transient. The elements included in the model are those affecting the acceleration (or deceleration) of the machine rotors. The complexity of the model depends upon the type of transient and system being investigated. Generally, the components of the power system that influence the electrical and mechanical torques of the machines should be included in the model. These components are:
1 . The network before, during, and after the transient. 2. The loads and their characteristics. 3. The parameters of the synchronous machines. 4. The excitation systems of the synchronous machines. 5 . The mechanical turbine and speed governor. 6. Other important components of the power plant that influence the mechanical torque. 7. Other supplementary controls, such as tie-line controls, deemed necessary in the mathematical description of the system.

Thus the basic ingredients for solution are the knowledge of the initial conditions of the power system prior to the start of the transient and the mathematical description of the main components of the system that affect the transient behavior of the synchronous machines. The number of power system components included in the study and the complexity of their mathematical description will depend upon many factors. I n general, however, differential equations are used to describe the various components. Study of the dynamic behavior of the system depends upon the nature of these differential equations.
1S . 1

linearized system equations

If the system equations are linear (or have been linearized), the techniques of linear system analysis are used to study dynamic behavior. The most common method is to

Power

System Stability

11

simulate each component by its transfer function. The various transfer function blocks are connected to represent the system under study. The system performance may then be analyzed by such methods as root-locus plots. frequency domain analysis (Nyquist criteria), and Routh's criterion. The above methods have been frequently used in studies pertaining to small systems or a small number of machines. For larger systems the state-space model has been used more frequently in connection with system studies described by linear differential equations. Stability characteristics may be determined by examining the eigenvalues of the A matrix, where A is detined by the equation

%=Ax+Bu

(1.1)

where x is an n vector denoting the states of the system and A is a coefficient matrix. The system inputs are represented by the r vector u, and these inputs are related mathematically to differential equations by an n x r matrix B. This description has the advantage that A may be time varying and u may be used to represent several inputs if necessary.
1.5.2
large system with nonlinear equations

The system equations for a transient stability study are usually nonlinear. Here the system is described by a large set of coupled nonlinear differential equations of the form

f(X,U.f)

( 1 .2)

where f is an n vector of nonlinear functions. Determining the dynamic behavior of the system described by (1.2) is a more difficult task than that of the linearized system of ( 1 . 1 ) . Usually rirrre sohrions of the nonlinear differential equations are obtained by numerical methods with the aid of digital computers, and this is the method usually used in power system stability studies. Stability of synchronous machines is usually decided by behavior of their rotor angles. as discussed in Section I .4.1. More recently, modern theories of stability of nonlinear systems have been applied to the study of power system transients to determine the stability of synchronous machines without obtaining time solutions. Such efforts. while they seem to offer considerable promise, are still in the research stage and not in common use. Both linear and nonlinear equations will be developed in following chapters.

Problems
I .I

I .2

I .3 I .4 1.5

Suggest detinitions for the following terms: a. Power system reliability. b. Power system security. c. Power system stability. Distinguish between steady-state (dynamic) and transient stability according to a . The type of disturbance. b. The nature of the detining equations. What is a tie line'! Is every line a tie line'! What is an impact insofar as power system stability is concerned! Consider the system shown in Figure P1.5 where a mass M is pulled by a driving force f ( f )and is restrained by a linear spring K and an ideal dashpot B.

12

Chapter 1 Write the diferential equation for the system in terms of the displacement variable x and determine the relative values of B and K to provide critical damping when J(r) is a unit step function.

hf(t
Fig. P1.5.

I .6

Repeat Problem I .5 but convert the equations to the state-space form of ( I . I ).

chapter

The Elementary Mathematical Model

A stable power system is one in which the synchronous machines, when perturbed, will either return to their original state if there is no net change of power or will acquire a new state asymptotically without losing synchronism. Usually the perturbation causes a transient that is oscillatory in nature; but if the system is stable, the oscillations will be damped. The question then arises, What quantity or signal, preferably electrical, would enable us to test for stability? One convenient quantity is the machine rotor angle measured with respect to a synchronously rotating reference. If the difference in angle between any two machines increases indefinitely or if the oscillatory transient is not suficiently damped, the system is unstable. The principal subject of this chapter is the study of stability based largely on machine-angle behavior.

2.1

Swing Equation

The swing equation governs the motion of the machine rotor relating the inertia torque to the resultant of the mechanical and electrical torques on the rotor; Le.,'

To N - m (2.1) whereJ is the moment of inertia in kg.m2 of all rotating masses attached to the shaft, 8 is the mechanical angle of the shaft in radians with respect to a fixed reference, and T, is the accelerating torque in newton meters (N- m) acting on the shaft. (See Kimbark [ l ] for an excellent discussion of units and a dimensional analysis of this equation.) Since the machine is a generator, the driving torque T, is mechanical and the retarding or load torque T, is electrical. Thus we write
=

J8

T, = T, - T, N - m (2.2) which establishes a useful sign convention, namely, that in which a positive T, accelerates the shaft, whereas a positive T, is a decelerating torque. The angular reference may be chosen relative to a synchronously rotating reference frame moving with

I . The dot notation is used to signify derivatives with respect to time. Thus
x=-

dx d2x , x = dl ,etc. dr
13

.. -

14

Chapter 2

constant angular velocity wR,


0
=

(wRr

+ a) + 6,

rad

(2.3)

where a is a constant. The angle a is needed if 6, is measured from an axis different from the angular reference frame; for example, in Chapter 4 a particular choice of the 7r/2 + 6,. From (2.3) reference for the rotor angle 6, gives a = 1r/2 and 6 = W R f we see that 8may be replaced by&, in (2.l), with the result

J6,

Jk,

To N.m

(2.4)

where J is the moment of inertia in kg.m2, 6, is the mechanical (subscript r n ) torque angle in rad with respect to a synchronously rotating reference frame, w, is the shaft & angular velocity in rad/s, and is the accelerating torque in N. m. Another form of (2.4) that is sometimes useful is obtained by multiplying both sides the by urn, shaft angular velocity in rad/s. Recalling that the product of torque T and angular velocity w is the shaft power P in watts, we have

J w , ~ , = P, - P, W (2.5) The quantity Jw, is called the inertia constant and is denoted by M. (See Kimbark [ I ] pp. 22-27 and Stevenson [2], pp. 336-40 for excellent discussions of the inertia constant.) It is related to the kinetic energy of the rotating masses W , , where W, = (1 /2) J w i joules. Then M is computed as
Angular Momentum = M = J o , = 2 Wk/o, J-s
(2.6)

It may seem rather strange to call M a constant since it depends upon w , which certainly varies during a transient. On the other hand the angular frequency does not change by a large percentage before stability is lost. To illustrate: for 60 Hz,w, = 377 rad/s, and a 1% change in w, is equal to 3.77 rad/s. A constant slip of 1% of the value of w, for one second will change the angle of the rotor by 3.77 rad. Certainly, this would lead to loss of synchronism. The equation of motion of the rotor is called the swing equarion. It is given in the literature in the form of (2.4) or in terms of power,

Mi,

M, ;

P,

- P, w

(2.7)

where M is in J-s, 6, is in rad, w, is in rad/s, and P is in W. In relating the machine inertial performance to the network, it would be more useful to write (2.7) in terms of an electrical angle that can be conveniently related to the position of the rotor. Such an angle is the torque angle .6, which is the angle between the field MMF and the resultant MMF in the air gap, both rotating at synchronous speed. It is also the electrical angle between the generated EMF and the resultant stator voltage phasors. The torque angle 6, which is the same as the electrical angle 6,, is related to the rotor mechanical angle 6, (measured:from a synchronously rotating frame) by

6 = 6, = ( p / 2 ) 6 , wherep is the number of poles. (In Europe the practice is to write 6, the number of polepairs.)

(2.8)
= pb,,

where p is

WI

2. The subscript R is used to mean rated for all quantities including speed, which is designated as in ANSI standards ANSI Y 10.5. 1968. Hence W R = W I in every case.

The Elementary Mathematical Model

15

For simplicity we drop the subscript e and write simply 6, which is always understood to be the electrical angle defined by (2.8). From ( 2 . 7 )and (2.8) we write

(2Mlp);T'= ( 2 M / p ) k = Po

(2.9)

which relates the accelerating power to the electrical angle 6 and to the angular velocity of the revolving magnetic field w . In most problems of interest there will be a large number of equations like (2.9), one for each generator shaft (and motor shaft too if the motor is large enough to warrant detailed representation). In such large systems problems we find it convenient to normalize the power equations by dividing all equations by a common three-phase voltampere base quantity SB]. Then ( 2 . 9 )becomes a per unit (pu) equation

(2M/pSB])i= (ZM/pSB,)k

pa/sB3

pan

pu

(2.10)

where M ,p , 6, and w are in the same units as before; but P is now in pu (noted by the subscript u ) .
2.2
Units

It has been the practice in the United States to provide inertial data for rotating machines in English units. The machine nameplate usually gives the rated shaft speed in revolutions per minute (r/min). The form of the swing equation we use must be in M K S units (or pu) but the coefficients. particularly the moments of inertia, will usually be derived from a mixture of M K S and English quantities. We begin with the swing equation in N - m

(2J/p)$

(2J/p);

T, N - m

(2.1 I )

NOWnormalize this equation by dividing by a base quantity equal to the rated torque at rated speed:

TB =

SB~/W,R =

60S~3/2Tn~

(2.12)

where SB] is the three-phase V A rating and nR is the rated shaft speed in r/mind Dividing (2.1 I ) by (2.12) and substituting 120fR/nR furp, we compute

(J*2ni/900wRSB3)b

T,/TB

To, P U

(2.13)

where we have Substituted the base system radian frequency wR = 2 T f R for the base , frequency. Note that w in (2.13) is in rad/s and T is in pu. The U.S. practice has been to supply J , the moment of inertia, as a quantity usually called W R 2 ,given in units of Ibm.ft2. The consistent English unit for J is slug-ft' o r W R 2 / g where g is the acceleration of gravity (32.17398 ft/s2). We compute the corresponding M KS quantity as

Substituting into (2.13). we write

(2.14)
The coefficient of 6 can be clarified if we recall the definition of the kinetic energy
Of

16

Chapter 2

rotating body

wk, which we can write as

Then (2.14) may be written as

( ~ W ~ I S B ~ W Tau ) P R ~ U
We now define the important quantity

(2.15)

H2

wk/s,,

(2.16)

where Sg3= rated three-phase MVA of the system Wk = (2.311525 x IO-'O)(WR*)n~ MJ Then we write the swing equation in the form most useful in practice:

( 2 H / w ~ ) b= T , pu

(2.17)

where H is in s, w is in rad/s, and T is in pu. Note that w is the angular velocity of the revolving magnetic field and is thus related directly to the network voltages and currents. For this reason it is common to give the units of w as electrical rad/s. Note also that the final form of the swing equation has been adapted for machines with any number of poles, since all machines on the same system synchronize to the same w R . Another form of the swing equation, sometimes quoted in the literature, involves some approximation. It is particularly used with the classical model of the synchronous machine. Recognizing that the angular speed w is nearly constant, the pu accelerating power Pa is numerically nearly equal to the accelerating torque T,. A modified (and approximate) form of the swing equation becomes

( 2 H / w ~ ) bZ Pa !

PU

(2.18)

The quantity H is often given for a particular machine normalized to the base VA rating for that machine. This is convenient since these machine-normalized H quantities are usually predictable in size and can be estimated for machines that do not physically exist. Curves for estimating H are given in Figures 2.1 and 2.2. The quantities taken from these curves must be modified for use in system studies by converting from the machine base VA to the system base VA. Thus we compute
Hsys = Hmich (SB3mach /SB3sys)

(2.19)

The value of Hmaeh usually in the range of 1-5 s. Values for Hays is vary over a much wider range. With SB38ya = 100 M V A values of Hays from a few tenths of a second (for small generators) to 25-30 s (for large generators) will often be used in the same study. Typical values of J (in MJ) are given in Appendix D.

2.3 Mechanical Torque


The mechanical torques of the prime movers for large generators, both steam and waterwheel turbines, are functions of speed. (See Venikov [6], Sec. 1.3, and Crary [71, Vol. 11, Sec. 27.) However we should carefully distinguish between the case of the unregulated machine (not under active governor control) and the regulated (governed) case.

The Elementary Maihematical Model

17

i
0

I
100

I 200
(0 )

1 300

1
400 500

Generator Rating, MVA

'"C

4.0

3606 r/min

fossil

G e n a a b r Rating, MV A

(b)

Fig. 2. I

Inertia constants for large steam turbogenerators:(a) turbogenerators rated 500 M V A and below 13, p. 1201, (b) expected future large turbogenerators. (a IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Truns.. vol. PAS-90, Nov./Dec. 1971 .)

2.3.1

Unregulated machines

For a fixed gate or valve position (Le., when the machine is not under active governor control) the torque speed characteristic is nearly linear over a limited range at rated speed, as shown in Figure 2.3(a). No distinction seems to be made in the literature between steady-state and transient characteristics in this respect. Figure 2.3(a) shows that the prime-mover speed of a machine operating at a fixed gate or valve position will drop in response to an increase in load. The value of the turbine torque coefficient suggested by Crary [7] is equal to the loading of the machine in pu. This can be verified as follows. From .the fundamental relationship between the mechanical torque

4.5r

11

20

40

100 Genemtor Rating, MVA

60

80

120

140

Fig. 2.2

Inertia constants of large vertical-type waterwheel generators, including allowance of 15% for waterwheels. (o IEEE. Reprinted from E/ecrr Eng.. vol. 56, Feb. 1937).

18

Chapter

't

. L , *

WR

w d mds e ,
(b)

Fig. 2.3

Turbine torque speed characteristic: (a) unregulated machine. (b) regulated machine.

T, and power P, T,,, = P,/w N - m


we compute, using the definition of the differential,

(2.20)

(2.21)
Near rated load (2.2 1 ) becomes

dT,

(I/WR)dPm- (P,R/W:)dW N - m
=

(2.22) (2.23)

If we assume constant mechanical power input, dP,

0 and

dT, = - ( P m R / w : ) d w N.m
This equation is normalized by dividing through by TmR = P , , / u , with the result

dT, = -dw

PU

(2.24)

where all values are in pu. This relationship is shown in Figure 2.3(a).

2 3 2 Regulated machines .. In regulated machines the speed control mechanism is responsible for controlling the throttle valves to the steam turbine or the gate position in hydroturbines, and the

The Elementary Mathematical Model

19

mechanical torque is adjusted accordingly. This occurs under normal operating conditions and during disturbances. To be stable under normal conditions, the torque speed characteristic of the turbine speed control system should have a droop characteristic; Le., a drop in turbine speed should accompany an increase in load. Such a characteristic is shown in Figure 2.3(b). A typical droop or speed regulation characteristic is 5% in the United States(4x in Europe). This means that a load pickup from no load (power) to full load (power) would correspond to a speed drop of 5% if the speed load characteristic is assumed to be linear. The droop (regulation) equation is derived as follows: from Figure 2.3(b), T, = Tm0+ T m A , and T,A = - w A / R , where R is the regulation in rad/ N-mes. Thus

T,

T,,

- (w -

wR)/R N-m

(2.25)

Multiplying (2.25) by w R ,we can write

Let P,,,,, = pu mechanical power on machine VA base

or Since PmA = P,,, - Pm0,

P,A,

- w k w A , , / S B R = -wA,,/Ru PU Ru 9 S B R / W : PU

(2.28)

where the pu regulation Ru is derived from (2.28) or (2.29)


As previously mentioned, R , is usually set at 0.05 in the United States. We also note that the effective regulation in a power system could be appreciably different from the value 0.05 if some of the machines are not under active governor control. IfCSB the sum of the ratings of the machines under governor control, and is CS,,is the sum of the ratings of all machines, then the effective pu regulation is given by

RucR = R u ( C S B / C S , B )

(2.30)

Similarly, if a system base other than that of the machine is used in a stability study, the change in mechanical power in pu on the system base PmA,,, given by is
PmAsu

-(SBwAu/ssBRu) Pu

(2.31)

A block diagram representing (2.28) and (2.31) is shown in Figure 2.4 where

= SB/SSB

The droop characteristic shown in Figure 2.3(b) is obtained in the speed control system with the help of feedback. It will be shown in Part I11 that without feedback the speed control mechanism is unstable. Finally, we should point out that the steadystate regulation characteristic determines the ultimate contribution of each machine to a change in load in the power system and fixes the resulting system frequency error.

20

Chapter 2

K = S$S,a

Fig. 2.4 Block diagram representation of the droop equation.

During transients the discrepancy between the mechanical and electrical torques for the various machines results in speed changes. The speed control mechanism for each machine under active governor control will attempt to adjust its output according to its regulation characteristic. Two points can be made here: 1. For a particular machine the regulation characteristic for a small (and sudden) change in speed may be considerably different in magnitude from its overall average regulation. 2. In attempting to adjust the mechanical torque to correspond to the speed change, time lags are introduced by the various delays in the feedback elements of the speed control system and in the steam paths; therefore, the dynamic response of the turbine could be appreciably different from that indicated by the steady-state regulation characteristics. This subject will be dealt with in greater detail in Part 111.
2.4
Electrical Torque

In general, the electrical torque is produced by the interaction between the three
stator circuits, the field circuit, and other circuits such as the damper windings. Since the three stator circuits are connected to the rest of the system, the terminal voltage is determined in part by the external network, the other machines, and the loads. The flux linking each circuit in the machine depends upon the exciter output voltage, the loading of the magnetic circuit (saturation), and the current in the different windings. Whether the machine is operating at synchronous speed or asynchronously affects all the above factors. Thus a comprehensive discussion of the electrical torque depends upon the synchronous machine representation. If all the circuits of the machine are taken into account, discussion of the electrical torque can become rather involved. Such a detailed discussion will be deferred to Chapter 4. For the present we simply note that the electrical torque depends upon the flux linking the stator windings and the currents in these windings. If the instantaneous values of these flux linkages and currents are known, the correct instantaneous value of the electrical torque may be determined. As the rotor moves, the flux linking each stator winding changes since the inductances between that winding and the rotor circuits are functions of the rotor position. These flux linkage relations are often simplified by using Parks transformation. A modified form of Parks transformation will be used here (see Chapter 4). Under this transformation both currents and flux linkages (and hence voltages) are transformed into two fictitious windings located on axes that are 90 apart and fixed with respect to the rotor. One axis coincides with the center of the magnetic poles of the rotor and is called the direct axis. The other axis lies along the magnetic neutral axis and is called the quadrature axis. Expressions for the electrical quantities such as power and torque are developed in terms of the direct and quadrature axis voltages (or flux linkages) and currents.

The Elementary Mathematical Model

21

A simpler mathematical model, which may be used for stability studies, divides the electrical torque into two main components, the synchronous torque and a second component that includes all other electrical torques. We explore this concept briefly as an aid to understanding the generator behavior during transients.
2.4.1 Synchronous torque

The synchronous torque is the most important component of the electrical torque. It is produced by the interaction of the stator windings with the fundamental component of the air gap flux. It is dependent upon the machine terminal voltage, the rotor angle, the machine reactances, and the so-called quadrature axis EMF, which may be thought of as an effective rotor E M F that is dependent on the armature and rotor currents and is a function of the exciter response. Also, the network configuration affects the value of the terminal voltage.
2.4.2
Other electrical torques

During a transient, other extraneous electrical torques are developed in a synchronous machine. The most important component is associated with the damper windings. While these asynchronous torques are usually small in magnitude, their effect on stability may not be negligible. The most important effects are the following.
1. Positive-sequence damping results from the interaction between the positive-sequence air gap flux and the rotor windings, particularly the damper wihdings. In general, this effect is beneficial since it tends to reduce the magnitude of the machine oscillations, especially after the first swing. It is usually assumed to be proportional to the slip frequency, which is nearly the case for small slips. 2. Negative-sequence braking results from the interaction between the negative-sequence air gap flux during asymmetrical faults and the damper windings. Since the negative-sequence slip is 2 - s, the torque is always retarding to the rotor. Its magnitude is significant only when the rotor damper winding resistance is high. 3 . The dc braking is produced by the dc component of the armature current during faults. which induces currents in t h e rotor winding of fundamental frequency. Their interaction produces a torque that is always retarding to the rotor.

It should be emphasized that if the correct expression for the instantaneous electrical torque is used, all the above-mentioned components of the electrical torque will be included. In some studies approximate expressions for the torque are used, e.g., when considering quasi-steady-state conditions. Here we usually make an estimate of the components of the torque other than the synchronous torque.
2.5
Power-Angle Curve of Q Synchronous Machine

Before we leave the subject of electrical torque (or power), we return momentarily to synchronous power to discuss a simplified but very useful expression for the relation between the power output of the machine and the angle of its rotor. Consider two sources = V e and E = Ekconnected through a reactance x as shown in Figure 2.5(a).' Note that the source V i s chosen as the reference. A current
3. A phasor is indic_ated with a bar above the symbol for the rms quantity. For example if / is 'the rms value of the current, / is the current phasor. By dejnirion the phasor f is given by the transformation 6 where 7 /e9 = /(cos B + j sin e) = 6 [ v f / cos (,ut e)]. A phasor is q complex number related to the ? + corresponding time quantity i ( t ) by i ( t ) (Re (\/I le'"') = cos ( W I + 0) = 6 -'.(le'').

22

Chapter 2

't

(a)

Fig. 2.5 A simple two-machine system: (a) schematic representation, (b) power-angle curve.

IEf l ow s between the two sources. We can show that the power P i s given by

(EV/x)sin6

(2.32)

Since E, V , and x are constant, the relation between P and 6 is a sine curve, as shown in Figure 2.5(b). We note that the same power is delivered by the source E and received by the source since the network is purely reactive. Consider a round rotor machine connected to an infinite bus. At steady state the machine can be represented approximately by the above circuit if V is the terminal voltage of the machine, which is the infinite bus voltage; x is the direct axis synchronous reactance: and E is the machine excitation voltage, which is the E M F along the quadrature axis. We say approximately because such factors as magnetic circuit saturation and the difference between direct and quadrature axis reluctances are overlooked in this simple representation. But (2.32) is essentially correct for a round rotor machine at steady state. Equation (2.32) indicates that if E, V , and x are constant, EV/x is a , constant that we may designate as P to write P = P, sin 6; and the power output of the machine is a function only of the angle 6 associated with E. Note that E can be chosen to be any convenient EMF, not necessarily the excitation voltage; but then the appropriate x and 6 must be defined accordingly.
2.5.1
Classical representation of a synchronous machine in stability studies

The EMF of the machine (i.e., the voltage corresponding to the current in the main field winding) can be considered as having two components: a component E' that corresponds to the flux linking the main field winding and a component that counteracts the armature reaction. The latter can change instantaneously because it corresponds to currents, but the former (which corresponds to flux linkage) cannot change instantly.

The Elementary M a t h e m a t i c a l M o d e l

23

When a change in the network occurs suddenly, the flux linkage (and hence E') will not change, but currents will be produced in the armature; hence other currents will be induced in the various rotor circuits to keep this flux linkage constant. Both the armature and rotor currents will usually have ac and dc components as required to match the ampere-turns of various coupled coils. The flux will decay according to the effective time constant of the field circuit. At no load this time constant is o n the order of several seconds, while under load it is reduced considerably but still on the order of one second or higher. From the above we can see that for a period of less than a second the natural characteristic of the field winding of the synchronous machine tends to maintain constant flux linkage and hence constant E ' . Exciters of the conventional type do not usually respond fast enough and their ceilings are not high enough to appreciably alter .this picture. Furthermore, it has been observed that during a disturbance the combined effect of the armature reaction and the excitation system is to help maintain constant flux linkage for a period of a second or two. This period is often considered adequate for determining the stability of the machine. Thus in some stability studies the assumption is commonly made that the main field flux linkage of a machine is constant. The main field-winding flux is almost the same as a fictitious flux that would create an EMF behind the machine direct axis transient reactance. The model used for the synchronous machine is shown in Figure 2.6, where x; is the direct axis transient reactance.

~~

Fig. 2.6 Representation of a synchronous machine by a constant voltage behind transient reactance.

The constant voltage source E f i is determined from the initial conditions, Le., pretransient conditions. During the transient the magnitude E is held constant, while the angle 6 is considered as the angle between the rotor position and the terminal voltage V .

Example 2.1

For the circuit of Figure 2.6 let V operating at P = 0.8 pu at 0.8 PF.

1 .O pu, x;

0.2 pu, and the machine initially

Solution Using Vas reference, V

=
= =

I.O&
1.0/-36.9" = 0.8

&
E

- j0.6
- j0.6)

E@

1.0

+ j0.2(0.8
=

1.12

+ j0.16

1.1314/8.13"

The magnitude of E is 1.1314. This will be held constant during the transient, although 6 may vary. The initial value of 6, called 6 is 8.13". , ,

24

Chapter 2

During the transient period, assuming that Vis held constant, the machine power as a function of the angle 6 is also given by a power-angle curve. Thus P For theexamplegiven above P,
2.5.2
=

(EV/x;)sinb = P,sin6

(2.33)

1.1314/0.2

5.657.

Synchronizing power coefficients

Consider a synchronous machine the terminal voltage of which is constant. This is the case when the machine is connected to a very large power system (infinite bus). Let us assume that the machine can be represented by a constant voltage magnitude behind a constant reactance, as shown in Figure 2.6. The power is given by (2.32). Let the initial power delivered by the machine be Po, which corresponds to a rotor angle 6, (which is the same as the angle of the EMF E ) . Let us assume that 6 changes from its , initial value 6 by a small amount 6,; i.e., 6 = 6, + 6,. From (2.32) P also changes to P = Po + PA.Then we may write

Po + PA = P, sin (6,

+ 6,)

P,(sin bo COS 6,
1 and sin 6,

+ cos 6, sin 6,)


6,, or

(2.34)

If 6 is small then, approximately, cos 6, ,


and since Po
P, sin So,

Po + PAe P, sin 6 ,
=

+ (P,

COS

&)aA
(2.35)

PA

(P, cos 6,)6,

The quantity in parentheses in (2.35) is defined to be the synchronizing power coeficient and is sometimes designated p,,. From (2.35) we also observe that
A P,t = P,cos6, =

(2.36)

Equation (2.35) is sometimes written in one of the forms PA = P$i,


=

ap -6 , a6

(2.37)

(Compare this result with dP, the differential of P.) I n the above analysis the appropriate values of x and E should be used to obtain P,. In dynamic studies x; and the voltage E are used, while in steady-state stability analysis a saturated steady-state reactance x,, is used. If the control equipment of the machine is slow or inoperative, it is important that the machine be operating such that 0 I 6 5 7r/2 for the operating point to be stable in the static or steady-state sense. This is the same as having a positive synchronizing power coefficient. This criterion was used in the past to indicate the so-called steady-state stability limit.
2.6
Natural Frequencies of Oscillation of a Synchronous Machine

A synchronous machine, when perturbed, has several modes of oscillation with respect to the rest of the system. There are also cases where coherent groups of machines oscillate with respect to other coherent groups of machines. These oscillations cause fluctuations in bus voltages, system frequencies, and tie-line power flows. It is important that these oscillations should be small in magnitude and should be damped if the system is to be stable in the sense of the definition of stability given in Section 1.2. I .

The Elementary Mathematical Model

25

In this section we will illustrate the inherent oscillatory nature of a synchronous machine by the following example.
Example 2.2 A two-pole synchronous machine is connected to an infinite bus with voltage through a reactance x as in Figure 2.5(a). The voltage E remains constant, and a small

change in speed is given to the machine (the rotor is given a small twist); i.e., + r u ( t ) , where u ( t ) is a unit step function. Let the resulting angle change be aA. Let the damping be negligible. Compute the change in angle as a function of time and determine its frequency of oscillation.
w = wo

Solut ion

From (2.10) we write M8/SB3+ Pr = P,. But we let 6 = 6, + 6, such that $ = iA and P, = Pto + Ped; P,,, is constant. Then ~Uii'~/Ssj P r A = P, - Pro = 0 since io= 0. From (2.37) for small aA we write PrA = PSdA,where from (2.36) P, is the synchronizing power coefficient. Then the swing equation may be written as

/B s 3

Ps6A

0
c elect rad

which has the solution of the form

a,&)

6d3ssB3/M
sin

(2.38)

Equation (2.38) indicates that the angular frequency of oscillation of the synchronous machine with respect to the rest of the power system is given by d P s S , , / M . This frequency is usually referred to as the natural frequency.of the synchronous machine.
I t should be noted that P, is a function of the operating point on the power-angle characteristic. Different machines, especially different machine types, have different inertia constants. Therefore, the different machines in a power system may have somewhat different natural frequencies. We now estimate the order of magnitude of this frequency. From (2.6) and (2.16) we write MIS,, = 2 H / w , or P,,S,,/M = P,,w,/2H where P, is in pu, w, is in rad/s, and H is in s. Now P, is the synchronizing power coefficient in pu (on a base of the machine three-phase rating), I f the initial operating angle 6 is small, P, is approximately equal to the amplitude of the power-angle curve. We must also be careful with the units. For example, a system having P,/S,, = 2 pu, H = 8 ,
w,,
=

4 2 x 377)/(2 x 8 ) = 6.85 rad/s

f,,, =

6 . 8 5 / 2 ~= 1.09 HZ

If MKS units are used, we write


hsc =

( I /2*)

drf(p s / s B 3

H,

(2.39)

where f S,,
H

= =
= =

P,

system frequency in Hz three-phase machine rating in M V A inertia constant in s synchronizing power coefficient in MW/rad

Next, we should point out that a system of two finite machines can be reduced to a single equivalent finite machine against an infinite bus. The equivalent inertia is J l J 2 / ( J , + J 2 ) and the angle is al, -

26

Chapter 2

Thus we conclude that each machine oscillates with respect to other machines, each coherent group of machines oscillates with respect to other groups of machines, and so on. The frequencies of oscillations depend on the synchronizing power coefficients and on the inertia constants.
2.7
System of One Machine against an Infinite Bus-The Classical Model

A n infinite bus is a source of invariable frequency and voltage (both in magnitude and angle). A major bus of a power system of very large capacity compared to the rating of the machine under consideration is approximately an infinite bus. The inertia of the machines in a large system will make the bus voltage of many high-voltage buses essentially constant for transients occurring outside that system. Consider a power system consisting of one machine connected to an infinite bus through a transmission line. A schematic representation of this system is shown in Figure 2.7(a).

Fig.2.7

O n e m a c h i n e connected t o a n infinite (b) equivalent circuit.

bus

through a transmission line: (a) one-line diagram,

The equation of motion of the rotor of the finite machine is given by the swing equation (2.7) or (2.10). To obtain a time solution for the rotor angle, we need to develop expressions for the mechanical and the electrical powers. In this section the simplest mathematical model is used. This model, which will be referred to as the classical model, requires the following assumptions:
1. The mechanical power input remains constant during the period of the transient. 2. Damping or asynchronous power is negligible. 3. The synchronous machine can be represented (electrically) by a constant voltage source behind a transient reactance (see Section 2.5. I). 4. The mechanical angle of the synchronous machine rotor coincides with the electrical phase angle of the voltage behind transient reactance. 5 . If a local load is fed at the terminal voltage of the machine, it can be represented by a constant impedance (or admittance) to neutral.

The period of interest is the first swing of the rotor angle 6 and is usually on the order of one second or less. At the start of the transient, and assuming that the impact initiating the transient creates a positive accelerating power on the machine rotor, the rotor angle increases. If the rotor angle increases indefinitely, the machine loses synchronism and stability is lost. If it reaches a maximum and then starts to decrease, the resulting motion will be oscillatory and with constant amplitude. Thus according to this model and the assumptions used, stability is decided in the first swing. (If damping is present the amplitude will decrease with time, but in the classical model there is very little damping.)

The Elementary M a t h e m a t i c a l M o d e l

27

. ' 0
EA
0
Fig. 2.8 Equivalent circuit for a system o f one machine against an infinite bus.

The equivalent electrical circuit for the system is given in Figure 2.7(b). I n Figure 2.7 we define

V
=

V, V&)

= =

z, = z, =

x; =

terminal voltage of the synchronous machine voltage of the infinite bus, which is used as reference direct axis transient reactance of the machine series impedance of the transmission network (including transformers) equivalent shunt impedance at the machine terminal, including local loads if any

By using a Y-A transformation, the node representing the terminal voltage E in Figure 2.7 can be eliminated. The nodes to be retained (in addition to the reference node) are the internal voltage behind the transient reactance node and the infinite bus. These are shown in Figure 2.8 as nodes I and 2 respectively. Also shown in Figure 2.8 are the admittances obtained by the network reduction. Note that while three admittance elements are obtained (viz., y I 2 ,ylo,and y z o ) , y z o omitted since it is not needed is in the analysis. The two-port network of Figure 2.8 is conveniently described by the equation

The driving point admittance at node 1 is given by K l = Yil /811 = plz + jjlo where we use lower case y's to indicate actual admittances and capital Y's for matrix elements. The negative of the transfer admittance vlz between nodes I and 2 defines the admittance = matrix element ( I , 2) or F12 Y12/812 = -yi2. From elementary network theory we can show that the power at node 1 is given by PI = &eEi:or

P,
b

EZYl,co seII EVYl2cos(eI2 6) + =

Now define G I I = YII cosB,, and y

OI2 - H/2, then

Pi

E2Gll + EVYI2sin(6 - y ) = Pc

+ PMsin(6 - y)

(2.41)

The relation between PI and 6 in (2.41) is shown in Figure 2.9. Examining Figure 2.9, we note that the power-angle curve of a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus is a sine curve displaced from the origin vertically by an amount Pc, which represents the power dissipation in the equivalent network, and horizontally by the angle y, which is determined by the real component of the transfer admittance F2. In the special case where the shunt load at the machine terminal is open and where the transmission network is reactive, we can easily prove that Pc = 0 and y = 0. In this case the power-angle curve becomes identical to that given in (2.33).

28

Chapter 2

Fig. 2.9 Power output of a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus.

Example 2.3 A synchronous machine is connected to an infinite bus through a transformer and a double circuit transmission line, as shown in Figure 2.10. The infinite bus voltage V = 1.0 pu. The direct axis transient reactance of the machine is 0.20 pu, the transformer reactance is 0.10 pu, and the reactance of each of the transmission lines is 0.40 pu, all to a base of the rating of the synchronous machine. Initially, the machine is delivering 0.8 pu power with a terminal voltage of 1.05 pu. The inertia constant H = 5 MJ/MVA. All resistances are neglected. The equation of motion of the machine rotor is to be determined.

o== +=E
ELL
j T l 2 = l/j0.5 = -j2.0
YlO =

V = I . O L

Fig. 2.10 System of Example 2.3.

Solution The equivalent circuit of the system is shown in Figure 2.1 1. For this system:

0 Y12= j2.0

Y I I= -j2.0 e,1 = -a/2


*/2

eI2 =

therefore, Pc = 0 and y = 0. The electrical power is given by

P = PI ,

Pc

+ E V Y I 2sin (6

- y)

= EVY12 6 = 2Esin sin


=

Since the initial power is Pco= 0.8 pu, then E sin 6, ,

0.4.

Fig. 2.1 I

initial equivalent circuit of the system of Example 2.3.

The Elementary Mathematical Model

29

To find the initial conditions, we solve the network of Figure 2.1 1. We have the terminal condition

I.O/o

PU

V,

I.OSF, PU

P,

0.8

PU

To find the angle of

F, we write, since resistance is zero,

Pro = 0.8 = ( V V , / x )sin OrO = (1.05/0.30) Bf0 sin sinB,, = 0.8/3.5 = 0.2286 e,o = 13.21"
The current is found from
=

zi +

v,or

T = ( q - V ) / z = (l.O5/13.2l0 I.O,&l)/j0.3 (1.022 + j0.240 - I.OOO)/j0.3= 0.800 - j0.074 = 0.803/-5.29"


Then the internal machine voltage is

EE= l.05/13.21"+ (0.803/-5.29")(0.2/90")


=
=

1.022 + j0.240 + 0.0148 + j0.160 1.037 + j0.400 = 1.1 I 1 /21.09" pu

Thus E = 1.1 I I is a constant that will be unchanged during the transient, and the initial angel is 6o = 21.09" = 0.367 rad. We also may write

P,

(( 1.1 1 1 x 1.0)/0.50] sin 6 = 2.222sin 6

Then the swing equation is given by

or
-=

d26 dt2

377 -(0.8 - 2.222sin6)


1 0

rad/s2

From this simple example we observe that the resulting swing equation is nonlinear and will be difficult to solve except by numerical methods. We now extend the example to consider a fault on the system.
Example 2.4

Develop the equation of motion of the system of Figure 21 1 where a fault is applied . at the sending end (node 4) of the transmission line. For simplicity we will consider a three-phase fault that presents a balanced impedance of j . to neutral. The network 0l now is as shown in Figure 2.12,where admittances are used for convenience.

Solution
By Y-A transformation we compute

pI2= -j[(3.333 x 5)/18.333]= -j0.909


and since Y,, = is now
- J I 2 , then

K2 = j0.909. The electrical power output


=

of the machine

P,

(0.909 x 1.lII)sin6

1.010sin6

30

Chapter 2

4
Fig. 2. I2 Faulted network for Example 2.4 in terms of admittances.

From Example 2.3 the equation of motion of the rotor is

dt

37.7(0.8 - 1.OIOsin6) rad/s2


=

At the start of the transient sin 6o

0.36, and the initial rotor acceleration is given by


=

dtz

37.7[0.8 - (1.010 x 0.368)]

16.45 rad/s2

Now let us assume that after some time the circuit breaker at the sending end of the faulted line clears the fault by opening that line. The network now will have a series reactance ofj0.70 pu, and the new network (with fault cleared) will have a new value of transfer admittance, Tl2= j 1.429 pu. The new swing equation will be

d26 -= dt

37.7(0.8 - 1.587 sin 6) rad/s2

Example 2.5 Calculate the angle d as a function of time for the system of Examples 2.3 and 2.4. Assume that the fault is cleared in nine cycles (0.15 s ) . Solution The equations for 6 were obtained in Example 2.4 for the faulted network and for the system with the fault cleared. These equations are nonlinear; therefore, time solutions will be obtained by numerical methods. A partial survey of these methods is given in Appendix B. To illustrate the procedure used in numerical integration, the modified Euler method is used in this example. This method is outlined in Appendix B. First, the swing equation is replaced by the two first-order differential equations:

o(t)

- wR

& = (wR/2H)[Pm - P e ( f ) ]

(2.42)

The time domain is divided into increments called At. With the values of 6 and w and their derivatives known at some time t , an estimate is made of the values of these variables at the end of an interval of time A t , Le., at time t + At. These are called the predicted values of the variables and are based only on the values of 6 ( t ) , w ( t ) , and their derivatives. From the calculated values of 6 ( t + A t ) and w(t + At), values of the derivatives at t + A t are calculated. A corrected value of 6 ( t + A t ) and w(t + A t ) is obtained using the mean derivative over the interval. The process can be repeated until a desired precision is achieved. At the end of this repeated prediction and correction a final value of S(t + A t ) and w(t + A t ) is obtained. The process is then repeated for the next interval. The procedure is outlined in detail in Chapter IO of [8]. From Example 2.4 the initial value of 6 is sin-0.368, and the equation

The Elementary Mathematical M o d e l


n

31

I
0

II
0.2

0.4

0.6 0.8 Time, I

1.0

1.2

1 7

Fig. 2. I3

Angle-time curve for Example 2.5.

for w is given by
w =

37.7(0.800 - 1.010sin6) = 37.7(0.800 - 1.587sin6)

0 =( t < 0.15
t

2 0.15

The results of the numerical integration of the system equations, performed with the aid of a digital computer, are shown in Figure 2.13. The time solution is carried o u t for two successive peaks of the angle 6. The first peak of 48.2" is reached at t = 0.38 s, after which 6 is decreased until it reaches a minimum value of about 13.2" at t = 0.82 s, and the oscillation of the rotor angle 6 continues. For the system under study and for the given impact, synchronism is not lost (since the angle 6 does not increase indefinitely) and the synchronous machine is stable.

2.8

Equal Area Criterion

Consider the swing equation for a machine connected to an infinite bus derived previously in the form 2 - d26 -H - - P ,
WR

dt'

- P,

p* P U

(2.43)

where Pa is the accelerating power. From (2.43)

d'6 -=
dt2

wR

2H

(2.44)
p a

32

Chapter 2

Multiplying each side by 2 ( d s / d t ) ,


(2.45)

(2.46) (2.47)

Integrating both sides,


(2.48)

or

d6 -= dt

66
Padb

Pad6)'"

(2.49)

Equation (2.49) gives the relative speed of the machine with respect to a reference frame moving at constant speed (by the definition of the angle 6 ) . For stability this speed must be zero when the acceleration is either zero or is opposing the rotor motion. , Thus for a rotor that is accelerating, the condition of stability is that a value ,,a exists such that Pa(&,,,,) 5 0, and
=

(2.50)

If the accelerating power is plotted as a function of 6, equation (2.50) can be inter, ,. preted as the area under that curve between & and &, This is shown in Fig-

pa

Pa (t = O+)

b)
Fig. 2.14 Equal area criteria: (a) for stability for a stable system, (b) for an unstable system

The Elementary Mathematical Model

33

ure 2.14(a) where the net area under the Pa versus 6 curve adds to zero at the angle since the two areas A I and A , are equal and opposite. Also at,,,a the accelerating power, and hence the rotor acceleration, is negative. Therefore, the system is stable and 6,,, is the maximum rotor angle reached during the swing. I f the accelerating power reverses sign before the two areas A , and A, are equal, synchronism is lost. This situation is shown in Figure 2.14(b). The area A , is smaller than A , , and as 6 increases beyond the value where Pa reverses sign again, the area A, is added to A , . The limit of stability occurs when the angle 6,,, is such that = 0 and the areas A , and A , are equal. For this case,,a , coincides with the angle 6 on the power-angle curve with the fault cleared such that P = P , and , 6 > */2. Note that the accelerating power need not be plotted as a function of 6. We can obtain the same information if the electrical and mechanical powers are plotted as a function of 6. The former is the power-angle curve discussed in Section 2.7, and in many studies P, is a constant. The accelerating power curve could have discontinuities due to switching of the network, initiation of faults, and the like.
2.8.1 Critical clearing angle

For a system of one machine connected to an infinite bus and for a given fault and switching arrangement, the critical clearing angle is that switching angle for which the system is at the edge of instability (we will also show that this applies to any twomachine system). The maximum angle b,,, corresponds to the angle 6, on the faultcleared power-angle curve. Conditions for critical clearing are now obtained (see [ I ] and [2]). Let

P M = peak of the prefault power-angle curve r, = ratio of the peak of the power-angle curve of the faulted network to PM r, = ratio of the peak of the power-angle curve of the network with the fault cleared to PM 6, = sin-' P,/P, < */2 6, = sin-' P,/r2PM > */2
= A,

Then for A ,

and for critical clearing.

6, = cOs-'{[1/(r2 - rl)I[(Pm/PM)(& - 80)

+ r2cOs8,

- r1cosbOl)

(2.51)

Note that the corresponding clearing time must be obtained from a time solution of the swing equation.
2.8.2 Application to a one-machine system

The equal area criterion is applied to the power network of Examples 2.4-2.5, and the results are shown in Figure 2.15. The stable system of Examples 2.4-2.5 is illustrated in Figure 2.15. The angle at t = 0 is 21.09" and is indicated by the intersection of P, with the prefault curve. The clearing angle 6, is obtained from the time solution (see Figure 2.13) and is about 31.6". The conditions for A, = A , correspond to ,,,a z 48". This corresponds to the maximum angle obtained in the time solution z shown in Figure 2.13. To illustrate the critical clearing angle, a more severe fault is used with the same system and switching arrangement. A three-phase fault is applied to the same bus with zero impedance. The faulted power-angle curve has zero amplitude. The prefault and

34

Chapter 2

Fig. 2.15 Application of the equal area criterion to a stable system.

postfault networks are the same as before. For this system

r, r,

0 1.58712.222 = 0.714
6,

6 ,

= =

a, ,

21.09" 149.73"

Calculation of the critical clearing angle, using (2.5I ) , gives


=

~ 0 ~ - ' 0 . 2 6 8 4= 74.43" 8

This situation is illustrated in Figure 2.16.

' A

Fig. 2.16 Application of the equal area criterion to a critically cleared system.

The Elementary Mathematical Model

35

2.8.3 Equal area criterion for a two-machine system


It can be shown that the equal area criterion applies to any two-machine system since a two-machine system can be reduced to an equivalent system of one machine connected to an infinite bus (see Problem 2.14). We can show that the expression for the equal area criterion in this case is given by (2.52) where a,, = 6, - 6,. I n the special case where the resistance is neglected, (2.52) becomes

- J b 1 2 P,,dSI2= I
Ho
6120

where
2.9

H,

H IH 2 / ( H , + H 2 ) .

Classical Model of a Multimachine System

The same assumptions used for a system of one machine connected to an infinite bus are often assumed valid for a multimachine system:

I . Mechanical power input is constant. 2. Damping or asynchronous power is negligible. 3. Constant-voltage-behind-transient-reactance model for the synchronous machines is valid. 4. The mechanical rotor angle of a machine coincides with the angle of the voltage behind the transient reactance. 5. Loads are represented by passive impedances.
This model is useful for stability analysis but is limited to the study of transients for only the first swing or for periods on the order of one second. Assumption 2 is improved upon somewhat by assuming a linear damping characteristic. A damping torque (or power) Dw is frequently added to the inertial torque (or power) in the swing equation. The damping coefficient D includes the various damping torque components, both mechanical and electrical. Values of the damping coefficient usually used in stability studies are in the range of 1-3 pu [9, IO, 1 I , 121. This represents turbine damping, generator electrical damping, and the damping effect of electrical loads. However, much larger damping coefficients, up to 25 pu, are reported in the literature due to generator damping alone [7, 131. Assumption 5 , suggesting load representation by a constant impedance, is made for convenience in many classical studies. Loads have their own dynamic behavior. which is usually not precisely known and varies from constant impedance to constant MVA. This is a subject of considerable speculation, the major point of agreement being that constant impedance is an inadequate representation. Load representation can have a marked effect on stability results. The electrical network obtained for an n-machine system is as shown in Figure 2.17. Node 0 is the reference node (neutral). Nodes 1,2, . . . ,n are the internal machine buses, or the buses to which the voltages behind transient reactances are applied. Passive impedances connect the various nodes and connect the nodes to the reference at load . . . , E , are debuses. As in the one-machine system, the initial values of E,, termined from the pretransient conditions. Thus a load-flow study for pretransient

36

Chapter 2

n -machine system

n generators

- 1
Transmission system
r constunt impedance loads

.
r

.+ .
0

L--

I I

n d n

+jx'

-' I
Fig. 2. I 7

Node. 0

Representation of a multimachine system (classical model).

conditions is needed. The magnitudes E,., i = I , 2... . , n are held constant during the transient in classical stability studies. The passive electrical network described above has n nodes with active sources. The admittance matrix of the n-port network, looking into the network from the terminals of the generators, is defined by

where y has the diagonal elements

I=VE

(2.53)

E,.and the off-diagonal elements qj.By definition,

Y ,

yii = yi,
= =

driving point admittance for node i G, + j B,, Y i i b = negative of the transfer admittance between nodes i and j
=

G,

+ j B,

(2.54)

The power into the network at node i, which is the electrical power output of machine i , is given by = (Re.!?,.p

e.

P,,. E ~ G , + = ,

C E , E,~ ~ ~ co s(o , 13, + 1 3 ~ ) j- I j#i

i = 1 , 2 ,..., n

EfG,, +

EiEj(B,sin(6,
j- I j#i

13,)

+ GVcos(bi- aj)]

1,2,

...,n

(2.55)

The Elementary Mathematical Model

37

The equations of motion are then given by

2Hi dwi -wR di


j#i

E , E ~ K ~ C O S ( 6,, + - ~
i
=

aj)

l , 2 , ...,n
=

(2.56)

I t should be noted that prior to the disturbance ( t


n

0-) Pmio P, = ,
Si,

Pmio= E: G,,

,E, Yijocos (eijo j- I j#i

+ ),a

(2.57)

The subscript 0 is used to indicate the pretransient conditions. This applies to all machine rotor angles and also to the network parameters, since the network changes due to switching during the fault. The set of equations (2.56) is a set of n-coupled nonlinear second-order differential equations. These can be written in the form
x = f(x,xo,t)

(2.58)

where x is a vector of dimension (2n x I ) , and f is a set of nonlinear functions of the elements of the state vector x.
2.10

Classical Stability Study of a Nine-bus System

The classical model of a synchronous machine may be used to study the stability of a power system for a period of time during which the system dynamic response is dependent largely on the stored kinetic energy in the rotating masses. For many power systems this time is on the order of one second or less. The classical model is the simplest model used in studies of power system dynamics and requires a minimum amount of data; hence, such studies can be conducted in a relatively short time and at minimum cost. Furthermore, these studies can provide useful information. For example, they may be used as preliminary studies to identify problem areas that require further study with more detailed modeling. Thus a large number of cases for which the system exhibits a definitely stable dynamic response to the disturbances under study are eliminated from further consideration. A classical study will be presented here on a small nine-bus power system that has three generators and three loads. A one-line impedance diagram for the system is given in Figure 2.18. The prefault normal load-flow solution is given in Figure 2.19. Generator data for the three machines are given in Table 2.1. This system, while small, is large enough to be nontrivial and thus permits the illustration of a number of stability concepts and results.
2.10.1
Data preparation

In the performance of a transient stability study, the following data are needed:
I . A load-flow study of the pretransient network to determine the mechanical power P,,, of the generators and to calculate the values of Ei&for all the generators. The equivalent impedances of the loads are obtained from the load bus data.

38

Chapter 2

18 kV

230 kV
0.0085 ij0.072 v 2 = j0.0745

23OkV 0.0119 + jO.1008

13.8 kV

s/2 = j0.1645
L

II

:s
h d A

2s

3 @
$ 8
0,

+ ?
11

56
230 kV

7 % LaadB

OS

" 2
16.5 k -V-@

Fig. 2.18 Nine-bus system impedance diagram: all impedances are in pu on a 100-MVAbase.

18kV

230kV

(35.0)-Load C
-75.9 -24.1 (-10.7) (-24.3)

100.0

13.8 kV 230 kV 24.2 -850 $85.01 (3.0) (15.0)$ I

85.0

(-10.9)

1.026

/4.70

1.025

13.70? ?

.
U
Y

1.032

m1.013

Fig. 2.19 Nine-bus system load-flow diagram showing prefault conditions; all flows are in M W and MVAR.

The Elementary Mathematical Model


Table 2.1.
Generator Rated M V A kV Power factor Type Speed
xd

39

Generator Data

247.5 16.5
1 .o

192.0 18.0 0.85


steam

128.0 13.8 0.85


steam

x;

4I X

xt(leakage)
140

Stored energy at rated speed

710

hydro 180 r/min 0.1460 0.0608 0.0969 0.0969 0.0336 8.96 0

3600 r/min 0.8958 0 1198 . 0.8645 0. I969 0.0521 6.00 0.535 640 M W - s

3600 r/min 1.3125 0.1813 1.2578 0.25 0.0742 5.89 0.600

2364 M W - s

31 MW-S 0

Note: Reactance values are in pu on a 100-MVA base. All time constants are in s. (Several quantities are tabulated that are as yet undefined in this book. These quantities are derived and justified in Chapter 4 but are given here to provide complete data for the sample system.)

2. System data as follows: a. The inertia constant H and direct axis transient reactance x j for all generators. b. Transmission network impedances for the initial network conditions and the subsequent switchings such as fault clearing and breaker reclosings. 3. The type and location of disturbance, time of switchings, and the maximum time for which a solution is to be obtained.
2.10.2
Preliminary calculations

To prepare the system data for a stability study, the following preliminary calculations are made:
1. All system data are converted to a common base; a system base of 100 M V A is

frequently used. 2. The loads are converted to equivalent impedances or admittances. The needed data for this step are obtained from the load-flow study. Thus if a certain load bus has a voltage F, power P,, reactive power Q,, and current & flowing into a load admittance FL = G, + jSL, then
P,

+ jQ,

v,@
YL

= V L ( C ( G L-

- -

jf?,)] = VZ(G, - jS,)

The equivalent shunt admittance at that bus is given by


=

PL/VZ

- j(QL/W

(2.60)

3. The internal voltages of the generators E,,& are calculated from the load-flow data. These internal angles may be computed from the pretransient terminal voltages V k as follows. Let the terminal voltage be used temporarily as a reference, as shown in Figure 2.20. If we define 7 = I, + jI,, then from the relation P + j Q = we have I, + jI, = ( P - jQ)/V. But since E E = jxjK we compute

r+

vr*

E@'

(V

+ Qxj/V) + j ( P x i / V )

(2.61)

The initial generator angle So is then obtained by adding the pretransient voltage

40

Chapter 2

+
E&

Fig. 2.20 Generator representation for computing 60.

angle CY to d', or
6 = 6' ,
4. The

+ ff

(2.62)

V matrix for each network condition is calculated. The following steps are usually needed: a . The equivalent load impedances (or admittances) are connected between the load buses and the reference node; additional nodes are provided for the internal generator voltages (nodes 1, 2, . . . , n in Figure 2.17) and the appropriate values of x i are connected between these nodes and the generator terminal nodes. Also, simulation of the fault impedance is added as required, and the admittance matrix is determined for each switching condition. b. All impedance elements are converted to admittances. c. Elements of the matrix are identified as follows: ITi is the sum of all the adis the negative of the admittance between mittances connected to node i, and node i and node j. 5 . Finally, we eliminate all the nodes except for the internal generator nodes and obtain the k matrix for the reduced network. The reduction can be achieved by matrix operation if we recall that all the nodes have zero injection currents except for the internal generator nodes. This property is used to obtain the network reduction as shown below.

xj

Let

I
where
1

YV

(2.63)

I;[
(2.64)

Now the matrices Y and V are partitioned accordingly to get

where the subscript n is used to denote generator nodes and the subscript r is used for the remaining nodes. Thus for the network in Figure 2.17, V, has the dimension (n x 1) and V, has the dimension ( r x 1). Expanding (2.64),

I, = Y,,V,

+ Y,,V,

Y,V,

+ Y,V,

The Elementary Mathematical Model

41

from which we eliminate V, to find


I n = (Ynn - YnrY;'Yrn)Vn

(2.65)

The matrix (Ynm Y,, Y;' Y,n) is the desired reduced matrix Y. It has the dimensions (n x n) where n is the number of the generators. The network reduction illustrated by (2.63)-(2.65) is a convenient analytical technique that can be used only when the loads are treated as constant impedances. If the loads are not considered to be constant impedances, the identity of the load buses must be retained. Network reduction can be applied only to those nodes that have zero injection current.
Example 2.6

The technique of solving a classical transient stability problem is illustrated by conducting a study of the nine-bus system, the data for which is given in Figures 2.18 and 2.19 and Table 2.1. The disturbance initiating the transient is a three-phase fault occurring near bus 7 at the end of line 5-7. The fault is cleared in five cycles (0.083 s) by opening line 5-7. For the purpose of this study the generators are to be represented by the classical model and the loads by constant impedances. The damping torques are neglected. The system base is 100 M V A . Make all the preliminary calculations needed for a transient stability study so that all coefficients in (2.56) are known. Solution The objective of the study is to obtain time solutions for the rotor angles of the generators after the transient is introduced. These time solutions are called "swing curves." In the classical model the angles of the generator internal voltages behind transient reactances are assumed to correspond to the rotor angles. Therefore, mathematically, we are to obtain a solution for the set of equations (2.56). The initial conditions, denoted by adding the subscript 0, are given by & = 0 and 6, obtained from (2.57). , Preliminary calculations (following the steps outlined in Section 2.10.2) are: The system base is chosen to be 100 M V A . All impedance data are given to this base. The equivalent shunt admittances for the loads are given in pu as load A: j j L s = 1.2610 - j0.5044 load B: pL6= 0.8777 - j0.2926 load C: pLB = 0.9690 - j0.3391 The generator internal voltages and their initial angles are given in pu by

E l k o = 1.0566/2.2717" E2& = 1.0502/19.7315" E3/6,, = l.O170/13.1752"


The matrix is obtained as outlined in Section 2.10.2, step 4. For convenience bus numbers I , 2, and 3 are used to denote the generator internal buses rather than the generator low-voltage terminal buses. Values for the generator x i are added to the reactance of the generator transformers. For example, for generator 2 bus 2 will be the internal bus for the voltage behind transient reactance; the reactance between

42
Table 2.2.

Chapter 2

Prefault Network
impedance Admittance

Bus no.

X
0.1 184

Generators* No. 1 No. 2 No. 3


Transmission lines

1-4 2-7 3-9 4-5 4-6 5-7 6-9 7-8 8-9

0 0 0
0.0100 0.0 170

0.1823 0.2399 0.0850 0.0920 0.1610 0. I700 0.0720 0.1008

0 0 0

-8.4459 -5.4855 -4.1684

0.0320 0.0390 0.0085 0.01 19

1.3652 I .9422 1.1876 I .2820 1.6171 1.1551 1.2610 0.8777 0.9690

- I I .604 I - 10.5107
-5.9751 -5.5882 - 13.6980 -9.7843 -0.2634 -0.0346 -0.1601 0.1670 0.2275 0.2835

S h u n t admittancest

Load A
Load B Load C

5-0 6-0 8-0 4-0 7-0


9-0
~ ~~

*For each generator the transformer reactance is added to the generator x i . tThe line shunt susceptances are added to the loads.

bus 2 and bus 7 is the sum of the generator and transformer reactances (0.1 198 + 0.0625). The prefault network admittances including the load equivalents are given in Table 2.2, and the corresponding k matrix is given in Table 2.3. The P matrix for the faulted network and for the network with the fault cleared are similarly obtained. The results are shown in Tables 2.4 and 2.5 respectively. 5. Elimination of the network nodes other than the generator internal nodes by network reduction as outlined in step 5 is done by digital computer. The resulting reduced Y matrices are shown in Table 2.6 for the prefault network, the faulted network, and the network with the fault cleared respectively. We now have the values of the constant voltages behind transient reactances for all three generators and the reduced Y matrix for each network. Thus all coefficients of (2.56) are available.

Example 2.7 For the system and the transient of Example 2.6 calculate the rotor angles versus time. The fault is cleared in five cycles by opening line 5-7 of Figure 2.18. Plot the angles a,, a2, and 4 and their difference versus time.
S o ht ion

The problem is to solve the set of equations (2.56) for n = 3 and D = 0. All the coefficients for the faulted network and the network with the fault cleared have been determined in Example 2.6. Since the set (2.56) is nonlinear, the desired time solutions for 6,, 6,. and ti3 are obtained by numerical integration. A brief survey of numerical integration of differential equations is given in Appendix B. (For hand calculations see [ I ] for an excellent discussion of a numerical integration method of the swing equa-

Table 2.3. Y Matrix of Prefault Network


5

6 j5.4855

8
9

0.3937 1.6041 0.5107

- 1.3652 + j I I ,604I 3.8138 -j17.8426 - I . 1876 + j5.975 I - 1.2820 + j5.5882


2.8047 - j24.9311 - 1.6171 + j13.6980 -1.6171 +j13.6980 3.7412 - j23.6424 -1.1551 + j9.7843 4.1019

- 1.9422 + j 10.5 107 - j16.1335


-1.1876

j4.1684

+ j5.9751

- I .2820 + j5.5882
-1.1551 + j9.7843 2.4371 - j19.2574

Table 2.4. Y Matrix of Faulted Network


5

0.3937 1.6041 0.5107 4.1019

- 1.3652 + jl1.6041 3.8138-j17.8426

- 1.9422 + j10.5107

j4. I684

- j16.1335
3.7412 - j23.6424 -1.1551 + j9.7843

- I .2820 + j5.5882

- I .2820 + j5.5882
Table 2.5. Y Matrix of Network with Fault Cleared
5

- 1.1551 + j9.7843 2.4371 - j19.2574

7 j5.4855

9 -1.3652 + jl1.6041 2.6262 - j I I .8675 -1.9422 4.1019

30.3937 1.6041 10.5107

+ jl0.5107
- jl6.1335
- I .2820 + j5.5882
1.6171 - j18.9559 -1.6171 + j13.6980 -1.6171 + j13.6980 3.7412 - j23.6424 -1.1551 +j9.7843

j4. I684

- 1.2820 + j5.5882
- 1.1551 + j9.7843 2.4371 - j19.2574

44

Chapter 2

Table 2.6.
Type of network

Reduced Y Matrices
I

Node

Prefault Faulted Fault cleared

2 3
I 2

3
1

0.846 - j2.988 0.287 + j1.513 0.210 + j1.226 0.657 - j3.816 0.000 + jO.000 0.070 + j0.631 1.181 - j2.229 0.138 + j0.726 0.191 + j1.079

0.287 + j1.513 0.420 - j2.724 0.213 + j1.088 O.OO0 + jO.000 0.000 - j5.486 0.000 + jO.000 0.138 + j0.726 0.389 - j1.953 0.199 + j1.229

0.2 10

+ j I .226 0.213 + jl.088 0.277 - j2.368 0.070 + j0.631 0.000 + jO.000 0.174 - j2.796 0.191 + j1.079 0.199 + j1.229 0.273 - j2.342

tion. Also see Chapter IO of [8] for a more detailed discussion of several numerical schemes for solving the swing equation.) The so-called transient stability digital computer programs available at many computer centers include subroutines for solving nonlinear differential equations. Discussion of these programs is beyond the scope of this book. Numerical integration of the swing equations for the three-generator, nine-bus system is made by digital computer for 2.0 s of simulated real time. Figure 2.21 shows the rotor angles of the three machines. A plot ofd,, = 6, - 6, and b,, = 6, - 6, is shown

cycln
I

0.5

1 .o
TIrne, I

1
2.0

1.5

Fig. 2.21

Plot of 61,62,and 63 versus time.

The Elementary Mathematical Model

45

20
I

40
0.5

60
cyclr
I

eo
I

100

120

1
0

I
2.0

1 .o nm4

1.5

Fig. 2.22

Plot of 6 differences versus time.

in Figure 2.22 where we can see that the system is stable. The maximum angle difference is about 8 5 . This is the value of 6 , at t = 0.43 s. Note that the solution is carried , out for two swings to show that the second swing is not greater than the first for or &,. To determine whether the system is stable or unstable for the pareither ticular transient under study, it is sufficient to carry out the time solution for one swing only. If the rotor angles (or the angle differences) reach maximum values and then decrease, the system is stable.. If any of the angle differences increase indefinitely, the system is unstable because at least one machine will lose synchronism.
2.1 1
Shortcomings of the Classical Model

System stability depends on the characteristics of all the components of the power system. This includes the response characteristics of the control equipment on the turbogenerators, on the dynamic characteristics of the loads, on the supplementary control equipment installed, and on the type and settings of protective equipment used. The machine dynamic response to any impact in the system is oscillatory. In the past the sizes of the power systems involved were such that the period of these oscillations was not much greater than one second. Furthermore, the equipment used for excitation controls was relatively slow and simple. Thus the classical model was adequate. Today large system interconnections with the greater system inertias and relatively weaker ties result in longer periods of oscillations during transients. Generator control systems, particularly modern excitation systems, are extremely fast. It is therefore

46

Chapter 2

questionable whether the effect of the control equipment can be neglected during these longer periods. Indeed there have been recorded transients caused by large impacts, resulting in loss of synchronism after the system machines had undergone several oscillations. Another aspect is the dynamic instability problem, where growing oscillations have occurred on tie lines connecting different power pools or systems. As this situation has developed, it has also become increasingly important to ensure the security of the bulk power supply. This has made many engineers realize it is time to reexamine the assumptions made in stability studies. This view is well stated by Ray and Shipley [ 14): We have reached a time when it is appropriate that we appraise the state of the Art of Dynamic Stability Analysis. In conjunction with this we must:
1. Expand our knowledge of the characteristictime response of our system loads to changes in

voltage and frequency-develop new dynamic models of system loads. 2. Re-examine old concepts and develop new ideas on changes in system networks to improve system stability. 3. Update our knowledge of the response characteristics of the various components of energy systems and their controls (boilers, reactors, turbine governors, generator regulators, field excitation, etc.) 4. Reformulate our analytical techniques to adequately simulate the time variation of all of the foregoing factors in system response and accurately determine dynamic system response. Let us now make a critical appraisal of some of the assumptions made in the classical model:
1. Transient stability is decided in thefirst swing. A large system having many machines will have numerous natural frequencies of oscillations. The capacities of most of the tie lines are comparatively small, with the result that some of these frequencies are quite low (frequencies of periods in the order of 5-6 s are not uncommon). It is quite possible that the worst swing may occur at an instant in time when the peaks of some of these nodes coincide. It is therefore necessary in many cases to study the transient for a period longer than one second. 2 . Constant generator mainfield-windingflux linkage. This assumption is suspect on two counts, the longer period that must now be considered and the speed of many modern voltage regulators. The longer period, which may be comparable to the field-winding time constant, means that the change in the main field-winding flux may be appreciable and should be accounted for so that a correct representation of the system voltage is realized. Furthermore, the voltage regulator response could have a significant effect on the field-winding flux. We conclude from this discussion that the constant voltage behind transient reactance could be very inaccurate. 3. Negfecting the damping powers. A large system will have relatively weak ties. In the spring-mass analogy used above, this is a rather poorly damped system. It is important to account for the various components of the system damping to obtain a correct model that will accurately predict its dynamic performance, especially in loss of generation studies [8]. 4. Constant mechanical power. If periods on the order of a few seconds or greater are of interest, it is unrealistic to assume that the mechanical power will not change. The turbine-governor characteristics, and perhaps boiler characteristics should be included in the analysis. 5 . Representing loads by constant passive impedance. Let us illustrate in a qualitative manner the effect of such representation. Consider a bus having a voltage Y to which a load PL j Q L is connected. Let the load be represented by the static ad-

The Elementary Mathematical Model

47

Fig. 2.23 A load represented by passive admittance.

mittances CL = P L / V 2 and B L = Q L / V as shown in Figure 2.23. During a transient the voltage magnitude V and the frequency will change. In the model used in Figure 2.17 the change in voltage is reflected in the power and reactive power of the load, while the change in the bus frequency is not reflected at all in the load power. In other words, this model assumes PL m V z , QL= V 2 ,and that both are frequency independent. This assumption is often on the pessimistic side. (There are situations, however, where this assumption can lead to optimistic results. This discussion is intended to illustrate the errors implied.) To illustrate this, let us assume that the transient has been initiated by a fault in the transmission network. Initially, a fault causes a reduction of the output power of most of the synchronous generators. Some excess generation results, causing the machines to accelerate, and the area frequency tends to increase. At the same time, a transmission network fault usually causes a reduction of the bus voltages near the fault location. In the passive impedance model the load power decreases considerably (since PL a V2),and the increase in frequency does not cause an increase in load power. In real systems the decrease in power is not likely to be proportional to Y 2 but rather less than this. A n increase in system frequency will result in an increase in the load power. Thus the model used gives a load power lower than expected during the fault and higher than normal after fault removal. From the foregoing discussion we conclude that the classical model is inadequate for system representation beyond the first swing. Since the first swing is largely an inertial response to a given accelerating torque, the classical model does provide useful information as to system response during this brief period.
2.1 2 Block Diagram of One Machine

Block diagrams are useful for helping the control engineer visualize a problem. We will be considering the control system for synchronous generators and will do so by analyzing each control function in turn. It may be helpful to present a general block diagram of the entire system without worrying about mathematical details as to what makes up the various blocks. Then as we proceed to analyze each system, we can fill in the blocks with the appropriate equations or transfer functions. Such a block diagram is shown in Figure 2.24 [ 15). The basic equation of the dynamic system of Figure 2.24 is (2.18); i.e.,
TjW

P, - P,

Pa pu

(2.66)

where has been replaced by G, and J has been replaced by a time constant rj, the numerical value of which depends on the rotating inertia and the system of units. Three separate control systems are associated with the generator of Figure 2.24. The first is the excitation system that controls the terminal voltage. Note that the excitation system also plays an important role in the machines mechanical oscillations, since it affects the electrical power, P,. The second control system is the speed control or governor that monitors the shaft speed and controls the mechanical power P,.

48

Chapter 2

Fig. 2.24 Block diagram of a synchronous generator control system.

Finally, in an interconnected system there is a master controller for each system. This to sends a unit dispatch signal (UDS) each generator and adjusts this signal to meet the load demand or the scheduled tie-line power. It is designed to be quite slow so that it is usually not involved in a consideration of mechanical dynamics of the shaft. Thus in most of our work we can consider the speed reference or governor speed changer (GSC) position to be a constant. In an isolated system the speed reference is the desired system speed and is set mechanically in the governor mechanism, as will be shown later. In addition to the three control systems, three transfer functions are of vital importance. The first of these is the generator transfer function. The generator equations are nonlinear and the transfer function is a linearized approximation of the behavior of the generator terminal voltage C: near a quiescent operating point or equilibrium state. The load equations are also nonlinear and reflect changes in the electrical output quantities due to changes in terminal voltage ?. Finally, the energy source equations are a description of the boiler and steam turbine or of the penstock and hydraulic turbine behavior as the governor output calls for changes in the energy input. These equations are very nonlinear and have several long time constants. To visualize the stability problem in terms of Figure 2.24, we recognize immediately that the shaft speed w must be accurately controlled since this machine must operate at precisely the same frequency as all others in the system. If a sudden change in w occurs, we have two ways of providing controlled responses to this change. One is through the governor that controls the mechanical power P,,,. but does so through some rather long time constants. A second controlled response acts through the excitation system to control the electrical power P,. Time delays are involved here too, but they are smaller than those in the governor loop. Hence much effort has been devoted to refinements in excitation control.

Problems
2. I
2.2

Analyze (2. I ) dimensionally using a mass, length, time system and specify the units of each
quantity (see Kimbark [I]). A rotating shaft has zero retarding torque T, = 0 and is supplied a constant full load accelerating torque; Le., T,,, = TFL. Let r, be the accelerating time constant, Le., the time required to accelerate the machine from rest to rated speed wR. Solve the swing equation to find r, in terms of the moment of inertia J , wR, and TFL. Then show that r, can also be related to H , the pu inertia constant.

The Elementary Mathematical Model

49

2.3 2.4

Solve the swing equation to find the time to reach full load speed wR starting from any initial speed uo with constant accelerating torque as in Problem 2.2. Relate this time to rr and the slip at speed u , . Write the equation of motion of the shaft for the following systems: (a) An electric generator driven by a dc motor, where in the region of interest the generator torque is proportional to the shaft angle and the motor torque decreases linearly with increased speed. (b) An electric motor driving a fan, where in the region of interest the torques are given by

T,,, a - bB ,,,* ,

T ,

d2

where a, b, and c are constants. State any necessary assumptions. Will this system have a steady-state operating point? Is the system linear? 2.5 In(2.4) assume that Tis in N-m, 6 is in elec.deg.,andJis in Ibm.ft2. What factor must be used to make the units consistent? 2.6 I n (2.7) assume that Pis in W and M in J -s/rad. What are the units of 6? 2.1 A 500-MVA two-pole machine is to operate in parallel with other U.S. machines. Compute the regulation R of this machine. What are the units of R ? 2.8 A 60-MVA two-pole generator and a 600-MVA four-pole generator are to operate in parallel with other U.S. systems and are to share in system governing. Compute the pu constant K that must be used with these machines in their governor simulations if the system base is 100 MVA. 2.9 Repeat problem 2.8 if the constant K is to be computed in MKS units rather than pu. 2.10 In computer simulations it is common to see regulation expressed in two different ways as described below: where P,,,
= mechanical power in pu on SsB Pmo initial mechanical power in pu on SSB = J = system base frequency in Hz R , = steady-state speed regulation in pu on a system base = RuSsB/SB

s =

generatorslip

= (uR -

w)/2rHz

(b) Pm - Pmo KIAw PU. where P,,, = turbine power in pu on SsB fmo = initial turbine power in pu on SsB
Kl

= SB/RuuRSsB
=

Au

speed deviation, rad/s

Verify the expressions in (a) and (b). 4.0 MJ/MVA is initially operated in A synchronous machine having inertia constant H steady state against an infinite bus with angular displacement of 30 elec. deg. and delivering I .O pu power. Find the natural frequency of oscillation for this machine, assuming small perturbations from the operating point. 2.12 A solid-rotor synchronous generator is driven by an unregulated turbine with a torque speed characteristic similar to that of Figure 2.3(a). The machine has the same characteristics and operating conditions as given in Problem 2. I 1 and is connected to an infinite bus. Find the natural frequency of oscillation and the damping coefficient, assuming small perturbations from the operating point. 2.13 Suppose that (2.33) is written for a salient pole machine to include a reluctance torque term; i.e.. let P = PMsin6 + ksin2S. For this condition find the expression for Pa and for the synchronizing power coefficient. 2. I4 Derive an expression similar to that of (2.7) for an interconnection of two finite machines that have inertia constants M , and M, and angles 6 , and 6. Show that the equations for , such a case are exactly equivalent to that of a single finite machine of inertia 2.1 I and angle SI,
=

M = M,M*I(M, + M2) 6, - S connected to an infinite bus. ,

50

Chapter 2

2. I5 Derive linearized expressions (similar to Example 2.2) that describe an interconnection of three finite machines with inertia constants M I , and M, and angles 6,, d2. and 6. M2, , Is there a simple expression for the natural frequency of oscillation in this case? Designate synchronizing power between machines I and 2 as P S l 2etc. , 2.16 The system shown in Figure P2.16 has two finite synchronous machines, each represented by a constant voltage behind reactance and connected by a pure reactance. The reactance x includes the transmission line and the machine reactances. Write the swing equation for each machine, and show that this system can be reduced to an equivalent one machine against an infinite bus. Give the inertia constant for the equivalent machine, the mechanical input power, and the amplitude of its power-angle curve. The inertia constants of the two machines are HI and H2s.

Fig. P2. I6

2.17 The system shown in Figure P2.17 comprises four synchronous machines. Machines A and E are 60 Hz,while machines C and D are 50 Hz;E and C are a motor-generator set (frequency changer). Write the equations of motion for this system. Assume that the transmission networks are reactive.

2.18 The system shown in Figure P2.18 has two generators and three nodes. Generator and transmission line data are given below. The result of a load-flow study is also given. A three-phase fault occurs near node 2 and is cleared in 0.1 s by removing line 5 .

Fig. P2. I8

(a) Perform all preliminary calculations for a stability study. Convert the system to a common 100-MVA base, convert the loads to equivalent passive impedances, and calculate the generator internal voltages and initial angles. (b) Calculate the Y matrices for prefault, faulted, and postfault conditions. (c) Obtain (numerically)time solutions for the internal general angles and determine if the system is stable.

The Elementary Mathematical Model

51

Generator Data (in pu to generator MVA base) Generator number


I
3
tX, =

xi
(PU)

xTt

(PU)

H ( M W-s/MVA)
5 4

Rating
(MVA)

0.28

0.08

50

0.25

0.07

I20

generator transformer reactance Transmission Line Data (resistance neglected)


Line number:
3
4

x p u to 100-MVA base

0.08

0.06

0.06

0.13

Load-Flow Data
Bus
no.
Voltage

Load
Angle MW
MVAR

Generator
MW MVAR

Magnitude pu

I 2
3

1.030 1.018 I .020

0.0

-1.0
-0.5

0.0 50.0 80.0

0.0

20.0
40.0

30.0 0.0
100.0

23. I
0.0
37.8

2.19 Reduce the system in Problem 2.18 to an equivalent one machine connected to an infinite. bus. Write the swing equation for the faulted network and for the network after the fault is cleared. Apply the equal area criterion to the fault discussed in Problem 2.18. What is the critical clearing angle? 2.20 Repeat the calculations of Example 2.4, but with the following changes in the system of Figure 2. I I . (a) Use a fault impedance of 2, = 0.01 + j pu. This is more typical of the arcing re0 sistance commonly found in a fault. (b) Study the damping effect of adding a resistance to the transmission lines of R L in each line where R L = 0.1 and 0.4 pu. To measure the damping, prepare an analog comp_uter simulation for the system. Implementation will require computation of Y,,, , , , the initial conditions, and the potentiometer settings. Y (c) Devise a method of introducing additional damping on the analog computer by adding a term K d b in the swing equation. Estimate the value of Kd by assuming that a slip of 2.5% gives a damping torque of 50% of full load torque. (d) Make a parametric study of changes in the analog simulation for various values of H. For example, let H = 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 s. 2.21 Repeat Problem 2.20 but with transmission line impedance for each line of R L + j0.8, where R L = 0.2, 0.5. 0.8 pu. Repeat the analog simulation and determine the critical clearing time to the nearest cycle. This will require a means of systematically changing from the fault condition to the postfault (one line open) condition after a measured time lapse. This can be accomplished by logical control on some analog computers or by careful hand switching where logical control is not available. Let Y, = 0.95. 2.22 Repeat Problem 2.21 using a line impedance of0.2 + j0.8. Consider the effect of adding a local unity power factor load R L D at bus 3 for the following conditions: Case 1: PLD = 0.4 pu P, + jQ, = 0.4 j0.20 pu Case 2: P L D = value to give the same generated power as Case 1 P, + jQ.. = 0 + j0 pu Case3: PLD = 1.2 pu P, + jQ, = -0.4 r j0.2 pu (a) Compute the values of R L D and E and find the initial condition for 6 for each case.

52

Chapter 2

(b) Compute the values of I,, y12 the prefault, faulted, and postfault condition. and for if the fault impedance is Z , = 0.01 + j0. Use the computer for this, writing the admittance matrices by inspection and reducing to find the two-port admittances. (c) Compute the analog computer settings for the simulation. (d) Perform the analog computer simulation and plot the following variables: T,,,, T,, T,,, w,, 6, e,, - 6. Also. make a phase-plane plot of w, versus 6. Compare these results with similar plots with no local load present. (e) Use the computer simulation to determine the critical clearing angle.
References
I . Kimbark, E. W. Power System Stability. Vol. I . Wiley, New York, 1948.
2 . Stevenson, W. D. Elements qfPower System Analysis. 2nd ed. McGraw-Hill. New York, 1962.

3. Federal Power Commission. Narional Power Survey. Pt. 2. USGPO, Washington, D.C.. 1964. 4. Lokay. H. E., and Thoits. P. 0. Effects of future turbine-generator characteristics on transient stability. I E E E Trans. PAS-902427- 31. 1971. 5 . AIEE Subcommittee on Interconnection and Stability Factors. First report of power system stability. Electr. Eng. 56261 -82. 1937. 6. Venikov. V. A. Transient Phenomena in Electrical Power Systems. Pergamon Press, Macmillan. New York. 1964. 7. Crary, S . 8. Power System Stability. Vol. 2. Wiley. New York, 1947. 8. Stagg. G. W.. and El-Abiad, A. H. Cottipurer Me1hod.s in Power System Analysis. McGraw-Hill, New York. 1968. 9. Concordia. C. Erect of steam turbine reheat on speed-governor performance. A S M E J . Eng. Power 81:201 -6, 1959. IO. Kirchmayer, L. K. Economic Control oflnrerronnected Systels. Wiley, New York, 1959. 1 1 . Young. C. C., and Webler. R. M . A new stability program for predicting the dynamic performance of electric power systems. Proc. Am. Power Con/: 29: 1126-39. 1967. 12. Byerly, R. T.. Sherman. D. E., and Shortley. P. B. Stability program data preparation manual. Westinghouse Electric Corp. Rept. 70-736. 1970. (Rev. Dec. 1971.) 13. Concordia, C. Synchronous machine damping and synchronizing torques. A I E E Trans. 70:73 1-37, 1951. 14. Ray, J. J.. and Shipley, R. B. Dynamic system performance. Paper 66 CP 709-PWR, presented at the IEEE Winter Power Meeting. New York. 1968. 15. Anderson, P. M., and Nanakorn, S. A n analysis and comparison of certain low-order boiler models. ISA Trans. 14:17-23. 1975.

chapter

System Response to Small Disturbances

3.1

Introduction

This chapter reviews the behavior of an electric power system when subjected to small disturbances. It is assumed the system under study has been perturbed from a steady-state condition that prevailed prior to the application of the disturbance. This small disturbance may be temporary or permanent. If the system is stable, we would expect that for a temporary disturbance the system would return to its initial state, while a permanent disturbance would cause the system to acquire a new operating state after a transient period. In either case synchronism should not be lost. Under normal operating conditions a power system is subjected to small disturbances at random. It is important that synchronism not be lost under these conditions. Thus system behavior is a measure of dynamic stability as the system adjusts to small perturbations. We now define what is meant by a small disturbance. The criterion is simply that the perturbed system can be linearized about a quiescent operating state. A n example of this linearization procedure was given in Section 2.5. While the power-angle relationship for a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus obeys a sine law (2.33), it was shown that for small perturbations the change in power is approximately proportional to the change in angle (2.35). Typical examples of small disturbances are a small change in the scheduled generation of one machine, which results in a small change in its rotor angle 6, or a small load added to the network (say 1/100 of system capacity or less). In general, the response of a power system to impacts is oscillatory. If the oscillations are damped, so that after sufficient time has elapsed the deviation or the change in the state of the system due to the small impact is small (or less than some prescribed finite amount), the system is stable. If on the other hand the oscillations grow in magnitude or are sustained indefinitely, the system is unstable. For a linear system, modern linear systems theory provides a means of evaluation of its dynamic response once a good mathematical model is developed. The mathematical models for the various components of a power network will be developed in greater detail in later chapters. Here a brief account is given of the various phenomena experienced in a power system subjected to small impacts, with emphasis on the qualitative description of the system behavior.
53

54

Chapter 3

3.2

Types of Problems Studied

The method of small changes, sometimes called the perturbation method [ 1.2.31, is very useful in studying two types of problems: system response to small impacts and the distribution of impacts.
3.2.1
System response to small impacts

If the power system is perturbed, it will acquire a new operating state. If the perturbation is small, the new operating state will not be appreciably different from the initial one. I n other words, the state variables or the system parameters will usually not change appreciably. Thus the operation is in the neighborhood of a certain quiescent state xo. In this limited range of operation a nonlinear system can be described mathematically by linearized equations. This is advantageous, since linear systems are more convenient to work with. This procedure is particularly useful if the system contains control elements. The method of analysis used to linearize the differential equations describing the system behavior is to assume small changes in system quantities such as b,, u,, PA (change in angle, voltage, and power respectively). Equations for these variables are found by making a Taylor series expansion about xo and neglecting higher order terms [4,5,6]. The behavior or the motion of these changes is then examined. In examining the dynamic performance of the system, it is important to ascertain not only that growing oscillations do not result during normal operations but also that the oscillatory response to small impacts is well damped. If the stability of the system is being investigated, it is often convenient to assume that the disturbances causing the changes disappear. The motion of the system is then free. Stability is then assured if the system returns to its original state. Such behavior can be determined in a linear system by examining the characteristic equation of the system. If the mathematical description of the system is in state-space form, i.e., if the system is described by a set of first-order differential equations,

(3.1) the free response of the system can be determined from the eigenvalues of the A matrix.
=

AX

+ BU

3.2.2

Distribution of power impacts

When a power impact occurs at some bus in the network, an unbalance between the power input to the system and the power output takes place, resulting in a transient. When this transient subsides and a steady-state condition is reached, the power impact is shared by the various synchronous machines according to their steady-state characteristics, which are determined by the steady-state droop characteristics of the various governors [5,7]. During the transient period, however, the power impact is shared by the machines according to different criteria. If these criteria differ appreciably among groups of machines, each impact is followed by oscillatory power swings among groups of machines to reflect the transition from the initial sharing of the impact to the final adjustment reached at steady state. Under normal operating conditions a power system is subjected to numerous random power impacts from sudden application or removal of loads. As explained above, each impact will be followed by power swings among groups of machines that respond to the impact differently at different times. These power swings appear as power oscil-

System Response to Small Disturbances

55

lations on the tie lines connecting these groups of machines. This gives rise to the term tie-line oscillations. In large interconnected power systems tie-line oscillations can become objectionable if their magnitude reaches a significant fraction of the tie-line loading, since they are superimposed upon the normal flow of power in the line. Furthermore, conditions may exist in which these oscillations grow in amplitude, causing instability. This problem is similar to that discussed in Section 3.2.1. It can be analyzed if an adequate mathematical model of the various components of the system is developed and the dynamic response of this model is examined. If we are interested in seeking an approximate answer for the magnitude of the tie-line oscillations, however, such an answer can be reached by a qualitative discussion of the distribution of power impacts. Such a discussion is offered here.
3.3
The Unregulated Synchronous Machine

We start with the simplest model possible, i.e., the constant-voltage-behind-transient-reactance model. The equation of motion of a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus and the electrical power output are given by (2.18) and (2.41) respectively or

P,
Letting 6
=

Pc

+ PMsin(6- y)

(3.2)

60

+6

sin(6

+ P A , P,,, = Pm0and using the relationship - y ) = sin(& - y + 6,) sin(& - y) + cos(6o ~ Pe ,


=

P,o

(3.3)

the linearized version of (3.2) becomes

(3.4)
where

The system described by (3.4) is marginally stable (Le., oscillatory) for P, > 0. Its response is oscillatory with the frequency of oscillation obtained from the roots of the characteristic equation (2H/wR)s2+ P, = 0, which has the roots
s = &jdP,wR/2H

(3.6)

If the electrical torque is assumed to have a component proportional to the speed change, a damping term is added to (3.4) and the new characteristic equation becomes (2H/wR)s2

+ (D/wR)s + P, = 0

(3.7)

where D is the damping power coefficient in pu. The roots of (3.7) are given by

(3.8)

56

Chapter 3

Usually ( D / w R ) 2< 8HP,/o,, and the roots are complex; Le., the response is oscillatory with an angular frequency of oscillation essentially the same as that given by , (3.6). The system described by (3.7) is stable for P > 0 and for D > 0. If either one of these quantities is negative, the system is unstable. Venikov [4] reports that a situation may occur where the machine described by (3.4) can be unstable under light load conditions if the network is such that tJo < y. This would be the case where there is appreciable series resistance (see [4], Sec. 3.2). , From Chapter 2 we know that the synchronizing power coefficient P is negative if the spontaneous change in the angle 6 is .negative. A negative value of P leads to , unstable operation.
3.3.1
Demagnetizing effect of armature reaction

The model of constant main field-winding flux linkage neglects some important effects, among them the demagnetizing influence of a change in the rotor angle 6. To account for this effect, another model of the synchronous machine is used. It is not our concern in this introductory discussion to develop the model or even discuss it in detail, as this will be accomplished in Chapter 6. Rather, we will state the assumptions made in such a model and give some of the pertinent results applicable to this discussion. These results are found in de Mello and Concordia [8] and are based on a model previously used by Heffron and Phillips (91. To account for the field conditions, equations for the direct and quadrature axis quantities are derived (see Chapter 4). Major simplifications are then made by neglecting saturation, stator resistance, and the damper windings. The transformer voltage terms in the stator voltage equations are considered negligible compared to the speed voltage terms. Linearized relations are then obtained between small changes in the electrical power Pea, the rotor angle ,a the field-winding voltage uFArand the voltage proportional to the main field-winding flux EA. For a machine connected to an infinite bus through a transmission network, the following s domain relations are obtained,

Pea

K16A

+ &EA

(3.9) (3.10)

where K , is the change in electrical power for a change in rotor angle with constant flux linkage in the direct axis, K 2 is the change in electrical power for a change in the direct axis flux linkages with constant rotor angle, ri0 is the direct axis open circuit time constant of the machine, K 3 is an impedance factor, and K4 is the demagnetizing effect of a change in the rotor angle (at steady state). Mathematically, we write
Kt
= PeA/6AlEb=0
K2

= peA/E;16~-0 =

K3

final value of unit step u, response

lim Ek(t)]6A-o
I--

K4

= -

1 - lim
K3
1-m

EA(r)

The constants K I , K 2 , and K4 depend on the parameters of the machine, the external network, and the initial conditions. Note that K , is similar to the synchronizing power coefficient P, used in the simpler machine model of constant voltage behind

(3.1 1)
aA-U(I)

v~1-0

System Response to Small Disturbances

57

Fig. 3. I

Primitive linearized block diagram representation of a generator model.

transient reactance. Equations (3.9) and (3.10), with the initial equation (3.2), may be represented by the incremental block diagram of Figure 3.1.

(3.12)
For the case where V ,
=

0,

(3.13)
where we can clearly identify both the synchronizing and the demagnetizing components. Substituting in the linearized swing equation (3.4), we obtain the new characteristic equation,(with D = 0)
[ Z s '

+ (K,

or we have the third-order system

(3.14) +wR I - K2K3K4)= 0 (K, 2H K3Td0 Note that all the constants (3.1 1) are usually positive. Thus from Routh's criterion [IO] this system is stable if K, - K2K3K4 > 0 and K2K3 K4 > 0. The first of the above criteria states that the synchronizing power coefficient K, must be greater than the demagnetizing component of electrical power. The second criterion is satisfied if the constants K2, K3, and K4 are positive. Venikov [4] points out that if the transmission network has an appreciable series capacitive reactance, it is possible that instability may occur. This would happen because the impedance factor producing the constant K, would become negative.
s3

1 + -s2 + !Q!K.$

K6 3

2H

3.3.2

Effect of small changes of speed

In the linearized version of (3.2) we are interested in terms involving changes of power due to changes of the angle 6 and its derivative. The change in power due to

58

Chapter 3

6, was discussed above and was found to include a synchronizing power component and a demagnetizing component due the change in EL with 6,. The change in speed, W, = dsA/dl, causes a change in both electrical and mechanical power. In this case the new differential equation becomes (3.15)
As in (3.7) the change in electrical power due to small changes in speed is in the form of

PL

(D/WR)WA

(3.16)

From Section 2.3 the change in mechanical power due to small changes in speed is also linear PmA = a p m / a w l w ~ W A (3.17) where i3Pm/dw],, can be obtained from a relation such as the one given in Figure 2.3. If a transient droop or regulation R is assumed, we may write in pu to the machine base
PmA = - ( ~ / W W A / W R )

PU

(3.18)

which is the equation of an ideal speed droop governor. The system block diagram with speed regulation added is shown in Figure 3.2.

I, . -L
Fig. 3.2 Block diagram representation of the linearized model with speed regulation added.

The characteristic equation of the system now becomes


(3.19)

or

+ R :[

(D + - +

KiK37;o s

+ (Ki

- KZK3K4)

(3.20)

System Response t Small Disturbances o

59

Again Rouths criterion may be applied to determine the conditions for stability. This is left as an exercise (see Problem 3.2).
3.4
Modes of Oscillation of an Unregulated Multimachine System

The electrical power output of machine i in an n-machine system is


n

Pei

E:Gii

+
+

j- I j+i
n

Ei Ej Yij cos (eij - 6,j) ,

E:Gii

EiE,(Bijsin 6,
j- I j+i

+ Gijcos aii)

(3.2 I )

where 6 = Si - 4 , Ei = constant voltage behind transient reactance for machine i - = y.. G,i + jBii is a diagonal element of the network short circuit admittance matrix Y y.. = Gu + jBu is an off-diagonal element of the network short circuit admittance matrix Y Using the incremental model so that 6, sin 6, cos 6, Finally, for PciA,
P,,
=

+ bijA, we compute = sin Sij0 cos SijA + cos S,jo sin SijA Y sin tiijo + 6ijA cos Sij0
=

, 6

cos Sij0 -, ,a

sin 6 ,

j- I
j4i

C E,E,(B, COS a,,

- Gij sin 6ijo) 6 i j A

(3.22)

For a given initial condition sin Sijo and cos bij0 are known, and the term in parentheses in (3.22) is a constant. Thus we write
n

peiA

j- I jzi

(3.23)

where

Psij

s] 8%

= Ei Ej(Bijcos 6 ,

- Gij sin 6ijo)

(3.24)

dijo

is the change in the electrical power of machine i due to a change in the angle between machines i and j , with all other angles held constant. Its units are W/rad or pu power/rad. It is a synchronizing power coefficient between nodes i and j and is identical to the coefficient discussed in Section 2.5.2 for one machine connected to an infinite bus. We also note that since (3.21) applies to any number of nodes where the voltages are known, the linearized equations (3.22) and (3.23) can be derived for a given machine in terms of the voltages at those nodes and their angles. Thus the concept of the synchronizing power coefficients can be extended to mean the change in the electrical power of a given machine due to the change in the angle between its internal EMF and

60

Chapter 3

any bus, with all other bus angles held constant. (An implied assumption is that the voltage at the remote bus is also held constant.) This expanded definition of the synchronizing power coefficient will be used in Section 3.6. Using the inertial model of the synchronous machines, we get the set of linearized differential equations,

-2Hi d26iA
WR

dt2

2
j-1

EiEj(B,~os6,i,- G,sin6,0)6,A

i = 1,2,. . . , n

(3.25)

jti

or
(3.26)
jti

The set (3.26) is not a set of n-independent second-order equations, since Z b , Thus (3.26) comprises a set of (n - I)-independent equations. From (3.26) for machine i,
n

0.

PS,6,,
jti

1,2, ...,n

(3.27)

Subtracting the n t h equation from the ith equation, we compute


n- I

--2Hn j - 1
jti

(3.28)

Equation (3.28) can be put in the form

Since

6.. IJA
(3.29) can be further modified as

6inA -

(3.30)

dt2

j- I

c
n- I

a,ajnA =

i = 1,2, ..., n

- I

(3.31)

where the coefficients aiidepend on the machine inertias and synchronizing power coefficients. Equation (3.31) represents a set of n - 1 linear second-order differential equations or a set of 2(n - 1) first-order differential equations. We will use the latter formulation to examine the free response of this system. Let x l , x 2 , . . . ,x n - I be th e angles aInA, &,,A,. . . ,c$,-,),,~ respectively, and let x,, .. . , x ~ , , - ~ the time derivatives of these angles. The system equations are of the be form

System Response io Small Disturbances

... 010 1 ... 0 ...........


I 1
I

1.
I

_______---

I O
I I I I I I I I I .I!

... ... A ......


A 12
22

+---------------

4 1 . 2

or

:
XI
x2

61

(3.32)*

xn

-%+I

...

X2n - 2

(3.33)

where

U
XI X2

= the n = the n

the identity matrix - 1 vector of the angle changes 6,, ,, - 1 vector of the speed changes db,,,,/dt

To obtain the free response of the system, we examine the eigenvalues of the characteristic matrix [ l l , 121. This is obtained from the characteristic equation derived from equating the determinant of the matrix to zero, as follows:

-XU I U det _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ A ; - X u ]= d e t M = O

(3.34)

where X is the eigenvalue. Since the matrix -XU is nonsingular, we compute the determinant of M as

IM I

=
=

- A(-XU)-U I (-l)-X- I -XU - (-1/X)-IA I

I -XU I I (-XU)

(See Lefschetz [ 121, p. 133.) The system described by I M I = 0. has 2(n - 1) imaginary roots, which occur in n - 1 complex conjugate pairs. Thus the system has n - 1 frequencies of oscillations.
Example 3.1

I X2U - A I (3.35) or I X2U - A I = 0,

Find the modes of oscillation of a three-machine system. The machines are unregulated and classical model representation is used.
Solution

For an unregulated three-machine system, the system equations are given by

*See the addendum on page 650.

62

Chapter 3

Multiplying the above three equations by w,/2H, , from the first two, we get (noting that 6 = -aji)

and subtracting the third equation

I f we eliminate are obtained:

by noting that

0, the following two equations

or

The state-space representation of the above system is

To obtain the eigenvalues of this system, the characteristic equation is given by

det
-all

=o
-a12 -a22 -a21

Now by using ( 3 . 3 9 ,

det

[+
h2
a21

all

System Response to Small Disturbances

63

Examining the coefficients aii,we can see that both values of Xz are negative real quantities. Let these given values be X = i ja, X = f j y . The free response will be in the form 6, = C , cos (Br + &) + Cz cos ( y t + c$~), where C,, C,, and & are constants.

Example 3.2 Consider the three-machine, nine-bus system of Example 2.6, operating initially in the steady state with system conditions given by Figure 2.18 (load flow) and the computed initial values given in Example 2.6 for Ei/66, i = I , 2 , 3. A small IO-MW load (about 3% of the total system load of 315 MW) is suddenly added at bus 8 by adding a three-phase fault to the bus through a 10.0 pu impedance. The system base is 100 MVA. Assume that the system load after t = 0 is constant and consists of the original load plus the IO pu shunt resistance at bus 8. Compute the frequencies of oscillation that will result from this small disturbance. Then compare these computed frequencies against those actually observed in a digital computer solution. Assume there are no governors active on any of the three turbines. Observe the system response for about two seconds. Solution First we compute the frequencies of oscillation. From (3.24) Psij = V, %(Si/cos , 6

- G sin),a , ,

V, 5Bi, cos 6,,

From Example 2.6 we find the data needed to compute Psij with the results shown in Table 3.1.
Table3.1. Synchronizing Power Coefficients of the Network of Example 2.6
Ij
v i

vi
I .OS02 1.0170 I .0566

Bij

4jti

psi,

12 23 31

I .0566 I .0502
1.0170

1.513 1.088 1.226

- 17.4598
6.5563 10.9035

1.6015 1.1544 I .2936

Note that the 6, are the values of the relative rotor angles at I = 0-. Since these , are rotor angles, they will not change at the time of impact, so these are also the correct values for t = O+. This is also true of angles at load buses to which appreciable inertia is connected. For loads that are essentially constant impedance, however, the voltage zngle will exhibit a step change. Also from Example 2.6 we know H i = 23.64, 6.40, and 3.01 for i = I , 2, 3 respectively. Thus we can compute the values of aijfrom Example 3.1 as follows:

a12

(WR/2)(Ps12/HI + P s 1 3 / H , + Ps31/H3) = 104.096 (%/2)(Ps3z/H3 - Psiz/Hi) = 59.524 a21= (0R/2)(Ps3& - Psz1/H2) = 33.841
=
E

a22= (oR/2)(Ps2,/H2

+ Pa3/H2 + Ps32/H3) =
4(alIa22

153.460

Then
=
=

-(1/2)[+1, + -(1/2)[-257.556

a2z)

da 1 + azz) (1

- at~l)]

f (66336 - 55841)*] = -77.555, -180

64

Chapter 3

Now we can compute the frequencies and periods shown in Table 3.2.
Table 3 2 Frequencies of Oscillation of .. a Nine-Bus System
Quantity Eigenvalue I
2j8.807

Eigenvalue 2

x
o rad/s

f Hz
Ts

8.807 1.402 0.713

kj13.416 13.416 2.135 0.468

Thus two frequencies, about 1.4 Hz and 2.1 Hz, should be observed in the intermachine oscillations of the system. This can be approximately verified by an actual solution of the system by digital computer. The results of such a solution are shown in Figure 3.3, where absolute angles are given in Figure 3.3(a) and angle differences relative to 6, are given in Figure 3.3(b). As might be expected, neither of the computed frequencies is clearly observed since the response is a combination of the two frequencies. A rough measurement of the peak-to-peak periods in Figure 3.3(b) gives periods in the neighborhood of 0.7 s.
Methods have been devised [3,1I ] by which a system such as the one in Example 3.2 can be transformed to a new frame of reference called the Jordan canonical form. In Jordan form the different frequencies of oscillation are clearly separated. In the form of equations normally used, the variables 6,, and a,, (or other angle differences) contain

""CI I 24.0

-97.0 0.0

0.500

1.000

1.500
Time,
(a )
I

2.000

2.500

8.01 0.0

0.500

1.000

1.500
Time, s

2.000

2.500

(b)

Fig. 3.3 Unregulated response of the nine-bus system to a sudden load application at bus 8: (a) absolute angles, (b) angles relative to 6 1 .

System Response to Small Disturbances

65

harmonic terms generally involving all fundamental frequencies of oscillation. Hence we have difficulty observing these frequencies in measured physical variables.

Example 3.3 Transform the system of Example 3.2 into the Jordan canonical form and show that in this form the system frequencies of oscillation are clearly distinguishable.
Solution

The system equations for the three-machine problem are given by

or i

A x, where x is defined by

and the a coefficients are computed in Example 3.2. We now compute the eigenvectors of A, using any method [ I , 3, 1 1 1 and call these vectors E,, E,, E,, and E4. We then use these eigenvectors to define a matrix E.

-j0.06266 i E
=

[E, E E E41 2 ,

j -j0.07543
1
1.OoooO
I

i -0.13831
!

0.14523

; -0.14523
I

0.13831

0.83069

,1.00000

1.OOOOO

1.oooOO -0.95234

I -0.95234

where the numerical values are found by a suitable computer library routine. We now define the transformation x = E y to compute 2 = E i = A x = A E y j, = E- A E y = D y whereD = diag(X,,X,,X,,X,). Performing the indicated numerical work, we compute

or

E-=

I
L

-j3.5245 j3.5245

-j3.7008 j 1 S967 -j1.5967


0.0

0.2659 0.2792 0.2792


0.0

0.2792 0.2792 -0.23 19 -0.2312

j3.7008 0.2659

-j I .9221 j1.9221

r-j13.2571 0.0

00 .
0.0

E-IAE

j13.2571
0.0

0.0 -j6.8854 0.0

0.0

0.0
j6.8854

0.0

0.o

66

Chapter 3
=

Substituting into

Dy,we can compute the uncoupled solution


yi
=

Ciexi' i

1,2,3,4

where Ci depends on the initial conditions. This method of computing the distinct frequencies of oscillation is quite general and may be applied to systems of any size. For very large systems this may not be practical, however, since the eigenvector computation may be too costly. Finally, we note that the simple model used here assumes that no damping exists. In physical systems damping is usually present; therefore, the oscillatory response given above is usually damped. The magnitude of the damping, however, is such that the frequencies of oscillation given by the above equations are not appreciably affected.
3.5
Regulated Synchronous Machine

In this section we examine the effect of voltage and speed control equipment on the dynamic performance of the synchronous machine. Again we are interested in the free response of the system. We will consider two simple cases of regulation: a simple voltage regulator with one time lag and a simple governor with one time lag.
3.5.1
Voltage regulator with one time lag

Referring to Figure 2.24, we note that a change in the field voltage uF, is proor duced by changes in either VREF y . If we assume that V,,,, = 0 and the transducer , has no time lags, uFA depends only upon K modified by the transfer function of the excitation system. Analysis of such a system is discussed in Chapter 7. To simplify the analysis, a rather simple model of the voltage regulator and excitation system is assumed. This gives the following s domain relation between the change in the exciter voltage u,, and the change in the synchronous machine terminal voltage y,:
'A F

- iKc/(l +

7ts)1

yA

(3.36)

where K,
7,

= =

regulatorgain regulator time constant

To examine the effect of the voltage regulator on the system response, we return to the model discussed in Section 3.3 for a machine connected to an infinite bus through a transmission network. These relations are given in (3.9) and (3.10). To use (3.36), a relation between 6,, and E: is needed. Such a relation is developed in reference [8] and is in the form

v,,

y A =

KS6,

+ &E:

(3.37)

where K5

=
=

y,/6,1EA =
VIA/E6la, =

K6

change in terminal voltage with change in rotor angle for constant E' change in terminal voltage with change in E' for constant 6

The system block diagram with voltage regulation added is shown in Figure 3.4. From (3.36) and (3.37)
UFA =

-[Kt/(l

+ 7es)l(KS6A +

(3.38)

Substituting in (3.10), we compute

System Response to Small Disturbances

67

'mb REF

Fig. 3.4 System block diagram with voltage regulation.

rearranging,

(3.39)

From (3.39) and (3.9)

peA

Substituting in the s domain swing equation and rearranging, we obtain the following characteristic equation:

Equation (3.41) is of the form

s4

+ 03S3 + O*S2 + q s + cr, = 0

(3.42)

Analysis of this fourth-order system for stability is left as an exercise (see Problem 3.7).

68

Chapter 3

3.5.2

Governor with one time lag

Referring to Figure 2.24, we note that a change in the speed w or in the load or speed reference [governor speed changer (GSC)] produces a change in the mechanical torque T,,,. The amount of change in T,,, depends upon the speed droop and upon the transfer functions of the governor and the energy source. For the model under consideration it is assumed that GSCA = 0 and that the combined effect of the turbine and speed governor systems are such that the change in the mechanical power in per unit is in the form

(3.43)
where Kg = gain constant = I / R r g = governor time constant The system block diagram with governor regulation is shown in Figure 3.5. Then the linearized swing equation in the s domain is in the form (with wR in rad/s) SSA(S) ( ~ W W R ) ~ ' ~ A-[&/(I + 7sI = S) g) - Ped($

(3.44)

The order of this equation will depend upon the expression used for PeA(s). If we assume the simplest model possible, PeA(s)= PSGA(s), characteristic equation of the the system is given by

(2H/wR)s2

+ [Kg/(I+ T~s)]S+ Ps

(3.45)

or
S3(2HTg/W~) s2(2H/WR) + (Kg

PsTg)S

+ P, = O

(3.46)

The system is now of third order. Applying Routh's criterion, the system is stable if Kg > 0 and P, > 0. Ifanother model is used for PeA(s),such as the model given by (3.9) and (3.10), the system becomes of fourth order, as shown in Figure 3.5. Its dynamic response will change. Information on stability can be obtained from the roots of the characteristic equation or from examining the eigenvalues of its characteristic matrix.

*p.d

Fig. 3.5 Block diagram of a system with governor speed regulation.

System Response to Small Disturbances

69

1
GSCA

Fig. 3.6

Block diagram of a system with a governor and voltage regulator.

If both speed governor and voltage regulation are added simultaneously, as is usually the case, the system becomes fifth order, as shown in Figure 3.6.
3.6
Distributionof Power Impacts

In this section we consider the effect of the sudden application of a small load PLA at some point in the network. (See also [7,5].) To simplify the analysis, we also assume that the load has a negligible reactive component. Since the sudden change in load PLAcreates an unbalance between generation and load, an oscillatory transient results before the system settles to a new steady-state condition. This kind of impact is continuously occurring during normal operation of power systems. The oscillatory transient is in fact a spectrum of oscillations resulting from the random change in loads. These oscillations are reflected in power flow in the tie lines. Thus the scheduled tie-line flows will have random power oscillations superimposed upon them. Our concern here is to make an estimate of the magnitude of these power oscillations. Note that the estimates made by the methods outlined below are only approximate, yet they are quite instructive. We formulate the problem mathematically using the network configuration of Figure 3.7 and the equations of Sections 2.9 and 3.4. Referring to the (n + I)-port network in Figure 3.7, the power into node i is obtained from (3.21) by adding node k.
0 -

pi

E ~ G ~ ~ + E,E,(B, sin 6,
j-l

.*

+ ~ , c o s s ~ ,+ )

v ~ ( B ~ai, sin ~

+ cik cossik)

jti.k

For the case of nearly zero conductance


pi

C
j - I

E, B~~ sii + sin

V, B~~ ail sin

(3.47)

jti.k

70

Chapter 3
n

L -

(n + I)-port network

Fig. 3.7 Network with power impact at node k.

and the power into node k (the load bus) is

(3.48)
Here we assume.that the power network has a very high X/R ratio such that the conductances are negligible. The machines are represented by the classical model of constant voltage behind transient reactance. We also assume that the network has been reduced to the internal machine nodes (nodes I , 2, . . . n of Figure 2.17) and the node k, where the impact P L A is applied. The immediate effect (assuming the network response to be fast) of the application of P L A is that the angle of bus k is changed while the magnitude of its voltage v k is unchanged, or V &becomes , v k /6ko + &A. Note also that the internal angles of the machine nodes d l , J2,. . . 6, do not change instantly because of the rotor inertia.
3.6.1
Linearization

The equations for injected power (3.47) and (3.48) are nonlinear because of the transcendental functions. Since we are concerned only with a small impact P L A , we linearize these equations to find
Pi =
P0 i

+ Pia

P k = PkO

PkA

and determine only the change variables Pia and P k A . The transcendental functions are linearized by the relations

sinbkj cos6kj

= =

sin(6kjo + 6kjA) cos(6kjO 6kjA)

sin6kj0 + (cos6kjO)6kjA cos6kjO - (sin6kjO)6kjA

(3.49)

for any k,j . Note that the order k j must be carefully observed since & j = - 6 j k . Substituting (3.49) into (3.47) and (3.48) and eliminating the initial values, we compute the linear equations

j-l j6i.k

(3.50)
I1

j-l

These equations are valid for any time t following the application of the impact.

System Response to Small Disturbances

71

3 6 2 A special case: r = 0 .. The instant immediately following the impact is of interest. In particular, we would like to determine exactly how much of the impact PLA is supplied by each generator P i A , i = 1,2,...,n. At the instant r = O+ we know that a, = 0 for all generators because of rotor , inertias. Thus we can compute (with both i a n d j indicating generator subscripts)

6A IJ

6i&A = 6 i A

- 6 & = -6&.(o+) ~

6&jA

= 6&A

6jA

= 6&A(o+)

Thus (3.50) becomes


n

piA(o+) = -psik6&A(o+)
Comparing the above two equations at r
=

p&A(o+) =
/-I

Ps&j6&A(O+)

(3.51)

0+,we note that at node k


(3.52)

This is to be expected since we are assuming a nearly reactive network. We also note that at node i Pia depends upon Bikcos6p,. In other words, the higher the transfer susceptance Bik and the lower the initial angle 6iko.the greater the share of the impact picked up by machine i. Note also that PkA = -PLA, so the foregoing equations can be written in terms of the load impact as

From (3.52) and (3.53) we conclude that

(3.54)

It is interesting that at the instant of the load impact (i.e., at r = O?, the source of energy supplied by the generators is the energy stored in their magnetic fields and is distributed according to the synchronizing power coefficients between i and k. Note that the generator rotor angles cannot move instantly; hence the energy supplied by the generators cannot come instantly from the energy stored in the rotating masses. This isalso evident from the first equation of (3.51); Pia depends upon Psi&or Bik, which depends upon the reactance between generator i and node k . Later on when the rotor angles change, the stored energy in the rotating masses becomes important, as shown below. Equations (3.52) and (3.55) indicate that the load impact PLA at a network bus k is immediately shared by the synchronous generators according to their synchronizing power coefficients with respect to the bus k. Thus the machines electrically close to the point of impact will pick up the greater share of the load regardless of their size. Let us consider next the deceleration of machine i due to the sudden increase in its output power Pia. The incremental differential equation governing the motion of machine i is given by

72

Chapter 3

2Hi d W i A --+ PiA(t) = 0 W R dt


and using (3.55)

i = 1,2, . . . , t ~

(3.56)

Then if PLA is constant for all t , we compute the acceleration in pu to be

(3.57)
Obviously, the shaft decelerates for a positive load P L A . The pu deceleration of machine i, given by (3.57), is dependent on the synchronizing power coefficient Psik and inertia H i . This deceleration will be constant until the governor action begins. Note that after the initial impact the various synchronous machines will be retarded at different rates, each according to its size H i and its electrical location given by P,ik.

3 6 3 Average behavior prior to governor action ( t = 1, ) .. We now estimate the system behavior during the period 0 < t < t,, where t, is the time at which governor action begins. To designate this period simply, we refer to time as t l , although there is no specific instant under consideration but a brief time period of no more than a few seconds. Looking at the system as a whole, there will be an overall deceleration of the machines during this period. To obtain the mean deceleration, let us define an inertial center that has angle 8 and angular velocity a, where by definition,

(l/CH,)CG,H,

ij

(1/CHi)CWiH1

(3.58)

Summing the set (3.57) for all values of i, we compute

(3.59)
(3.60)
Equation (3.60) gives the mean acceleration of all the machines in the system, which is defined here as the acceleration of a fictitious inertial center. We now investigate the way in which the impact PLa will be shared by the various machines. Note that while the system as a whole is retarding at the rate given by (3.60), the individual machines are retarding at different rates. Each machine follows an oscillatory motion governed by its swing equation. Synchronizing forces tend to pull them toward the mean system retardation, and after the initial transient decays they will acquire the same retardation as given by (3.60). In other words, when the transient decays, dwiA/dt will be the same as dGA/dt as given by (3.60). Substituting this value of dwiA/dt in (3.56), at t = t , > to,

(3.61)
Thus at the end of a brief transient the various machines will share the increase in load as a function only of their inertia constants. The time t , is chosen large enough

System Response to Small Disturbances

73

so that all the machines will have acquired the mean system retardation. At the same time t , is not so large as to allow other effects such as governor action to take place.

Equation (3.61) implies that the H constants for all the machines are given to a common base. If they are given for each machine on its own base, the correct powers are obwhere SBs the machine rating and S,, is the is tained if H is replaced by HSB3/SsB, chosen system base. Examining (3.56) and (3.61), we note that immediately after the impact PLA(i.e.,at t = 0+) the machines share the impact according to their electrical proximity to the point of the impact as expressed by the synchronizing power coefficients. After a brief transient period the same machines share the same impact according to entirely different criteria, namely, according to their inertias.

Example 3.4 Consider the nine-bus, three-machine system of Example 2.6 with a small IO-MW resistive load added to bus 8 as in Example 3.2. Solve the system differential equations and plot PtA and wid as functions of time. Compare computed results against theoretical values of Section 3.6.

-2

1
Fig. 3.8 PrAversus t following application of a 10 M W resistive load at bus 8.

Solution A nominal IO-MW(0.1 pu) load is added to bus 8 by applying a three-phase fault through a 10 pu resistance, using a library transient stability program. The resulting power oscillations P,A, i = 1, 2, 3, are shown in Figure 3.8 for the system operating without governor action. The prefault conditions at the generators are given in Table 3.1 and in Example 2.6. From the prefault load flow of Figure 2.19 we determine that V = 1.016 and a,, = , 0.7". A matrix reduction of the nine-bus system, retaining only nodes 1, 2, 3, and 8, gives the system data shown on Table 3.3.

74

Chapter 3

Table 3.3 Transfer Admittances and Initial Angles of a Nine-Bus System


ij
Gii Bii

b o
1.5717 19.03 15 12.4752

1-8 2-8 3-8

0.01826 -0.03530 -0.00965

2.51242 3.55697 2.61601

From (3.24) we compute the synchronizing power coefficients


psik

6 v k ( B , k cos 6 i k O

- Gi sin 6 i k O ) k

These values are tabulated in Table 3.4. Note that the error in neglecting the Gik term is small.

Table 3.4. Synchronizing Power Coefficients


ik
18 28 38
psik
psik psik

(neglecting G j k )

(with Gik term)

c
The values of
piA(o+)

2.6961 3.5878 2.6392 8.923 I

2.6955 3.6001 2.6414 8.9370

are computed from (3.55) as

where PLA(O+)= 10.0 M W nominally. The results of these calculations and the actual values determined from the stability study are shown in Table 3.5.

Table 3.5. Initial Power Change at Generators Due to IO-MWLoad Added to Bus 8

I
2 3

3.02 1 4.02 1 2.958

3.016 4.028 2.956

2.8 3.6 2.7 9.1

9.100

2.749 3.659 2.692

2.745 3.665 2.690 9.100

1O.OOO

10.000

Note that the actual load pickup is only 9 1 M W instead of the desired IO MW. . This is due in part to the assumption of constant voltage v k at bus 8 (actually, the voltage drops slightly) and to the assumed linearity of the system. If the computed PIA scaled down by 0.91, the results agree quite well with values measured from the are computer study. These values are also shown on the plot of Figure 3.8 at time t = O+ and are due only to the synchronizing power coefficients of the generators with respect to bus 8. The plots of P i a versus time in Figure 3.8 show the oscillatory nature of the power exchange between generators following the impact. These oscillations have frequencies that are combinations of the eigenvalues computed in Example 3.2. The total, labeled Z P i A , averages about 9.5 M W .

System Response to Small Disturbances

75

lime,

01
-0"'t
-0.04

0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1

1.2 1.3 1.4

1,s

1.6 1:7 1,8 1:9 2:O

%- . . .A' %

-0.08.-0.10
a-

-0.12 ,-

-0.14
-0.16 -0.18

..

'-

t
Fig. 3.9 Speed deviation following application of a 10 MW resistive load at bus 8.

Another point of interest in Figure 3.8 is the computed values of PiA(t1) that depend entirely on the machine inertia. These calculations are made from

PiA(tl) = (Hi/CHi)PLA = IOHi/(23.64 - I 6.40 - -3.01) I = 7.15 MW i = 1 = 1.94MW i = 2 = 0.91 M W i = 3

lOHi/33.05

and the results are plotted in Figure 3.8 as dashed lines. It is fairly obvious that the PiA(t) oscillate about these values of P,A(tl). It is also apparent that the system has little damping and the oscillations are likely to persist for some time. This is partly due to the inherent nature of this particular system, but the same phenomenon would be present to some extent on any system. The second plot of interest is the speed deviation or slip as a function of time, shown in Figure 3.9. The computer program provides speed deviation data in Hz and these units are used in Figure 3.9. Note the steady deceleration with all units oscillating about the mean or inertial center. This is computed as
&A
-I

--=PLA

dr

2 C Hi - 1.513 x

0. IO 2(23.64 + 6.40 + 3.01) pu/s = -0.570 rad/s2 = -0.0908 Hz/s

The individual machine speed deviations wiA are plotted in Figure 3.9 and show graphically the intermachine oscillations that occur as the system slowly retards in frequency. The mean deceleration of about 0.09 Hz/s is plotted in Figure 3.9 as a straight line. If the governors were active, the speed deviation would level off after a few seconds to a constant value and the oscillations would eventually decay. Since the governors have a drooping characteristic, the speed would then continue at the reduced value as

76

Chapter 3

long as the additional load was present. I f the speed deviation is great, signifying a substantial load increase on the generators, the governors would need to be readjusted to the new load level so that additional prime-mover torque could be provided.
Example 3.5

Let us examine the effect of the above on the power flow in tie lines. Consider a power network composed of two areas connected with a tie line, as shown in Figure 3.10. The two areas are of comparable size, say 1000 MW each. They are connected with a tie line having a capacity of 100 MW. The tie line is carrying a steady power flow of 80 MW from area I to area 2 as shown in Figure 3.10. Now let a load impact PLA = IO MW (1% of the capacity of one area) take place at some point in area I , and determine the distribution of this added load immediately after its application ( I = 0 + )and a short time later ( t = t , ) after the initial transients have subsided. Because of the proximity of the groups of machines in area 1 to the point of impact, their synchronizing power coefficients are larger than those of the groups of machines = PSI, = Psz, in area 2. If we define CPSikJareaI CPsiklarca2 then let us assume that P,, = 2ps2.

9Q 80MW

PM = 10 M W

Fig. 3.10 Two areas connected with a tie line.

Solution Since PSI= 2Ps2, the instant of the impact 2/3 of the IO-MW load will be supat plied by the groups of machines in area 1, while 1/3 or 3.3 MW will be supplied by the groups of machines in area 2. Thus 3.3 MW will appear as a reduction in tie-line flow. In other words, at that instant the tie-line flow becomes 76.7 MW toward area 2. At the end of the initial transient the load power impact PLA will be shared by the machines according to their inertias. Let us assume that the machines of area 1 are

2 76.7 - --

80.0----

t=O

tl
Time,
I

Fig. 3.1 I

Tie-line power.oscillations due to the load impact in area I .

System Response to Small Disturbances

77

predominantly hydro units (with relatively small H), while the units of area 2 are of = 2CHi],,e,I where all H's are on a comlarger inertia constants such that CHIJarea2 mon base. The sharing of the load among the groups of machines will now become 6.7 MW contributed from area 2 and 3.3 MW from area I . The tie-line flow will now become 73.3 MW (toward area 2). From the above we can see that in the situation discussed in this example a sudden application of a IO-MW load caused the tie-line flow to drop almost instantly by 3.3 MW, and after a brief transient by 6.7 MW. The transition from 76.7-MW flow to 73.3-M W flow is oscillatory, and power swings of as much as twice the difference between these two values may be encountered. This situation is illustrated in Figure 3.1 I . The time t , mentioned above is smaller than the time needed by the various controllers to adjust the system generation to match the load and the tie-line flow to meet the scheduled flow.

Example 3.6 We now consider a slightly more complex and more realistic case wherein the area equivalents in Figure 3.10 are represented by their Thevenin equivalents and the tieline impedance is given. The system data are given in Figure 3.12 in pu on a 1000-MVA base. The capacity of area I is 20,000 MW and that of area 2 is 14,000 MW. The inertia constants of the machines in the two areas are about equal.
(a) Find the equations of power for PI and Pz. (b) Find the operating condition when PI = 100 MW. This would correspond approximately to a 100-MW tie-line flow from area 1 to area 2. (c) Find the synchronizing power coefficients. (d) Consider a sudden load addition to area 2, represented by the resistive load P4,, at bus 4. If this load is 200 MW (1.43% of the capacity of area 2), find the distribution of this load at f = O+ and t = f l .

Ara 1 eguivalent

Tie litm

Area 2 equivalent

Fig. 3.12 Two areas connected by a tie line.

Solution Consider the system as a two-port network between nodes 1 and 2. Then we compute
Z12 =

0.450
I/f12

+ j1.820 =
= =

Ylz GI1

plz = =

= -712

1.875 /76.112" pu 0.533/-76.112" = 0.128 - j0.518 pu 0.533/103.888"


g l o = go = 0 z

0.128

Chapter 3

GI2 = -0.128

612 =

61 - 62

6,

B12

0.518

PI = V:glo + V, V 2 ( G 1 2 ~ ~ + 6B12sin612) V:GI2 ~ 12 = 0 + I.O(-O.l28co~6~ 0 . 5 1 8 ~ i n 6 ~ ) 0.128 + + = 0.128 + 0.533sir1(6~ 13.796") P2 = V:gzo + VI V 2 ( G 1 2 ~ ~+ 6 2 1 ~ BI2sin - V:GzI = 0 + I.O(-O.I28c0s6~ - 0.518sin6,) + 0.128 = 0.128 - 0.533sin(6, + 13.796")
(b) Given that PI
=

0.1 pu

0.100 = 0.128

+ 0.533sin(dl -

13.796")

6 1 = 10.784"

(4

Pr12 =
=
PS21 =

K W B I Z 6 1 2 0 - Gl2 sin d120) cos l.O(O.518cos 10.784" + 0.128sin 10.784")

0.533

K VZ(B2I cos 6210 - G2I sin 6210) 1.0[0.518cos(- 10.784") + 0.128sin(- 10.784")] = 0.485
=

(d) Now add the 200-MW load at bus 4; P 4 A

200/1000 = 0.2 pu.

To complete the problem, we must know the voltage pute


f12(0-) =

p4at

t =

0-. Thus we com-

(K

K(O-)

60 = 4

(1.0/10.784" - l.0~)/1.875/76.112" = 0.100/19.280" + (0.100 + j0.012)&2 = 1.009 + j0.004 = 1.009/0.252" 6240 = 620 - 640 = -0.252" 0.252' 6 4 = 610 - 640 = 10.532" 10

- K)/Z,z

From the admittance matrix elements

Y14 Y24

= -1 = y4

- 1/114

= =

= - 2 = -l/Fz4 y4

-0.103 -9.858

+ j0.533
+ j1.183

we compute the synchronizing power coefficients


P1 s4

VI Y 4 ( B 1 4 ~ ~ ~- 1 4 0 6 G14sin6140)

= (1.009)(0.533 cos 10.532'


Ps24 ==

+ 0.103 sin 10.532')

= 0.548

Vz V4(B24 COS 6240 - G24 sin 6240) = 1.009(1.183~0~(-0.?.52") 9.858sin(-0.252")] = 1.150 +


P4A

Then the initial distribution of


PIA(^+)

is

PS14(o.2)/(Ps14+ P S z 4 ) = (0.323)(0.2) = 0.0646 PU Pz~(o+) Ps24(0.2)/(Psi4 + Ps24) = (0.677)(0.2) = 0.1354 pu = The power distribution according to inertias is computed as PlA(fl) = 0.2[20,000ff/(20,000ff PzA(fl) = 0.2[14,000H/(20,000H

14,000H)J = 0.1 1765 pu 14,000H)I 0.08235 pu


= I

In this example the synchronizing power coefficientsPSI., smaller than PSz4, is while the inertia of area 1 is greater than that of area 2. Thus, while initially area 1 picks up only about

System Response to Small Disturbances

79

one third of the load P, at a later time t = t , it picks up about 59% of the load and area ,, 2 picks up the remaining 41%. In general, the initial distribution of a load impact depends on the point of impact. Problem 3.10 gives another example where the point of impact is in area I (bus 3).

In the above discussion many factors have been neglected, e.g., the effect of the network transfer conductances, the effect of the reactive component of the load impact, the fast primary controllers such as some of the modern exciters, the load frequency and voltage characteristics, and others. Thus the conclusions reached above should be considered qualitative and as rough approximations. Yet these conclusions are basically sound and give a good "feel" for what happens to the machines and to the tie-line flows under the influence of small routine load changes. If the system is made up of groups of machines separated by tie lines, they share the impacts differently under different conditions. Hence they will oscillate with respect to each other during the transient period following the impact. The power flow in the connecting ties will reflect these oscillations. The analysis given above could be extended to include governor actions. Following an impact the synchronous machines will share the change first according to their synchronizing power coefficients, then after a brief period according to their inertias. The speed change will be sensed by the prime-mover governors, which will act to make the load sharing according to an entirely different criterion, namely, the speed governor droop characteristic. The transition from the second to the final stage is oscillatory (see Rudenberg [7), Ch. 23). The angular frequency of these oscillations can be estimated as follows. From Section 3.5.2, neglecting PIA, the change in the mechanical power PmAis of the form
(3.62)
where R is the regulation and 7, is the servomotor time constant. The swing equation for machine i becomes,h thes domain,

The characteristic equation of the system is given by


s2

+ (1/7si)s +

1 / 2 H i R i ~ , i= 0

(3.63)

from which the natural frequency of oscillation can be estimated. It is interesting to note the order of magnitude of the frequency of oscillation in the two different transients discussed in this section. For a given machine (or a group of machines) the frequency of oscillation in the first transient is the natural frequency with respect to the point of impact. These frequencies are determined by finding the eigenvalues X of the A matrix by solving det (A - XU) = 0, where U is the unit matrix and A is defined by ( 3 . I). For the second transient, which occurs during the transition from sharing according to inertia to sharing according to governor characteristic, the frequency of oscillation is given by Y : ~% 1/2HiRf7,,. Usually these two frequencies are appreciably different.

80

Chapter 3

Problems 3. I
A synchronous machine is connected to a large system (an infinite bus) through a long transmission line. The direct axis transient reactance x i = 0.20 pu. The infinite bus voltage is 1.0 pu. The transmission line impedance is Zlinc= 0.20 + j0.60 pu. The synchronous machine is to be represented by constant voltage behind transient reactance with E = 1.10 pu. Calculate the minimum and maximum steady-state load delivered at the infinite bus (for stability). Repeat when there is a local load of unity power factor = having Itload 8.0 pu. 3.2 Use Rouths criterion to determine the conditions of stability for the system where the characteristic equation is given by (3.14). 3.3 Compute the characteristic equation for the system of Figure 3. I , including the damping term, and determine the conditions for stability using Rouths criterion. Compare the results with those of Section 3.3.1. as 3.4 Using 1 3 ~ the output variable in Figure 3.2, use block diagram algebra to reduce the system block diagram to forward and feedback transfer functions. Then determine the system stability and possible system behavior patterns by sketching an approximate rootlocus diagram. 3.5 Use block diagram algebra to reduce the system described by (3.45). Then determine the system behavior by sketching the root loci for variations in K,. 3.6 Give the conditions for stability of the system described by (3.20). 3.1 A system described by (3.41) has the following data: H = 4, ria = 5.0, T , = 0.10, K I = 4.8,Kz = 2.6,K3 = 0.26, K, = 3.30, KS = 0.1, and K b = 0.5. Find the maximum and minimum values of K, for stability. Repeat for K5 = -0.20. 3.8 Write the system described by (3.46) in state-space form. Apply Rouths criterion to (3.46). 3.9 The equivalent prefuulr network is given in Table 2.6 for the three-machine system discussed in Section 2.10 and for the given operating conditions. The internal voltages and angles of the generators are given in Example 2.6. (a) Obtain the synchronizing power coefficients PSlz,P S I ) ,PSz3, and the corresponding coefficientsaij[see(3.3 I)]for small perturbations about the given operating point. and (b) Obtain the natural frequencies of oscillation for the angles 6 1 2 ~ 6 1 3 ~ . Compare with the periods of the nonlinear oscillations of Example 2.7. 3.10 Repeat Example 3.6 with the impact point shifted to area I and let P L = 100 MW as ~ before. 3.1 I Repeat Problem 3.10 for an initial condition of PLA = 300 MW.
References
I . Korn, G . A., and Korn, T. M. Mathematical Handbook for Scientists and Engineers. McGraw-Hill, New York, 1968. 2 . Hayashi, C. Nonlinear Oscillations in Physical Systems. McGraw-Hill, New York, 1964. 3. Takahashi, Y., Rabins. M. J., and Auslander, D. M. Control and Dynamic Systems. Addison-Wesley, Reading, Mass., 1970. 4. Venikov, V. A. Transient Phenomena in Electric Power Systems. Trans. by B. Adkins and D. Rutenberg. Pergamon Press, New York, 1964. 5. Hore, R. A. Advanced Studies in Electrical Power System Design. Chapman and Hall, London, 1966. 6. Crary, S. B. Power System Stability. Vols. 1 . 2. Wiley, New York, 1945, 1947. 7. Rudenberg. R. Transient Performance of Electric Power Systems: Phenomena in Lumped Networks. McGraw-Hill, New York. 1950. (MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1967.) 8. de Mello. F. P.. and Concordia, C. Concepts of synchronous machine stability as affected by excitation control. IEEE Trans. PAS-88:316-29, 1969. 9. Heffron. W. G.. and Phillips, R. A. Effect of a modern amplidyne voltage regulator on underexcited operation of large turbine generators. AlEE Trans. 71 (Pt. 3):692-97, 1952. 10. Routh, E. J . Dynamics o f a System o Rigid Bodies. Macmillan, London, 1877. (Adams Prize Essay.) f 11. Ogata. K. State-Space Analysis of Control Systems. Prentice-Hall. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,1967. 12. Lefschetz, S. Stability of Nonlinear Control Systems. Academic Press, New York, London, 1965.

Part II The Electromagnetic Torque

P. M. Anderson A. A. Fouad

chapter

The Synchronous Machine

4.1

Introduction

In this chapter we develop a mathematical model for a synchronous machine for use in stability computations. State-space formulation of the machine equations is used. Two models are developed, one using the currents as state variables and another using the flux linkages. Simplified models, which are often used for stability studies, are discussed. This chapter is not intended to provide an exhaustive treatment of synchronous machine theory. The interested reader should consult one of the many excellent references on this subject (see [ 1]-[9]). The synchronous machine under consideration is assumed to have three stator windings, one field winding, and two amortisseur or damper windings. These six windings are magnetically coupled. The magnetic coupling between the windings is a function of the rotor position. Thus the flux linking each winding is also a function of the rotor position. The instantaneous terminal voltage u of any winding is in the form,
u = icri A

ci,

(4.1)

where X is the flux linkage, r is the winding resistance, and i is the current, with positive directions of stator currents flowing out of the generator terminals. The notation indicates the summation of all appropriate terms with due regard to signs. The expressions for the winding voltages are complicated because of the variation of X with the rotor position.

*x

4.2

Park's Transformation

A great simplification in the mathematical description of the synchronous machine is obtained if a certain transformation of variables is performed. The transformation used is usually called Park's transformation [ 10, I I]. It defines a new set of stator variables such as currents, voltages, or flux linkages in terms of the actual winding variables. The new quantities are obtained from the projection of the actual variables on three axes; one along the direct axis of the rotor field winding, called the direct axis; a second along the neutral axis of the field winding, called the quadrature axis; and the third on a stationary axis. Park's transformation is developed mathematically as follows.'
I . The transformation developed and used in this book is not exactly that used by Park [IO,I I ] but is more nearly that suggested by Lewis 1121. with certain other features suggested by Concordia (discussion to [12]) and Krause and Thomas [13].
83

a4

Chapter 4
a axis

b axis

Fig. 4. I

Pictorial representation of a synchronous machine.

We define the d axis of the rotor at some instant of time to be at angle B rad with respect to a fixed reference position, as shown in Figure 4.1. Let the stator phase currents ia, ibr i, be the currents leaving the generator terminals. If we project these and currents along the d and q axes of the rotor, we get the relations
iqpxis (2/3)[i,sinB =

idaxis (2/3)[i,,cosB =

+ ibsin(B - 2r/3) + i,sin (e + 2 ~ / 3 ) ] + i6cos(B - 2r/3) + i,cos(B + 2r/3)1

(4.2)

We note that for convenience the axis of phase a was chosen to be the reference position, otherwise some angle of displacement between phase a and the arbitrary reference will appear in all the above terms. The effect of Parks transformation is simply to transform all stator quantities from phases a, 6 , and c into new variables the frame of reference of which moves with the rotor. We should remember, however, that if we have three variables i., i6, and i,, we need three new variables. Parks transformation uses two of the new variables as the d and q axis components. The third variable is a stationary current, which is proportional to the zero-sequence current. A multiplier is used to simplify the numerical calculations. Thus by definirion
iOdq =

Pi&

(4.3)

where we define the current vectors

(4.4)

and where the Parks transformation P is defined as

(4.5)

The main field-winding flux is along the direction of the d axis of the rotor. It produces an E M F that lags this flux by 90. Therefore the machine EMF E is primarily along the rotor q axis. Consider a machine having a constant terminal voltage V. For generator

The Synchronous Machine

85

action the phasor gshould be leading the phasor The angle between E and is the machine torque angle 6 if the phasor V is in the direction of the reference phase (phase a ) . At f = 0 the phasor Vis located at the axis of phase a, Le., at the reference axis in Figure 4.1. The q axis is located at an angle 6, and the d axis is located at 8 = 6 + u/2. At t > 0, the reference axis is located at an angle uRt with respect to the axis of phase a. The d axis of the rotor is therefore located at

v.

B =

WRt

+6+~

/ rad 2

(4.6)

where wR is the rated (synchronous) angular frequency in rad/s and 6 is the synchronous torque angle in electrical radians. Expressions similar to (4.3) may also be written for voltages or flux linkages; e.g.,
VOdq

= pvabc

AOdq

= pxabc

(4.7)

If the transformation (4.5) is unique, an inverse transformation also exists wherein we may write
iabc = P-iodq The inverse of (4.5) may be computed to be
1/dT
COS

(4.8)

sin 8
sin(8

P-I

fl l / &

cos(8 - 2 ~ / 3 ) sin(t9 - 2 r / 3 )

[/G cos(e

+ 243)

+ 2*/3)

and we note that P - = P, which means that the transformation P is orthogonal. Having P orthogonal also means that the transformation P is power invariant, and we should expect to use the same power expression in either the a-b-c or the 0-d-q frame of reference. Thus

(4.9)

= = =

uaia

+, U,i,

= V:briabc = (P-VOd,)(P-iwq)

vhdq(P-)P-Iiwq = v & + ~ P P - ~ , ,
vhdqiodq = uoio + udid + uqiq (4.10)

4.3

Flux linkage Equations

The situation depicted in Figure 4.1 is that of a network consisting of six mutually coupled coils. These are the three phase windings sa-fa, sb-fb, and sc-fc; the field winding F-F; and the two damper windings D-D and Q-Q. (The damper windings are often designated by the symbols kd and kq. We prefer the shorter notation used here. Phase-winding designations s and f refer to start and finish of these coils.) We write the flux linkage equation for these six circuits as

stator

rotor

i 1

Wb turns

(4.1 1)

86

Chapter 4
= =

where Ljk

self-inductance when j = k mutual inductance when j

and where Ljk = Lkjin all cases. Note the subscript convention in (4.11) where lowercase subscripts are used for stator quantities and uppercase subscripts are used for rotor quantities. Prentice [ 141 shows that most of the inductances in (4. I I ) are functions of the rotor position angle 8. These inductances may be written as follows
4.3.1 Stator self-inductances

The ph ase-w i n di ng self-inductances are given by

L,, Lbb L,

=
=

L, L, L,

+L , C O ~ H + L, COS2(8 - 2 ~ / 3 )H + L , C O S ~ (+ 2*/3) H ~

(4.12)

where L, > L, and both L, and L, are constants. (All inductance quantities such as L, or M , with single subscripts are constants in our notation.)
4.3.2 Rotor self-inductances

Since saturation and slot effect are neglected, all rotor self-inductances are constants and, according to our subscript convention, we may use a single subscript notation; Le., L,
4.3.3
=

LF H

LD D

LD H

LQQ= LQ H

(4.13)

Stator mutual inductances

The phase-to-phase mutual inductances are functions of 8 but are symmetric, Lab = L, Lb, = Lcb L, = L,,
= =

- M , - L,COS2(8 + * / 6 ) H - M, - L, COS 2(8 - */2) H - M , - ~ , C o q e+ 5*/6) H

(4.14)

where I M, I > L,. Note that signs of mutual inductance terms depend upon assumed current directions and coil orientations.
4.3.4 Rotor mutual inductances

The mutual inductance between windings F and D is constant and does not vary with 8. The coefficient of coupling between the d and q axes is zero, and all pairs of windings with 90" displacement have zero mutual inductance. Thus L,
4.3.5
=

LDF

= MR

L,

LQF = 0 H

LDQ = L , D

0 H

(4.15)

Stator-to-rotor mutual inductances

Finally, we consider the mutual inductances between stator and rotor windings, all of which are functions of the rotor angle 8. From the phase windings to the field winding we write La, = LF, LbF = LFb L,, = LFc
= =
=

MFCOS8 H hfFcos(8 - 2 ~ / 3 ) H MFCOS(8 + 2 ~ / 3 )H

(4.16)

Similarly, from phase windings to damper winding D we have

The Synchronous Machine

87

(4.17) and finally, from phase windings to damper winding Q we have La, =- L, = MQsinB H LbQ = LQb = MQsin(8 - 2*/3) H LcQ = LQc = MQsin(B + 2*/3) H

(4.18)

The signs on mutual terms depend upon assumed current directions and coil orientation.
4.3.6
Transformation of inductances

Knowing all inductances in the inductance matrix (4. I I), we observe that nearly all terms in the matrix are time varying, since B is a function of time. Only four of the off-diagonal terms vanish, as noted in equation (4.15). Thus in voltage equations i such as (4. I ) the h term is not a simple Li' but must be computed as = L i + i . We now observe that (4.1 I ) with its time-varying inductances can be simplified by referring all quantities to a rotor frame of reference through a Park's transformation (4.5) applied to the a-6-c partition. We compute

where

L ,

stator-stator inductances

La=,LRa = stator-rotor inductances


LRR rotor-rotor inductances = Equation (4.19) is obtained by premultiplying (4.1 I ) by

where P is Park's transformation and U3 is the 3 x 3 unit matrix. operation indicated in (4.19). we compute

[.' ".3

Performing the

Wb turns

(4.20)

where we have defined the following new constants,


Ld =

Lo

L, + M, + (3/2)Lm H L, - 2M, H

L, k

L, =

+ M, - (3/2)Lm
q

H
(4.21)

88

Chapter 4

In (4.20) Ad is the flux linkage in a circuit moving with the rotor and centered on the d axis. Similarly, A, is centered on the q axis. Flux linkage A. is completely uncoupled from the other circuits, as the first row and column have only a diagonal term. It is important also to observe that the inductance matrix of (4.20) is a matrix of constants. This is apparent since all quantities have only one subscript, thus conforming with our notation for constant inductances. The power of Park's transformation is that it removes the time-varying coefficients from this equation. This is very important. We also note that the transformed matrix (4.20) is symmetric and therefore is physically realizable by an equivalent circuit. This was not true of the transformation used by Park [ 10, 1 I], where he let vodq = Qvabr with Q defined as

(4.22)

Other transformations are found in the literature. The transformation (4.22) is not a power-invariant transformation and does not result in a reciprocal (symmetric) inductance matrix. This leads to unnecessary complication when the equations are normalized.
4.4
Voltage Equations

The generator v.oltage equations are in the form of (4.1). Schematically, the circuits are shown in Figure 4.2, where coils are identified exactly the same as in Figure 4.1 and with coil terminations shown as well. Mutual inductances are omitted from the schematic for clarity but are assumed present with the values given in Section 4.3. Note that the stator currents are assumed to have a positive direction flowing out of the machine terminals, since the machine is a generator. For the conditions indicated we may write the matrix equation
v .= -ri

-X

+ v,
i

L
F '

Fig. 4.2 Schematic diagram of a synchronous machine.

The Synchronous Machine

89

or

+I;]
v
where we define the neutral voltage contribution to vabc as

(4.23)

v,,=-r,, 1

[:

lo [: 1I;J
I

-ib

ib - L ,

(4.24) (4.25)

If r,

= rb =

rc

r, as is usually the case, we may also define


Robc =

rU3

where U, is the 3 x 3 unit matrix, and we may rewrite (4.23) in partitioned form as follows:

where

Thus (4.26) is complicated by the presence of time-varying coefficients in the term, but these terms can be eliminated by applying a Park's transformation to the stator partition. This requires that both sides of (4.26) be premultiplied by

By definition

for the left side of (4.26). For the resistance voltage drop term we compute

VFDQ 'vabc]

- -

r;

RFDQ 0

] p] [k] k]
~FDQ

- XFDQ

(4.26)

(4.27)

(4.28)

90

Chapter 4

The second term on the right side of (4.26) is transformed as


(4.30)

We evaluate

by- recalling the definition (4.71,

Aodq

PA&, from which we com-

(4.3 1)

0=
wAd-

(4.32)

Finally, the third term on the right side of (4.26) transforms as follows:
(4.33)

where by definition nodq is the voltage drop from neutral to ground in the 0-d-q coordinate system. Using (4.24), we compute

(4.34)

and observe that this voltage drop occurs only in the zero sequence, as it should. Summarizing, we substitute (4.28)-(4.3 1) and (4.33) into (4.26) to write

Note that all terms in this equation are known. The resistance matrix is diagonal. For balanced conditions the zero-sequence voltage is zero. To simplify the notation, let

['-1
VFDQ

1;

RFDQ

] [?] [
~FDQ

- AFDQ k ] q

["':"Odj

]: n [

(4.35)

The Synchronous Machine

91

Then for balanced conditions (4.35) may be written without the zero-sequence equation as

4.5
Formulation of State-Space Equations

["I

(4.36)

XFDQ

Recall that our objective is to derive a set of equations describing the synchronous machine in the form

x
where

= f(x,u,r)

(4.37)

x = a vector of the state variables u = the system driving functions

a set of nonlinear functions

If the equations describing the synchronous machine are linear, the set (4.37) is of the well-known form
= AX

+ BU

(4.38)

Examining (4.35). we can see that it represents a set of first-order differential equations. We may now put this set in the form of (4.37) or (4.38), Le., in state-space form. Note, however, that (4.35) contains flux linkages and currents as variables. Since these two sets of variables are mutually dependent, we can eliminate one set to express (4.35) in terms of one set of variables only. Actually, numerous possibilities for the choice of the state variables are available. We will mention only two that are common: ( I ) a set based on the currenrs as state variables; i.e., x' = ( i d i q i F i D i Qwhich has the ], advantage of offering simple relations between the voltages u d and u, and the state variables (through the power network connected to the machine terminals) and (2) a set based onflux linkages as the state variables, where the particular set to be chosen depends upon how conveniently they can be expressed in terms of the machine currents and stator voltages. Here we will use the formulation x' = [ A d A, X F X D XQ].
4.6
Current Formulation

Starting with (4.39, we can replace the terms in X and iby terms in i and ;,as follows. The term has been simplified so that we can compute its value from (4.20), which we rearrange in partitioned form. Let

, where L& is the transpose of L. But the inductance matrix here is a constant matrix, so we may write h = Li V, and the iterm behaves exactly like that of a passive inductance. Substituting this result into (4.35). expanding to full 6 x 6 notation, and rearranging,

92

Chapter 4

(4.39) where k = m a s before. A great deal of information is contained in (4.39). First, we note that the zero-sequence voltage is dependent only upon io and io. This equation can be solved separately from the others once the initial conditions on io are given. The remaining five equations are all coupled in a most interesting way. They are similar to those of a passive network except for the presence of the speed voltage terms. These terms, consisting of WX or wLi products, appear unsymmetrically and distinguish this equation from that of a passive network. Note that the speed voltage terms in the d axis equation are due only to q axis currents, viz., iqand i,. Similarly, the q axis speed voltages are due to d axis currents, i d , iF, and iD. Also observe that all the terms in the coefficient matrices are constants except w, the angular velocity. This is a considerable improvement over the description given in (4.23) in the a-b-c frame of reference since nearly all inductances in that equation were time varying. The price we have paid to get rid of the time-varying coefficients is the introduction of speed voltage terms in the resistance matrix. Since w is a variable, this causes (4.39) to be nonlinear. If the speed is assumed constant, which is usually a good approximation, then (4.39) is linear. I n any event, the nonlinearity is never great, as w is usually nearly constant.
4.7
Per Unit Conversion

The voltage equations of the preceding section are not in a convenient form for engineering use. One difficulty is the numerically awkward values with stator voltages in the kilovolt range and field voltage at a much lower level. This problem can be solved by normalizing the equations to a convenient base value and expressing all voltages in pu (or percent) of base. (See Appendix C.) An examination of the voltage equations reveals the dimensional character shown in Table 4.1, where all dimensions are expressed in terms of a u-i-i (voltage, current, time) system. [These dimensions are convenient here. Other possible systems are

The Synchronous Machine

93

FLtQ (force, length, time, charge) and MLtp (mass, length, time, permeability).] Observe that all quantities appearing in (4.39) involve only three dimensions. Thus if we choose three base quantities that involve all three dimensions, all bases are fixed for all quantities. For example, if we choose the base voltage, base current, and base time, by combining these quantities according to column 4 of Table 4.1, we may compute base quantities for all other entries. Note that exactly three base quantities must be chosen and that these three must involve all three dimensions, u, i, and t .
Table 4.1.
Quantity

Electrical Quantities, Units, and Dimensions


Units
u-i-i

Symbol

Dimensions
[VI

Relationship

Voltage Current Power or voltamperes


Flux linkage

v
i

volts (V)

p or S

x
r Lor M
I
0

Resistance Inductance Time


Angular velocity
Angle
4.7.1

amperes (A) watts (W) voltamperes (VA) weber turns (Wb turns) ohm (a)
henry (H) second (s)

[vi1
[v/il

[il

vi
ri. Li

v = x

[vrlil
[ 1 /I1

v v

=
=

[I1

radians per second radian (rad)


(Ws)

Bord

dimensionless

Choosing a base for stator quantities

The variables udr u,, id, i,, Ad, and A, are stator quantities because they relate directly to the a-6-c phase quantities through Parks transformation. (Also see Rankin [ 151, Lewis [ 121 and Harris et al. [9] for a discussion of this topic.) Using the subscript B to indicate base and R to indicate rated, we choose the following stator base quantities. Let SB= SR = stator rated VA/phase, VA rms V, = VR = stator rated line-to-neutral voltage, V rms wB = w R = generator rated speed, elec rad/s

(4.40)

Before proceeding further, let us examine the effect of this choice on the d and q axis quantities. First note that the three-phast power in pu is three times the pu power per phase (for balanced conditions). To prove this, let the rms phase quantities be V b V and I& A. The three-phase power is 3 VIcos(a - y) W. The pu power P3* is given by
Pj+

(~VI/VBI,)COS((Y 7) -

~V,I,COS((Y 7 ) -

(4.4 1 )

where the subscript u is used to indicate pu quantities. To obtain the d and q axis quantities, we first write the instantaneous phase voltage and currents. To simplify the expression without any loss of generality, we will assume that u,(t) is in the form,
u, = V,sin(O + (Y) = d V s i n ( 8 ub = d V s i n ( O + (Y - 2 ~ / 3 ) V u, = d V s i n ( O + (Y + 2 ~ / 3 ) V

+ a) v
(4.42)

Then from ( 4 . 9 , vodq

PvObc or

94

Chapter 4

(4.43)

In pu
udu

= ud/VB =

&(V/V,)sincu

6 Ksincu

(4.44) (4.45) (4.46)

Similarly,

uqU= d 3 V U c o s a
Obviously, then
u:

+ u&

3Vt

The above results are significant. They indicate that with this particular choice of the base voltage, the pu d and q axis voltages are numerically equal to fl times the pu phase voltages. Similarly, we can show that if the rms phase current is fly A, the corresponding d and q axis currents are given by,

(4.47)

and the pu currents are given by


id. = d 3 1 , , s i n ~

iF

fii,cosy

(4.48)

To check the validity of the above, the power in the d and q circuits must be the same as the power in the three stator phases, since P is a power-invariant transformation.
Pj6
= i#dU =

+ iquuqu 3 I,, K(sin a sin y = 3f,,KcOS(a - y) P U

+ cos

C Y

cosy)

(4.49)

We now develop the relations for the various base quantities. From (4.40) and Table 4 1 we compute the following: .
1, = SB/VB = SR/VR A rms

r,
L,

l/wB = 1/wR s
V,r,/f, =
VR/IRWR

A, = V,r,

= VR/wR =

LBf, Wb turn
=

R,

VB/IB

VR/IR

H (4.50)

Thus by choosing the three base quantities S, V,, and re, we can compute base , values for all quantities of interest. To normalize any quantity, it is divided by the base quantity of the same dimension. For example, for currents we write
i, = i(A)/f,(A)

pu

(4.51)

where we use the subscript u to indicate pu. Later, when there is no danger of ambiguity in the notation, this subscript is omitted.

The Synchronous Machine

95

4.7.2

Choosing a base for rotor quantities

Lewis [ 121 showed that in circuits coupled electromagnetically, which are to be normalized, it is essential to select the same voltampere and time base in each part of the circuit. (See Appendix C for a more detailed treatment of this subject.) The choice of equal time base throughout all parts of a circuit with mutual coupling is the important constraint. It can be shown that the choice of a common time base t, forces the VA base to be equal in all circuit parts and also forces the base mutual inductance to be the geometric mean of the base self-inductances if equal pu mutuals are to result; i.e., MI,, = (LlBL2B). (See Problem 4.18.) is For the synchronous machine the choice of SB based on the rating of the stator, and the time base is fixed by the rated radian frequency. These base quantities must be the same for the rotor circuits as well. It should be remembered, however, that the stator VA base is much larger than the VA rating of the rotor (field) circuits. Hence some rotor base quantities are bound to be very large, making the corresponding pu rotor quantities appear numerically small. Therefore, care should be exercised in the choice of the remaining free rotor base term, since all other rotor base quantities will then be automatically determined. There is a choice of quantities, but the question is, Which is more convenient? To illustrate the above, consider a machine having a stator rating of 100 x lo6 V A / phase. Assume that its exciter has a rating of 250 V and lo00 A. If, for example, we choose I R B = 1000 A, VRB will then be 100,000 V; and if we choose VRB = 250 V, then I R B will be 400,000 A. Is one choice more convenient than the other? Are there other more desirable choices? The answer lies in the nature of the coupling between the rotor and the stator circuits. It would seem desirable to choose some base quantity in the rotor to give the correct base quantity in the stator. For example, we can choose the base rotor current to give, through the magnetic coupling, the correct base stator flux linkage or open circuit voltage. Even then there is some latitude in the choice of the base rotor current, depending on the condition of the magnetic circuit. The choice made here for the free rotor base quantity is based on the concept of equal mutualflux linkages. This means that base field current or base d axis amortisseur current will produce the same space fundamental of air gap flux as produced by base stator current acting in the fictitious d winding. Referring to the flux linkage equations (4.20) let id = I,, iF = IFB, and io = I D B be applied one by one with other currents set to zero. If we denote the magnetizing inductances ( 4 = leakage inductances) as

(4.52)

and equate the mutual flux linkages in each winding,

Then we can show that

96

Chapter 4

- -

(4.54)

and this is the fundamental constraint among base currents. From (4.54) and the requirement for equal S, we compute ,

These basic constraints permit us to compute

and since the base mutuals must be the geometric mean of the base self-inductances (see Problem 4. I8),
MFB =

kFLB H

MDB= kDLB H

MQB= kQLB H

MRB= kFkDLB H (4.57)

4.7.3

Comparison with other per unit systems

The subject of the pu system used with synchronous machines has been controversial over the years. While the use of pu quantities is common in the literature, it is not always clear which base quantities are used by the authors. Furthermore, synchronous machine data is usually furnished by the manufacturer in pu. Therefore it is important to understand any major difference in the pu systems adopted. Part of the problem lies in the nature of the original Park's transformation Q given in (4.22). This transformation is not power invariant; i.e., the three-phase power in watts is given byp,,, = 1.5 (idud + lquq). Also, the mutual coupling between the field and the stator d axis is not reciprocal. When the Q transformation is used, the pu system is chosen carefully to overcome this difficulty. Note that the modijied Park's transformation P defined by (4.5) was chosen specifically to overcome these problems. The system most commonly used in the literature is based on the following base quantities: SB = three-phase rated V A VB = peak rated voltage to neutral I B = peak rated current and with rotor base quantities chosen to give equal pu mutual inductances. This leads to the relations fl(Lmd/MF)lB vFB = (3/fl)(MF/Ln1d)~B This choice of base quantities, which is commonly used, gives the same numerical values in pu for synchronous machine stator and rotor impedances and self-inductances as the system used in this book. The pu mutual inductances differ by a factor of Therefore, the terms kMF used in this book are numerically equal to M F in pu as found in the literature. The major differences lie in the following:
IFB

a.

1. Since the power in the d and q stator circuits is the three-phase power, one pu cur-

rent and voltage gives three pu power in the system used here and gives one pu power in the other system.

The Synchronous Machine

97

2. In the system used here uk + u& = 3 V t , while in the other system Vt,where Vuis the pu terminal voltage.

viu +

u&

The system used here is more appealing to some engineers than that used by the manufacturers [9, 121. However, since the manufacturers' base system is so common, there is merit in studying both.

Example 4.1 Find the pu values of the parameters of the synchronous machine for which the following data are given (values are for an actual machine with some quantities, denoted by an asterisk, being estimated for academic study): L Q = 1.423 x H* RatedMVA = 160 MVA Rated voltage = 15 kV, Y connected = t,(unsaturated) = 0.5595 x lo-.' H Excitation voltage = 375 V kMD = 5.782 X w3 H* Statorcurrent = 6158.40 A kMQ = 2.779 x IO-' H* Fieldcurrent = 926 A r(125"C) = 1.542 x 52 Power factor = 0.85 rF(125"C) = 0.371 52 Ld 6.341 X w3 H rD 18.421 x ioT3 Q* LF = 2.189 H rQ = 18.969 x 52* LO = 5.989 x H* Inertia constant = 1.765 kW.s/hp L , = 6.118 x H

.ed

From the no-load magnetization curve, the value of field current corresponding to the rated voltage on the air gap line is 365 A.

Solution: Stator Base Quantities: S, = 160/3 = 53.3333 MVAIphase VB = lSOOO/fl = 8660.25 V 1, = 6158.40 A t, = 2.6526 x s A, = 8660 x 2.65 x = 22.972 Wb turn/phase R, = 8660.25/6158.40 = 1.406 52 H L, = 8660/(377 x 6158) = 3.730 x L,d = Ld - 2 d = (6.341 - 0.5595)10-3 = 5.79 x io-' H
T o obtain M,, we use (4.11). (4.16), and (4.23). At open circuit the mutual inductance La, and the flux linkage in phase a are given by
A, = iFMF cos 8 LaF = MF cos 8 The instantaneous voltage of phase a is u, = i+,M,sin 8, where wR is the rated synchronous speed. Thus the peak phase voltage corresponds to the product iFwRMF. From the air gap line of the no-load saturation curve, the value of the field current at rated voltage is 365 A. Therefore, H MF = 8 6 6 0 d / ( 3 7 7 x 365) = 89.006 x kM, = x 89.006 x = 109.01 x H

Then k, = kMF/L,d = 18.854. Then we compute, from (4.55)-(4.57), I,, = 6158.4/18.854 = 326.64 A MFB= 18.854 x 3.73 x IO-' = 70.329 x lo-' H

98

Chapter 4

V B = (53.33 x 106)/326.64 = 163280.68 V F


RFB =
LFB

163280.681326.64 = 499.89 s2 (18.845)2 x 3.73 x = 1.326 H


L B = LB H D R B = RB s2 D RQB = RBI4 = 0.352 Q

Amortisseur Base Quantities (estimated for this example): kMD/L,,,d MDB= kMQ/L,,,, = LQB = Inertia Constant:

5.78115.781 10 .0 LB H 2.77915.782 = 0 5 . LB/4 = 0.933 x IO-

H
2.37 kW *s/kVA

H
Ld LF LD
{d

1.765( I .0/0.746)

The pu parameters are thus given by:


=
=

L, = LQ = LD = A LA, = r = rF = r = D rQ =

6.3413.73 = 1.70 2.18911.326 = 1.651 5.98913.730 = 1.605 4, 0.559513.73 0.15 6.11813.73 = 1.64 1.42310.933 = 1.526 kMD = kMF = M R = 1.70 - 0.15 kMQ 1.64 - 0.15 1.49 0.001542/1.406 = 0.001096 0.3711499.9 = 0.000742 0.018/1.406 0.0131 18.969 x 10-/0.351 = 0.0540

1.55

The quantities L D and LA, are defined in Section 4.1 1. A


4.7.4
The correspondence of per unit stator EMF to rotor quantities

We have seen that the particular choice of base quantities used here.gives pu values of d and q axis stator currents and voltages that are d3times the rms values. We also

note that the coupling between the d axis rotor and stator involves the factor k = and similarly for the q axis. For example, the contribution to the d axis stator flux linkage Ad due to the field current iF is kM& and so on. In synchronous machine equations it is often desirable to convert a rotor current, flux linkage, or voltage to an equivalent stator EMF. These expressions are developed in this section. The basis for converting a field quantity to an equivalent stator EMF is that at open circuit a field current iF A corresponds to an EMF of i F W R M F V peak. If the rms value of this EMF is E, then i F o R M F = .\/ZE and i F W R kM, = d E in MKS units?

m,

2. The choice of symbol for the E M F due to iF is not clearly decided. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) uses the symbol [ 16). A new proposed standard uses Ea 1171. The International , Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), in a discussion of [17], favors E4 for this vokage. The authors leave this voltage unsubscripted until a new standard is adopted.

The Synchronous Machine

99

Since M , and wR are known constants for a given machine, the field current corresponds to a given EMF by a simple scaling factor. Thus E is the stator air gap rms voltage in pu corresponding to the field current iF in pu. We can also convert a field flux linkage A, to a corresponding stator EMF. At steady-state open circuit conditions A, = LFiF,and this value of field current iF, when multiplied by w , M F , gives a peak stator voltage the rms value of which is denoted by E:. We can show that the d axis stator EMF corresponding to the field flux linkage A, is given by AF(WRk MF/LF)
=

flE:

(4.58)

By the same reasoning a field voltage U, corresponds (at steady state) to a field current UF/rF. This in turn corresponds to a peak stator EMF (Uf/rF)wRMF. If the rms value of this EMF is denoted by E,, the d axis stator EMF corresponds to a field voltage U, or
(v,/rF)wRkMF
4.8
=

~ E F D

(4.59)

Normalizing the Voltage Equations

Having chosen appropriate base values, we may normalize the voltage equations
(4.39). Having done this, the stator equations should be numerically easier to deal with,

as all values of voltage and current will normally be in the neighborhood of unity. For the following computations we add the subscript u to all pu quantities to emphasize their dimensionless character. Later this subscript will be omitted when all values have been normalized. The normalization process is based on (4.51) and a similar relation for the rotor, which may be substituted into (4.39) to give

0 0
r

0
0
0
rD

WkMQl O

0
0

rF

0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0

0 0
kM,

0
kMF

0
O
kM,
(4.60)

0
kMF

Lq

0
LF
MR

0
0
kMQ

kMD

LD

Q-

where the first three equations are on a stator base and the last three are on a rotor base. Examine the second equation more closely. Dividing through by V, and setting w = u u w R ,we have

1 00

Chapter 4

(4.61)
Incorporating base values from (4.50), we rewrite (4.61) as
UdU =

r - id,,
RB

- 0,

i,,

- w,,

w l VB

kMQi, -

(4.62)

We now recognize the following pu quantities.


r, = r / R B
Lqu

Ldu

= Ld/LB

Mu = F
MQu
E

MFWRIFBIVB
MQwRIQB/vB

= Lq/LB

MDu

= MDwRIDB/VB

(4.63)

Incorporating (4.63), the d axis equation (4.62) may be rewritten with all values except time in pu; i.e.,

The third equation of (4.60) may be analyzed in a similar way to write


U , = w,Ld,id,, ,

- r,i,,,

L,, + U,kMF,ip, + &+,kMD,,iD,, - - iqu- k


*

Mw * -i,
WR

WR

P U

(4.65)

where all pu coefficients have been previously defined. The first equation is uncoupled from the others and may be written as
uou = -

-lo, RB

+ 3r,

Lo

+ 3Ln 10, :
(4.66)

"RLB

= - (r

1 + 3rn),,iO,, WR ( L , + 3 ~ , ) , , i ~ pu -,

If the currents are balanced, it is easy to show that this equation vanishes. The fourth equation is normalized on a rotor basis and may be written from (4.60) as

(4.67)
We now incorporate the base rotor inductance to normalize the last two terms as

The normalized field circuit equation becomes


uF,,

= rF,,iF,

kMFu' LFu + - + -iF,,+ -i D ~ id, "R WR WR


*

(4.69)
The

The damper winding equations can be normalized by a similar procedure. following equations are then obtained,

(4.70)

The Synchronous Machine

101

(4.7 I )

These normalized equations are in a form suitable for solution in the time domain with time in seconds. However, some engineers prefer to rid the equations of the awkward 1 / 0 , that accompanies every term containing a time derivative. This may be done by normalizing time. We do this by setting
1 d _ -- - - d
OR

dt

d7

(4.72)

(4.73)

is the normalized time in rad. Incorporating all normalized equations in a matrix expression and -dropping the subscript u since all values are in pu, we write

= -

Ld

kMF

kMD

pu

(4.74)

where we have omitted the u,, equation, since we are interested in balanced system conditions in stability studies, and have rearranged the equations to show the d and q coupling more clearly. It is important to notice that (4.74) is identical in notation to (4.39). This is always possible if base quantities are carefully chosen and is highly desirable, as the same equation symbolically serves both as a pu and a system quantity equation. Using matrix notation, we write (4.74) as
v = -(R

+ oN)i

L i pu

(4.75)

where R is the resistance matrix and is a diagonal matrix of constants, N is the matrix of speed voltage inductance coefficients, and L is a symmetric matrix of constant inductances. If we assume that the inverse of the inductance matrix exists, we may write

-L- I (R

+ wN)i

- L-v pu

(4.76)

This equation has the desired state-space form. It does not express the entire system behavior, however, so we have additional equations to write. Equation (4.76) may be depicted schematically by the equivalent circuit shown in

102

Chapter 4

vQ

r-~$-y-kMQ+-J+ r

+
ad

Fig. 4.3 Synchronous generator d-q equivalent circuit.

Figure 4.3. Note that all self and mutual inductances in the equivalent circuit are constants, and pu quantities are implied for all quantities, including time. Note also the presence of controlled sources in the equivalent. These are due to speed voltage terms in the equations. Equation (4.74) and the circuit in Figure 4.3 differ from similar equations found in the literature in two important ways. I n this chapter we use the symbols L and M for self an'd mutual inductances respectively. Some authors and most manufacturers refer to these same quantities by the symbol x or X . This is sometimes confusing to one learning synchronous machine theory because a term XI that appears to be a voltage may be a flux linkage. The use of X for L or M is based on the rationale that w is nearly constant at 1.0 pu so that, in pu, X = w L L . However, as we shall indicate in the sections to follow, w is certainly not a constant; it is a state variable in our equations, and we must treat it as a variable. Later, in a linearized model we will let w be approximated as a constant and will simplify other terms in the equations as well. For convenience of those acquainted with other references we list a comparison of these inductances in Table 4.2. Here the subscript notation k d and kq for D and Q respectively is seen. These symbols are quite common in the literature in reference to the damper windings.
Table 4.2.

Comparison of Per Unit Inductance Symbols


LF
Lfl
xfl Xkdd

Chapter 4
Kimbark [2] Concordia [ I ]

Ld Ld xd

Lq
Lq

LD

LQ
L88

kMF
MF

MR
xJld

kMD
xakd

~ M Q
M8 xakq

xq

Xkgq

xo/

Example 4.2 Consider a 60-Hz synchronous machine with the following pu parameters:
L d

= 1.70

Lq = LF = L = D LQ = kMF =

1.64 1.65 1.605 1.526

kMQ = 1.49 r = 0.001096


r F 0.000742 r, = 0.0131 rQ = 0.0540
= 1.55

M R = kMD
= 0.15

= 2.37s

t d = t q

The SynchronousMachine

103

Solution From (4.75) we have numerically

0.001 1 0

0 0

I
I I I

1.640
0 0

1.49~

0.00074

R+wN=

0
-I . 5 5 ~

0.0131

I
I

-1.70~ - 0
1.70

- 1 . 5 5 ~ 0.001 1
0
1.55 1.55 1.605
I I

_______
0

PU

0
1.55

0 0

0.0540

I
I

1.55 L =

1.65 1.55

I .55

I
I

I I

0
0

O 0

0 0

from which we compute by digital computer


5.405 -1.869 7.110 -5.060 -3.414 -5.060 8.804

I
I

0 0

I
I

Then we may compute

- 5.9269
2.0498 -L-I(R

1.3878 -5.2785 3.7564 8379.9~

44.7198 66.2818

; -8864.90
I. I

-8504.

U -

3065.9~ 5598.9~

2785.4~ 5086.80 284.857 -313.534

+ wN) =

IO-

3.7433 9 190.90

- 1 15.3290

______________________LL______________

P U

8 3 7 9 . 9 ~ I,- 5.9279

-8975.2~ - 8 1 8 3 . 3 ~ -8183.3~

5.7888

and the coefficient matrix is seen to contain w in 12 of its 25 terms. This gives some idea of the complexity of the equations.

4.9

Normalizing the Torque Equations

In Chapter 2 the swing equation

Jii

(2J/p);

To N - m

(4.77)

is normalized by dividing both sides of the equation by a shaft torque that corresponds to the rated three-phase power at rated speed (base three-phase torque). The result of this normalization was found to be

104

Chapter 4

(2H/w,)k
where w T,
=
=

T ~ ~ ( 3 6 ) o

(4.78)

angular velocity of the revolving magnetic field in elec rad/s accelerating torque in pu on a three-phase base

wR/SB)s

and the derivative is with respect to time in seconds. This normalization takes into account the change in angular measurements from mechanical to electrical radians and divides the equations by the base three-phase torque. Equation (4.78) is the swing equation used to determine the speed of the stator revolving M M F wave as a function of time. We need to couple the electromagnetic torque T,, determined by the generator equations, to the form of (4.78). Since (4.78) is normalized to a three-phase base torque and our chosen generator V A base is a per phase basis, we must use care in combining the pu swing equation and the pu generator torque equation. Rewriting (4.78) as

( ~ H / U B ) & T,,, - T, pU(34) =


the expression used for T, must be in pu on a three-phase V A base. Suppose we define

(4.79)

T,,
Then

=
=

pu generator electromagnetic torque defined on a per phase V A base Te(N'm)/(SB/wB) Pu

(4.80) (4.81)

Te = TtJ3

~ ~ ( 3 4 )

( A similar definition could be used for the mechanical torque; viz., Tm, = 3T,.

Usually, T,,,is normalized on a three-phase basis.) The procedure that must be used is clear. We compute the generator electromagnetic torque in N - m . This torque is normalized along with other generator quantities , on a basis of S, V,, I,, and t , to give T,#. Thus for a fully loaded machine at rated speed, we would expect to compute T,, = 3.0. Equation (4.81) transforms this pu torque to the new value T,, which is the pu torque on a three-phase basis.
4.9.1

The normalized swing equation

In (4.79), while the torque is normalized, the angular speed w and the time are given in M K S units. Thus the equation is not completely normalized. The normalized swing equation is of the form given in (2.66)

(4.82)
where all the terms in the swing equation, including time and angular speed, are in pu. Beginning with (4.79) and substituting
tu = w,t

w, = w / w ,

(4.83)

we have for the normalized swing equation

(4.84)
thus, when time is in pu,
Ti =

2HwB

(4.85)

The Synchronous Machine

105

4.9.2

Forms of the swing equation

There are many forms of the swing equation appearing in the literature of power system dynamics. While the torque is almost always given in pu, it is often not clear which units of w and f are being used. To avoid confusion, a summary of the different forms of the swing equation is given in this section. If We begin with w in rad/s and f in s, (2H/w,,)h = TO,,. t and T, are in pu (and w in rad/s), by substituting tu = w,t in (4.79),
- _ = 2H dw
0 ,

dt

2 H dw = To, pu dt,

(4.86)

If w and To are in pu (and t in s), by substituting in (4.79),


(4.87)

If I , w, and To are all in pu,


2HwB dw, -= dt,
T. - =

' dt,

do,

T0, P U

(4.88)

If w is given in elec deg/s, (4.79) and (4.86) are modified as follows:

H dw U 180& dt - Toll P
uH - - = dw
90 dt,

(4.89) (4.90)

To, P U

It would be tempting to normalize the swing equation on a per phase basis such that all terms in (4.79) are in pu based on S, rather than SB3. This could indeed be done with the result that all values in the swing equation would be multiplied by three. This is not done here because it is common to express both T, and T, in pu on a threephase base. Therefore, even though S , is a convenient base to use in normalizing the generator circuits, it is considered wise to convert the generator terminal power and torque to a three-phase base S,, to match the basis normally used in computing the machine terminal conditions from the viewpoint of the network (e.g., in load-flow studies). Note there is not a similar problem with the voltage being based on V,, the phase-to-neutral voltage, since a phase voltage of k pu means that the line-to-line voltage is also k pu on a line-to-line basis.
4.10 Torque and Power

The total three-phase power output of a synchronous machine is given by


pou, = uoio

+ ubib + uric =

Vtbciobc

pu

(4.91)

where the superscript t indicates the transpose of vob,. But from (4.8) we may write with a similar expression for the voltage vector. Then (4.91) becomes iOk =
PO", =

vbq(P-'Y P-'bq

Performing the indicated operation and recalling that P is orthogonal, we find that

106

Chapter 4

the power output of a synchronous generator is invariant under the transformation P; i.e.,
poul= udid + uqiq + uoio

(4.92)

For simplicity we will assume balanced but not necessarily steady-state conditions. Thusu, = io = Oand
poul= udid

+ u,i,

(balanced condition)

(4.93)

Substituting for u d and uq from (4.36),

(4.94)
Concordia [ I ] observes that the three terms are identifiable as the rate of change of stator magnetic field energy, the power transferred across the air gap, and the stator ohmic losses respectively. The machine torque is obtained from the second term,

T,,

aw,,/ae

aPRd/aW= a/aw

[(iqxd - idxq)W]= iqxd - idxq

PU

(4.95)

The same result can be obtained from a more rigorous derivation. Starting with the three armature circuits and the three rotor circuits, the energy in the field is given by
6
wfid

=
&-I
j- I

I 5 Cik4

Lkj)

(4.96)

which is a function of 8. Then using T = a WRd/a8 and simplifying, we can obtain the above relation (see Appendix B of [ I ] ) . Now, recalling that the flux linkages can be expressed in terms of the currents, we write from (4.20), expressed in pu,
=

Ldid

+ kMFiF + kMDiD

xq

Lqiq + kh!fQiQ

(4.97)

Then (4.95) can be written as

(4.98)

which we recognize to be a bilinear term. Suppose we express the total accelerating torque in the swing equation as

(4.99)
where T, is the mechanical torque, T, is the electrical torque, and Td is the damping torque. It is often convenient to write the damping torque as

T d

DW pu

(4.100)

where D is a damping constant. Then by using (4.81) and (4.98), the swing equation may be written as

The Synchronous Machine

107

where r j is defined by (4.85) and depends on the units used for w and following relation between 6 and w may be derived from (4.6).

t.

Finally, the
(4.102)

6=w-I
Incorporating (4.101) and (4.102) into (4.76), we obtain
I I I

-L-(R

+ wN)
____-kh!fQid

I I I I I I I I I I I-

37,

(4.103)

This matrix equation is in the desired state-space form x


v and T,.
4.1 1
Equivalent Circuit of o Synchronous Machine

f(x,u,t) as given by

(4.37). It is clear from (4.101) that the system is nonlinear. Note that the inputs are

For balanced conditions the normalized flux linkage equations are obtained from
(4.20) with the row for A, omitted.
t d

kMF kMD

0
LF

kM<
(4.104)

M U
LD

kMQ We may rewrite the d axis flux linkages as

Q.

108

Chapter 4

where and are the leakage inductances of the d, F, and D circuits respectively. Let iF = i, = 0, and the flux linkage that will be mutually coupled to the other circuits is Ad - &id, or (Ld - xa)id. As stated in Section 4.7.2, Ld is the magnetizing inductance Lmd. The flux linkage mutually coupled to the othe; d axis circuits is then L,did. The flux linkages in the F and D circuits, AF and AD, are given in this particular case by A, = kMFid, and A, = kMDid. From the choice of the base rotor current, to give equal mutual flux, we can see that the pu values of &did, A,, and AD must be equal. Therefore, the pu values of Lmd, kMF, and kMD are equal. This can be verified by using (4.57) and (4.59,
(4.106)

.e,,, .eF,

xD

In pu, we usually call this quantity LAD; i.e., L D L Ld A We can also prove that, in pu, LAD LD x d

kM,q

kMD P U

(4.107)

4, =

LF -

x~ = Ld =

x d

= kMF = kMD =

hf~

(4.108)

Similarly, for the q axis we define L , = L, A A

4,

LQ -

XQ =

kMQ P U

(4.109)

If in each circuit the pu leakage flux linkage is subtracted, the remaining flux linkage is the same as for all other circuits coupled to it. Thus
Ad

x d i d = XF

x F i F = AD

xDiD =

A,,

pu

(4. I

IO)

where

Similarly, the pu q axis mutual flux linkage is given by

Following the procedure used in developing the equivalent circuit of transformers, we can represent the above relations by the circuits shown in Figure 4.4, where we note that the currents add in the mutual branch. T o complete the equivalent circuit, we

Fig. 4.4 Flux linkage inductances of a synchronous machine.

The Synchronous Machine

109

Fig. 4.5 Direct axis equivalent circuit.

consider the voltage equations


Vd

= =

-rid -rid

Ad

WA,
[(Ld

- Xdid - xdid -uF =

4d)id

+ kMFiF + kM,iD)
wx,

- oxq

or
ud

-rid

LAD(id

. + iF + i,) .
XFiF

(4.1 13)

Similarly, we can show that


-rFiF

LA,(id L,,(id

VD =

= -rDi,

- X,i, -

+ + + iF i,) +

iD)

(4.1 14) (4.115)

The above voltage equations are satisfied by the equivalent circuit shown in Figure 4.5. The three d axis circuits (d, F, and D ) are coupled through the common magnetizing inductance L A D , which carries the sum of the currents id,iF, and io. The d axis circuit contains a controlled voltage source wA, with the polarity as shown. Similarly, for the q axis circuits
ui
=

-ri,

- X,i, - L,,(i,

UQ = 0 =

- XQiQ-

. + iQ) + . . .
LAQ(iq

WAd

(4.1 16) (4.1 17)

+ iQ)

These two equations are satisfied by the equivalent circuit shown in Figure 4.6. Note the presence of the controlled source in the stator-qcircuit.
4.1 2
Ad, id

The Flux linkage State-Space Model

A,, AD, A,, and A,.


=
(l/f!d)(Ad

We now develop an alternate state-space model where the state variables chosen are From (4.1 IO)

AAD)

but from (4.11 1) A,,

= (id

F-z Jk
+ iF + i D )LAD, which we can incorporate into (4.118) to get
=0
L~~

iF

(l/xF)(AF

xAD)

(l/xD)(x,

xAD)

(4*118)

v ,

i +i q Q
t -

u* d

Fig. 4.6 Quadrature axis equivalent circuit.

110

Chapter 4

N o w define then Similarly, we can show that where we define

and the 9 axis currents are given by

Writing (4.118) and (4.123) in matrix form,


I

-1/td

I I
I

(4.124)

4.12.1

The voltage equations

The voltage equations are derived as follows from (4.36). For the dequation
ud

= -rid

Ad

wX,

(4.125)

Using (4.124) and rearranging,


Ad

-r(Ad/td

AAD/td>

- wAq

vd

or
id

-(r/'i!d)Ad

+ (r/td)AAD =
-rFiF

OAq

vd

(4.126)

Also from (4.36)


-uF

XF

(4.127)

Substituting for iF

b
or

- r F ( b / t F

- A A D / t F > + UF
(4.128)

- ( ~ F / ~ F ) X F

+(rF/tF)h -

The Synchronous Machine

111

Repeating the procedure for the D circuit,


XD

= -(ro/tD)~D

(rD/tD)hAD

(4.129)

The procedure is repeated for the q axis circuits. For the uq equations we compute
iq

-<r/tq)Aq

+ ( r / t q ) A A Q + wAd + (rQ/tQ)AAQ

uq

(4.130)

and from the (I axis damper-winding equation,


=

-(rQ/tQ)AQ

(4.131)

Note that AAD or A,, appears in the above equations. This form is convenient if saturation is to be included in the model since the mutual inductances L A D and LA, are the , only inductances that saturate. If saturation can be neglected the A,, and A terms can be eliminated (see Section 4.12.3).
4.12.2
The torque equation

From (4.95) q, = iqAd - idAq. Using (4.124). we substitute for the currents to compute

= We may also take advantage of the relation t q The new electromechanical equation is given by

t d

(called t,in many references).


L/Tj

&=

-(AAD/td3Tj)Aq

+ (AAQ/tq3Tj)Ad- ( D / 7 j ) + ~

(4.133)

Finally the equation for 6 IS given by (4.102). Equations (4.126)-(4.13 I), (4. I33), and (4.102) are in state-space form. The auxiliary equations (4.120) and (4.121) are needed to relate A,, and A,, to the state variables. The state variables are A,, A,, A,, A,, A,, w , and 6. The forcing functions, are ud, uq,uF,and T,. This form of the equations is particularly convenient for solution where saturation is required, since saturation affects only A,, and A,,.
4.1 2.3

Machine equations with saturation neglected

I f saturation is neglected, LA, and LA, are constant. Therefore, L M D and L M , are also constant. The magnetizing flux linkages A,, and A,, will have constant relationships to the state variables as given by (4.120) and (4.121). We can therefore eliminate A,, and A,+, from the machine equations. Substituting for AAD, as given in (4.120), in (4.1 18) and rearranging,

(4.134)

112

Chapter 4

These currents are substituted in the d axis voltage equations of (4.36) to get

(4.135)

Similarly, the q axis equations are

(4.136)

and the equation for the electrical torque is given by

The state-space model now becomes

(4.138)

The system described by (4.138) is in the form k = f(x,u,t). Again the description of the system is not complete since u d and uq are functions of the currents and will depend on the external load connections. The 7 x 7 matrix on the right side of (4.138) contains state variables in several terms, and this matrix form of the equation is not an appropriate form for solution. It does, however, serve to illustrate the nonlinear nature of the system.

Example 4.3 Repeat Example 4.2 for the flux linkage model.
Solution From the data of Example 4. I:

The Synchronous Machine


x d
X F

113
=

= =

.eq = 0.150

4, = XQ=
1 -=L,D

pu 1.651 - 1.550 = 0.101 PU 1.605 - 1.550 = 0.055 PU 1.526 - 1.490 = 0.036 PU

.e,
2
X F X F

(I - 2) (I - %)=
X D

0.005928

- - =LMD
X F X d

0.001387 0.005278

1 1.55

1 1 + -0.15 +-0.101

+-=

0.055

35.2381 pu

--- - 0.003756 IF LMD --- I LMQ


0.005789

L,D = 0.028378 PU 1 -1 - - 1 L,Q 1.49 0.15 = 35.2381 PU L,Q = 0.028378 PU

+-+-

1 0.036

-- LnQ - 0.286058

X Q h

I_
X d

(I - %)
X F
X D

0.308485

0.005927

-MD L37j.e:
LMD 37j&XF
LMD

- 0.000235
= 0.000349

_-= LuD
Xd

0.002049 0.003743

- - =LMD
t d

ID L M D XD Xd
ID LMD !D X F

- 0.044720 - 0.066282
=

& &
XQ

= 0.000642 = 0.000980

LMQ
7j

.e,

(I - %)
-5.927 1.388

0.115330

- - - 0.000235 LMQ 37j 4 :

and we get for the state-space equation for the first six variables, with D
2.050

3.743 3.756
- 1 15.330

-o~1030

-5.278 66.282

0
59 : . 8

= 10-3

44.720
0

0
-5.928

~0x10~

o
0

0
0

284.854 -313.530 O

-0.235Aq -0.349Aq -0.642hq 0.235Ad 0.980Ad

1;
A,,

=o

A,

4.12.4

Treatment of saturation

The flux linkage state-space model is convenient for considering the effect of saturation because all the terms in the state equations (4.126)-(4.133) are linear except for the , magnetizing flux linkages A and AAQ. These are affected by saturation of the mutual inductances L A D and LA,, and only these terms need to be corrected for saturation. In the simulation of the machine, either by digital or analog computer, this can be accom-

114

Chapter 4

h T

iO M

MS

Fig. 4.7 Saturation curve for X A D .

plished by computing a saturation function to adjust (4.120) and (4.121) at all times to reflect the state of the mutual inductances. As a practical matter, the q axis inductance LA, seldom saturates, so it is usually necessary to adjust only XAD for saturation. The procedure for including the magnetic circuit saturation is given below [ 18). Let the unsaturated values of the magnetizing inductances be LADOand LAQO. The computations for saturated values of these inductances follow. For salient pole machines, LAD=

UADO = L Q LAQ A O

Ks

= f(AAD)

(4.139)

where K, is a saturation factor determined from the magnetization curve of the machine. F o r a round-rotor machine, we compute, according to [ 161 LD A
=

KsLADO

L Q = KsLAQO A

K, = f(M

+ L2p )112

(4.140)

To determine K, for the d axis in (4.139), the following procedure is suggested. Let the magnetizing current, which is the sum of id + iF + io, be iM. The relation between X A D and i M is given by the saturation curve shown in Figure 4.7. For a given value of the unsaturated magnetizing current is iMo, corresponding to L A D O , while the saturated value is iMs. The saturation function K, is a function of this magnetizing current, which in turn is a function of X A D . To calculate the saturated magnetizing current iMs,the current increment needed to satisfy saturation, i M A = iMs - iMo, is first calculated. Note that saturation begins at the threshold value corresponding to a magnetizing current iMT. For flux linkages greater than XADT the current i M A increases monotonically in an almost exponential way. Thus we may write approximately
jMA =

A,exp[Bs(XAD

XADT)]

XAD

>

k4DT

(4.141)

where A, and B, are constants to be determined from the actual saturation curve. Knowing iMa for a given value of XAD, the value of iMs is calculated, and hence K, is determined. The solution is obtained by an iterative process so that the relation h A D K , ( X A D ) = LAD& is satisfied.
4.1 3

Load Equations
x = f(x,v, 7-J

From (4.103) and (4.138) we have a set of equations for each machine in the form (4.142)

Next Page
The Synchronous Machine

115

where x is a vector of order seven (five currents, w and 6 for the current model, or five flux linkages, w and 6 for the flux linkage model), and v is a vector of voltages that includes u d , u,, and up. Assuming that uF and T, are known, the set (4.142) does not completely describe the synchronous machine since there are two additional variables ud and u, appearing in the equations. Therefore two additional equations are needed to relate ud and u, to the state variables. These are auxiliary equations, which may or may not increase the order of the system depending upon whether the relations obtained are algebraic equations or differential equations and whether new variables are introduced. To obtain equations for U d and u, in terms of the state variables, the terminal conditions of the machine must be known. In other words, equations describing the load are required. There are a number of ways of representing the electrical load on a synchronous generator. For example, we could consider the load to be constant impedance, constant power, constant current, or some composite of all three. For the present we require a load representation that will illustrate the constraints between the generator voltages, currents, and angular velocity. These constraints are found by solving the network, including loads, given the machine terminal voltages. For illustrative purposes here, the load constraint is satisfied by the simple one machine-infinite bus problem illustrated below.
4.13.1
Synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus

Consider the system of Figure 4.8 where a synchronous machine is connected to an infinite bus through a transmission line having resistance Re and inductance L e . The voltages and current for phase a only are shown, assuming no mutual coupling between Rei, Leia or phases. By inspection of Figure 4.8 we can write u, = u,,

(4.143)

In matrix notation (4.143) becomes


vabc

vmabc

+ ReULc+ L

U L

(4.144)

which we transform to the 0-d-q frame of reference by Park's transformation:


VOdq

= pvabc =

Pvm&

+ Rei,, + L e P i a b c v or pu

(4.145)

The first term on the right side we may call v,odq and may determine its value by assuming that vmabc is a set of balanced three-phase voltages, or

Fig. 4.8 Synchronous generator loaded by an infinite bus.

Previous Page
116
Chapter 4

(4.146)

cos(wRt

+ +
(Y

120")

where V, is the magnitude of the rms phase voltage. Using the identities in Appendix A and using B = W R t + 6 + uf2, we can show that

(4.147)

The last term on the right side of (4.145) may be computed as follows. From the definition of Park's transformation &dq = Piohr, we compute the derivative iodq = Piobr+ Piobe.Thus

Pinbe = iodq - Piobc= io, - PP-'iodq


where the quantity PP-'is known from (4.32). Thus (4.145) may be written as

(4.148)

0
vodq =

V - f i -Sin (6 [cos(6 -

.J
CY)

+ Rei,, + Lei,,

WL,

I:[

-iq

v Or PU

(4.149)

which gives the constraint between the generator terminal voltage vodq and the generator current io, for a given torque angle 6. Note that (4.149) is exactly the same whether in M K S units or pu due to our choice of P and base quantities, Note also that there are two nonlinearities in (4.149). The first is due to the speed voltage term, the wLei product. There is also a nonlinearity in the trigonometric functions of the first term. The angle 6 is related to the speed by 6 = w - 1 pu or, in radians,
(4.150)

Thus even this simple load representation introduces new nonlinearities, but the order of the system remains at seven.
4.1 3 2 .
Current model

Incorporating (4.149) into system (4.79, we may write

-Li

(R

+ wN)i +

(4.151)

The Synchronous Machine

117

where K

&V,

aild y

- 0 . Now let
i d =

+ Re

Ld

+ Le

i q

Lq

+ Le

(4.152)

iq obtain the new matrices Lan d (R + w i ) . to

Using (4.152), we may replac? the r , Ld, and Lq terms in L, R, and N by Thus -Ksiny

-ii

(ii + w h ) i +

[ -: j
K cos y
0

k, i d ,

and

(4.153)

Premultiplying by

-i-' adding the equations for & and i, and


I I I I I I I I I

---Ksin?
-OF

I I

W i )

1
I

I
I
I I I

0 -----K cos y 0 - -- -_ -

I .- - - - -

1
I

T" -

I o

1 - 1

--

(4.154) The system described by (4.154) is now in the form of (4.37), namely, j , = f(x, u, f ) , where x' = (idiFiDiqiQwS]. The function f is a nonlinear function of the state variables and f , and u contains T,. The loading effect of the transmisthe system driving functions, which areAuFAand sion line is incorporated in the matrices R, L, and fi. The infinite bus voltage V , appears in the terms K sin y and K cos y. Note also that these latter terms are not driving functions, but rather nonlinear functions of the state variable 6. Because the system (4.154) is nonlinear, determination of its stability depends upon finding a suitable Liapunov function or some equivalent method. This is explored in greater depth in Part I l l .
4.13.3

The flux linkage model

From (4.149) and substituting for id and iq in terms of flux linkages (see Section 4.12.3),

(4.155)

118

Chapter 4

(4.156)

Combining (4.155) with (4.139,

(4.157)

Similarly, we combine (4.156) with (4.136) to get

(4.158)

Equations (4.157) and (4.158) replace the first and fourth rows in (4.138) to give the complete state-space model. The resulting equation is of the form

Ti
wherex =
[ A d AF AD

CX + D

(4.159)

A, A, w

a],

The Synchronous Machine

119

and the matrix C is given by


I

0 0

I I I I
I

o
o

o
0

i
I I I

1- . . . - -. . ..

I
I

0
. .

L
and

I I

o]

(4.161)

D =

(4.162)

If T-l exists, premultiply (4.159) by T - ' to get


X

= T-ICX

+ T-ID

(4.163)

Equation (4.163) is in the desired form, i.e., in the form of x = f(x, u, f ) and completely describes the system. It contains two types of nonlinearities, product nonlinearities and trigonometric functions.

Example 4.4 Extend Examples 4.2 and 4.3 to include the effect of the transmission line and torque equations. The line constants are Re = 0, Le = 0.4 pu, 7j = 2HoR = 1786.94 rad. The infinite bus voltage constant K and the damping torque coefficient D are left unspecified. Solution

r 4-

R,

0.001096

i d =

L + Le = 2.10 d

i q =

L q

+ Le

2.04

120

Chapter 4

Then 0.001 1

0
0.00074

0 0
0.0131

I
I

2.040

1.490

I I

0 0

II
I

L o
1.651

0
1.550 1.550 1.550

0.054oJ

I
I

0 0

0 0

I I

1.550 1.605 0 0 ______________~-_------I 0 0 0 2.040 1.490

;
I

0 By digital computer we find


1.709

1.490

1.526

-0.591

-1.080

I
I

-5.867

-7.330

I
I I I

1.710 -1.669

-1.669 2.286

0
Then
-

0.00187 -0.00065

-0.00044 0.00495

-0.0141 -0.0769
I

3.4870
I
I

2.5470 0.88 I w

- 1.2060

i-yR + ,A)

-0,001 18 -0,00436 0.0960 I -2.2020 - 1.6090 _____________________-_-_---------------I -3.5900 -2.6500 -2.6500 0.00187 -0.09007

- 3.506~
and we compute

2.5880

2.5880

I I

-0.00183

0.12332

i - l

[Ki:j 7z: ] [
-Ksin y

- 1.71 K s i n y
1.08

+ 0.591 v,
VF

0.591 K sin y - 6.67 vF

,:Y,.87

-1.67Kcosy Therefore the state-space current model is given by

The Synchronous Machine


+O.O0044

121

0.0141 0.0769 -0.0960 2.6500 -2.5880

-3.4810

2.547~
0.8810

I
I

-0.00495

1.2060 2.2020 -0.0019 0.00183

I
I

0 0

0 0 0

0.00436 2.6500 -2.5880 -O.00029iq


0

1.6090 0.0901 -0.12332

I
I

0
0

I
I

0 0 -_-_____-___________--1----- - - - - - -0.00029iq 0.00031id 0.000280id -0.0005590 0

I I I I

I
I

i
1

1 7 K sin y - 0.59 uF .1

-0.59 K sin y -1.71 K

+ 6.67 UP
COS y

-1.08 K sin y - 5.87 vF


1.67Kcosy

0.000559 T,
-1

The flux linkage model is of the form Tf, = C X by (4.159)-(4.162).Substituting,

+ D, where T, C, and D are given

T =

0
0

0
0

;
I

1.0

I
1
I
I I I I I

o
0

1 0

I .o _

r0.3162 0.2365 0.4319


0 0
I .o
0
1.0
I
I

I
I I
I

0 0

0.3162 0.6678
O

1.0

The matrix C is mostly the same as that given in Example 4 3 except that the w terms . are modified.

Chapter 4

- 5.927
1.388 44.720

2.050 -5.278 66.282

3.743 3.756 -115.330 -13660

I 1
I

1-3162~ 2 1 1 2 ~ I 0 O I

I
0
I

I _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ - _I- _ - _ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - I

3162~

-747.7~

I 0 I I -5.928

5.789

0 0 1284.854 -313.530 0 I __---____--____-_----------------1--------I

I 1I
I

10-3

-0.7058A9

1.046A9

-1.910A9

I 0.705Ad
O

2.954Ad

I -0.55960
1

0
28.024 -5.278 66.282 -236.40
0

I I

01
I

.17.766 1.388 44.720 -47.733 3.756 -115.330 -431.8~


0

I
I

1 0 0 0 ~ 667.8~ I

I I

0
0

0
O

1
I

____--_-_____________L_-------------

10000
0

188.337 -207.529

.....................
-0.706Aq

1284.854 -313.530
I

- 1.046Aq - 1 .910A9 I 0.705Ad


0
p.316

1------------

2.954Ad

I I

K siny
VF

+ 0.236

.-

1
(4.164)

4.14

Subtransient and Transient Inductances and l i m e Constants

If all the rotor circuits are short circuited and balanced three-phase voltages are suddenly impressed upon the stator terminals, the flux linking the d axis circuit will depend initially on the subtransient inductances, and after a few cycles on the transient inductances. Let the phase voltages suddenly applied to the stator be given by

where u(t) is a unit step function and V is the rms phase voltage. Then from (4.7) we

The Synchronous Machine

123

can show that

(4.165)

Immediately after the voltage is applied, the flux linkages XF and AD are still zero, since they cannot change instantly. Thus at f = O+
=

kMFid

+ LFiF + MRiD
id
=

kM&

+ MRiF + LDiD
id

(4.166)

Therefore
iF = -

kMFLD - kMDMR LFLD - M i kZM$D

io = -

kM&F - kMFMR LFLD - M i

(4.167)

Substituting in (4.20) for Ad, we get (at t

0)
LFLD - M i
id

+ LFk2Mi - 2khfFkMDM~

(4.168)

The subtransient inductance is defined as the initial stator flux linkage per unit of stator current, with all the rotor circuits shorted (and previously unenergized). Thus by definition
Ad

L : i d

(4.169)

where L: is the d axis subtransient inductance. From (4.168) and (4.169)

Ld -

LD

+ LF - 2LAD
-1

(4.171)

(L,LD/L:D)

where L D is defined in (4.108). A If the balanced voltages described by (4.164) are suddenly applied to a machine with no damper winding, the same procedure will yield (at r = 0+) (4.172) (4.173) where L j is the d axis transient inductance; i.e., Li L, - (kMF)/LF Ld - L:D/L, (4.174)

I n a machine with damper windings, after a few cycles from the start of the transient
described in this section, the damper winding current decays rapidly to zero and the effective stator inductance is the transient inductance. If the phase of the impressed voltages in (4.164) is changed by 90 (ud = fiY sin e), ud becomes zero and us will have a magnitude of flV. Before we examine the q axis inductances, some clarification of the circuits that may exist in the q axis is needed. For a salient pole machine with amortisseur windings a q axis damper circuit exists, but there is no other q axis rotor winding. For such a machine the stator flux linkage after the initial subtransient dies out is determined by es-

124

Chapter 4

sentially the same circuit as that of the steady-state q axis flux linkage. Thus for a salient pole machine it is customary to consider the q axis transient inductance to be the same as the q axis synchronous inductance. The situation for a round rotor machine is different. Here the solid iron rotor provides multiple paths for circulating eddy currents, which act as equivalent windings during both transient and subtransient periods. Such a machine will have efleclive q axis rotor circuits that will determine the (I axis transient and subtransient inductances. Thus for such a machine it is important to recognize that a q axis transient inductance (much smaller in magnitude than L , ) exists. Repeating the previous procedure for the q axis circuits of a salient pole machine,

or
iQ = - ( k M p / L p ) i ,

(4.176)

Substituting in the equation for A,,


A,
=

Lqiq -k kM&
A

(4.177)

or
A,
=

[L,, - ( k M p ) 2 / L p ] i , , L:iq =

(4.178)

where L: is the q axis subtransient inductance

L : = L, - (kMQ)/LQ = L, - L:p/LQ

(4.179)

We can also see that when i , decays to zero after a few cycles, the 9 axis effective inductance in the transient period is the same as L,. Thus for this type of machine

L; = L,

(4.1 80)

Since the reactance is the product of the rated angular speed and the inductance and since in pu oR = 1, the subtransient and transient reactances are numerically equal to the corresponding values of inductances in pu. We should again point out that for a round rotor machine L; < L; < L,. To identify these inductances would require that two q axis rotor windings be defined. This procedure has not been followed in this book but could be developed in a straightforward way [21,22].
4.14.1
Time constants

We start with the stator circuits open circuited. Consider a step change in the field voltage; Le., U, = V F u ( t ) .The voltage equations are given by

rFiF -k

= vF/F(f)
=

rDiD

+ A,

(4.181)

and the flux linkages are given by (note that id

0)
=

AD
Again at t
=

LDiD

-k

MRiF

LFiF -k MRiD

(4.182)

0+,AD

0 , which gives for that instant


i,
=

-(LD/MR)iD

(4.183)

Substituting for the flux linkages using (4.182) in (4.181),

The Synchronous Machine

125

(4.185)

Usually in pu rD > r F ,while > write, approximately,

L D

and L F are of similar magnitude. Therefore we can

(4.186)

Equation (4.186) shows that iD decays with a time constant


r;o = L D

- M:/LF
TD

(4.187)

This is the d axis open circuit subtransient time constant. It is denoted open circuit because by definition the stator circuits are open, When the damper winding is not available or after the decay of the subtransient current, we can show that the field current is affected only by the parameters of the field circuit; i.e.,
rFiF

+ LFiF
Ti0

= vFu(t)

(4.188)

The time constant of this transient is the d axis transient open circuit time constant r&, where
=
LF/rF

(4.189)

Kimbark (21 and Anderson (81 show that when the stator is short circuited, the corresponding d axis time constants are given by
r; =
1;

r,&L;/L; r;oL;/Ld

(4.190) (4.191)

A similar analysis of the transient in the q axis circuits of a salient pole machine shows that the time constants are given by
(4.192) (4.193)

For a round rotor machine both transient and subtransient time constants are present. Another time constant is associated with the rate of change of direct current in the stator or with the envelope of alternating currents in the field winding, when the machine is subjected to a three-phase short circuit. This time constant is r , and is given by (see [8], Ch. 6)
r, = L 2 / r

(4.194)

where L2is the negative-sequence inductance, which is given by


L* = (L;

+ L,)/2

(4.195)

Typical values for the synchronous machine constants are shown in Tables 4.3, 4.4, and 4.5.

126

Chapter 4

Table 4.3. Typical Synchronous Machine Time Constants in Seconds


Time constant
Ti0
7;

Turbogenerators Low Avg. High

Waterwheel generators Low Avg. High

Synchronous condensers Low Avg. High

2.8 0.4
=
T;'

5.6 1.1

9.2 1.8
0.05

1.5

5.6

0.5
0.01

1.8

9.5 3.3
0.05

6.0

T: Ta

0.02

0.04

0.035 0.16

0.35

0.03

0.035 0.15

1.2 0.02
0.10

0.25

9.0 2.0 0.035 0.17

11.5

2.8 0.05 0.30


1956.

Source: Reprinted by permission from Power System Stability, vol. 3, by E.W. Kimbark.

@ Wiley,

Table 4.4. Typical Turbogenerator and Synchronous Condenser Characteristics


~~ ~~

Generators Parameter Range Recommended average

Synchronous condensers Range Recommended average

Nominal rating 300- 1000 M W Power factor 0.80-0.95 Direct axis synchronous reactance xd 140.- 180 Transient reactance x; 23-35 Subtransient reactance x : 15-23 Quadrature axis synchronous reactance x q 150- 160 18-20 Negative-sequence reactance x t Zero-sequence reactance xo 12-14 Short circuit ratio 0.50--0.72 3.0-5.0 Inertia constant H, 5.0-8.0

...
0.90
60

50-100MVA

...

...
220
55

170-270 25 45--65 20 35-45 55 100-130 19 35-45 13 15-25 0.64 0.35-0.65 4.0 ...
6.0

...

40
115

40 20 0.50

...

...

...

Source: From the 1964 National Power Survey made by the U.S. Federal Power Commission. USGPO. Note: All reactances in percent on rated voltage and kVA base. kW losses for typical synchronous condensers in the range of sizes shown, excluding losses associated with, step-up transformers, are in the order of 1.2-l.S% on rated kVA base. No attempt has been made to show kW losses associated with generators, since generating plants are generally rated on a net power output basis and losses vary widely dependent on the generator plant design.

Table 4.5. Typical Hydrogenerator Characteristics


Parameter Small units Large units

Nominal rating (MVA) Power factor SDeed (r/min) - ., Inertia constant H,IkW-s)
I

IkVA)
. I

0-40 0.80-0.95* 70-350 1.5-4.0


90-1 IO

40-200 0.80-0.95* 70-200


3.0-5.5

Direct axis synchronous reactance xd Transient reactance x i Subtransient reactance x: Quadrature axis synchronous reactance x q Negative-sequence reactance x 2 Zero-sequence reactance x o Short circuit ratio

25-45 20-35

...

80-100 20-40 15-30

...

20-45 10-35 I .o-2.0

20-35 10-25 I .o-2.0

Souree: From the 1964 National Power Survey made by the U.S. Federal Power Commission. U S G M. Note: All reactances in percent on rated voltage and kVA base. No attempt has been made to show kW losses associated with generators, since generating plants are generally rated on a net power output basis and losses vary widely dependent on the generator plant design. +These power factors cocdf conditions for generators installed either close to or remote from load centers.

The Synchronous Machine 4.1 5 Simplified Models of the Synchronous Machine

127

In previous sections we have dealt with a mathematical model of the synchronous machine, taking into account the various effects introduced by different rotor circuits, i.e., both field effects and damper-winding effects. The model includes seven nonlinear differential equations for each machine. In addition to these, other equations describing the load (or network) constraints, the excitation system, and the mechanical torque must be included in the mathematical model. Thus the complete mathematical description of a large power system is exceedingly complex, and simplifications are often used in modeling the system. In a stability study the response of a large number of synchronous machines to a given disturbance is investigated. The complete mathematical description of the system would therefore be very complicated unless some simplifications were used. Often only a few machines are modeled in detail, usually those nearest the disturbance, while others are described by simpler models. The simplifications adopted depend upon the location of the machine with respect to the disturbance causing the transient and upon the type of disturbance being investigated. Some of the more commonly used simplified models are given in this section. The underlying assumptions as well as the justifications for their use are briefly outlined. In general, they are presented in the order of their complexity. Some simplified models have already been presented. In Chapter 2 the classical representation was introduced. In this chapter, when the saturation is neglected as tacitly assumed in the current model, the model is also somewhat simplified. An excellent reference on simplified models is Young [ 191.
4.15.1 Neglecting damper windings-the

F i model

The mathematical models given in Sections 4.10 and 4.12 assume the presence of three rotor circuits. Situations arise in which some of these circuits or their effects can be neglected. Machine with solid round rotor [2]. The solid round rotor acts as a q axis damper winding, even with the d axis damper winding omitted. The mathematical model for this type of machine will be the same as given in Sections 4.10 and 4.12 with io or AD omitted. For example, in (4.103) and (4.138) the third row and column are omitted. Amortisseur efects neglecred. This assumption assumes that the effect of the damper windings on the transient under study is small enough to be negligible. This is particularly true in system studies where the damping between closely coupled machines is not of interest. In this case the effect of the amortisseur windings may be included in the damping torque, i.e., by increasing the damping coefficient D in the torque equa; tion. Neglecting the amortisseur windings can be simulated by omitting iD and t g in (4.103) or AD and A, in (4.138). Another model using familiar machine parameters is given below. From (4.1 18), (4.123), (4.120), and (4.121) with the D and Q circuits omitted,

[j=

(4.196)

128

Chapter 4

or
(4.197)

Therefore, the currents are given by


-LAD/L;LF Ld/L;Lf

E]=

[-L::;:iLF

I[]
IIL,
pu

(4.198)

(4.199)

The above equations may be in pu or in M K S units. This follows, since the choice of the rotor base quantities is based upon equal flux linkages for base rotor and stator currents. From the stator equation (4.36) and rearranging,
i d

-rid

WAq

Vd

(4.200)

or from (4.199) and (4.200)


Ad

= -(r/L;)Ad

(rLAD/L;LF)AF

WAq-

vd

pu

(4.201)

From (4.58) we define


6 E ;
WR(kMF/LF)AF

(4.202)

and converting to pu
f l E & V B = WR(k M F u M F B / L F u L F B ) ( A , LFBF B I / f i E & = (k M F u AFu / L Fu ) [WR ( M F B I F B / VB )1

or in pu
LADAF/LF

dTE6 P U

(4.203)

Now, from (4.201) and (4.203) we compute


i d

- ( r / L ; ) A d 4- ( r / L ; ) f i E i -

Ox,

Ud

P U

(4.204)

In a similar way we compute A, from (4.36). substituting for i, from (4.199) to write

Aq

= -(r/L,)X,

+ OX,

-I

J PU ~

(4.205)

Note that in (4.204) and (4.205) all quantities, including lime, are in pu. For the field voltage, from (4.36) uF = rFiF + A, pu, and substituting for i F from (4.199),
UF = r F [ - ( L A D / L i L F ) A d

+ (Ld/L;LF)AFI + i
f l E i / L A D

pu

(4.206)

Now from (4.203)


AF/LF

P U

(4.207)

Also from (4.59) we define


~ ~ E F RDk M F / r F ) v F W (

(4.208)

The Synchronous Machine

129

and converting to pu
. \ / ~ E F D u vB
~ E F D

= = u

WR[(kMFuMFB/rFuRFB)UFu

vFBl

(k M F u UFu l r F u )(OR
pu

MFB UFB

/ vB

RFB

d E F D

= LADUF/rF

(4.209)

From (4.207), (4.209), and (4.206) we compute

*
L*D

EFD = -

L;

2 Ad +
LF

Ld r L d

2f l E ;
LAD

L + 62 E; LAD

pu

(4.210)

Rearranging and using

L:D/LF

L d - Li and

ri0 =

LF/rF,

(4.21 I )

We now define rms stator equivalent flux linkages and voltages


A = A,f/fi d

dq = A q / G

vd

U d / d

vq =
vd

V q / 6

(4.212)

Then (4.204), (4.205), and (4.2 1 1) become


Ad =

-(r/L:)A,,

+ (r/L;)E; - W A q 5
P U

P U

(4.2 13) (4.2 14) (4.2 15)

8,

= WAd

- ( r / L q ) A q-

Note that in the above equations all the variables (including time) and all the parameters are in pu. Thus the time constants must be in radians, or
rPu= tsecwR rad
(4.2 16)
=

Now we derive the torque equation. From (4.95) T,, id and i q , from (4.199) we get
Tct$

iqXd

- idXq.
Pu

Substituting for
(4.217)

(hd/Lq -

(LADAF/LiLF)Aq

and by using (4.203) and (4.21 2),

T,
From the swing equation

E;A,/L; - ( I / L i

I/Lq)Addq

(4.2 18)

~ j b =

T, - DW 6 = 0 - 1 pu

T,

PU

(4.2 19) (4.220)

Equations (4.2 13)-(4.215), (4.219), and (4.220) along with the torque equation (4.218) describe the E; model. It is a fifth-order system with free inputs EFD and T,. The signals v and Vq depend upon the external network. d Block diagrams of the system equations are found as follows. From (4.213) we write, in the s domain,
( r / L i ) [ I -t (L;/r)S]Ad
=

(r/Li)E; - UAq -

vd

P U

(4.22 I )

Similarly, from (4.214)


(r/Lq)[l

+ (Lq/r)sIAq=

WAd

v q

Pu

(4.222)

130

Chapter 4

I I

Fig. 4.9 Block diagram representation of the E; model.

and from (4.215)


(Ld/L;)( 1

+ 7;0(L;/Ld)SlE; =

EFD

+ [(Ld - L i ) / L i ] A d

pu

(4.223)

Now define r i d 4 L.i)r, i A = L q / r ,and T; = & L i / L d . The above equations are repreq sented by the block diagram shown in Figure 4.9. The remaining system equations can be represented by the block diagrams of Figure 4.10. The block diagrams in Figures 4.9 and 4.10 can be combined to give the block diagram of the complete model. d Note that T,,, and E F D are assumed to be known and v and V, depend upon the load. The model developed to this point is for an unsaturated machine. The effect of saturation may be added by computing the additional field current required under saturated operating conditions. From Ad = tdid + L A D i F substituting for id from and
(4.199),

1 .o

Fig. 4. I O Block diagram representation of (4.218)-(4,220).

The Synchronous Machine


Ld

131

- L>

Fig. 4.1 I Block diagram for generating E ; with saturation.

then

Also, from W R M F i F = &E

in Section 4.7.4 we can show that


iFLAD d E P U (4.226) (4.227)

Now from (4.2 12). (4.203). (4.226). and (4.225)

( L d / L ; ) E i - [(Ld - L;)/L;IAd

Substituting (4.227) into (4.215 ) ,


T ~ O E ;= EFD

-E

(4.228)

For the treatment of saturation, Young [ 191 suggests the modification of (4.227) to the form

( L d / L ; ) E i - [(Ld - L;)/L;]Ad

+ EA

(4.229)

where EA corresponds to the additional field current needed to obtain the same EMF on the no-load saturation curve. This additional current is a function of the saturation index and can be determined by a procedure similar to that of Section 4.12.4. Another method of treating saturation is to consider a saturation function that depends upon E;; Le., let EA = f A ( E i ) . This leads to a solution for E; amounting to a negative feedback term and provides a useful insight as to the effect of saturation (see [20] and Problem 4.33). Equations (4.229) and (4.228) can be represented by the block diagram shown in Figure 4, I I . We note that if saturation is to be taken into account, the portion of Figure 4.9 that produces the signal E; should be modified according to the Figure 4. I I .

Example 4.5 Determine the numerical constants of the E; model of Figures 4.9 and 4.10, using the data of Examples 4.1 and 4.2. It is also given that L: = 0.185 pu and Li = 0.245 pu.

Solution From the given data we compute the time constants required for the model.

132

Chapter 4

From this we may also compute the short circuit subtransient time constant as
7;

= 7 i 0 L;/L; =

~A(0.185/0.245)= 0.023 s
T ~ ,

8.671 rad

The fictitious time constants 7 i d and


TAd =
T ~ = ,

are computed as

L;/r L,/r

= =

(0.245)(3.73 x 10-~)/1.542x = 0.593 s = 223.446 rad 6.1 18 x 10--'/1.542 x = 3.967 s = 1495.718 rad

This large time constant indicates that A, will respond relatively slowly to a change in terminal conditions. The various gains needed in the model are as follows:

0.245/1.7 = 0.1 14 (1.7 - 0.245)/0.245 = 3.939 1/0.245 - 1/1.64 = 3.473 4.08 110.593 W R = 0.00447
Note the wide range of gain constants required.

4.15.2

Voltage behind rubtransient reactance-the

E" model

I n this model the transformer voltage terms in the stator voltage equations are neglected compared to the speed voltage terms [ 19). I n other words, in the equations for v d and v,, the terms icd and i are neglected since they are numerically small com, pared to the terms wX, and respectively. In addition, it is assumed in the stator voltage equations that w E wR, and L&' = L-i. Note that while some simplifying assumptions are used in this model, the field effects and the effects of the damper circuits are included in the machine representation. Stator subtransient flux linkages are defined by the equations

&'

Ad - &id

A" =

- L"j9 4

(4.230)

where L i and L: are defined by (4.170) and (4.179) respectively. Note that (4.230) represents the more general case of (4.169). which represents a special case of zero inirial flux linkage. These flux linkages produce EMF'S that lag 90" behind them. These EM F's are defined by

e; A

= wR Ad "

ed

I1

= - w R AO "

(4.231)

(See [8] for a complete derivation.) From (4.36) the stator voltage equations, under the assumptions stated above, are given by

vd

-rid - wRX,

V, =

-ri, -ri,

+ uRXd + wRidL: + wRX;


+ id%" + e :

(4.232)

Combining (4.230) and (4.232),


vd =

-rid - wRiqLi - wRX; vd = -rid - iqx"

V, =

(4.233) (4.234)

Now from (4.231) and (4.233),

+ e$

vg = - riq

The Synchronous Machine

133

Fig. 4.12

Voltage behind subtransient reactance equivalent.

-:c
E
XI
R

where, under the assumptions used in this model,


L d
=
R

L q

(4.235)

The voltages e: and e: are the d and q axis components of the E MF errproduced by the subtransient flux linkage, the d and q axis components of which are given by (4.230). This EMF is called the volrage behind rhe subtransient reucrance. Equations (4.234) when transformed to the a-b-c frame of reference may be represented by the equivalent circuit of Figure 4.12. If quasi-steady-state conditions are assumed to apply at any instant, the relations expressed in (4.234) may be represented by the phasor diagram shown in Figure 4.13. In this diagram the q and d axes represent the real and imaginary axes respectively. Projections of the different phasors on these axes give the q and d components of these phasors. For example the voltage E is represented by the phasor ? shown. Its components are E: and E: respectively. From ! . the above we can see that if at any instant the terminal voltage and current of the machine are known, the voltage E can be determined. Also if E: and E: are known, E can be calculated; and if the current is also known, the terminal voltage can be determined. We now develop the dynamic model for the subtransient case. Substituting (4.230) into (4.134), we compute

We can show that

(4.237)

q axis

ri

Fig. 4.13 Phasor diagram for the quasi-static subtransient case.

134

Chapter 4

since by definition

(4.238)
Therefore we may write (4.236) as

Ai
A ;
=

(L;LMD/?dxF)AF +

(LiM D / t d 4 D ) A D L

(4.239)

Using (4.203). we can rewrite in terms of E; as

(L;L,DLF/xdxFLAD)flE;

+ ( L ; L M D /X ~ )~h , D

(4.240)

Now we can compute the constants


K , = L; LMDL,
=

tdd?FLAD
K 2 = -L; L,, =
4dtD

L: L; - X

- x i - xd x; - x4

(4.241)

I - G L M D L F 1 - x; - x = I - K , = 4dtFLAD x; - xx
)/(xi - ~4

(4.242)

Substituting in (4.240) and using (4.231), we compute in pu

e:

[(x: -

X~

11 ( d 3 - E ; =

AD)

+ AD

(4.243) (4.244)

Similarly from (4.230) and (4.104).

: A

(L,i,

+ LAQiQ)- L;i,
e:
=

( L , - L;)i,

+ LA,iQ

which can be substituted into (4.231) to compute


-(x, - x : ) i , - e,

(4.245)

where we define the voltage

e d
We can also show that
A ;
=

WRLAQiQ

(4.246) (4.247)

A, - Lii,

(LAQ/LQ)AQ

Now from the field flux linkage equation (4.104) in pu, we incorporate (4.203) and (4.226) to compute

E; - (xd -

Xj)(id

+iD)/lA

(4.248)

From the definition of L; (4.1 74) we can show that

L - L; d
We can also show that

LiD/LF

(4.249)

(L; - L i ) / ( L ; Then from (4.104) in pu


AD
=

Xd)

LF/(LFLD -L;D)

(4.250)

LADid L A D i F L D i D + +

A,

LADid

+ LFiF+ L A D i D

(4.251)

Eliminating if from (4.251).

(4.252)

The Synchronous Machine

135

Now substituting (4.203), (4.249). and (4.250) into (4.252),

(4.253)
which can be put in the form

(4.254)

In addition to the above auxiliary equations, the following differential equations are obtained. From (4.36) we write
rDiD

+ AD

(4.255)

Substituting (4.187) and (4.250) in (4.255),

jD -- - (xi - X $ ) * , (xi - x;)T;o


Similarly, from (4.36) we have
'QiQ

(4.256)

+ AQ

0
(4.257) (4.258) (4.259)

which may be written as


[WRrQ(LAQ/LQ)liQ

+ [(wR
g ;
=

L,4Q)/LQliQ

Now from (4.246), (4.247), (4.231), (4.192), and (4.257) we get the differential equation

ed / T I90 1 The voltage equation for the field circuit cames from (4.36)
V, =

rFiF +

x, '
-E

which can be put in the same form as (4.228)


E; = E,

(4.260)

where E is given by (4.248). Equations (4.256), (4.258), and (4.260) give the time rate of change AD, e and ,: E; in terms of i D , e,, and E. The auxiliary equations (4.245), (4.248), and (4.254) relate these quantities to id and iq, which in turn depend upon the load configuration. The voltage e; is calculated from (4.243). To complete the model, the torque equation is needed. From (4.99,
T,,
=

i9 Ad - idA9
=

By using (4.230) and recalling that in this model it is assumed that L;

LC, (4.261) (4.262)

Te4

= i9 A" - id A" d q

and if w in pu is approximately equal to the synchronous speed, (4.261) becomes

T,,

e; i,

+ e$id

If saturation is neglected, the system equations can be reduced to the following:


(4.263)

136

Chapter 4

(4.264)

Now from (4.243) and using K , and K, as defined in (4.241) and (4.242) respectively, we may write
e = d T K , E; :

+ KZXD
Dw/Ti

(4.266) (4.267) (4.268)

To complete the description of the system, we add the inertial equations


&
=

(l/Tj)T,,,- e:i,,/3fi

- ide:/3ri

S=w-l

The currents id and iq are determined from the load equations. The block diagrams for the system may be obtained by rearranging the above equations. In doing so, we eliminate the d f r o m all equations by using the rms equivalents, similar to (4.2 12),

AD = X , / d
Then (4.263)-(4.266) become
(1

E"

e r ' / d = E:

+ jEj

(4.269)

(I
(1

+ +

E: O) :S . AD Tj0.S) E; E:

= -(xq =

- x;)fq E; ( X i - xt)ld E, + Xxdfd


KIEi

+
(4.270)
E'b

+K2A~
+

-(x 9

- x")
9

Fig. 4.14

Block diagram for the E" model.

The Synchronous Machine

137

1 D+
7.5

U J

Fig. 4.15

Block diagram for computation of torque and speed in the E" model.

where we have defined

(4.271)

The block diagram for (4.270) is shown in Figure 4.14. The remaining equations are given by

(D

+ 7 , s ) ~=

T, -

+ E:/,,)

Sb =

- 1

(4.272)

The block diagram for equation (4.272) is given in Figure 4.15. Also the block diagram of the complete system can be obtained by combining Figures 4.14 and 4.15. If saturation is to be included, a voltage increment E,, corresponding to the increase in the field current due to saturation, is to be added to (4.248),
E = E: Example 4.6

+ E,

- (xd

- xi)(id + i D ) / f i

(4.27 3)

Use the machine data from Examples 4.1-4.5 to derive the time constants and gains for the E" model. Solution The time constant T : ~ = 0.03046 s = 72.149 rad is already known from Example 4.5. For the E" model we also need the following additional time constants. From (4.192) the q axis subtransient open circuit time constant is
7Y0

= L p / r Q = 1.423 x 10-3/18.969 x

0.075s = 28.279

rad

which is about twice the d axis subtransient open circuit time constant. We also need the d axis transient open circuit time constant. It is computed from
(4.189).
Ti0

LF/rF =

2.189/0.371 = 5.90s = 2224.25

rad

Note that this time constant is about 30 times the subtransient time constant in the d

138

Chapter 4

axis. This means that the integration associated with T : ~ will be accomplished very fast compared to that associated with .j0. To compute the gains, the constant x; or Li is needed. It is computed from

(.7) 414:

- LiD/LF 1.70 - (l.55)2/l.651= 0.245 P = U We can now compute from (4.271)


L;
= Ld

K,
Kd
xxd

K, = 0.632 (xd - x;)(x; - x:) = (1.70- 0.245)(0.245 - 0.185) = 9.673 (0.245 - 0.150) ( x i - x.J (xd - x;)(x: --~- 4 - (1.70- 0.245)(0.185 - 0.150) o.536 ) 0.245 - 0.150 x; - x4
E

1 -

From (4.179)we compute

Lc = L, - L:,/L,

1.64 - (1.49)/1.526 = 0.185 pu

Then, from (4.270), compute the gain, x, we


4.1 5 3 .
Neglecting

- x[

1.64 - 0.185 = 1.455 pu.


two-axis model

Ad and 4 for a cylindrical rotor machine-the

In the two-axis model the transient effects are accounted for, while the subtransient effects are neglected [18]. The transient effects are dominated by the rotor circuits, which are the field circuit in the d axis and an equivalent circuit in the q axis formed by the solid rotor. A n additional assumption made in this model is that in the stator , voltage equations the terms i d and i are negligible compared to the speed voltage terms and that w Y wR = 1 pu. The machine will thus have two stator circuits and two rotor circuits. However, the number of diflerentiul equations describing these circuits is reduced by two since i d and k are neglected in the stator voltage equations (the stator voltage equations are now , algebraic equations). The stator transient flux linkages are defined by
A; 2 A, - L;id
A A,, I = Aq

WA;

Li i,

(4.274)

and the corresponding stator voltages are defined by


e;

- w ~ ; = -wRh;

e ;

wRx;

(4.275) (4.276) (4.277) (4.278) (4.279)

Following a procedure similar to that used in Section 4.15.2,


vd =

-rid

- wRL;iq + e;
e; =
vd

u, = - r i ,

+ URLjid + e;

or

e;

+ rid + xii, + (xi - x;)i, = uq + r i , - xiid


e ;

Since the term (xi - x;)i, is usually small, we can write, approximately,

r vd

+ rid + x;iq

The Synchronous Machine

139

Fig. 4.16

Transient equivalent circuit of a generator.

The voltages e; and e: are the 9 and d components of a voltage e behind transient reactance. Equations (4.279) and (4.278) indicate that during the transient the machine can be represented by the circuit diagram shown in Figure 4.16. It is interesting to note that since e: and e; are d and q axis stator voltages, they represent d T tirn e s the equivalent stator rms voltages. For example, we can verify that e; = d E ; , as given by (4.203). Also, in this model the voltage e, which corresponds to the transient flux linkages in the machine, is not a constant. Rather, it will change due to the changes in the flux linkage of the d and q axis rotor circuits. We now develop the differential equations for the voltages e and e;. The d axis : flux linkage equations for this model are
Ad = L d i d

+ LADiF
Ad

pu

XF =

LAOid

-k L F i F

pu

(4.280)

By eliminating iF and using (4.174) and (4.203),


- 6 E ; = L:id

P U

and by using (4.275),

e;
Similarly, for the (I axis
X q = Lqiq

a E ; pu

(4.281)

+ LAQiQ pu
(LAQ/LQ)xQ

XQ

LAQiq

+ LhiQ pu
Pu

(4.282)

Eliminating iQ,we compute


=
(Lq

LiQ/LQ)iq

(4.283) (4.284)

and by using (4.284) and (4.275) we get


e :

fif?;

-(LAQ/LQ)XQ

pu
=

(4.285)

We also define

fiE
We can show that [8],

eq = LmiF pu
= EA

fiE d
Ed

ed

- L A Q ~pu Q

(4.286) (4.287)

+ xdzd

+ XAZd
=

- XqZq

= EA - X i Zq

From the Q circuit voltage equation rQiQ + d X Q / d r (4.286),

= 0,

and by using (4.282) with

&E:

-E: - (xq -

X6)fq

(4.288)

where, for uniformity, we adopt the notation

140

Chanter A

X d

xi

1+7bd

E'

Fig. 4.17 Block diagram representation of the two-axis model.

Ti0

= TJO =

LQ/rQ

(4.289)

Similarly, from the field voltage equation we get a relation similar to (4.228)
(4.290)

Equations (4.288), (4.290), and (4.287) can be represented by the block diagram shown in Figure 4.17. To complete the description of the system, the electrical torque is obtained from (4.93, T,, = Xdi, - Xqid,which is combined with (4.274) and (4.275) to compute

T,

EiId

+ EiIq - (Li - Li) i d l q

(4.291)

Example 4.7

Determine the time constants and gains for the two-axis model of Figure 4.17, based on the machine data of Examples 4.1-4.6. In addition we obtain from the manufacturer's data the constant xi = 0.380 pu.
Solution Both time constants are known from Example 4.7. The gains are simply the pu reactances
xq Xi

1.64

0.380 = 1.260 pu

Xd

xi

= 1.70 - 0.245 = 1.455

pu

The remaining system equations are given by


~ j h =

T,,, - DW - [EiId 6=w-I

+ EiIq - (Li - LJ)I,Jq]


(4.292)

The block diagram for (4.292) is shown in Figure 4.18. By combining Figures 4.17 and 4.18, the block diagram for the complete model is obtained. Again saturation can be accounted for by modifying (4.287).

E; -

( ~ d

- x ; ) I + E, ~

(4.293)

where E,, is a voltage increment that corresponds to the increase in the field current due to saturation (see Young [ 191). The procedure for incorporating this modification in the block diagram is similar to that discussed in Section 4.15.2.

The Synchronous Machine

141

b
E' 9

K 1
1 .o

*
u)

Fig. 4 1 Block diagram representation of ( . 9 ) .8 422.

4.15.4

Neglecting amortisseur effects and

and

iq terms-the

one-axis model

This model is sometimes referred to in the literature as the one-axis model. It is similar to the model presented in the previous section except that the absence of the Q circuit eliminates the differential equation for E; or e; (which is a function of the current i a ) . The voltage behind transient reactance e' shown in Figure 4.16 has only the component e; changing by the field effects according to (4.290) and (4.293). The component e: is completely determined from the currents and u d . Thus, the system equations are
E 7;oEi = E,, - E P U The voltage E; is obtained from (4.36) with i d
=
=

E;

(Xd

x:)td

PU

(4.294) (4.295)

0, and using (4.274) and (4.275),


PU

E:

5 + X;tq + r t d
=
Xdiq

The torque equation is derived from (4.99, T,,

&,id.

Substituting (4.274) and

1.o

Fig. 4 1 Block diagram representation of the one-axis model. .9

142

Chapter 4
=

noting that, in the absence of the Q circuit, A,

L,i,,
PU

T p
rj& = T,,, - Dw

E;Iq -

(Lq

f--i)ldiq

(4.296)

Thus the remaining system equations are

[EiI, - (Lq - L i ) I d I q ] P U

- 1 PU

(4.297)

The block diagram representation of the system is given in Figure 4.19.


4.15.5
Assuming constant flux linkage in the main field winding

From (4.228) we note that the voltage E;, which corresponds to the d axis field flux linkage, changes at a rate that depends upon .io. This time constant is on the order of several seconds. The voltage E,, depends on the excitation system characteristics. I f E, does not change very fast and if the impact initiating the transient is short, in some cases the assumption that the voltage E; (or e;) remains constant during the transient can be justified. Under this assumption the voltage behind transient reactance E' or e' has a q axis component E; or e; that is always constant. The system equation to be solved is (4.296) with the network constraints (to determine the currents) and the condition that E; is constant. The next step in simplifying the mathematical model of the machine is to assume ' that E; and E are approximately equal in magnitude and that their angles with respect to the reference voltage are approximately equal (or differ by a small angle that is constant). Under these assumptions E' is considered constant. This is the constant voltage behind transient reactance representation used in the classical model of the synchronous machine.
Example 4.8

The simplified model used in Section 4.15.2 (voltage behind subtransient reactance) is to be used in the system of one machine coiinected to an infinite bus through a transmission line discussed previously in Section 4.13. The system equations neglecting saturation are to be developed.

Solution For the case where saturation is neglected, the system equations are given by (4.263)-(4.268). This set of differential equations is a function of the state variables e;, A,, E;, w , and 6 and the currents id and iq. Equation (4.266) expresses e l as a linear combination o f t h e variables E; and A,. For the mathematical description of the system to be complete, equations for id and iq in terms of the state variables are needed. These equations are obtained from the load constraints. From the assumptions used in the model, Le., by neglecting the terms in h,, and Aq in the stator voltage equations (compared to the speed voltage terms) and also by as-

Fig. 4.20 Network representation of the system in Example 4.8.

The Synchronous Machine

143

suming that w wR, the system reduces to the equivalent network shown in Figure 4.20. By following a procedure similar to that in Section 4.15.2, equations (4.234) are given by
Vod = - k f d

ittIq

E:

Vmq=

- k f q + i f t I , , + E: + X,

(4.298)

where

k
and

= r

+ R,

211=
V ,
- E2
=

(4.299)

Ve

- V, sin (6 - a)
1

V, cos (6 - a)
- E,)]

(4.300)

From (4.298) I d and Iq are determined

Id =

(R)2

[+ (P) R(V,,

+ P(Vwq

(4.301)

Equations (4.147) and (4.301) along with the set (4.263)-(4.268) complete the mathematical description of the system.
4.1 6

Turbine Generator Dynamic Models

The synchronous machine models used in this chapter, which are in common use by power system engineers, are based on a classical machine with discrete physical windings on the stator and rotor. As mentioned in Section 4.14, the solid iron rotor used in large steam turbine generators provides multiple paths for circulating eddy currents that act as equivalent damper windings under dynamic conditions. The representation of these paths by one discrete circuit on each axis has been questioned for some time. Another source of concern to the power engineer is that the value of the machine constants (such as L;, L i , etc.) used in dynamic studies are derived from data obtained from ANSI Standard C42.10 [16]. This implicitly assumes two rotor circuits in each axis-the field, one d axis amortisseur, and two q axis amortisseurs. This in turn implies the existence of inductances Ld,Li, L;, L,, L;, and L: and time constants T&, It 7&, T ~ and T;, all of which are intended to define fault current magnitudes and decre, ments. I n some stability studies, discrepancies between computer simulation and field data have been observed. It is now suspected that the reason for these discrepancies is the inadequate definition of machine inductances in the frequency ranges encountered in stability studies. Studies have been made to ascertain the accuracy of available dynamic models and data for turbine generators (21-251. These studies show that a detailed representation of the rotor circuits can be more accurately simulated by up to three discrete rotor circuits on the d axis and three on the q axis. Data for these circuits can be obtained from frequency tests conducted with the machine at standstill. T o fit the conventional view of rotor circuits that influence the so-called subtransient and transient dynamic behavior of the machine, it is found that two rotor circuits (on each axis) are sometimes adequate but the inductances and time constants are not exactly the same as those defined in IEEE Standard No. 115. The procedure for determining the constants for these circuits is to assume equivaI

144

Chapter 4

lent circuits on each axis made up of a number of circuits in parallel. The transfer function for each is called an operational inductance of the form

Us)

[N(s)/W)lL

(4.302)

where L is the synchronous reactance, and N ( s ) and D ( s ) are polynomials in s. Thus for the d axis we write

Ld(s)

= Ld

(1

(I

+ a,s)(l + b , s ) ( l + c,s) + a,s)(l + b,s)(l + c2s)

(4.303)

and the constants Ld, a , , a,, b , , b,, e,, and c, are determined from the frequency domain response. If the operational inductance is to be approximated by quadratic polynomials, the constants can be identified approximately with the transient and subtransient parameters. Thus, for the d axis, &(s) becomes

(4.304)
The time constants in (4.304) are different from those associated with the exponential decay of d or 4 axis open circuit voltages, hence the discrepancy with lEEE Standard No. 115. A n example of the data obtained by standstill frequency tests is given in [24] and is reproduced in Figure 4.2 1. Both third-order and second-order polynomial representations are given. Machine data thus obtained differ from standard data previously obtained by the manufacturer from short circuit tests. Reference (241 gives a comparison between the two sets of data for a 555-MVA turbogenerator. This comparison is given in Table 4.6.
Speed, pu

2.0-

_p

1.0-

'**I
0.1 0.0006
I

Frequency response plots 555.5 -MVA unit -Test resulk --Adjusted resulk for simulation of hvo rotor windings i n each axis

I11111 0.006

I IIlIlll

! 0.06

I I 111111 0.6 Frequency, Hz

I 1 1 1 1 111111
6

111 l ~ l ~ l d 60

Fig. 4.21

Frequency response plot for a 555-MVA turboalternator.


vol. PAS-93, May/June 1974.)

(G

IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Trans..

The Synchronous Machine


Table 4.6.

145

Comparison of Standard Data with Data Obtained from Frequency Tests for a 555-MVA turboalternator
Standard data Adjusted data

Constants

Pu P U pu P U P U pu 4 PU 7;o s ?o l s Ti0 s 7; s
Ld

L; L; L, Li L;

I .97 0.27 0.175 I .867 0.473 0.213 0.16 4.3 0.03 1 0.56 0.061

1.81 0.30 0.2 17 1.76 0.61 0.254 0.16 7.8 0.022 0.90 0.074

Source: o IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Trans., vol. PAS-93, 1974.

The inductance versus frequency plot given in Figure 4.21 is nothing more than the amplitude portion of the familiar Bode plot with the amplitude given in pu rather than in decibels. The transfer functions plotted in Figure 4.21 can be approximated by the superposition of multiple first-order asymptotic approximations. If this is done, the break frequencies should give the constants of (4.304). The machine constants thus obtained are given in the third column of Table 4.6. If, however, the machine constants obtained from the standard data are used to obtain the breakpoints for the straight-line approximation of the amplitude-frequency plots, the approximated curve does not provide a good fit to the experimental data. For example, the d axis time constant ?&-, of the machine, as obtained by standard methods, is 4.3 s. If this is used to obtain the first break frequency for log [ 1 /( 1 + T ; ~ S ) ] ,the computed break frequency is
=

1/4.3

0.2326 rad/s

0.00062 pu

(4.305)

The break point that gives a better fit of the experimental data corresponds to a frequency of 0.1282 rad/s or 0.00034 pu. Since the amplitude at this frequency is the reciprocal of the d axis transient time constant, this corresponds to an adjusted value, denoted by r;:, given by
7;:

1/0.1282

7.8 s

(4.306)

Reference (241 notes that the proper ajustment of ?, ?io,and Li are all particu,A larly important in stability studies. A study conducted by the Northeast Power Coordinating Council [26] concludes that, in general, it is more important in stability studies to use accurate machine data than to use more elaborate machine models. Also, the accuracy of any dynamic machine model is greatly improved when the so-called standard machine data are modified to match the results of a frequency analysis of the solid iron rotor equivalent circuit. At the time of this writing no extensive studies have been reported in the literature to support or dispute these results. Finally, a comparison of these results and the machine models presented in this chapter are in order. The full model presented here is one of the models investigated in the NPCC study [26] for solid rotor machines. It was found to be inferior to the more

146

Chapter 4

elaborate model based on two rotor windings in each axis. This is not surprising since the added detail due to the extra q axis amortisseur should result in an improved simulation. Perhaps more surprising is the fact that the model developed here with F, D, and Q windings provided practically no improvement over a simpler model with only F and Q windings. Furthermore, with the F-Q model based on time constants .io and T ; ~ , larger digital integration time steps are possible than with models that use the much shorter time constants 7& and 7t0, as done in this chapter. As a general conclusion it is apparent that additional studies are needed to identify the best machine data for stability studies and the proper means for testing or estimating these data. This is not to imply that the work of the past is without merit. The traditional models, including those developed in this chapter, are often acceptable. But, as in many technical areas, improvements can and are constantly being made to provide mathematical formulations that better describe the physical apparatus.

Problems
4. I 4.2 4.3 4.4

4.5 4.6 4.1 4.8 4.9

4.10 4.1 I 4.12 4.13 4.14 4.15

Park's transformation P as defined by (4.5) is an orthogonal transformation. Why? But the transformation Q suggested originally by Park [IO, 1 I] is that given by (4.22) and is not orthogonal. Use the transformation Q to find voltage equations similar to (4.39). Verify (4.9) by finding the inverse of (4.5). Verify (4.12) by sketching the stator coils as in Figure 4.1 and observing how the inductance changes with rotor position. Verify the following equations: (a) Equation (4.13). Can you explain why these inductances are constant? (b) Equation (4.14). Why is the sign of M,negative? Why is I M, 1 > L,? (c) Explain (4.15) in terms of the coefficient of coupling of these coils. Verify (4.16)-(4.18). Explain the signs on these equations by referring to the currents given on Figures 4.1 and 4.2. Verify (4.20). Explain the signs on all terms of (4.23). Why is the term negative? Consider a machine consisting only of the phase winding sa-/a shown in Figure 4.1 and the field winding F. Sketch a new physical arrangement where the field flux is stationary and coil su-/a turns clockwise. Are these two physical arrangements equivalent? Explain. For the new physical machine proposed in Problem 4.8 we wish to compute the induced EMF in coil sa-fa. Do this by two methods and compare your results, including the polarity of the induced voltage. (a) Use the rate of change of flux linkages &. (b) Compute the Blv or speed voltage and the transformer-induced voltage. Do the results agree? They should! Verify (4.24) for the neutral voltage drop. Check the computation of PP-'given in (4.32). The quantities Ad and A, are given in (4.20). Substitute these quantities into (4.32) and compute the speed voltage terms. Check your result against (4.39). Verify (4.34) and explain its meaning. Extend Table 4.1 by including the actual dimensions of the voltage equations in an MLffi system. Repeat for an FLfQ system. Let ~ , ( t ) = V,,, COS (WRI + a) V b ( t ) = V,,,COS(w,t + a - 2 r / 3 ) + 2r/3) v,(t) = V,,,cos(wRf + (a) For the pu system used in this book find the pu voltages ud and u, as related to the rms voltage V. (b) Repeat part (a) using a pu system based on the following base quantities: SB = threephase voltampere and Vs = line-to-line voltage. (c) For part (b) find the pu power in the d and q circuits and id and i, in pu.
(Y

The Synchronous Machine


4.16

147

Using the transformation Q of (4.22) (originally used by Park) and the MKS system of units (volt, ampere, etc.). find: (a) The d and q axis voltages and currents in relation to the rms quantities. (b) The d and q axis circuit power in relation to the three-phase power. 4.17 Normalize the voltage equations as in Section 4.8 but where the equations are those found from the Q transformation of Problem 4.1. 4.18 Show that the choice of a common time base in any coupled circuit automatically forces the equality of VA base in all circuit parts and requires that the base mutual inductance be the geometric mean of the self-inductance bases of the coupled windings; Le., Show that the constraint among base currents (4.54) based upon equal mutual flux linkages is the same as equal MMFs in each winding. 4.20 Show that the I /wR factors may be eliminated from (4.62) by choosing a pu time T = w R t rad. 4.2 I Develop the voltage equations for a cylindrical rotor machine, i.e., a machine in which the inductances are not a function of rotor angle except for rotor-stator inductances that are as given in (4.16)-(4.18). 4.22 Consider a synchronous generator for which the following data are given: 2 poles, 2 slots/pole/phase, 3 phases, 6 slots/pole, I 2 slots, 5/6 pitch. Sketch the slots and show two coils of the phase a winding, coil I beginning in slot I (0) and coil 2 beginning in slot 7 (180). Label coil I sal-/a, (start a, and finish a , ) and coil 2 sa2-Ju2. Show the position of N and S salient poles and indicate the direction of pole motion. Now assume the machine is operating at 1.0 PF (internal PF) and note by + and notation, looking i n at the coil ends, the direction of currents at time t o , where at to
4.19

Plot the MMF as positive when radially outward +in enters sa, and +ib enters sb, but +i, entersfc,. Assume the MMF changes abruptly at the center line of the slot. The M M F wave should be a stepwise sine wave. Is it radially outward along d or q? 4.23 Verify (4.138). 4.24 Derive formulas for computing the saturation function parameters A, and B, defined in (4.141). given two different values ofthe variables A,, iyo, and iMs. 4.25 Compute the saturation function parameters A , and B,rgiven that when
A,, A,,
= =

&, (iMs - iMO)/iMO = 0.13 1.2 .\/5, ( i b - 1.2iM0)/ 1.2iMO

0.40

4.26 4.27

4.28 4.29 4.30 4.3 I

4.32

and i M O correspond to A,, = fl and i t s is the saturated current at A,, = fi. Compute the saturation function K,r at A,, = 1.8, using the data and results of the previous problem. The synchronous machine described in Examples 4.2 and 4.3 is connected to a resistive load of R, = 1.0 pu. Derive the equations for the state-space current model using uF and T,,, as forcing functions. Use the current model. Repeat Problem 4.27 using the flux linkage model Derive the state-space model for a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus with a local load at the machine terminal. The load is to be simulated by a passive resistance. Repeat Problem 4.29 for a local load simulated by a passive impedance. The load has a reactive component. Obtain the state-space model for a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus through a series resistance, inductance, and capacitance. Hint: Add two state variables related to the voltage (or charge) across the capacitance. Incorporate the load equations for the system of one machine against an infinite bus (shown in Figure 4.8) in the simplified models given in Section 4.15: (a) Neglecting damper effects. wherei,,
1.2

~.

Let A r = 0.8 m

148

Chapter 4

(b) Neglecting i d and A, for a machine with sdid ropnd rotor, (c) Neglecting damper erects and the terms Ad and A,. 4.33 Show that the voltage-behind-subtransient-reactancemodel of Figure 4.14 can be rearranged to give the model of Schulz [20] given in Figure P4.33, if the rotor has two circuits on the q-axis.

X'b

- xi
x,

Xi-

- 1

Fig. P4.33

4.34 Using the third-order transfer functions for Ld(s) and L,(s) given in Figure 4.21,sketd Bode diagrams by making straight-line asymptotic approximations and compare with thi given test results. 4.35 Repeat Problem 4.34 using the second-order transfer functions for Ld(s) and L,(s). 4.36 Repeat Problem 4.35 using the second-order transfer functions of (4.304)and substitutini the standard data rather than the adjusted data.
References
I . Concordia, C. Synchronous Machines. Wiley, New York, 1951. 2. Kimbark, E. W . Power System Stability. Vols. I , 3. Wiley. New York. 1956. 3. Adkins, B. The General Theory ofElecrrical Machines. Chapman and Hall, London, 1964.

The Synchronous Machine

149

4. Crary, S. B. Power System Stability. Vols. I . 2. Wiley. New York. 1945, 1947. 5 . Lynn, T. W.. and Walshaw. M . H. Tensor Ana1.vsi.c of a Synchronous Two-Machine System. IEE (British) Monograph. Cambridge Univ. Press, London, 1961. 6. Taylor, G. D. Analysis of Synchronous Machines Connected to Power Network. IEE (British) Monograph. Cambridge Univ. Press, London, 1962. 7. Westinghouse Electric Corp. Electrical Transmission and Di.stribution Keference Book. Pittsburgh, Pa.. 1950. 8 . Anderson, P. M. Analysis of Faulted Power Systems. Iowa State Univ. Press, Ames. 1973. 9. Harris, M. R., Lawrenson, P. J., and Stephenson. J. M. Per Unit Systems: With Special Reference IO Electrical Machines. IEE (British) Monograph. Cambridge Univ. Press, London, 1970. IO. Park, R. H. Two reaction theory of'synchronous machines, Pt. I . A I E E Trans. 48:716-30, 1929. I I . Park, R. H. Two reaction theory of synchronous machines. Pt. 2. A I E E Trans. 52:352-55, 1933. 12. Lewis, W.A. A basic analysis of synchronous machines. Pi. I . AI Trans. PAS-77:436-55. 1958. 13. Krause. P. C., and Thomas, C. H. Simulation ofsymmetrical induction machinery. IEEE Trans. PAS84:1038-52, 1965. 14. Prentice, B. R. Fundamental concepts of synchronous machine reactances. A I E E Trans. 56 (Suppl. I): 716.20, 1929. IS. Rankin. A. W. Per unit impedances ofsynchronous machines. A I E E Trans. 64569-72.839-41. 1945. 16. IEEE. Test procedures for synchronous machines. Standard No. 115, March. 1965. 17. IEEE Committee Report. Recommended phasor diagram tor synchronous machines. I E E E Trans. PAS-88:1593- 1610. 1969. 18. Prabhashankar, K., and Janischewskyj, W. Digital simulation of multimachine power systems for stability studies. IEEE Trm.PAS-87:73-80, 1968. 19. Young. C. C. Equipment and system modeling for large-scale stability studies. lEEE Trans. PAS91:99- 109, 1972. 20. Schulz, R . P. Synchronous machine modeling. Symposium on Adequacy and Philosophy of Modeling: System Dynamic Performance. IEEE Publ. 75 CH 0970-PWR, 1975. 21. Jackson. W. B.. and Winchester. R. L. Direct and quadrature axis equivalent circuits for solid-rotor turbine generators. / E Tran.c. PAS-88: 1121-36. 1969. 22. Schulz, R. P.. Jones, W. D.. and Ewart, D. N. Dynamic models of turbinc generators derived from solid rotor equivalent circuits. IEEE Trans. PAS-92:926-33. 1973. 23. Watson, W.. and Manchur. G. Synchronous machine operational impedances from low voltage measurements at the stator terminals. lEEE Trans. PAS-93:777 -44. 1974. 24. Kundur. P.. and Dandeno. P. L. Stability performance of 555 M V A turboalternators--.Digital comparisons with system operating tests. IEEE Trans. PAS-93:767- 76. 1974. 25. Dandeno. P. L.. Hauth. R. L.. and Schulz, R. P. Etfects of synchronous machine modeling in largeTrans. PAS-92:574 82, 1973. scale system studies. I 26. Northeast Power Coordinating Council. Erects of synchronous machine modeling in large-scale syStern studies. Final Report, NPCC-IO. Task Force on System Studies, System Dynamic Simulation Techniques Working Group. 1971.

chapter

The Simulation of Synchronous Machines


5.1
Introduction

This chapter covers some practical considerations in the use of the mathematical models of synchronous machines in stability studies. Among these considerations are the determination of initial conditions, determination of the parameters of the machine from available data, and construction of simulation models for the machine. In all dynamic studies the initial conditions of the system are required. This includes all the currents, flux linkages, and EMFS for the different machine circuits. The number of these circuits depends upon the model of the machine adopted for the study. The initial position of the rotor with respect to the system reference axis must also be known. These quantities will be determined from the data available at the terminals of the machine. The machine models used in Chapter 4 require some data not usually supplied by the manufacturer. Here we show how to obtain the required machine parameters from typical manufacturers data. The remainder of the chapter is devoted to the construction of simulation models for the synchronous machine. Both analog and digital simulation<are discussed.
5.2
Steady-State Equations and Phasor Diagrams

The equations of the synchronous machine derived in Chapter 4 are differential equations that describe machine behavior as a function of time. When the machine operates in a steady-state condition, differential equations are not necessary since all variables are either constants or sinusoidal variations with time. For this situation phasor equations are appropriate, and these will be derived. It is common to tacitly assume all machines to be in a steady-state condition prior to a disturbance. The soGalled stability study examines the system behavior following the disturbance. The phasor equations derived here permit the solution of the initial conditions that exist prior to the application of the disturbance. This is a necessary part of any stability investigation. From (4.74) at steady state all currents are constant or, mathematically,
id = iF = iD
=

iq

i,

Then from (4.74)


0 = iDrD
150

iQrQ

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

151

or at steady state
iD = i, = 0

(5.3)

Using (5.1) we may write the stator voltage equation from (4.74) as
ud =

-rid

d , i q

vq = -riq

+ WLdid + kMFUiF
+ u,sin8)

(5.4)

From (4.5) with balanced conditions, uo = 0. Therefore, from (4.9) we may compute
u,, = m ( v d c o s 8

(5.5)

where by definition 8 =

+ b + u/2. Then from (5.4) and (5.5) u,, = m [ - ( r i d + wLqi,)cos(wRt + 6 + ~ / 2 ) +(-ri, + wLdid + kMpwiF)sin(wRt + 6 + */2)] = -[-(rid + oL,iq)cos(wRt + 6 + r / 2 ) + (-riq + WLdid f kMFfdiF)cos(wRf + A)]
WRt

At steady state the angular speed is constant, w noted as reactances, or


wLq =
x q

(5.6) wR, and wL products may be de-

wLd

= xd

(5.7)

From (4.226) we also identify WRhfFiF = .\/ZE (5.8) where E is the stator equivalent E M F corresponding to iF. Using phasor notation,' the .\/Z multiplier of (5.6) is conveniently used to define the rms voltage phasor

(5.9)

where the superior bar indicates a total phasor quantity in magnitude and angle (a complex number). By using the relation j = 1 @in (5.9).
(5.10)

Note that in this equation V, and E are stator rms phase voltages in pu, while id and i, are dc currents obtained from the modified Park transformation. The choice of this particular transformation introduced the factor l / d in the equation. To simplify the notation we define the rms equivalent d and q axis currents as
Id

ii d / d

I,

i,/G

(5.1 1)

The stator current i,, expressed as a phasor will have the two rectangular components 1, and I d . Thus if the phasor reference is the q axis,

I , = (1,

+ jI,)ejs

(5.12)

I . We define the phasor d = Aej" as a complcx number that is related to the corresponding time domain quantity a ( r ) by the relation a ( r ) = @ ( t / Z A e J w ' ) = a A cos(wr + a).

152

Chapter 5

7 d axis

I,

Fig. 5.1

Phasor diagram representing (5.14).

Substituting (5.12) and (5.1 I ) in (5.10) and rearranging,

EB=
and by using E
= ED, 7 = ,

+ r c + jXqIq@ - Xdld@
id jld@, =

(5.13)

I,@, and

E + rTa + jxqTq + j x d L

(5.14)

The phasor diagram representing (5.14) is shown in Figure 5.1 [l]. Note that the phasor jx,& leads the q axis by 90". The phasorjxdT, makes a 90" angle with the negative d axis since I d is numerically negative for the case illustrated in Figure 5 . I . To obtain ud and u, from (5.4), we compute the rms stator equivalent voltages
d Note that V, and V are the projection of V , along the q and d axes respectively. Also note that in the phasor diagram in Figure 5.1 both V and Id are illustrated as d negative quantities. Thus the magnitude of d d is subtracted from x q l q to obtain the magnitude of V,. This situation is shown in Figure 5.1 since lagging current (negative Id) is commonly encountered in practice. Examining Figure 5.1 and (5.15), we note that if the angle 8 is known the phasor diagram can be constructed quite readily. If the position of the q axis is not known but the terminal conditions of the machine
q

axis

Fig. 5.2 Location of the q axis from a known terminal current and voltage.

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

153

are given (i.e., if V,,, I,, and the angle between them are known), construction of the phasor diagram requires some manipulation of (5.15). However, an alternate procedure for locating the position of the q axis is illustrated in Figure 5.2, where it is assumed that Vu, I,, and the power factor angle are known. Starting with E (used . Then the voltage , here as reference) the voltage drop rT, is drawn parallel to 7 drop j x , L is added (this is a phasor perpendicular to E ) . The end of that phasor (Eqa in Figure 5.2) is located on the q axis. This can be verified by noting that the d axis component of the phasor j x q z is x q < , which is similar to that shown in Figure 5.1. Its q axis component however is xq&, which is different from that shown in Figure 5.1. Thus to locate the phasor E in Figure 5.2, we add the phasor (xd - xq)& to the phasor

q 4
5.3

Machine Connected to an Infinite Bus through a Transmission line

To illustrate more fully the procedure for finding the machine steady-state conditions, we solve the simple problem of one machine connected to an infinite bus through a transmission line. Although this one-machine problem is far simpler than actual systems, it serves well to illustrate the procedure of finding initial conditions for any machine. As we shall see later, this simple problem helps us concentrate on concepts without becoming engulfed in details. The differential equations for one machine connected to an infinite bus through a transmission line with impedance 2, = R , + j u R L r is given by (4.149). Under balanced steady-state conditions with zero derivatives, (4.149) becomes

u d

u, =

- v3 V , sin (6 - a ) + Reid + u L e i q ' d V , cos(6 - a ) + R,iq - wL,id

(5.16)

Substituting for v d and u, from (5.4) into (5.16),

-ri,

-rid - uL,i, = - d V , sin(6 - a) + Reid + u L e i q WLdid + kMFuiF = v'3VmC0S(6- a ) + Reiq - wL,id E


VmC0S(6- a) ( r - V , sin(6 - a ) + ( r

By using (5.7) and (5.11) and rearranging the above equations, we compute
=
=
Re)fq

+ Re)[,, + ( x , + X , ) f ,

- (xd

+ xe)fd

(5.17)

where X e = w L e . Equations (5.17) represent the components of the voltages along the q and d axes respectively. The phasor diagram described by these equations is shown in Figure 5.3, where the phasor representing the infinite bus voltage V,, with the q axis as reference, is given by

V,

V,,

+ jV,,

V , c o s ( b - a) - jV,sin(6 - a)

(5.18)

Note that Figures 5.1 and 5.2 can be combined since the same q and d axes, the same EMF E, and the same current I, are applicable to both. Thus in Figure 5.3 the machine terminal voltage components Vd and V, can be obtained using (5.15). An alternate procedure would be to start with the phasor V, in Figure 5.3, then add the voltage drop R,I, - x , I d in the g axis direction and the voltage drop R,Id + X,f, in the d axis direction to obtain the phasor E. Again remember that in Figure 5.3 both I d and V,d are shown as negative quantities. The remarks concerning the location of the q axis starting from V , and f, are also applicable here.

154

Chapter 5

q axis

Fig. 5.3

Phasor diagram of(5.17).

5.4

Machine Connected to an Infinite Bus with local load at Machine Terminal

The equations that relate the infinite bus voltage V, to the stator equivalent EMF
E are given by (5.17). Note that this form of the equations does not give the machine

terminal voltage explicitly. Since the terminal voltage is a quantity of considerable d interest, we seek a solution in which V and V, are given explicitly. One convenient method is to add a local load at the machine terminals, as shown in Figure 5.4. For the system shown in Figure 5.4, the steady-state equations for the machine voltages, EMFS, and currents are the same as given by (5.14), (5.13, and (5.12) respectively. Equations (4. l49), which at steady-state conditions are the same as (5.16). are still applicable except that the currents id and i, should be replaced by the currents iIdand i,. These are the d and q axis components of the transmission line current i,. I n other words, with the q axis as a reference,

r; = I,, + j l ,
where we define

(5.19)

I,,

i, ,

/ v3

Ild

= i,,,/&

(5.20)

The transmission line equations are then given by

Fig. 5.4 One machine with a local load connected to an infinite bus through a transmission line.

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

155

which can be stated in the form (5.22) To obtain a relation between can write the phasor relations

5 and T , , we

refer to Figure 5.4. By inspection we (5.23)

iL To - T, = where we define 2, = RL + jXL.

(L - T,)(R, + j X L ) = v, + jvd

Separating the real and imaginary components, (5.24)

From (5.24) we can solve for I,, and t l d r (5.25) The equations for the q and d axis voltage drops can then be obtained from (5.25), (5. IS), and (5.22).
5.4.1
Special case: the resistive load,

zl = Rl + i0
f,,
=

For this case X L = 0. From (5.25)


I,d =: I d

vd/RL

f, - V,/RL

(5.26)

Substituting (5.26) into (5.22),


vd =

vq =
or

-v,Sin(6 - a) + R,(ld - vd/RL) + xc(fq V,/RL) v, COS(b - (Y) + R e ( f q- V,/RL) - xe(Id - vd/RL)

Vd(I R,/R,) + Vq(Xe/RL)= - V, Sin (6 - CY) - v , ( x e / R L ) + v,(I + R,/RL) = v, COS(b - a) + Re], Substituting (5.15) into (5.27) and rearranging,

+ X,f,
xcfd

(5.27)

(I + 2 ) ~, c o s ( ~ v
=

- a) -

RL
Now define

(5.28)

156

Chapter 5

Fig. 5.5

Phasor diagram of a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus with local resistive load.

k, = x,(I + r / R L ) + X,(l
Then (5.28) can be written as

4-

R,/RL)

?d

xe(I + r / R L ) -t X d ( 1 + R , / R L )
ddId
A

(X,/RL)E
(1

=
=

- ~ , s i n ( 6 - CY) +

+ R,/RL)E
El
=

v, COS(6

CY)

XdId

+ ,?,I+, + R,I,
a

(5.29)

Let us define a phasor E , :

( I + Re/RL)E + j(Xe/RL)E where the phasor E , makes an angle y with the 9 axis
y = arctan[X,/(R,

(5.30)

+ RL)]

(5.31)

The phasor diagram for (5.29)--(5.31)is shown in Figure 5.5.


5.4.2

The general case:

arbitrary

For ZL arbitrary the equations are more complicated. Substituting (5.25) into (5.22) and rearranging,
vd(I

RLRe +

xLxe)

+ V q ( R L x e-

XLRe

- V , sin(6 -

CY)

z:

z:

+ Reid + X e I ,

(5.32)

or
Vd(1 - VdX2 where
XI

Xi)

vqX2 = - v, Sin (6 -

CY)

+ R,ld + xelq
XeId

V,(I

+ XI)

V, COS(6 -

CY)

+ ReIq

(5.33)

(RLR,

+ XLXe)/Zt

A2

( R L X , - XLRe)/ZZ

(5.34)

Combining (5.33) and (5.15),

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

157

X2E

= - V,

(I

+ XI)E =
El 5
(1

sin(6 - a) [Re + r ( l + XI) - xdX2lId [ X , x , ( l + XI) + rXzll, V,cos(6 - a) + [ - X , - rXz - x d ( l Xl)]Id + [ R , - x,XZ r ( l + X l ) ] I q

+
Again, by defining

(5.35)

+ X I ) E + &E, i d Re + r(l + A , ) - xdXZ 5 td X , + x d ( l + A , ) + rA2 5 + X,)E =

h= R , X, 5 X,

+ r(l + XI) - xqX2 + X,(I + X I ) + rx2


+ R,I, + R,I,

(5.36)

we may write (5.35) in the form


X 2 E = - V , sin(6 - a) + &Id

(I

V,COS(~ a) -

fdld

(5.37)

Since (5.37) is of the same form as (5.29), it can be represented by the same phasor diagram in Figure 5.5.
5.5
Determining Steady-State Conditions

The most common' boundary conditions are the terminal voltage V , and either the current I, and the power factor Fp or the generated power P and the reactive power Q (per phase). I n either case V,, I , , and 4 (the power factor angle) are assumed to be known. , as a reference, we write Resolving 7 into components with

is the quadrature component (which carries its o w n sign). We also define the power factor Fpas

+ jf, where I, is the component of I;, in phase with E, and I,


I;,
=

I,

(5.38)

Fp

= COS@

(5.39)
-I,sin 4

where 4 is the angle by which I , lugs V,. Then

I,

I,cos$

I,

(5.40)

The phasor E,, in Figure 5.2 is given by

E,, 5
=

E + (r + jx,)E
(V, - xqlx +

V , + (I, + j I , ) ( r rl,) + j ( x , I , + rl,)


=

+ jx,)
(5.41)
(Le., the angle 6 - B in

The angle between the q axis and the terminal voltage Figures 5. I and 5.2) is given by
6 -

P
=

tan-'[(x,l,

+ d x ) / ( V a+ rlr
%
=

- x,lX)l

(5.42) (5.43)

The above relations are illustrated in Figure 5.6. Then we compute


Vd

- V,sin(6 - P )

V,cos(6 - P )

and ud and u, can then be determined from their relationship to Vd and V, given by (5.15). The currents are obtained from

Id

-l,sin(6 - P

+ 4)

I,

I,cos(6 - P

+ 4)

(5.44)
The remaining

and the rotor quantities id and i, can be determined from (5.11).

158

Chapter 5

'

q axis

Fig. 5.6 Phasor diagram illustrating (5.41) and (5.42).

currents and flux linkages can readily be determined once these basic quantities are known. In the case of a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus the same procedure is followed if the conditions at the machine terminals are given. The voltage of the infinite bus is then determined by subtracting the appropriate voltage drops to the machine terminal voltage E. If the terminal conditions at the infinite bus are given as the boundary conditions, the position of the q axis is determined by a procedure similar to the above. The machined and q axis currents and voltages and the machine terminal voltage can then be determined. This is illustrated in Examples 5. I and 5.2.
5.5.1
Machine connected to an infinite bus with local load

Case 1: V , , E, and the machine load angle 6

- a are known.

In this case Id and I, can be determined directly from (5.37). Then from (5.15) we can determine V, and V,. The three-phase power of the machine can be determined from the relation P3+ = 3(VdId + V , f , ) . The terminal current I, is determined from (5.25), and knowing V , we can also determine the power and power factor at the infinite bus.
Case 2: Machine terminal conditions V,, I,, and power factor are known.

From I,,, V,, and the power factor the position of the quadrature axis is determined (see Figure 5.2). From this information I d , Vd,I,, and V, can be found. Also E can be calculated from (5.13). From (5.36) and (5.37)the phasor E, can be constructed. The infinite bus voltage can then be determined by drawing R d I d + f , I , parallel to the d axis and R , I , - f d I d parallel to the q axis, as shown in Figure 5.7. Thus and the angle 6 - a are found, from which we can determine Vmdand V-,. The current I, is + determined from (5.25), and the power at the infinite bus is given by 3( VmdIId Vm4f,,).

r,

Case 3: Conditions at infinite bus are known.

From K, and Z , the machine terminal voltage V, is calculated. Then from ' F and Z L we can determine &. From TL and &, is found. Now the conditions at the terminals of the machine are known and the complete phasor diagram can be const ructed .

r-,

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

159

Fig. 5.7 Construction of the phasor diagram for Case 2.

5.6

Examples

The procedures described are illustrated by several examples where different initial conditions are given.
Example 5. I

The machine described in Examples 4.1, 4.2. and 4.3 is to be examined at rated power and 0.85 PF lagging conditions (nameplate loading). The terminal voltage is 1.0 pu. Calculate the steady-state operating conditions. I f this machine is connected by a transmission line of 0.02 + j0.40 pu impedance to a large system, find the infinite bus voltage.

Solution From previous examples and the prescribed boundary conditions the following data are available:
x,, = 1.700 PU

y, =
Re Le Z,
= = =

xq

r =

F, =

1.640 PU 0.001096 pu COS^ = 0.850

1.000 pu 0.02 PU 0.4 pu 0.4005/87.138"

From the given power, power factor, and voltage we compute


f,
=

I.0/0.85
=

1.176

PU

The angle I$ is computed from F, as 4


f,
=

cos-'0.85
f,
=

31.788". Then from (5.40)

I,cosd

1.000

fasin@= -0.620

From (5.42) and Figure 5.6

(6 - j3)

1.00 x 1.64 - 0.001096 x 0.620 1.000 + 0.620 x 1.64 + 1.00 x 0.001096 arctan 0.8126 = 39.096"

arctan

and 6 - B + 4 = 31.788 Then from (5.44)

+ 39.096 = 70.884" = angle by which 1, lags the q axis.

1 60

Chapter 5

t,
and
ld

t,cos(6 - ,B

+ 4)

0.385 pu

i, = 0.667 pu

-t,sin(6

-@

+ 4) =

-1.112

pu

id = -1.925 pu

From (5.43)

V,

6=

- Csin39.09" =

V , ~ 0 ~ 3 4 . 0 9 " 0.776 PU = U, = 1.344 PU -0.631 pu u = -1.092 d

pu

From Figure 5.1 by inspection


E =
= =

V,

0.776 2.666

+ rIq - X d t d + 0.001096 x
= EFD

0.385 + 1.70 x 1.1 12 at steady state [from (4.209) and (5.8)] where, from Example 4.1,
=
LAD =

Now using (5.8) in pu, iF = &E/L,, Then iF =

1.55 pu.

(fl 2.666)/1.55 x

2.979

PU

The currents io and i, are both zero. The flux linkages are given in pu by
Ad =

A,,
A,

= = =

A,, A, AD A,

=
=

Ldid + kMFiF = 1.70(- 1.925) + (1.55)(2.979) = 1.345 (id + iF)kMF = (2.979 - 1.925)(1.55) = 1.634 Lqiq = 1.64 x 0.667 = 1.094 kMQi, = 1.49 x 0.667 = 0.994 kMFid + LfiF = 1.55(-1.925) + (1.651)(2.979) = 1.935 kMDid M R i F = I.55(2.979 - 1.925) = 1.634 = A, , kM,i, = 0.994 = A,,

As a check we calculate the electrical torque T,, which should be numerically equal to the three-phase power in pu.

T,,

= =

i Ad - idA, , 0.667 x 1.345

1.925 x 1.094 = 3.004

Then T, = 1.001 pu. I f we subtract the three-phase t 2 r losses, we confirm the generated power to be exactly P = T, - rti = 1.000. We also calculate the infinite bus voltage for this operating condition. We can write V- = E - Ze<. Let V , = t,@ = 1.OLp. Then
=

V,

, = &

I,,/@ = l.l76//3 - 31.788" I .O - (0.4005 /87. I38")( I . I76 /@ 3 1.788') 1.0 - 0.4712 155.349" = 0.828 1-27.899"

or
PU Thus we have V, = 0.828 pu, and @ - (Y = 27.899" = the angle by which The angle between the infinite bus and the 4 axis is computed as
=

V, /a - p

v,.

leads

6 -

(Y

(6 - ,B)

+ (,B

CY)

39.096

+ 27.899

66.995"

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

161

Example 5.2 Let the same synchronous machine as in Example 5.1 be connected to an infinite ~. The bus through a transmission line having R, = 0 . 0 2 ~ and Le = X, = 0 . 4 ~ ~ . infinite bus voltage is 1.0 pu. The machine loading remains the same as before ( P = 1.0 pu at 0.85 PF). The boundary conditions given in this example are "mixed"; i.e., the voltage is known at one point (the infinite bus), while the power and reactive power are known at a different point (the machine terminal). A slight modification of the procedure of Example 5.1 is needed.

Solution A good approximation is to assume that the power at the infinite bus is the same as at the machine terminals by neglecting the ohmic power loss in the transmission line (since R, is small). A better approximation is to assume a power loss in the transmission line based on some estimate of current (say 1 .O pu current). Let 13 Re = (I.00)2(0.020) = 0 . 0 2 ~ ~Then the power at the infinite bus is 0.980 . pu and the component of the current in phase with V, is I, = 0 . 9 8 0 ~ ~The angle 6 . between and V, is given by
tan0
=

1,/1,

1.0201,

The angle p between

and 7 is given by an equation similar to (5.42), viz., tan p


=

- 0.392 + 0.021, X J , + RJX V, - XJ, + Ref, 1.020 - 0.41, The power factor angle at the machine terminal @ is given by

+e

COS-'0.85

31.788"
(Y

These angles are shown in Figure 5.8, with V, used as reference; i.e., tan 4 = tan (cos-' 0.85) = 0.620. Using the identity tan @ = (tanp we compute 0.620 from which we get 1,
=

0. Then

+ tan8)/(1

tanptane)

- 1.0201,

- 0.41,) I + [ 1.020(0.392 + 0.021,)1,]/( I .020 - 0.41,)

+ (0.392 + 0.021,)/(l.020

-0.217 pu.

/
'd

q axis

REF

Fig. 5.8 Phasor diagram of V , and V , .

162

Chapter 5

From the known value of I, we can now determine 8.

0.392 - 0.004) (1.020 + 0.082)


Also

1.1o 93o

8 = tan-'(0.213/0.980)= 1 . 8 ' 243

19.310 + 12.483

31.793"

which is a good check (see above). The terminal voltage V , is given by

= =

( V , - X,I,

+ &Ir)+ j(Xcfr &I,) +

1.106 + j0.388 = 1.172/19.31" pu 0.980 - j0.217 = I .003 /- 12.48" pu

The generator phasor current is


=

and P = %I,cos 4 = 1 .OOO I pu (on a three-phase basis). The position of the q axis can be determined from an equation similar to ( . 1 . 54) With a = 0,

The currents, voltages, and flux linkages can then be calculated as in Example 5.1. The results are given below in pu:
id

i, = iF =

E =
ud =

U, =

-1.591 0.701 2.826 2.529 -1.148 165 .7

Ad =

1.676
A,, A,,
=

A ,
A,

194 .1 105 .4

1.150
=

A ,
T,, T,
= =

3.004
1.001

I n steady-state system studies (often called load-flow studies) it is common to specify the generator boundary conditions in terms of generated power and terminal voltage are commonly used for the terminal voltmagnitude, Le., P and q. (Both V , and age and both are used in this book.) In studies of large systems these boundary conditions are satisfied by iterative techniques, using a digital computer. For the one machine-infinite bus problem the system may be solved explicitly. We now consider the bus consisting one machine-infinite bus problem with a local load connected to the of a shunt resistance RL and a shunt capacitance CL, representing the transmission line susceptance. The system of generator, local load, and line may be conveniently described as a two-port network (Figure 5 9 for which we write, with 7, as reference (a! = 0), .)
(5 4 ) .5

The apparent power injected at node I may be computed as

f,= P, + jQI= Frf

ViFE

~~~~~

(5.46)

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

163

Fig. 5.9

One-machine system as a two-port network

Then we may compute


PI = GllV:

V;V,(G,,cosB

+ B,,sinP)

(5.47)

where we define F,, = G,, + jBkm for all k and m. In (5.47) PI, V;, and V, are specified, while G , , , GI,, and B,, are known or computed system parameters. Thus we may solve (5.47) for the angle P. In doing so, it is convenient to define a constant angle y related to the admittance element = YI2/y. Then from (5.47) we define

(5.48) F = COS(? - 8) = (PI - G1,V~)/Y12V;V, from which P can be found. Obviously, there are limits on the magnitude of PI that can be specified in any physical situation, as the cosine function is bounded in (5.48).
Example 5.3 Compute the steady-state conditions for the system of Examples 5.1 and 5.2, where the given boundary conditions in pu are

1.0 (on a three-phase basis)

V,

1.17

V,

1 .OO

and where the local load is given in pu as


RL =

100

B L

= CL =

0.01

Solution For the numerical data and boundary conditions given, we compute

Z,

Re

q, =
=

+ jX,
= -

0.02

+ j0.4 = 0.4005/87.138"
pu

pu

-yl,

I/Ze = YI2/y

-0.1247

+ j2.4938 = 2.4969/92.862"

= 92.862" We are also given that RL = IOOpu and B = 0.01 pu. Thus the admittance from L node I to reference is ylo= 0.01 + jO.01 pu. We then compute

or y

Yll

ylo+ jj12 GI, =


F
=

+ jBll = 0.1347 - j2.4838 pu

We now compute the quantity F defined in (5.48) as

(PI - G,lV:)/Y12V;Vm = 0.2792


/3 = 92.862 - 73.788 = 19.074'

Then
7-P
= COS-'

F = 73.788"

or

l.l7/19.074".

164

Chapter 5

To find the currents, we note from Figure 5.9 that

+ &.

Now

6
We also write
= =

= =

(V:/RL)E+ ( q / X , > / @ 0.0072 + j0.0149. pu


=

& +&

+ 90"

(T - V,)/Z
[R,(V,cos@ - V,)

+ X,Ksin8] + j[R,V;sinP
z 3 /12.6' or

- Xe(Kcos@- V,)]

= 0.9667 - j0.2161 pu = 0.99056

- 0.2199 radians

Then, noting that

lies at an angle B from V , (Figure 5.8),

<

+ I', = IaD= 0.9739 - j0.2012

= 0.9945 1- 1 1.672" PU

We may now compute, as a check,


P

+ jQ = ci, =

1.000

+ j0.595
PU
0.859

= 1.164/30.746"

The power factor is

F , = cos 30.746' = ,

The quantity Eqa of Figure 5.2 may be computed as a means of finding 6. Thus with a = 0 we compute, as in Figure 5.6,
=

2.446/54.024" PU

and 6

54.024". Then we compute

6-0

= 34.950"

+@

30.746"

- @

+4

= 65.696"

With all the above quantities known, we compute d-q currents, voltages, and flux linkages in pu as in Example 5. I , with the result

i d

= - 1.570

Ad =

1.662

iq = 0.709
~d =

A,, A,
XAQ

X ,
XQ

1.897 1.056

-1.161
2.500 2.794

= 1.163 =
= =

uq = 1.661

E
if

= =

Xf T,, P,

2.180

= 3.003 =

1.000

Example 5.4

The same machine at the same loading as in Example 5.1 has a local load of 0.4 pu power at 0.8 PF. It is connected to an infinite bus through a transmission line having Re = 0.1 pu and X, = 0.4 pu. Find the conditions at the infinite bus.

Solution The internal machine currents, flux linkages, and voltages are the same as in Example 5.1. Thus, in pu,

Simulation of Synchronous Machines


Id

165

= = =

I,

-1.112 0.385 39.096 0.4/(1.O


x

V,

vd =

0.776 -0.631 2.666

From the local load information

I IL I

0.8) = 0 5 .

PU

Therefore IL = 0.4 - j0.3pu. We can also determine that, in pu,


RL =

16 .

XL =

1.2

ZL =

2.0

Thus we compute from (5.34)


X I = (1.6 x 0 1 + 1.2 x 0.4)/(2.0)2= 0.16 .
A2

(1.6 x 0.4 - 1 2 x 0 1 / 2 0 = 0.13 . .)(.) 0.001096 X 1 1 - 0.13 X 1.7 = -0.1197 .6 0.001096 x 1.16 - 0 1 x 1.64 = -0.119 .3 1 7 X 1.16 + 0.001096 X 0.13 = 2.372 . 1.64 x 1 1 + 0.001096 x 0.13 = 2.303 .6

Then
Rd =

R,

f d =

2 = ,
From (5.37)

01 + . 01 + . 0.4 + 0.4 +

V , = - V, sin ( 8 - a) = -(-1.112)(-0.1197) - (0.385)(2.303) (0.13)(2.666) = -0.673 V , , = V , COS (6 - CY) = (- 1.1 12)(2.372)- (0.385)(-0.119) + (1.16)(2.666) = 0.501 v, = [(0.673)2+ (0.501)2]12 0.839 =
From (5.25)
I;d =

-1.112 0.385 -

+ 0.776 x
0.776 x

I,,

1.2 + 0.631 x 1 6 = -o.6268 . 4 16 - 0.631 x 1 2 . . = 0.2639 4 0.554 PU

The power delivered to the infinite bus is

P ,

(-0.673)(-0.6268) + 0.2639 x 0.501

The power delivered to the local load is PL = 0.4 pu. Then the transmission losses are 0.14pu, which is verified by computing RJ;.

5.7

Initial Conditions for a Multimachine System To initialize the system for a dynamic performance study, the conditions prior to the start of the transient must be known. These are the steady-state conditions that exist before the impact. From the knowledge of these conditions we can assume that the power output, power factor, terminal voltage, and current are known for each machine. If they are not specifically known, a load-flow study is run to determine them. Assume that a reference frame is adopted for the power system. This reference can

166

Chapter 5

be chosen quite arbitrarily. Once it is chosen, however, it should not be changed during the course of the study. I n addition, during the study it will be assumed that this reference frame is maintained at synchronous speed. Consider the ith machine. Let its terminal voltage phasor Vaj at an angle Pi be with respect to the arbitrary reference frame, and let the q axis be at an angle 6, with respect to the same reference. Note that pi is determined from the load-flow study data, while di is the desired initial angle of the machine q axis, which indicates the rotor - Pi) is the load angle or the position. The difference between these two angles angle between the q axis and the terminal voltage. From the load-flow data we can determine for each machine the component I, of the terminal current in phase with the terminal voltage and the quadrature component I,. By using an equation similar to (5.42). we can determine the angle Si - Pi for this machine. Then by adding the angle & we get the angle d,, which is the initial rotor angle of machine i. and 6, we can determine I,,, I d j , vdj, and Vqi. which can be used in (5.14) From or (5.15) to determine Ei. Then from (5.7) i, can be determined. The flux linkages , can also be calculated once the d and q components of I are known. ,

vaj

5.8

Determination of Machine Parameters from Manufacturers Data

The machine models given in Chapter 4 are based upon some parameters that are very seldom supplied by the manufacturer. Furthermore, the pu system used here is somewhat different from the manufacturers pu system. It was noted in Section 4.7.3 that the pu self-inductances of the stator and rotor circuits are numerically equal to the values based on a manufacturers system, but the mutual inductances between rotor and We shall attempt to clarify these matters in stator circuits differ by a factor of this section. For a more detailed discussion see Appendix C. Typical generator data supplied by the manufacturer would include the following. Ratings:

m.

Three-phase MVA Frequency and speed Stator line voltage

Stator line current Power factor

Parameters: Of the several reactances supplied, the values of primary interest here are the so-called unsaturated reactances. They are usually given in pu to the base of the machine three-phase rating, peak-rated stator voltage to neutral, peak-rated stator current, and with the base rotor quantities chosen to force reciprocity in the nonreciprocal Parks transformed equations. This is necessary because of the choice of Park transformation Q (4.22) traditionally used by the manufacturers. The following data are commonly supplied. Reactances (in pu I: Synchronous d axis Synchronous q axis Transientdaxis Transient q axis Subtransient d axis
= Xd
=

x,

= xi = xi = xi

Subtransient q axis = x; Negative-sequence = x2 Zero-sequence = xo Armature-leakage = xt

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

167

Time constants (in s):


Field open circuit Subtransient of amortisseur ( d axis) Subtransient of amortisseur ( q axis)
=

.io

= T;

= 7;

Resistances (in Q):


Stator resistance at 25C Field circuit resistance at 25C

Other data:
Moment of inertia in Ibm.ftZor WRz (sometimes separate data for generator and turbine are given) No-load saturation curve (at rated speed) Rated load saturation curve (at rated speed)

Calculations: The base quantities for the stator are readily calculated from the rating data: SB = V A rating/phase V A VB = stator-rated line-to-neutral voltage V f B = stator-rated current A wB = 27r x rated frequency rad/s
The remaining stator quantities follow:

Also the stator pu inductances are known from the corresponding reactance values. , Thus L d , L;, L;, L ~L;, L;, L,, LO,and& are known. Rotor base quantities: I f & in pu is known, then L A D in pu is determined from L A D = L,, - X d , the corresponding value of LA, in H is then calculated. The mutual field-to-stator inductance MF in H is determined from the air gap line on the no-load saturation curve as d V B = WBhfFiF, where iF is the field current that gives the rated voltage in the air gap line. The base rotor quantities are then determined from (4.55) and (4.56); the base mutual inductance M F B is calculated from (4.57). Rotor per unit quantities: Calculation of the rotor circuit leakage inductances is made with the aid of the equivalent circuits in Figure 5.10. The field-winding leakage is calculated from Figure S.IO(a) by inspection: inductance

.eF

Li
which can be put in the form

4 d + LADXF/(LAD + XF)

PU

(5.49)

(5.50)

168

Chapter 5

6)
Fig. 5. IO Equivalent circuit ford axis inductances: (a) transient inductance, (b) subtransient inductance.

Similarly, by inspection of Figure 5.10(b),


(5.51)

from which we can obtain

e,

= LADeAL:

- td)/[L,&

- LF(Li - e,)]

(5.52)

The self-inductances of the field winding L and of the amortisseur LD are then calcuF lated from

L F = .eF The same procedure is repeated for the q axis circuits.


=

LD

4 ,

+ LAD
LA,

LAD

(5.53)

Lq -

where .eq =

.ed and 4 , is determined from Figure 5.1 I by inspection:


L:

44

(5.54)

4, +
= LAQ[(L;

.eQLAQ/(&Q

+ LAQ)

(5.55)

from which we can obtain

.e,

- tq>/<Lq-

L:)I

(5.56)

and the self-inductance of the q axis amortisseur is given by


Resisrances: The value used for the stator winding resistance should be that which corresponds to the generator operating temperature at the rated load. If this data is not available, a temperature rise of 80-100C is usually assumed, and the winding resistance

Fig. 5.1 I

Equivalent circuit of the 9 axis subtransient inductance.

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

169

is calculated accordingly. Thus for copper winding the stator resistance for I00"C temperature rise is given by

r125 = '25[(234.5

125)/(234.5

+ 25)]

(5.58)

The same procedure can be used to estimate the field resistance at an assumed operating temperature. However, other information is available to estimate the field resistance. From (4.189) we compute

r~

W 7 i 0 PU

(5.59)

where ~i~ is given in pu time. The damper winding resistances may be estimated from the subtransient time constants. From (4.187) and (4.190) the d axis subtransient time constant is given by
T :

= [(LDLF

LiD)/rDLFl(L$/Li)
rD

pu

(5.60)

Since all the inductances in (5.60) are known, (4.192) and (4.193) rQcan be found,
7;

can be determined. Similarly, from

(L;/L,WQ/rQ) P U

(5.61)

Again note that T$ and 7; are given in pu. Finally, data supplied by the manufacturer may not be available in the complete form given in this section. We should also differentiate between data obtained from verified tests and those obtained from manufacturers' quotations. The latter are usually estimated for a machine of given size and type, often long before the machine is fabricated. This may also explain apparent inconsistencies that may be found in a given set of data. This section illustrates the procedure that can be used to determine the parameters of the machine. When some of the data is not available, the engineer may find it convenient to assign values for this data from typical data available in the literature for machines of the same size and type. We should always ascertain that the parameters thus calculated are self-consistent. Actual values for several existing machines are given in Appendix D.

Example 5.5 The data given by the manufacturer for the machine of Example 4.1 are given below. The machine parameters are to be calculated and compared to those obtained in Example 4. I .

xd
xq
X :
X :

= =

X; =

=
=

Ld L, L A L; LI

1.70 pu

xt

= k d =

4,

0.15 pu

1.64 PU = 0.245 PU = 0.380 PU = 0.185 = L: PU


=

Ti0 =

5.9 S T$ = 0.023 s .o l = 0.075 s 7, = 0.24 s

Solution We begin by calculating the pu d axis mutual inductance


LAD

1.70 - 0.15

1.55

This is also the same as kMF, kMD,and MR.Similarly,

170

Chapter 5

LA,
Now, from (5.50)

kMQ = 1.64 - 0.15 = 1.49 PU 0.101

.eF =
L ,
=

1.55[(0.245 - 0.15)/( I .70 - 0.245)j


0.101

PU

1.55

1.651

PU

From (5.52)
.eD

LD

(1.55)(0.101)(0.185 - 0.15) (1.55)(0.101) - (1.651)(0.185 - 0.15) 1.550 + 0.055 = 1.605 PU

0.055 PU

Also, from (5.56)

&Q=
L,
=

1.49[(0.185 - 0.150)/(1.640 - O.l85)] 1.490

0.036 PU

+ 0.036
70 = A

1.526

PU

From the open circuit time constant


5.9 s
=

2224.25 rad

We compute from (5.59)


r, = 1.651/2224.25 = 7.423 x

pu

and from (5.60)


rD=
=

(1.605 x 1.651 - 1.55 x 1.55)(0.185) (1.65 1)(0.023 x 377)(0.245) 0.0131 PU

From

T$

0.075 s we compute
T;

(L;/L;)?$ = 8.46 ms = 3.19 rad


0.054 pu

Then from (5.61)


rp =

(1.526/3.19)(0.l85/l.64)

These values are the same as those calculated in Example 4. I .


5.9
Analog Computer Simulation of the Synchronous Machine

The mathematical models describing the dynamic behavior of the synchronous machine were developed in Chapter 4. The remainder of this chapter will be devoted to the simulation of these models by both analog and digital computers. We begin with the analog simulation. Note that the equations describing the machine are nonlinear. For example (4.154) and (4.163) have two types of nonlinearities, a product nonlinearity of the form xixj (where xi and xi are state variables) and the trigonometric nonlinearities cos y and sin y. These types of nonlinearities can be conveniently represented by special analog computer components. Also, the analog computer can be very useful in representing other nonlinearities such as limiters (in excitation systems) and saturation (in the magnetic circuit). Thus in many ways the analog computer is very well suited for studying synchronous machine problems. A brief description of analog computers is given in Appendix B.

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

171

To place the matter in the proper perspective, recall that the state-space model of a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus is a set of seven first-order, nonlinear differential equations. When the equations for the excitation system (for u,) and the mechanical torque (for T,) are also added, the system is typically described by 14 differential equations. Complete representation of only one synchronous machine with its controls would occupy the major part of a large-size analog computer. Thus while the analog computer is well adapted for the study of synchronous machine dynamics, it is usually limited to problems involving one or two machines with full representation or to a small number of machines represented by simplified models (2, 3,4,5]. The model most suited for analog computer representation is the flux linkage model. Thus the equations developed in Section 4.12 are used for the analog simulation. The differential equations will be modified, however, to avoid differentiation. For example the state-space equation of the variable xi is

ii= J ( x , u , t )
where xi. j = 1,2,. . . ,n. are the state variables, and u,, k ing functions. For analog computer simulation (5.62) is written as
=

(5.62)

1,2,. . ., r , are the driv-

(5.63)

wherea is the computer time scale factor and wB is required if time is to be in seconds (see Appendix B).
5.9.1
Direct axis equalions

From (4.126)
A, =

4 l [

(A,

- A,) -

wx,

Ud

From (4.128)

dt

+ X,(O)

(5.64)

(5.65)

and from (4.129)


A,
=

>l
id iF

D (A, - X,)dt

+ A,(O)

(5.66)

& I

The mutual flux linkage A,,

is computed from (4.120)

Then from (4. I 18) the d axis and field currents are given by
=

(l/&,)(x, - A,)

(5.68) (5.69)

= (l/tF)(AF

The analog representation of the d axis equations is shown in Figure 5.12. Note that all integrand terms are multiplied by wB to compute time in seconds and divided by the time scaling factor a.

172

Chapter 5

-a
-A

AD

-A

Fig. 5.12 Analog representation of the daxis equations.

5.9.2

Quadrature axis equations

From (4.130) (5.70) and from (4. I3 I )


XQ
=

( A ~ Q XQ)df -

+ XQ(O)

(5.71)

The mutual flux linkage is computed from


= LQ(hq/&q

hQ/&Q)

(5.72) (5.73)

Then the q axis current is given by, from (4. I23),


jq

(I/&q)<Xq

- XAQ)

The analog simulation of the q axis equations is shown in Figure 5.13.

-
AQ

-
Q

AQ

-^Itt
9

Fig. 5.13 Analog sirnulation of the q axis equations.

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

173

Fig. 5.14

One machine-infinite bus system with local resistive load.

5.9.3

load equations
=

In (4.149) a

0 will be used for convenience. Therefore,


(5.74)

i,

2 lo
'

[ - .\/5 V , cos 6

+ u,

Rei,

+ wL,id]dt + i,(O)

(5.75)

Equations (5.74) and (5.75) are useful in generating the voltages u and uq. Howd , ever, if they are used directly, differentiation of id and i will be required, which should be avoided in analog computer simulation. To generate Vd and u,, the following scheme, suggested by Krause [2], is used. The machine is assumed to have a very small resistive load located at its terminal, as shown in Figure 5.14. This load is represented by a large resistance R . From Figure 5.14 the machine terminal voltage and current for phase a are given by
u, = (i, - if,) R
(5.76)

where if, is the phase a current to the infinite bus.

-L
Fig. 5.15 Analog simulation of the load equations.

174

Chapter 5

Fig. 5. I6 Simulation of the electrical torque T,,.

Following a procedure similar to that used in Section 5.4, the current if can be resolved into d and q axis components id, and iqf given by (5.74) and (5.75). The currents id and i, are given by (5.68) and (5.73). The ud and uq signals are obtained from Figure 5.14 by inspection,
Vd =

(id - i,)R

u, = (iq - i,)R

(5.77)

where i and if, are obtained from (5.74) and (5.75) respectively, with subscript t , added as required by Figure 5.14. The analog computer simulation of the load equations is shown in Figure 5.15.
5.9.4
Equations for w and 6
T,

From (4.90) and (4.99), with hA = h in pu and

2HwB,we can write (5.78)

where T = (i,Xd - idXq)/3. Equation (5.78) is integrated with time in seconds to , compute, with zero initial conditions and with a time scale factor of a,

(5.79)
Note that the load damping signal used is proportional to wA (pu slip), requiring appropriate values of D . Most analog computers require that 6 be expressed in degrees to find sin 6 and cos 6 [6]. Therefore, since d = wB(w, - I ) = W B O A pu, we compute

!.?!-% Aa

wA dt

+ - 6(0) 180
A

elec deg

(5.80)

The analog computer simulation of (5.78)-(5.80) is shown in Figures 5.16 and 5.17. The generation of the signals - a and -6 is shown in Figure 5.17. The analog repre-

&A

-I

-1

1 .o-

Fig. 5.17

Simulation ofwA,w,and b .

Next Page
Simulation of Synchronous Machines

175

sentations shown in Figures 5.12, 5.13, and 5.15-5.17 generate the basic signals needed to simulate a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus through a transmission line. However, other auxiliary signals are needed. For example to produce the signals wX, and whd shown in Figures 5.12 and 5.13, additional multipliers are needed. To produce the signals V, sin 6 and V, cos 6, an electronic resolver is needed. The complete analog representation of the system is shown in Figure 5.18. It is important to

100

SW 1017

Fig. 5.18

Analog computer patching for a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus through a transmission line.

Previous Page
176
Chapter 5

note that signals are added by using the appropriate setting for the potentiometers associated with the various amplifiers and integrators scaled to operate within the analog computer rating. This scaling is best illustrated by an example, and in Example 5.6 the scaling is given in detail for the simulation of the synchronous machine. The initial conditions may be calculated from the steady-state equations (as in Examples 5.1-5.3), and these values may be used to initialize the integrators. However, the analog computer may be used to compute these initial conditions. To initialize the system for analog computation, the following procedure is used. The integrator for the speed is kept at hold position, maintaining the speed constant. The integrators for the flux linkages are allowed to operate with the torque T, at zero. This builds the flux linkages to values corresponding to the no-load conditions. The load T, is then applied with the speed integrator in operation. The steady-state conditions thus reached correspond to initialization of the system for transient studies.
Example 5.6

The synchronous machine discussed in Examples 4.1-4.3, 5. I , and 5.2 is to be simulated on an analog computer. The operating conditions as stated in Example 5.1 represent the steady-state conditions. The system response to changes in U, and T, is to be examined. Solution The data for the synchronous machine and transmission line in pu is given by:

L,
L,
LD

= =

1.700 1.640

LD ,

= 0.02838
=

L,e

0.02836

= 1.605 = 1.526 =
= =

r = 0.001096
rF =
rD

Le
LAD

0.00074 0.0131

1.550
1.490 1.651
=

LA,

rQ = 0.0540

L F

R = 100.0

4d
&F

= =
=

0.150

R, = 0.02

0.101
0.055

4,

H
T:,,

2.37

&Q= 0.036
Le = 0.400

5.90

s s

V,

= 0.828
E

The additional data needed is T, = 1.00 pu and E F D 2.666. Note that EFD = E in the steady state. This value of E F D with the proper scaling is introduced into the integrator for A,. As explained in Section 5.9.5, the analog computer is made to initialize itself by allowing the integrators to reach the steady-state conditions in two steps. In the first step E F D is applied with T, = 0 and w = w R = constant. Then T, is switched on with all integrators, including the w integrator, in operation. The basic connection diagrams for the analog simulation are given in Figures 5.12 5.17. The overall connection diagram is shown in Figure 5.18. In that figure the analog unit numbers and the scaling factors for the various signals are given; e.g., the scaling factor for A, is 10, which is given in parentheses. The time scaling used is 20. The settings of the various potentiometers and the scaling are listed in Table 5 . I.

00

r0 0 0

00

r-

2
0

w
$4 J
Q

s
2 I
2
I

2
w r w
w
0

2
rw -

R 3

2
w
q
0

2 I
2
\

2 I
-

9
m -

z
2 8

Q Q
Q
rn

00

II
I I

1 I

-I-$
4 1
01

01

2
I

2
2
2

4
e 0 m 0

Ei

v ,

VI

8
2
'c! m

"/f
8
II

9
1

rr: 4 -

ro

0 0 00

9 ' c ! c ? c ?
00

VI

22

E 3 *

F:

F:

I=
2
m

SI2

5s 2

2N 2 N

8 d

8 d

SI
d

180

Chapter 5

Fig. 5.19 Response of a machine initially at 90% load and 90% excitation to a 20% step change in excitation.

The steady-state conditions reached by the analog computer are listed in Table 5.2. They are compared with the values computed in Example 5.1. Figures 5.19-5.21 show the following analog computer outputs: the change in the exciter voltage E F D , the mechanical torque T,+, the electromagnetic torque T,,, the field flux linkage A,, the stator d axis current id, the terminal voltage error V,,, the angular velocity error a, and the rotor angle 6 . The results of the simulation are , shown in Figures 5.19-5.23, where all plotted quantities are given in pu. Example 5.1 is used as a base for the computer runs. Thus a 10% change in EFDis 0.2666, which is 10% of the nominal value computed in Example 5.1. Similarly, 10% T is 0.3 pu, and , zero V,, corresponds to a terminal voltage V, of 6 p u (or V, = 1 .O).

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

181

, Fig. 5.20 Response of a machine initially at lOOu/, load (Example 5.1 conditions) to a 10% increase in T followed by a 10% increase in EFD to assure stable operation.

Figure 5.19 shows the response of the loaded machine to a 20% change in E F D . The generator is initially loaded at 90% of rated load (T'+ = 2.7). Note that the response to this change in E F D does not excite an oscillatory response except for a small, welldamped oscillation in ob. The terminal voltage responds nearly as a first-order system with a time constant of about 4 s (.io = 5.9 s). Figure 5.20 shows the system response to 10% step changes in both T,,, and E F D . The system is initially in exactly the condition calculated in Example 5.1 with computer voltages given in Table 5.2. A 10% increase in T,,,is the first disturbance. This excites a well-damped oscillatory response, particularly in T,, id, V,, w , and 6 (as well as other variables that are not plotted). A good degree of damping is evident. However, this

182

Chapter 5

Fig. 5.21

Response of a machine initially at 90% load to a 20% increase in T,,, followed by a 20% increase in EFDto restore stability.

overload on the system results in a gradual increase in 6 with time, which if not arrested will cause the machine to fall out of step. Repeated runs of the system have indicated that corrective action is required before 6 reaches about 95". The corrective action chosen was a 10% increase in EFD. This quickly restores the system to a stable operating state at about the same angle 6 as the initial angle, but at a higher A, than the initial value. Figure 5.21 is similar to 5.20 except that the increments of T, and EFD are each 20%. The system is initially at 9U% load and 90% EFD(0.9 x 2.666 = 2.399). Then a 20% step increase in T,,,is applied. The result is a fast movement toward instability, as evidenced by the rapid increase in 6 and the drop in terminal voltage. A 20% increase in EFD is

Simulation of Synchronous Machines


Table 5.2.
Variable

183

Comparison of Digital and Analog Computed Variables


Analog computed values V
L W

Computed value pu

Percent error

I .732
- 1.092

1.344

- I .925
0.667 2.979 1.634 0.994 1.345 I .094 I .935 3.004 66.995
*Angle between q axis and infinite bus
=

68.66 -44.I2 52.63 -38.39 13.42 48.12 30.10 39.49 33.10 19.04 29.97 33.89
8 - a.

1.717

- I .I03
1.316

-0.90 - 10 .1
-2.10 0.29 0.60

- I .920 0.67I
1.604 1.003 1.316 1.103 I .904 2.997 67.78

- I .84
0.94 -2.13 0.85 - 1.60 -0.10 1.17

applied at about the time 6 reaches IOO,and the system is quickly restored to a stable operating state. Finally, the excess load and excitation are removed. Figure 5.22 shows a plot in the phase plane, or uAversus 6, for exactly the same disturbances as shown in Figure 5.20. The system spirals to the right, first very fast and later very slowly, following the 10% increase in T,. Just prior to loss of synchronism a

Fig. 5.22

Phase-plane plot U A versus 6 for a 10% step increase inT,,, followed by a 10% step increase in EFD(see Figure 5.20). Initial conditions of Example 5. I.

184

Chapter 5

Fig. 5.23 Phase-plane plot EFD = 2.666.

04

versus 6 for a 10% step increase in T, with initial conditions T, = 0.9,

IO?, increase in EFDcauses the system to return to about the original 6, following along the lower trajectory. Figure 5.23 shows a n example of a stable phase-plane trajectory. The system is initially at 90% load but with 100% of the Example 5.1 computed value of E F D , or 2.666. A 10% increase in T, causes the system to oscillate and to seek a new stable value of 6. A comparison of Figures 5.22 and 5.23 shows the more rapid convergence to the target value of 6 in the stable case.

5.10

Digital Simulation of Synchronous Machines

Early efforts in solving synchronous machine behavior by digital computer were simply digital applications of the constant-voltage-behind-transient-reactance model, using a step-by-step solution method similar to that of Kimbark [7]. As larger and faster computers became available, engineers quickly realized that the digital computer was a powerful tool for handling very large system of differential equations. This caused an expansion in power plant modeling to include exciters, governors, and turbines. I t also introduced more detailed synchronous machine models into many cornputer programs, usually in the form of one of the simplified models of Section 4.15. More recent research [8,9]has been aimed at finding the best machine model for system dynamic studies. All digital computer simulations must solve the differential equations in a discrete and manner; Le., the time domain is broken up into discrete segments of length the equations solved for each segment. A simple flow chart of the process is shown

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

185

nonlinearities

+
t= t c t

results

Fig. 5.24 Flow chart of digital integration.

in Figure 5.24. There are several proven methods for performing the actual numerical integration, some of which are presented in Appendix E. Our concern in this book is not with numerical methods, although this is important. Our principal concern is the mathematical model used in the simulation. A number of models are given in Chapter 4. We shall use the flux linkage model of Section 4.12 to illustrate a digital program for calculating synchronous machine behavior in a numerical exercise.
5.10.1
Digital computation of saturation

One of the problems in digital calculation of synchronous machine behavior is the determination of saturation. This is difficult because saturation is an implicit function; i.e., A,, = f ( A A D ) . Actually, A,, is a function ofi,, = id + iF + i,, which flows in the magnetizing inductance L A D .But the currents id, iF, and i, depend upon AAo, as shown clearly in the analog computer representation of Figure 5.12. Each integra, From tion step gives us new As by integration. From these As we compute .i iMD we estimate saturation, which gives a new AAD, and this gives new currents, and so on. The first requirement in computing saturation is to devise some means of determining the amount of saturation corresponding to any given operating point on the saturation curve. For this procedure the saturation curve is represented by a table of data of stator EMF corresponding to given field current, by a polynomial approximation, or by an exponential estimate. The exponential estimate is often used since exponentials are easy to compute. It is based upon computing the offset from the air gap line in pu based on the field current required to produce rated open circuit voltage, shown in Figure 5.25 as iFO. Usually it is assumed there is no saturation at 0.8 pu

186

Chapter 5

Field Current, IF, A

01

pu

Fig. 5.25

Estimating saturation as an exponential function.

voltage. We then compute the normalized quantities


SGI =

iFI

im

iF0

sG2

iF3

- iF2 iF2

iF3

- 1.2iFo 1.2iFO

(5.81)

Then any saturation may be estimated as an exponential function of the form


SG =
AGf?8GvA

(5.82)

where V, = V, - 0.8. Since at open circuit X A D tion in terms of X A D ,

d , can also compute saturaV we ,


(5.83)

SG = A c e x p [ ( X A ~ / d )- 0.81

This is appealing since X A D = (id + iF + iD)LAD LAD the only inductance that and is saturates appreciably. If sGI S G 2 are given, these values can be substituted into (5.82) to solve for the and saturation parameters A G and BG. From (5.81) and (5.82) we write
S G ~ Ace =
0.286

1.2s~~ = Ace

0.48 G

(5.84)

Rearranging, we compute In(SGI/AG) Then


0.4BG = In( I . ~ S G , / A G ) In(SG, /AG) =
=

0.2B~

I ~ ( ~ . ~ S G ~ /0.4BG) = A G

(5.85)

or
AG
= s l/I a

.2SG2

(5.86)

This result may be substituted into (5.85) to compute


BG

5 In (1.2sG2 /AsGI)

(5.87)

Appendix D shows a plot of SGas a function of V,. The function SGis always positive and satisfies the defined values SG, and s G 2 at r/; = 1 .O and 1.2 respectively. Although we define saturation to be zero for V, < 0.8 pu, actually SGassumes a very small posi-

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

187

tive value in this voltage range. The exponential function thus gives a reasonably accurate estimate of saturation for any voltage. From (5.81) we can write for any voltage level,
SG = (iF - kiFO)/kiFO

(5.88)

where iF is the field current required to produce an open circuit voltage V,, including the effect of saturation. If the air gap line has a slope (resistance) R we have V, = RkiFo. Then, from (5.81)

s ~ ( 5 = (RiF - RkiFo)/RkiFo = (Rip - K)/K )


from which we may write the nonlinear equation
=

Rip - K s ~ ( 4 )

(5.89)

where Rip is the voltage on the air gap line corresponding to field current i F . Because of saturation, the actual terminal voltage is not Rip but is reduced by an amount V,SG where SG is a function of V,. Equation (5.89) describes only the no-load condition. However, we usually assume that saturation has a similar effect under load; Le., it reduces the terminal voltage by an amount V,SGfrom the unsaturated value.
Example 5.7

Determine the constants A G and B G needed to compute saturation by means of the exponential definition, given the following data from the saturation curve.

V, = 1.0 PU S G l = 30 A V, = 1.2 P U SGZ= 120 A The field current corresponding to V, = 1.0 on the air gap line is iFo = 365 A.
Solution From (5.81) we compute in pu
S G ~ 30/365 = 0.08219 =

S G = 120/1.2(365) ~

0.27397

Then from (5.86)


AG

(0.08219)2/1.2(0.27397)

0.0205

and from (5.87)


BG =

5 In [1.2(0.27397/0.08219]

6.9315

5.10.2

Updating the integrands

After computing the new value of saturation for each new time step, we are ready to update the integrands in preparation for numerical integration. This process is illustrated by an example.
Example 5.8

Prepare a FORTRAN computer program to compute the integrands of the flux linkage model for one machine against an infinite bus using the machine data of the Chapter 4 examples. Include in the program a treatment of saturation that can be

188

Chapter 5 Chapter 5
C C N NUGUS S Y S T E M M O D E N G PROGRAM * * * * C C N T I T I N U G U S S Y S T E M MODELLIIN 6 P R O G R A M * * * * VERSION

1.3

Fig. 5.26 CSMP program for computing initial conditions. Fig. 5.26 CSMP program for computing initial conditions.

Machines Simulation of Synchronous Machines

189 189

Fig. 5.26 (continued)

1 90

Chapter 5

Fig; 5.26 (continued)

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

191

executed prior to integration at each time step. Include a local load on the generator bus in the computation. Use the Continuous System Modeling Program (CSMP) [IO] for solving the equations and plotting the results.
Solution

An essential part of the computer program is a routine to compute the initial conditions. As noted in Examples 5.1-5.3, this computation depends upon the boundary conditions that are specified. The boundary conditions chosen for this example are those of Example 5.3, viz., P and at the generator terminals. The FORTRAN coding for this section of the program is included in the portion of the program listing in Figure 5.26 called INITIAL. Note that the statement of the problem does not give any explicit numerical boundary condition. This is one of the advantages of a. computer program: once it is written and verified, problems with different boundary conditions but of the same type can be solved with ease. The boundary conditions specified in Figure 5.26give P = 1.00 (PGEN), V, = 1.17(VT),and V , = I.OO(VINF).

I . Make a preliminary estimate of XAD (AAD is named WADS in the program; W being used for X and S meaning saturated).

2. Compute the new currents. From the equations


id = ( A d
iD

- XAD>/?!d (AD - X A D ) / { D

i~
iMD

(XF - X A D ) / ~ F

= id

+ +
iF

iD

(5.91)

we compute an estimate of the new currents. This estimate is not exact because the value of X A D used in (5.91) is the value computed at the start of the last A t , whereas the flux linkages Ad, X F , and AD are the integrated new values. Thus iMD computed by (5.91) does not correspond to point A of Figure 5.27, but to some new point B. Since X A D is a function of the currents and of saturation, we must find the correct new X A D iteratively. We do this by changing our estimated XAD slightly until iMDagrees with X A D on the saturation curve, or until points A and B of Figure 5.27 coincide. 3. To estimate the new XAD, we compute the saturation function SGD= f ( X A D ) in the

Fig. 5.27

Saturation curve for the magnetizing inductance L A D .

192

Chapter 5

Fig. 5.28 CSMP program for updating integrands.

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

193

usual way, using (5.83). Then we compute A. and A N , defined in Figure 5.27,
A0

= AAD(1

SGD)

AN = L A D i M D

Then the error measured on the air gap line is X E sured on the saturation curve is approximately
AA =

AN - A,, and the error mea-

SGD)

Now define a new A,, GAD =


4. Now we test
GAD
AAD

to be

GAD,

defined as G A D

XAD

+ AA.

Then we compute

+ ( A N - Ao)/(I + S G D )=
I GAD
A

L A D ~ M D / ( + SGD) ~

to see if it is significantly different from A A D ; Le., we compute


AAD

<

where E is any convenient precision index, such as mate a new A A D from neWA,D
= FAD =

If the test fails, we esti-

AAD - h ( G A D

- AAD)

where h is chosen to be a number small enough to prevent overshoot; typically, h = 0.01. Now the entire procedure is repeated, returning to step 1 with the XAD = F A D , finding new currents, etc. As the process converges, we will know both the new current and the new saturated value of A A D . The second part of the program computes the integrands of all equations in preparation for integration (integration is indicated in the program by the macro INTGTL). The computer program for updating the integrands is shown in Figure 5.28. The computed output of several variables to a step change in T,,, and E F D is shown in Figures 5.29-5.40. Computer mnemonics are given in Table 5.3. In both cases, the step input is applied at t = TSTART = 0.2 s.

I .ma-

Response to a 10% step increase in T,,,

1 1 .

il
% 1.6826A

--

I - -

--I l l I I I

I l l I l l I l l I l l

..----

--..
I I I I I I
I

I I I I I I

l I l I l l

l I l I l l

l l 1 1 l l , ,

--l l

I l l

l l l l

.I I I I ,
I I l I l I l

I I I I I I I 1 I

l l l l l l l l 1

l l l l l l l l 1
L.

l l ,
l

l l l l

l l

---

l l

--I l l I l l

I I I I I I I I

l l l l l l l l

l l l l l l l l

I l l

I l l I l l

I l l I l l

I l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l

. . I -

--...
I

I I I I I I I I

0
Time, s

1.5

2.0

2.5

1.6629

-. . .

I l l 1 1 I I I I l . I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I

Response to a 57; step increase in EFD

1.6406

1.6182

2
A

%
1.5999

.-I I I 1 l I I l I l

I 1 I
I I 1 I I I l 1 1 l 1 l

I l l I l l

ccI l l I l l I l l I I .I

1.5735

I I I I

l I l l

l l

l I

- - I

I I I I I

I I I I l l

I l l

l I l l l

l I l l l

--I

0.5

1.o
Time, a

18

2.0

2.5

Fig. 5.29 d axis flux linkages Ad.

2.2548

a
d

i L

2.2287'

2.2026

- . * * . . I
- e

I I 1 I I I

c c c c c -

I I I I I I I I I I I I I , , , , , ~.
I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I 1 I I I

- - -.*
c

I I 1 I I I

I I I I I I

I I I I I I

I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

cc4-.-.3

I I I I I I I I
I

I I I I I I I I
I

I I I I I I I I
I

I I I I I I I I
I

I I I I I I I I
I

I I I I I I I I
I

.-I-...--

1 I 1 1 I 1 I I I

1 I 1 1 I 1 I I I

1 I 1 1 I 1 I I I

1 I 1 1 I 1 I I I

1 I l 1 I 1 I I I

1 I 1 1 I 1 I I I

---I--

1 1 1 1 l I I I I : l I I I I I I I I I I I I I

2.1000

-1

I I I 1

.----.-.-

I I I 1 I

I I I 1

I I I 1 I I

I I I 1 I

I I I 1 I

0.5
Response to'a
- . - . e - . . - - -

1.0
The, s

1.5

2.0

2.5

2.2026-L

L L2 L
I I I 1 I I I 1 I I I 1 I I I 1 I I I 1 I I I 1

, I .

2.1)88-;

a
d

I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
L C C . - C C l ,

; ;;;;:I
I

I I . I I I I I 1 1

.+
I

~2.1750--: I ; I ; I -:
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2.16117 777; ; ;
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I 1 I I 1 .I I

i i i i i i +
1 1 1 1 1 1 l .
-r,--r---*LI

-I

I I I I
I I I I 1 1

2.1473-!
I I I I I 1 I I I
I I I I 1 I I

I I I I I I I

I------

-.....2. IOOO-L
I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I l I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I l I I I I I I 1 I I

1 1 i 1 1 -.1 1 1 I

I I I I I I
I 1 1 I

I I 1 I I I 1 I 1

l I l I I I 1 I 1

l I 1 I I I 1 I 1

l I 1 I I I 1 I 1

l I 1 I I I 1 I 1

l I 1 I I I 1 I 1

l I 1 I I I 1 I 1

l I l I I I 1 I 1

l I 1 I I I 1 I 1

. I 1 I I I 1 I l

*.
1 I I I I I I 1 I I I I

i i l+ l .
I I I l I I I I I I I 1 I I I I
I

t . I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I
I

t I I . I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
1

I I I 1 I I I I
I

I I I I I I I I
1

I I I I I I I I
1

...#-.I ..I

l I -.---1 .a

I I I I I I I I I I I

I I

1 1 I I I I I 1

I . .

0:s
Fig.

I 1.o
The, s
30 Field flux linkages XI;.

1.5

-.-.-

I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I

.---...I

I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I

25 . 1

* * . I

. . ! ! ! * * .. ?! f!f !! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! . . . r ! ! . I .
I , I . I

+ + i i i i i i i
! !

c c c c c

I I I 1 I 1

i i i i i
I I I 1 I 1 I I I I I 1 I I I l I 1

I I I I I 1

I I I I

!!!:!
i i i i i
I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I

I I I I

I I I I

I I I I

. . 3 . - -

1 1 1 1 l I I I I I
I I 1 I I I
1 1

I I I I I
I I 1 I I I I I 1 I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I

----I I I I I
1 1 1 1 I I I I I I 1 l 1 1 1
I----

I I I I I I I I I I 1 1 1 1 I

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 I I 1 1 I

1 . 8 0 0 .!, -.

1 i I 1 1 I I I I I 1 l 1 1

1 l I 1 1 I

1 l I 1 1 I

1 l I 1 1 I I 1

0.5

1 .o
lime,

1.5

2.0

2.5

1.89827 ;;;;
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I
I

Response to a 5':d step increase in EFD


I .

I I 1 I 1 I I I I

I I 1 I 1 I I I l

I I 1 I 1 I I I l

I I 1 I 1 I I I 1

I I 1 I I I I I 1

e . + . . - - - .

-I I 1 I I + 1 1 . 1 I 1 I
I

ccccc..

1.8679--j

iiii
1 I l l I 1 l I I 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 I I

I I I I I
M - 1 - 1

a
d

.
P

1 I I I I 1 I I I

1 I l l I 1 l I I

I I 1 1 I I 1 I I

-.II 1 I

I 1

I I I 1

I 1 I 1 I 1 I I I 1
I -

c . - c - -

+ I + I 1 * I l l + * l l l I 1 1 1 l I I
3-----

1.8375-;

I I I I I I 1 I I I I I 1 I I I 1 I 1 I I I 1 I 1 I I I 1

:;;;
1 I I I I 1

l l I 1

I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I

I I I I I I
1 I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I

I. I
I 1 I I

I I I 1
e . .

. - e . - -

- - c 1 - I

l I I I I I

1 1 1 1 *

I I I I I 1 1 1 1 1
I I I I I

I I I 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 I l l 1 1

I I I I I I I I I I I I
1

I I I I I I I I I I

1.@tJ&.!.

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

. . .,.. !! !! ,

1 I I I

1 I I I

1 1 8 1 I I I I I I I I

-I

-...---I 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1

I I I I I I

1 :o
lime, s

1.5

210

2 .-5

Fig. 5.31 daxis amortisseur flux linkages AD.


196

Response to a 10% step increase in T,,,

1.9404

--

b b 1.9193 <

-I I

I
r

I I
I

-.
I I I

8 0

~ 0;s

1 Io
Time, s

2;o

2.-5

1.8982-;
I I I I 1 I I

;;;
I I I I 1 l l I I I I 1 l l I I I I 1 1 1 I t I I . l l

I l l .
I I I I I l l 1
1 1 1 1 *

c c c c - - . e . -

b
k

.
4

1.8679--: n

I I I I I I I I I l l 1 I
I C

I I I I 1

-: : I
l l I 1 I I I I 1 1 1 I 1 I I I I 1

I l I l 1

I l I l 1

I 1 I 1 1

I I I I I I I I I I 1 1 1 1 l
I I I I I I 1 I I I I 1 . I I I I 1 I I I . I I I I I

I I I 1 I I I I 1

l l I 1 I I I I 1

I I I I I I 1 I I

I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I l I I 1

I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I l I I 1

I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I 1 I I 1

I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I 1 I I 1

+ I I . . , a , . r i i i i i r

..

1-11 *I---

1.8374-:

w e - -

l l 1 I I I I I I I I 1 1 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I

-I---

I 1 I I
I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 1 1 I I

I 1 l I

I 1 l I

I , 1 I

I I I I I I I I I I

1.8ooo-L L L L

l l 1 I I I I I 1 I I I I I I

I 1 I I

I 1 I I

I 1 I I

I 1 I I

---I-

0.5

1 .o
lime, I

1.5

2.0

2.5

Fig. 5.32 Saturated d axis mutual flux linkages A A ~ s .


197

0.21119

Response to a

lax step increase in T,,,

v)

3 0.19283 -

-.--.--e-

0.17446

- + + + + + i i
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 1 1 1 1 1
1 1 1 1 1 1 1

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I 1

----..--I 1 I I 1 1 I I I 1 1 I I 1 1 I I I 1 1 I I 1 1 I I I 1 1 I I 1 1 I I I 1 1 I I 1 1 I I I 1 1 I I 1 1 I I I

I I I I I I 1

------I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
1 I 1 I I I
I 1 1 I

1 1 I I 1 1 I I I

1 I 1 I I I
I 1 l I

1 I 1 I I I
I 1 1 I

1 I 1 I I I
I , 1 I

1 I 1 I I I
I 1 1 I

1 I 1 I I I
I 1 1 I

1 I 1 I I I
I 1 1 I

11---1-

1 1 1 l 1 1 1
I I I I I I I 1 1 1 l 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

0.1m

:I -

I
0

:A A ,. L: !

015

1 io
Time, s

2:o

215

*..
I I I I l I I I l I I I

. I I . I I

Response to a 5'2, step increase in EFD

L - C C e - C e -

I I I I 1 1 I I I

I I I I 1 1 I I

I I I I I I

I I l I 1 1 I I

I I l I 1 1 I I

I I l I 1 1 I I

. I l 1 . I l .

L.-------L.

0.15546-!
I I

0.13245--f
I

I I

01Oo: .2O-

0.5

1.0
Time,
t

1.5

2.0

2.5

Fig. 5.33 d axis saturation function SGD.


198

Response to a 10% step increase in T,,,

M i

1 .W14 0.5945
0.9800
0

0.5

1 .o
Time, s

1.5

2.0

2.5

Response to a 5% step increase in EFD

1.1 I 6 7

I-

.I I I l l . 1 1 1 1
c c

i i

I . I1 I

.
1 1 I . I I

l l +

a
1.0766-

- - I c . . . c - - - - - - I - I I I c

+ 1 I 1 I
1 I 1 I I I

I 1 I 1 I 1 I 1 I

I 1 I 1 I 1 I 1 I

I 1 I 1 I 1 I 1 I
1 I 1 1 I I

I 1 I 1 I 1 I 1 I
1 I 1 1 I I

I 1 I 1 I 1 I 1 I
1 I 1 1 I I

i i
I 1 1
I 1

I!

!!!!!:

1 I I I

i i i i
1 l I l 1 l I l 1 1 I 1

!!!:!

1 I I I

1 l I I

1 l I I

I I I I I I
1 l 1 1 I I l I I I 1.1 1 1 I I I 1 1 I I I 1 1 I I I ! I

1 I 1 1 I I

1 I 1 1 I I

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 .
I C C C - C L C - - L C c . - . C C . .

1 1 I I I I

1 I I 1 I I

I -

1.0355-

0.5945
0.9800

015

1
Time, s

2;o

Fig. 5.34 Line current i,.

199

3.1W3-

Response to a 10% step increase in T,,,

3.0322

3.00757 ; ; 3.oooo-!. .! L

1 :o
llme, s

15 .

2:o

Response to a 5% step increase in EFD

I I

3.0616-

1 :o
lime, E

2.0

2:s

Fig. 5.35
200

Field current if.

.- .
8 4.00343. -i
m
I I I

. . . . .
I.

-0.00687

-1

I ii - ... ...- . .
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
r

...... ..... - - - - ...........


c
e c

Response to a 10% step increase in T,,,

I I I l . I I l + . I I I I I 1 I I l l
c w

-I

-------...
I
1 1 1 l I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 0 l

I I I I I I I I

1 I I I I I I I

1 I I I I I I I 1

1 I I I I I I I I

1 I I I I I I I l

I I I I I I I l I

... ... ...


c- c

. . . . . ..... ....
I I 1 I I I I
I I 1 I I I I

.*
I I I I I 1 I

I l l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
e. ..

* * .
c

* * . * I
* I I I 1 * I I I 1 . I I I 1 * I I I 1
1 1 I 1 I I 1 1

*---------1 I I 1 1 1 I I 1 I I 1 1 1 I I 1 I I 1 1 1 I I 1 I I 1 1 1 I I 1 I I 1 1 1 I I 1 I I l 1 1 I I 1 I I 1 1 1 I I 1 I I 1 1 1 I I 1 I I l 1 1 I I

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I I I I I I l l l l l 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 l 1 1 1 1 I I I I I I I I l l l l I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 l 1 1 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I 1 1 I I 1 1 1 I I 1 I I 1 l 1 I I 1 I I 1 I 1 1 l I

..... .....
1 1 I 1 I I 1 1

I I I I 1
1 1 I 1 I I 1 1

I I I I 1
1 1 I 1 I I 1 l

I I I I 1
1 1 I 1 I I 1 1

I I I I 1 1 1 I 1 I I 1 1

I I I I 1 1 1 I 1 I I 1 I

l I 1 l I I I

l I I l I I I
I I I I I I I

1 I I l I I I
I I I I I I I

1 I I l I I I

1 1 . .

..... ....
1 1 1 1 1 l 1 1
1 l I 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 l I 1 I 1 1 I 1 l 1 I 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 I 1 1 1 I 1 1 I 1 I 1 I 1 1
F...-......----

1 1 I 1 I I 1 1

I I 1 I I I I

I I I I I I I

-I 1 I I

1 1 1 1 I 1 I

I I I I I I I I I I
1-11-

I I I I I I

I I I I

I I

-c

I
I

I
I

l
I

I
I

1
I

-0*02000 -L!..LL.!.!.!.L

I I I I I 1 I

l I I I I 1 I

I I I I I 1 I

* I I I I 1 I

I I I I I 1 I

I I I I I 1 I

I I I I I 1 I

I I I I I 1 I

I I I I I 1 I I I I I 1

!,""'A'.!.!.!
0.5

1 .o
Time,
I

1.5

2.c

---..-

I 1 I I I I I

I 1 I I I I I

I 1 I I I I I

I 1 I I I I I

I 1 I I I I I

I I

2.5

Response to a 5% step increase in .EFD

0.03075 -

.......................... .........................
i i
I t
I

1 I

I I

0.01866c

i ;
I I
I I I 1

+ i i +
I I

I I I I
l l l l
1 1 1

................ ...............
1

1 1

.l I l +
I l l

a .0.00657CI

I l l * I l l I I I I
I l l 1

I I I 1 I 1 I I I 1
I I I 1 I I

I I I I I I I I
I I I I

I
I I 1 I I I . * * I I I I I I 1 I I I I _I I I

l
I I 1 l I l I I I

l
I I 1 l I l

- c b - C C -

..

I I 1 1 I 1 I I I I I I

....... ......
l l * I l l I l l
I l l I l l I l l I l l I l l

* 1 1 I
I I

1 I 1 I 1 I 1 1 I
I I

1 I 1 l 1 I 1 1 I
I I

1 I 1 l 1 I 1 1 I
I I

1 I 1 1 1
I

I 1 I
I I

I I I I I

... ...

I I I I I 1 1 1 1 1
I I 1 I I I 1 I I I 1 I I l 1 I I l 1 I

i i
I I I 1 I I
I I I I

I I I I

-0.01762-!

-0.02000

-I I

0.5

1 ;o
The, s

1.5

2.5

Fig. 5.36 d axis amortisseur current iD.


20 1

Response to a 10% step increase in T,,,

1. I826

--..
. . I I

I I I I

>-

a .

-_
I 1 I I

1.17631 . .

i i i --I

* . I

I I I I I
r

I I I

l l l

l l l

I 1 I I I I
L

1700-;
I
I I

....
I I
I

I l l I l l I l l I l l
- e -

I l
l

I
l

I I I I
l 1
1

I I I
I

l l l
l

l l l
l

I I

I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I
1 l I I 1 l I I

I I I I

I I I I

I I I I

I l l I l l I l l I l l -c
I

I I
I I I I I I
I

- e - -

I I I 1 I I I I

I I I I I

1 , I I

I l l I l l I l l

-.-.--

I I I I I l l 1 I I I I

I 1 1 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I l l 1

--..
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I

I , , l , I I l l I l l I I

I l l

- ---I l l 1 I I I I I I I l l 1 1

I l l 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I

l l l I l l l l I
l l l l l l I l

l l l I l l l l I
l l l l l l I l

I I I

-.-.-

I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I 1 1 1 1 I I I I I

I I I I
1 ' 1

I --I-

I 1

--..

I I I

I I

I I I I
l l

IiiI
I I I 1 1 1 I I I

1500-A

I I I 1 I

I I I

I l l I l l

I l l I l l I l l

1 I
I I

I
0

----

...-1 .o
Time, s

I l l I I I I l l I l l

1 .5

2.0

I . 1708-

1.1642-1I

I I I I I I I I L eoI I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I

. .
t I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

Response to a 57, step increase in EFD


I I I I I

*. * * -. -.- - . . . .
& .I

,----_
I I I I I

. I - - -, 1 - -

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I e I I I I - - . I I I I I I - I I I I I I I I O I I I I I I I I

I I I I I

I I I I I

I I I I I

I I I I I

--------

- - I - - - _

I I I I I I I I I

I r I I

-*. 3

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
c
I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

- -I

I I I I I I I I I

--..
---- ...
a .

. - e - C e C - r

. 1-. 1
I I 1 I I

I I I I

I -

>-

I I I I I I I I I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I
--------e-

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I ) I t 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I l I I I I
I

I l I I

11 6: .nI I I I I I I I l I I I 1 I I

I I I I I I I

:::::::; :
I I I I I I I O I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I . 1 I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I

.-.-.-.I

I I 1 I I

I I 1 I I

I l 1 l I I I I I I l l I I I I l l I I l l I I I l l I 1 I l l I I I l l I I I

l l 1 l . I I I 1
I I

l l 1 I I I I I I I I l l 1 I I I I I I
I I I I

--I l l l l
-4.-

I I I I

I I I I

I I I I

I I I

I I I I

I I I I

..
I I I I I I I I I 1 1 I I I I I I 1 I I I I

-I.--.----...-

l I I l l 1 l 1 1 I l l 1 I l l I I I I I I I l l I I I I I I I l l I I l I l l 1 I I

I I I I I I I 1 1 1 1 1 I I 1 I l I I 1 1 I I I I I 1 1 I I I I I 1 1 I I I I I 1 1 I I I I

-..-I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I

.*

I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I

-.-I...-.-

4-1-1

1.1500-L ! . . ,! ., A L A ! .! ! ! ! , .

I I I l I 1 I I I I l l I I I I

I I I I I

I I I I I l l I I I I I I I I I l l 1 I l l I I I I I I I I I I I I I l l I I I I I I I I

l I I I l

l I I I l

1 I I I 1

I I I I I

l l l l l

l l l l l

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I $ I l I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I

1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1
-I

- - - I

05 :

1 :o

-"-I

he

- ...

I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I

-c

---MI

I
2.0

I
2.5

rime,

1.5
I

Fig. 5.37 Terminal voltage

V,.

Response to a 10% step increase in T,

1 ;o
Time, s

1.5

2;o

0.5

1 .o

1.5

2.0

2.5

Time, s

Fig. 5.38 Torque angle 6 in degrees.

Response to a 10% step increase in T,,,

. . . . . -----... .

1l o
Time, s

0.00185

Response to a Sg step increase in EFD

I 1 8

0.00102

!
I .

n .

0.00019

-0.00064

-0.00147 4.00160 ,O
Time,
I

1 ;5
ub

2.0

Fig. 5.39 Speed deviation

in pu.

3JoOo-- I
I
I 1 I
1

+
I I
1 1

..
I I I I
I 1 l 1

* * .
f

I I
l 1

I I
I 1

I I I t + I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
1 1 1 1 l 1 l 1 l l l l

.
l

Response to a loo/, step increase in T,,,


* * * *
I l l 1

+.*+**.**.*..
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I I I I I I 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 1 I 1 I 1 I I l l I I 1
l

..-_-...^-I-I l l l
I l l

I l l 1 I I I I I l l 1
I - - -

1 1 1 1 1 1 I I I I I I

a
2.9000-;
I-@

I 1 I I

I I l I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I l l 1 I I I I I 1

l l l l l l 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
I l

; ;:; ; ;;; ;; I I I I I I I I I I I
- - I

I 1 I I 1 1 1 1 I
l

l 1 l I 1 1 1 1 l I I I 1 l 1 1 1 l

l 1 l I 1 1 1 1 l I I I 1 l 1 1 1 l

1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 I I I 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 I I l l I I 1
l

1 I I 1 1 I I 1
1

I I I I I I I I I I I I I
1

I
I

I
I

I
I

I
I

I
I

I I I I I I 1 I I1 I I I l 1 I 1 I

I I I I I I
--e---

- - - 1 d , . - - . .

, . 1 . - -

, - 1 3 -

2.W)oO-

I I I ~ 1 1 1 I I I I I I ~ I I I 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 I I l l 1 1 1 1 1 I I I I

l l l l l I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I 1 1 1 1 1
1 1 1 1 1

l I l I 1
1

l I l I 1
1

I
0

--....-+------

I I I I I I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I I I I I I

I I I 1 I 1 1 1 I

I--.-

0.5

1 .o

,----

1 1 l 1 1 1 l 1 I

1 1 l 1 1 1 l 1 I

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I

I 1 I I I I

I I 1 1 I I I I I I I

I 1 I I I

I 1 I I I

I 1 I I I

I I I I I I
I I I I I I

15 .
lime, I

20 .

25 .

3.5638-

.+,

Response to a S?; step increase in EFD

3.4236 -

. . I

3.2834-,

.-

3.1432e-

I I I 1 I I

I 1 I 1 I I I I I 1

2.8000

I , ! .
2,
i
0:5

1 ;o
Time, s

1.5

20 .

2.5

Fig. 5.40 Electromagnetic torque Tcb

206
Table 5.3.
Figure

Chapter 5

Computer Mnenomics of Output Variables


Variable
Ad
AF

Computer mnemonic

5.29 5.30 5.3 I 5.32 5.33 5.34 5.35 5.36 5.37 5.38 5.39 5.40

WD

WF
WKD WADS SG D IA

AD

XADS
SCD

ia
iF iD

IFF
IKD

6 (in degrees) W A (in pu) Tt,

v,

VT
DLD DOMU

TE

Problems
5. I

5.2

5.3 5.4

5.5 5.6 5.7


5.8

The synchronous machine discussed in Examples 5.1 and 5.2 is operating at rated terminal voltage, and its output power is 0.80 pu. The angle between the q axis and the terminal voltage is 45". Find the steady-state operating condition: the d and q axis voltages, currents, flux linkages, and the angle 4. The same synchronous machine connected to the same transmission line, as i n Examples 5.1 and 5.2, has a local load of unity power factor, which is represented by a resistance R = 10 pu. The infinite bus voltage is 1.0 pu. The power at the infinite bus is 0.9 pu at 0.9 PF lagging. Find the operating condition ofthe machine. Repeat Problem 5.2 with the machine output power being 0.9 pu at 0.9 PF lagging. I n the system of one synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus through a transmission line (discussed in Examples 5.1, 5.2, and 5.6) the synchronous machine is to be represented by the simplified model known as the one-axis model given in Section 4.15. Prepare a complete analog computer simulation of this system. Indicate the signal levels for the operating conditions of Example 5.1, the amplitude and time scaling, the potentiometer settings, and the amplifier gains. Note: In the load equations, assume that ~ , i = lei, = 0.. , Repeat Problem 5.4 using the two-axis model of Section 4.15. Repeat Problem 5.4 using the voltage-behind-subtransient-reactance model of Section 4. 15. In the analog computer simulation shown in Figure 5.13 and Table 5.1. the time scaling is (20). If the time scaling is changed to (lo), identify the amplifiers and potentiometers in Table 5. I that will be affected. I n Figure 5.13 the signal to the resolver represents the infinite bus voltage. I f the level of this signal is reduced by a factor of 2 while the level of all the other signals are maintained, identify the potentiometer and amplifier settings that need adjustment.

References
I . IEEE Committee Report. Recommended phasor diagram for synchronous machines. IEEE Trans. PAS-88:1593-1610, 1969. 2. Krause, P. C . Simulation of a single machine--infinite bus system. Mimeo notes, Electr. Eng. Dept., Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, Ind.. 1967. 3. Buckley, D . F. Analog computer representation of a synchronous machine. Unpubl. M.S. thesis, Iowa State Univ., Ames, 1968. 4. Riaz, M. Analogue computer representations of synchronous generators in voltage regulator studies. AI&& Trans. PAS-75: I I78--84, 1956. 5. Schroder, D. C., and Anderson, P. M . Compensation of synchronous machines for stability. Paper C 73 313-4, presented at the IEEE Summer Power Meeting, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. 1973. 6. Electronic Associates, Inc. Handbook of Analog Compurarion. 2nd ed. Publ. 00800.0001-3. Princeton, N.J., 1967.

Simulation of Synchronous Machines

207

7. Kimbark. E. W. Power System Stahiliry. Vol. I . Wiley. New York, 1948. 8. Dandeno, P. L., Hauth, R . L.. and Schulz, R . P. ElTects of synchronous machine modeling in large-sale system studies. IEEE Trans. PAS-92:574-.82, 1973. 9. Schulz. R . P., Jones, W. D., and Ewart. D. N. Dynamic models of turbine generators derived from solid rotor equivalent circuits. lEEE Trans. PAS-92:926-33. 1973. IO. International Business Machines. System/360 Continuous System Modeling Program Users Manual, GH2O-0367-4. IBM Corp.. 1967.

chapter

Linear Models of the Synchronous Machine


6.1 Introduction

A brief review of the response of a power system to small impacts is given in Chapter 3. It is shown that when the system is subjected to a small load change, it tends to acquire a new operating state. During the transition between the initial state and the new state the system behavior is oscillatory. I f the two states are such that all the state variables change only slightly (i.e., the variable x i changes from xio to xio + x i Awhere x i A is a small change in x i ) , the system is operating near the initial state. The initial state may be considered as a quiescent operating condition for the system. To examine the behavior of the system when it is perturbed such that the new and old equilibrium states are nearly equal, the system equations are linearized about the quiescent operating condition. By this we mean that first-order approximations are made for the system equations. The new linear equations thus derived are assumed to be valid in a region near the quiescent condition. The dynamic response of a linear system is determined by its characteristic equation (or equivalent information). Both the forced response and the free response are decided by the roots of this equation. From a point of view of stability the free response gives the needed information. If it is stable, any bounded input will give a bounded and therefore a stable output. The synchronous machine models developed in Chapter 4 have two types of nonlinearities: product nonlinearities and trigonometric functions. The first-order approximations for these have been illustrated in previous chapters and are outlined below. As an example of product nonlinearities, consider the product x i x i . Let the state variables x i and x j have the initial values xio and x j o . Let the changes in these variables be x i Aand x j A . Initially their product is given by x i o x j o . The new value becomes
(xi0

XiA)(xjO

x j A ) = XjOXjO

XjOXjA

xjoxjA

XjAxjA

The last term is a second-order term, which is assumed to be negligibly small. Thus for a first-order approximation, the change in the product x i x j is given by
(xi0

+ xiA)(xjO + XjA) -

XiOXjO = x j O x j A

+ XiOxjA

(6.1)

We note that xjo and xio are known quantities and are treated here as coefficients, while x i Aand x j Aare incremental variables.
208

l i n e a r Models of the Synchronous Machine

209

The trigonometric nonlinearities are treated in a similar manner as


COS ( 6 0

+ 6,)

= C O S ~ ~ C OA 6S

- sin 6 0 sin 6 A
(-sin60)6,,

with

COS bA E

I and sin 6A % J A . Therefore,


COS(^^

+ 6,)

- cos60

EZ

(6.2)

The incremental change in cos 6 is then (-sin 60)6A;the incremental variable is bA and its coefficient is -sin J0. Similarly, we can show that the incremental change in the term sin 6 is given by sin ( 6 0
6.2

+ 6,)

sin 6 0

(COS~O)~~

(6.3)

linearization of the Generator State-Space Current Model


= t o ; e.g.,

Let the state-space vector x have an initial state xo at time t rent model is used,

if the cur(6.4)

XA

[boi F o

io0

iqo ieo wo 601


t =

At the occurrence of a small disturbance, i.e., after slightly from their previous positions or values. Thus
x
= X O

to", the states will change


(6.5)

+ XA

Note that xo need not be constant, but we do require that it be known. The state-space model is in the form
x
=

f(x,r)

(6.6)

which, by using (6.5), reduces to


i o -k
XA =

f(x0

+ xA,f)

(6.7)

In expanding (6.7) all second-order terms are neglected; i.e., terms of the form x i A x j 4are assumed to be negligibly small. The system (6.7) becomes
Xo

*A

f(X0.t)

+ A(xO)XA + B ( x ~ ) u + B(XO)U

(6.8)

from which we obtain the linearized state-space equation


XA

= A(xO)XA

(6.9)

The elements of the A matrix depend upon the initial values of the state vector xo. For a specific dynamic study it is considered constant. The dynamic properties of the system described by (6.9) are determined from the nature of the eigenvalues of the A matrix. The state space may be thought of as an n-dimensional space, and the operating conditions constrain the operation to a particular surface in this n space. Being nonlinear, the surface is not flat, although we would expect it to be continuous and relatively smooth. The quiescent operating point xo and the functions A(xo) and B(x,) are different for every new initial condition. We may also compute the A(xo) by finding the total differential d x at xo with respect to all variables; i.e., with dx % xA

210

Chapter 6

where the quantity in brackets defines A(xo). We begin by linearizing (4.74). proceeding one row at a time. For the first equation (of the d circuit) we write

Expanding the product terms and dropping the second-order terms,

The quantity in parenthesis on the right side is exactly equal to udo. Rearranging the remaining quantities,
(6.10)

which is equal to
(6.1 1)

Similarly, for the q axis voltage change we write


\

(6.12)
which is equal to
(6.13)

For the field winding we compute


(6.14)

The linearized damper-winding equations are given by


(6.15) (6.16)

From (4.101) the linearized torque equation may be established as

(6.17)

linear Models of the SynchronousMachine

21 1

which can be put in the form


7 j h ~ TmA - ( 1 / 3 ) [ ( L d i q o =
kh!fgi,oiDA

XqO)idA

(Ad0

Lqid0)iqA

kMFiqoiFA

-t

k M ~ i d o i ~ ~D]W b

(6.18)

Finally, the torque angle equation given by (4.102) may be written as

8,

= (&A

(6.19)

Equations (6.11)-(6.19) are the linearized system equations for a synchronous machine (not including the load equation). If we drop the A subscript, since all variables are now small displacements, we may write these equations in the following matrix form:

(6.20)

or in matrix form v
=

- K x - MX PU

(6.21)

Note that the matrix M is related to the matrix L of equation (4.74) by

Assuming that M - ' exists, the state equation for the synchronous generator, not including the load equations, is

- M-'

- M-'v

pu

(6.22)

21 2

Chapter

which is the same form as


X =

AX

+ BU

(6.23)

Example 6.1 As a preparation for later examples involving a loaded machine, determine the matrices M and K for the generator described in Examples 4.1-4.3. Let rj = 2HwR = 1786.94 rad. Solution The matrix M is related to the matrix L of Example 4.2 as follows

Then we write
b.700

1.550
1.651

1.550

1.550

1.550
1.506

;
I

1.550

1.550

I I

I I I I I I I

1
0

M =

lI - - _ _ - _ _ _o _ _ - _ _ - 0 0
0

I I I I I-

1.640

1.490

I
I

1.490 1.526 I I - - - - - - - - - - r---------

The matrix K is defined by (6.20)


0.0011 1 I
I
I I

I .64
0

1.49

I
I

X,o

0.0007

K =

L o

I I

-1

01

When the machine is loaded, certain terms in these matrices change from the numeric values given to reflect the impedance of the connecting system. For example, when loaded through a transmission line to a large system, r , Ld, and L, change

linear Models of the Synchronous Machine

213

to 8 , L d , and iq noted in Section 4.13. Other terms are load dependent (such as L,,, i, as the currents and flux linkages) and must be determined from the initial conditions.
6 3 linearization of the load Equation for the One-Machine Problem . Equation (4.149) is repeated here for convenience:

(6.24)
where K = V , and LY is the angle of V,. The same procedure followed previously is used to linearize this equation, with the result

(6.25)
Substituting (6.25) into (6.11) and (6.12),

(6.26)
Rearranging (6.26) and making the substitution

(6.27)
we get, after dropping the subscript A,

(6.28)
Combining (6.28) with (6.14)--(6.16), I8), and (6.19), we get for the linearized sys(6. tem equations

214

Chapter 6

0
I

0
I I I

AI I

-LI

I
I

I I
I

(6.29)

1 .
I

-L_
I

I I

1
I

Equation (6.29) is a linearized set of seven first-order differential equations with constant coefficients. In matrix form (6.29) becomes v = -Kx - M i , and assuming that M-' exists,
X =

- M-I K X -

M-Iv

AX

+ BU

(6.30)

where A = -M-'K. Note that the new matrices M and K are now expanded to include the transmission line constants and the infinite bus voltage. I t is convenient to compute A as follows. Let

Then

(6.31)

Note that the only driving functions in the system (6.29) are the field voltage uFA and the mechanical torque T m A . Initially, the machine is spinning at synchronous speed and is delivering some known power to the infinite bus. A change in either uF or T,,, will cause the system to seek a new operating point, and this change is usually accompanied by damped oscillations of the variables. Example 6.2 Complete Example 6.1 for the operating conditions described in Example 5.2, taking into account the load equation. Find the new expanded A matrix. Assume D = 0.

Linear Models of the Synchronous Machine

215

Solution From Example 5.2 we compute

ff
The matrix M is given by
2.100

i d =

Lq =
1.550

0.001 1 + 0.020 = 0.021 I 1.700 + 0.400 = 2.100 1.640 + 0.400 = 2.040

1.550

I
I I I I I I
I

1.550
1.550

1.651 1.550

1.550 1.605

I
I I I I I I

M = 0

1 I I I I I I

2.040 1.490

1.490 1.526

I I
I I I

-1786.9

0
1

0 We also compute, in pu,


id0 X40

I I

= =

1.676 1.150

+ (-1.591)(0.4) = 1.039 + (0.701)(0.4) = 1.430

KCOS(&- CU) = ~ T ( ~ 0 ~ 5 3 . 7 3= " ) 5 1.025 K sin (6, - a) = v'T(sin 53.735") = 1.397 1 1.150 - 1.70 x 0.701 = -0.014
(XqO

LdiqO) =

- (-kMDi@)
3
1
- (-Ado

= =

-1.55

3 0.701

= -0.362
X

+ L&o)

-(1.676

1.64

1.591)

= -1.428

The matrix K is given by

K =

The new A matrix is given by A

-M-'K, or with D

0,

216
-

Chapter 6

- 36.062
12.472 22.776
- .-

0.439 -4.950 4.356

14.142 76.857 -96.017

I
I I I I

I
I

- - - - - - - - - - -. - - - - - - - ._ I_ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - J- - - - - - - - - - - - - - I
I I I
I

-3487.18 -2547.01 880.86 1206.0I 1608.63 2202.43 90.072

I I
I I I

- 2444.63

1751.33-

845.46

I I

- 605.68 1543.98 - 1106.10

A =

3589.95 2649.72 2649.72 -3505.70 -2581.54 -2587.54

- 36.064
35.218

I I
I

I I

1776.7I
.-

2387.40

10-3

I - - - - - - - . - - - - - . - - - - - - - - - - _ - - - _ - -. - - - - - - - . _ -I_ . I I -0.0078 -0.2027 -0.2027 I -0.7993 - 0.4422 I I I

- 123.320
0.0

- 1735.01 - 2331.37
----

- -------

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

I I

0.0

I I

1000

0.0

Example 6.3 Find the eigenvalues of the A matrix of the linearized system of Example 6.2. Examine the stability of the system. Generator loading is that of Example 5.2.
Solution

To perform the computation of the eigenvalues for the A matrix obtained in Example 6.2, a digital computer program is used. The results are given below. -0.0359 + j0.9983 A s = -0.0016 + j0.0289 = -0.0359 - j0.9983 A6 = -0.0016 - j0.0289 = -0.0991 A 7 = -0.0007 A4 = -0.1217 All the eigenvalues are given in rad/rad. Note that there are two pairs of complex eigenvalues. The pair A s and A6 correspond to frequencies of approximately I .73 Hz; they are damped with a time constant of 1/(0.0016 x 377) or 1.66 s. This complex pair and the real pole due to A, dominate the transient response of the system. The other complex pair corresponds to a very fast transient of about 60 Hz. which is damped at a much faster rate. This is the 60-Hz component injected into the rotor circuits to balance the M M F caused by the stator dc currents. Note also that the real parts of all the eigenvalues are negative, which means that the system is stable under the conditions assumed in the development of this model, namely small perturbation about a quiescent operating condition.
A, A2 A,
=

Example 6.4 Repeat the above example for the system conditions stated in Example 5. I . Solution A procedure similar to that followed in Examples 6.2 and 6.3 gives the following results:

- 36.062

0.439 -4.950 4.356 2649.72 -2587.54 -0.1929


0.0

14.142 1-3487.18 76.857 -96.017

-2547.01 880.86 1608.63 90.071

-2327.01 804.78 1469.69

958.54 -331.50 -605.39


--

12.472 22.776
---

-------------------L_--_--_---_-_-L__-__-

11I I
I

1206.01 2202.43

fI

- -- - - -

A =

3589.95
- 3505.70
-------

2649.72 I -36.064 -2587.54 -0.1929


0.0
f

I
I

982.66

2257.70 IO-

35.218 -0.8399
00 .

-123.320 I-959.60

- 2204.72
- - - - --

---------------L--------------l-------

--

-0.0075

-0.5351
0.0

0.0
1000

0.0
0.0

0.0

Linear Models of the Synchronous Machine

217

and the eigenvalues are given by


A, A, A, A,
= = =
=

-0.0359 + j0.9983 -0.0359 - j0.9983 -0.0991 -0.1230

A, A, A,

= = =

-0.0009 + j0.0248 -0.0009 - j0.0248 -0.0005

Note that this new operating condition has a slightly reduced natural frequency ( I .49 Hz) and a greatly increased time constant (2.95 s) compared to the previous example. Thus damping is substantially reduced by the change in operating point.
6.4

Linearization of the Flux Linkage Model

We now linearize the flux linkage model of a synchronous machine, following a procedure similar to that used above for the current model. From (4.135) we can compute the linear equations

(6.32) (6.33)

,A ,

rD - d , LMD A
4 D t d

+ rDAL h

4, 4 F

rD F A- - ( I &D

2)

ADA

(6.34)

Similarly the q axis equation (4.136) can be linearized to give

(6.35) (6.36)
The torque equation (4.137) becomes

(6.37)
Similarly, the swing equation becomes

218

Chapter 6

(6.38)
For a system of one machine connected to an infinite bus through a transmission line, the load equations are given by (4.157) and (4.158). These are then linearized to give

[I

2 I)"
(I
-

4 4

A,,

where

and d = r + Re and K = 2/? V , . The linearized equations of the system are (6.33), (6.34), (6.36), and (6.37)-(6.40) and 8, = uA.In matrix form we write

TA

CX

+D

(6.41)

where the matrices T, C, and D are similar to those defined in Section 4.13.3 for the nonlinear model. If the state equations are written out in the form of (6.41) and compared with the nonlinear equations (4. I59)-(4. I62), several interesting observations can be made. First, we can show that the matrix T is exactly the same as (4.160). The matrix C is similar, but not exactly the same as (4.161). If we write C as
dFD
qQ
wb

(6.42)

l i n e a r Models of the Synchronous Machine

219

with partitioning as in (4.161), we can observe that C,, C,, and C, are exactly the same as in the nonlinear equation. Submatrices C, and C, are exactly as in (4.161) if w is replaced by w,. Submatrices C,, C,, C,, and C, are considerably changed, however, and C, and C,, which were formerly zero matrices, now become

[ f - ' &V,COS(6,
c, =
0 0

- a)

1
(6.43)

where a is the angle of vm 6, is the initial angle of the q axis, each measured from and the arbitrary reference. We may write matrices C, and C, as

C,

'[
L

3.j(,d I _-_----___-----

(""

7) iLMDAqO

LMDAqO

1-- - - - - I

'

- r-------

O J
(6.44)

where X A D o and A A Q o are the initial values of AAD and A,, the new D matrix to be

respectively. Finally, we note


01'
(6.45)

[0

UFA

O O O

Tm,/7j

Assuming that the inverse of T exists, we can premultiply both sides of (6.42) by T - ' to obtain
=

T-'CX

+ T-ID

(6.46)

which is of the form

AX

+ BU

(6.47)

The matrices A and B will have constant coefficients, which are dependent upon the quiescent operating conditions. Note that the matrices A and B will not be the same here as in the current model. Since the choice of the state variables is arbitrary, there are many other equations that could be written. The order of the system does not change, however, and there are still seven degrees of freedom in the solution.
Example 6.5 Obtain the matrices T, C, and A of the flux linkage model for the operating conditions discussed in the previous examples. Solution Machine and line data are taken from previous examples in pu as:

220

Chapter 6

3.1622 0 0 T =
0

-0.7478
1 .o

- 1.3656

I
I I I

0
O

0 0 0 -2.1118
1.0

I O
I I

0 0 0 0 0 0
1.0

0
1.0

0
0 0

0
I I I

I o
I I I

------_-----_---__I------------l------

0 0

3.1625

0
0

0 0

I o
I I

I
I I

0 0

0 0

0 0

I o

; 1.0 I 0
I

r0.3 162 0.2364 0.43 I8


1

I
I
I

.o

O
1.0

I I
I

Io

0
L

I I

j I

0
1 -

I
I

I I O

To calculate the matrix C, the following data is obtained from the initial operating conditions as given in Example 5.2:
A,, AQo Ado
AFO

=
=

=
=

A,,

1.150 1.045 1.676 2.200 1.914

d T V , COS($ sin(6, -

a) = 1.025 a) = 1.397

The matrix C corresponding to Example 5.2 loading is then calculated to be

Linear Models of the Synchronous Machine

-114.035 1.388 44.720


C =

39.438 -5.278 66.282 -747.76


0

72.022 3.756
I

-3162.53
0

2 I I I .78
0 1
I

- 1430.1 1

1024.530 0

-115.330
- 1365.58

I
I

1
I

------______________-L__-----

____-__I____________-

3162.16
0
- 1.0285

I
I

- 114.055
284.854
- 1.9867

I 1 I .378 )I

1039.32 1396.55
0

1
I

-313.530 1.6503

I
I

0
0

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I. . . . . . .

- - - - - _ _ - _ - I_ - - _ _ _ _ _ - - _

-0.4009
0

-0.7322
0

I
I I

0
1000

Note that some of the elements of the matrices C, and C, in this example are somewhat different from those in Example 4.4 since the resistance is not the same in both examples. The A matrix is given by

1.388 44.120
A =

-5.278 66.282 -236.44


0

3.756
- 115.330

0 0

I ;
I

o o
0 0

0
0
10-3

-----_--.--__________L______________1----_-____--~--_--..____--

999.88
0

-431.80
0

j I

154.147 284.854
- 1.9867

-174.142

1
I

328.63 441.59
0
0

-313.530 ) 1.6503
0

-________________-__l______________l____---_---I I

1.0285 -0.4009

-0.7322
0 1

1000

0 -

The eigenvalues of this matrix are the same as those obtained in Example 6.3 and correspond to the loading condition of Example 5.2. For the operating condition of Example 5.1 we obtain the same matrix T. For this operating condition the initial conditions in pu are given by A = 1.345, A = 1.935, , , ADO = 1.634, A,, = 1.094, A,, = 0.994, Kcos(6, - a) = 0.5607, and K sin ( 6 , - a) = 1.3207. The matrix C for the operating conditions of Example 5.1 is given by
-

114.035 1.388 44.720

39.437 -5.278 66.282 -747.76

72.022 3.756

- 115.330
-1365.58
0

I I I

-3162.53

2111.78
0 0

-1361.30

560.75-

0
0

I
I

o
O

0 0
1320.68 10-3

C =

3162.16

0
-0.9790

0
-0.3816

I I
I

-114.055 284.854 -1.7155

111.378 -313.530 1.3246

I I
I

574.48

0 0
1000

0 0 0

-0.6969

I
I

I
I

j
;

and the matrix A is given by

222

Chapter 6

16.422
I .388

39.848

-26.141 3.756
I

-1000.12

667.83

I
l
I

-430.50

177.33

- 5.278
66.282
~

0
--

o
0

o
o

0
0

44.720
A =

-115.330
-. ---

I
I

0
154.15 284.85 -1.7155
0

;
I

- - - _ . _.- ._ - - - .. . _ - - _

999.88
0
- - - .- -

-236.44

-431.80

-174.14 -313.53 - _- - . ..L . 1.3246


~

181.76

417.60 10-3

0 0 I - - .. . .- . . _ _ - - - - - - - . - .. -1. . 0.9790 -0.3816 -0.6969 I


0

0
.

0
-__

. - . - . .- _ - . -

I I I

__

0
lo00

0
0 -

The eigenvalues obtained are the same as those given in Example 6.4 and correspon to the loading condition of Example 5.1.
6.5

Simplified linear Model

A simplified linear model for a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus through a transmission line having resistance R , and inductance Le (or a reactance X,) can be developed (see references [ I ] and (21). Let the following assumptions be made:
1 . Amortisseur effects are neglected. 2. Stator winding resistance is neglected. 3. The i d and A, terms in the stator and load voltage equations are neglected compared to the speed voltage terms wX, and ox,. 4. The terms w X in the stator and load voltage equations are assumed to. be approximately equal to w R X . 5. Balanced conditions are assumed and saturation effects are neglected.

Under the assumptions stated above the equations describing the system are given below in pu.
6.5.1

The E' equation

From (4.74) and (4.104) the field equations are given by


VF = rFif

+ AF
+
AF

= LFiF

kMFid

(6.48)

Eliminating i,, we get


UF

(rF/LF)XF

(rF/LF)kMFid

(6.49)

Now let e; = &E; be the stator EMF proportional to the main winding flux linking the stator; Le., f i E 6 = U R k M F X F / L F . Also let E F D be the stator EMF that is produced by the field current and corresponds to the field voltage v,; i s . ,
~ E F =D R k M F v F / r F O

Using the above definitions and main


EFD

.io defined by (4.189), we get from (6.49) in


(1
Ti0S)E;

the s do-

(Xd

xi)ld

(6.50)

where I d = i d / G and s is the Laplace transform variable. Also using the above definition for E;, we can arrange the second equation in (6.48) to give

E;

= @RkkfFiF/d

(xd

xj)ld

(xd

xi)ld

(6.51)

linear Models of the Synchronous Machine

223

where E is as defined in Section 4.7.4. Note that (6.50) and (6.51) are linear. From (4.149) and (4.74) and from the assumptions made in the simplified model, d we compute v and uq for infinite bus loading to be
u = - wRL,~, = - 4 d u, = WRLdid W R kMFiF =

v, Sin (6 - + R e i d + wRL,~, d v , cos ( 6 - a ) + Reiq - W R L , i d


CY)

(6.52)

Linearizing (6.52),

0 0

= -RciqA = -Reid&

+ (xd + x e ) i d A + URkkfFiFA + [Ksin(6, - (xq + x e ) i q ~(Kcos(60 - ( Y ) ] 6 A +


+ x e ) I d A + R,IqA
+
(xq

a)]6A

(6.53)

where K = f i V , and V, is the infinite bus voltage to neutral. Rearranging (6.5 1) and (6.53),
-(xi
= E;& =

+ [ v, sin(& - ( . ) ] S A
(6.54)

xc>rqA

[ vm cos

Solving (6.54) for I d A and IqA, we compute

[t;] [
=

-(xq

+ X,)
R,

R,cos(6, - a) - ( x q + X,)sin(6, (xi

a)

K'

+ X,)cos(6,
=

- a)

+ R,sin(6,

- a)

(6.55)

where
K/

1/[Rf

+ (xq + Xe)(xi+Xe)I

(6.56)

We now substitute I d into an incremental version of (6.50) to compute


EFDA

= ('l/K3 r& s ) E b A

+ K4 6 ,
- a)]

(6.57)

where we define (in agreement with [2])


I/K, = 1 K/(X,j - X;)(X, X,) K4 = V-K/(Xd - X ; ) [ ( X , + Xe)sin(6,

- a) - R , C O S ( 6 0

(6.58)

Then from (6.58) and (6.57) we get the followings domain relation (6.59) [Note that (6.59) differs from (3.10) because of the introduction here of E,, rather than uF.) From (6.59) we can identify that Kl is an impedance factor that takes into account the loading effect of the external impedance, and K4 is related to the demagnetizing effect of a change in the rotor angle; Le.,

K4

K 3
6.5.2

--]SA
+

1 EbA
= constant

(6.60)

Electrical torque equation

The pu electrical torque T, is numerically equal to the three-phase power. Therefore,

T,

= (I/j)(UJd

Uqiq)

= (&Id

PU

(6.61)

where under the assumptions used in this model,

224

Chapter 6

Using (6.51) in the second equation of (6.62),

b = -x919
From (6.63) and (6.61)
T,
=

v9

xd' ld

+ E i

(6.63)

[ E : - (x, - x;)Id]f9

(6.64)

Linearizing (6.64). we compute


T ~ A= IqOE6A

EqaO'qA

(xq

(xq

xi)IdOIIqA

(xq

xi)lqO1dA

= 19JiA

x;)'qO'dA

(6.65)

where we have used the q axis voltage E,. defined in Figure 5.2 as Eqa = E with E taken from (6.51) t o write the initial condition
=

+ (xd

xq)Id

EO

(xd

xq)IdO x;)IdO

E~o

(xd

xi)IdO

+ (xd

xq)IdO

- (x,

(6.66)

Substituting (6.55) and (6.56) into (6.65), we compute the incremental torque to be

T,,

K / V , IEqa0[R,sin(6, - a) (xi Xe)cos(6, - a)] + Iq0(x, - x;)[(x, + X,)sin(6, - a) - R , c o s ( ~- a ) l ) a A ~

K/irqOIR:

K,6,

+ ( x q + X~)zl +

EqaORe)E6A

K,E;,

(6.67)

Where K , is the change in electrical torque for a small change in rotor angle at constant d axis flux linkage; i.e., the synchronizing torque coefficient

K,V,{Eqa,[R,sin(6, -

a)

+ ( x i + X , ) C O S ( - ~a)] ~
- .)]I

+ Iq0(x, - x ; ) [ ( X , + xq) sin (6, - a) - R, cos(6,

K, is the change in electrical torque for small change in the d axis flux linkage at constant rotor angle

We should point out the similarity between the constant K , in (6.67) and the synchronizing power coefficient discussed in Chapter 2 and given by (2.36). If the field flux linkage is constant, E6 will also be constant and K , = 0. The model is reduced to the classical model of Chapter 2.
6.5.3 Terminal voltage equation

From (4.41) the synchronous machine terminal voltage

is given by

v:
or in rms equivalent variables

(l/3)(u;

+ u:)
(6.68)

v; = v; + vi

linear Models of the Synchronous Machine

225

This equation is linearized to obtain (6.69) (6.69) Substituting (6.63) in (6.69), (6.70) (6.70) and Substituting for lqA I,, from (6.55),

(6.7 I ) where K, is the change in the terminal voltage V, for a small change in rotor angle at constant d axis flux linkage, or

and K6 is the change in the terminal voltage linkage at constant rotor angle, or

for a small change in the d axis flux

6.5.4

Summary of equations

Equations (6.59), (6.67), and (6.7 1) are the basic equations for the simplified linear model, Le.,

(6.72) We note that the constants K,, K,, K,, K4, K,, and K6 depend upon the network parameters, the quiescent operating conditions, and the infinite bus voltage. To complete the model, the linearized swing equation from (4.90) is used.
7jLjA =

T,A - TeA

(6.73)

The angle 6, in radians is obtained by integrating on cbA twice. I n the above equations the time is in pu to a base quantity of 1/377 s, T is the total torque to a base quantity of the three-phase machine power, and 7j = 2Hw,.

Example 6.6 Find the constants K , through K6 of the simplified model for the system and conditions stated in Example 5.1, but with the. armature resistance set to zero.
Solution

We can tabulate the data from Example 5.1 as follows.

226
Transmission line data:

Chapter 6

Re
Infinite bus voltage:

0.02

X, = 0.40 PU
=

V,
Synchronous machine data:

0.828

xd
X ;

= =

1.700 pu x, = 1.640 pu 1.700 - [(1.55)2/1.651] = 0.245

PU

Also, from Example 5.1 iFo = 2.979


Id0 =

f, ,

V,

v, =
E,,,,
Also,

-1.112 -0.631 1.000

%o =

0.385 0.776

We can calculate the angle between the infinite bus and the q axis to be 6, - a = 66.995". Then sin (6, - a) = 0.9205, cos(6, - a) = 0.3908. From (6.66) we compute
=

1.55 x 2.979/dT - 1.1 12(1.70 - 1.64) = 2.5995

I/K, K, K, K4

Rt + (x,, 0.7598

+ X,)(X; + X,)

1.3162

Then we compute from (6.58)


=

[ l + (1/1.3162)(1.455)(2.04))-1 = 0.3072 0.828 x 0.7598 x 1.455(2.04 x 0.9205 - 0.02 x 0.3908)

1.7124

We then calculate K , and K2 from (6.67).

K,

K,V, &,,[Re sin (6, - a) + (x: + X,)cos (6, - a)] + I@(xq - X;) [(x, + X e ) sin (6, - a) - R, cos(d, - a)]) 0.7598 x 0.828[2.5995(0.02 x 0.9205 + 0.645 x 0.3908) + 0.3853 x 1.395(2.04 x 0.9205 - 0.02 x 0.3908)] 1.0755 K/{Iqo[R,Z + (xq + X 1 1 + EqaoRe1 e2 0.7598{0.385[(0.02)2 + (2.04)2] + 2.5995 x 0.02) 1.2578

K2

=
=

K5 and K6 are calculated from (6.71):

K, = (K,Vmx;%,/ qo)[R, cos (6, - a) - (x, + X,) sin (, - a)] 6 - (K,V,X,VdO/C/rO)[(X~+ Xe)cOs(60 - a) + ReSin(60 - a)] = [(0.7598)(0.828)(0.245)(0.776/ 1.0)][(0.02)(0.3908) - (2.04)(0.9205)] - (0.7598)(0.828)(1.64)(-0.631/1.0)[(0.645)(0.3908) + (0.02)(0.9205)]
=

-0.0409

Linear Models of the Synchronous Machine

227

K6

= =

Yo)[1 - K1xXx9 + Xt)l - ( Go/ Yo)K,xqRe 0.77611 - (0.7598)(0.245)(2.04)] + (0.63 1)(0.7598)( 1.64)(0.02) = 0.497 1
( %o/

Therefore at this operating condition the linearized model of the system is given by EiA T,,
y b

=
=

[0.3072/(1 + I.~I~S)]EF,A [0.5261/(1 1.0755 6, + 1.2578 E d A -0.0409 6, + 0.497 1 E ; A

1.813~)]6,

Example 6 . 7 Repeat Example 6.6 for the operating conditions given in Example 5.2.
Solution From Example 5.2

, i
5 0

Id0 =

Yo =

2.8259 -0.9185 -0.6628 1.172

Z9,

0.4047 PU

KO= 0.9670 PU v, = 1.000 pu


60

LY =

53.736"

and sin(6, - a) = 0.8063, cos(6, - a) = 0.5915. From this data we calculate E;, and Eqno

1.55 x 2 .8 2 6 /d % - 1.455 x 0.9185 Eqno= 1.1925 - 1.395(-0.9185) = 2.4738 l / K l = R f + ( x , + A',)(x; + A',) = 1.3162 Kl = 0.7598
E60
=

1.1925

Then
K3=

(I +

2.04 x 1.455)-' 1.316

o.3072
=

K4
T;,

= =

1.3162 5.90 s

(2.04 x 0.8063 - 0.02 x 0.5915)

1.805

The effective field-winding time constant under this loading is given by


K37i0 = 0.3072 x 5.9 K,
=

1.8125 s (0.7598)( 1 .O) ((2.474)[(0.02)(0.8063) + (0.645)(0.59 15)] + (0.4047)( 1.395)[(2.04)(0.8063) - (0.02)(0.5915)]) = 1.4479
=

We note that for this example the constant K , is greater in magnitude than in Example 6.6. The constant K , corresponds to the synchronizing power coefficient discussed in Chapter 2. The greater value in this example is indicative of a lower loading condition or a greater ability in this case to transmit synchronizing power. K 2
=

0.7598 (0.4047[(0.02)2 + (2.04)2] + (2.474)(0.02))

1.3174

228

Chapter 6

K,

(0.7598)( 1.0)(0.245) 09670 [(0.02)(0.5915) - (2.04)(0.8063)] (1.172)


-

(0.7598)(I .O)( 1.64)

(-t;:i8)[(0.645)(0.5915) + (0.02)(0.8063)]
=

0.0294

K6 =

(Xb
0.9670
-

(0.7598)(0.245)(2.04 1 )] 0.5257

-o6628 (0.7598)(1.64)(0.02) 1.172

The linearized model of the system at the given operating point is given in pu by

E;,, TeA
K A

= = =

[0.3072/(1 + 1.813 s)]EFnA - [0.5546/(1 1.4479 6 , + I .3174 E:, 0,02946, + 0.5257 EA ;

1.813~)]6A

6.5.5

Effect of loading

Examining the values of the constants K , through Kb for the loading conditions of Examples 6.6 and 6.7, we note the following:
I . The constant K 3 is the same in both cases. From (6.57) and (6.58) we note that K3 is an impedance factor and hence is independent of the machine loading. 2. The constants K , , K,, K4,and K6 are comparable in magnitude in both cases, while K, has reversed sign. From (6.58). (6.67), and (6.71) we note that these constants depend on the initial machine loading.

The cases studied in the above examples represent heavy load conditions. Certain effects are clearly demonstrated. In the heavier loading condition of Example 6.6, K, has a value of -0.0409, and in the less severe loading condition of Example 6.7 its value is 0.0294. This is rather significant, and in Chapter 8 it will be pointed out that in machines with voltage regulators, the system damping is affected by the constant K,. If this constant is negative, the voltage regulator decreases the natural damping of the system (at that operating condition). This is usually compensated for by the use of supplementary signals to produce artificial damping. From Examples 6.6 and 6.7 we note that the demagnetizing effect of the armature reaction as manifested by the E;A dependence is quite significant. This effect is more pronounced in relation to the change in the terminal voltage. = To illustrate the demagnetizing effect of the armature reaction, let EFDA 0; then
E6A

= [K3K4/(1

+ K37iOs)18A
+ K37hls)16A

(6.74) (6.75)

and substituting in the expression for TeA get, we


TeA

iK,

K2K3K4/(1

The bracketed term is the synchronizing torque coefficient taking into account the effect of the armature reaction. Initially, the coefficient K , is reduced by a factor
K2K4/

TiO.
Similarly, substituting in the expression for
K A =

IK, -

K3K4K6/(I

KA, + K37A0s)16A

(6.76)

The second term is usually much larger in magnitude than K,, and inifially the change in the terminal voltage is given by

,A],,o

-(K4K6/7h)6A

(6.77)

linear Models of the Synchronous Machine

229

1.21.1-

re-0.0 xe = 0.4

Q = 0.0

r e = 0.0

1.0y"

0.9-

0.80.7-

0.8

06 .

06 ., 01 0 2 . .

0.4

0.6

08 .

1 .o

0.4

R e a l Power, P

02 .1 I 01 0 2 . .

04 .

06 .

0.8

1 .o

Real Paver, P

-.5 011 I 0 1 02 . .

0.4

06 .
Rml Power, P

0.8

1 .o

Real Power, P
xe = 0.4

00 .

0m21
01 .

- -o . o
01 0 2 . . 0.4
06 .
R e a l Power. P

0.8

1 .o

Fig. 6.1

Variation of parameters K , , . . ,K6 with loading: (a) K I versus P (real power) and Q (reactive . power) as parameter, (b) K2 versus P and Q , (c) K4 versus P and Q , (d) K5 versus P and Q , (e) K 6 versus P and Q . (o IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Trans., vol. PAS-92, Sept./Oct. 1973.)

The effects of the machine loading on the constants K , , K2,K4, K,, and K6 are studied in reference [3] for a one machine-infinite bus system very similar to the system in the above examples except for zero external resistance. The results are shown in Figure 6.1.
6.5.6
Comparison with classical model

The machine model discussed in this section is almost as simple as the classical model discussed in Chapter 2, except for the variation in the main field-winding flux. I t is interesting to compare the two models. The classical model does not account for the demagnetizing effect of the armature reaction, manifested as a change in E:. Thus (6.67) in the classical model would have K2 = 0. Also in (6.59) the effective time constant is assumed to be very large so that E; Z constant. I n (6.72) the classical model will have K6 = 0. Z

230

Chapter 6

To illustrate the difference between the two models, the same system in Example 6.7 is solved by the classical model.

Example 6.8 Using the classical model discussed in Chapter 2, solve the system of Example 6.7.
X d

Re

Fig. 6.2 Network of Example 6.7.

Solution The network used in the classical model is shown in Figure 6.2. The phasor E = E Lis the constant voltage behind transient reactance. Note that the angle 6 here is not the same as the rotor angle 6 discussed previously; it is the angle of the fictitious voltage E. The phasors 7 and 7- are the machine terminal voltage and the infinite bus voltage respectively. For convenience we will use the pu system used (or implied) in Chapter 2, Le., based on the three-phase power. Therefore,

= =

E & = 1 + jO.0 I .3 I86 /28.43

+ (0.020 + j0.645)(0.980 - j0.217)

The synchronizing power coefficient is given by


P,
=

6-60

- 1.3186

EV,(B,,cos6, - G,,sin6,)

( E V , / Z 2 ) [ ( x ;+ X , ) C O S + ~ ~ R,sin6,)] 0.4761) = 1.826

1.0

0.4164

(0.645

0.8794

+ 0.02 x

To compare with the value of K, in Example 6.7 we note the difference in the pu system, K, = 1.448. Thus the classical model gives a larger value of the synchronizing power coefficient than that obtained when the demagnetizing effect of the armature reaction is taken into account. To obtain the linearized equation for VI,neglecting R , we get

fa -

VI = 1 .OOO

[(1.3186cos6 - 1.00) + j1.3186sin6]/j0.645 + jO.0 + j0.40

Substituting, we get for the magnitude of V,


Vf = (0.3798 + 0.8177 cos 6) 2 VI,V I , = - (0.62 sin 6,) 6 ,

+ (0.8177) sin 6

or
V I A= - 0.1261 6 ,

Linear Models of the Synchronous Machine

231

The corresponding initial value in Example 6.7 is given by

KA],-~+ =
6.6
Block Diagrams

( K , K 6 / ~ ; 0 ) 6 , = -0.12526,

The block diagram representation of (6.73) and the equation for 6, is shown in Figure 6.3. This block diagram generates the rotor angle 6,. When combined with (6.59), (6.67), and (6.72) the resulting block diagram is shown in Figure 6.4. In both diagrams the subscript A is omitted for convenience. Note that Figure 6.4 is similar to Figure 3. I . Figure 6.4 has two inputs or forcing functions, namely, E,, and T,,,. The output is the terminal voltage change V , . Other significant quantities are identified in the diagram, such as E:, T,, w , and 6. The diagram and its equations show that the simplified model of the synchronous machine is a third-order system.

7 s

6 elec rod

Fig. 6.3 Block diagram of (6.73).

6.7

State-Space Representation of Simplified Model

From Section 6.5 the system equations are given by

K3Thktj6~+ E:, T,,

= = = =

v,,
6 ,

K,EFDA - K3K4 6 , K,6 , K,EiA K,aA K~E:A T,,,, - T,,

= @A

(6.78)

Eliminating V,, and T,, from the above equations,

By designating the state variables as

and

and the input signals as E,,

and

Fig 6.4 Block diagram of the simplified linear model of a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus.

232

Chapter 6

T,,, the above equation is in the desired state-space form


k !
=

AX

+ BU

where

(6.80)

(6.81)

In the above equations the driving functions E,,, and T,, are determined from the detailed description of the voltage regulator-excitation systems and the mechanical turbine-speed governor systems respectively. The former will be discussed in Chapter 7 while the latter is discussed in Part 111.
Problems
The generator of Example 5.2 is loaded to 75% of nameplate rating at,rated terminal voltage and with constant turbine output. The excitation is then varied from 90% PF lagging to unity and finally to 90% leading. Compute the current model A matrix for these three power factors. How many elements of the A matrix vary as the power factor is changed? How sensitive are these elements to change in power factor? Use a digital computer to compute the eigenvalues of the three A matrices determined in 6.2 Problem 6.1. What conclusions, if any, can you draw from the results? Let D = 0. 6.3 Using the data of Problem 6.1 at 90%PF lagging, compute the eigenvalues of the A matrix with the damping D = I , 2, and 3. Find the sensitivity of the eigenvalues to this parameter. 6.4 Repeat Problem 6. I using the flux linkage model 6.5 Repeat Problem 6.2 using the flux linkage model. 6.6 Repeat Problem 6.3 using the flux linkage model. 6.7 Make an analog computer study using the linearized model summarized in Section 6.5.4. Note in particular the system damping as compared to the analog computer results of Chapter 5 . Determine a value of D that will make the linear model respond with damping similar to the nonlinear model. 6.8 Examine the linear system (6.79) and write the equation for the eigenvalues of this system. Find the characteristic equation and see if you can identify any system constraints for stability using Rouths criterion. 6.9 For the generator and loading conditions of Problem 6.1. calculate the constants K, through K6 for the simplified linear model. 6.10 Repeat Example 6.8 for the system of Example 6.6. Find the synchronizing power coefficient and V,, as a function of 6 , for the classical model and compare with the corresponding values obtained by the simplified linear model.
6. I
References
I . Heffron, W.G., Phillips, R. A. Effect of a modern voltage regulator on underexcited operation of large and turbine generators. N E E Trans. 71:692-97, 1952. 2. de Mello, F. P., and Concordia, C. Concepts of synchronous machine stability as affected by excitation control. IEEE Trans. PAS-88:316-29, 1969. 3. El-Sherbiny, M. K., and Mehta, D . M. Dynamic system stability. Pt. I . IEEE Trans. PAS-92:1538-46, 1973.

chapter

Excitation Systems

Three principal control systems directly affect a synchronous generator: the boiler control, governor, and exciter. This simplified view is expressed diagramatically in Figure 7.1, which serves to orient our thinking from the problems of represenlalion of the machine to the problems of confrol. In this chapter we shall deal exclusively with the excitation system, leaving the consideration of governors and boiler control for Part 111.
7.1 Simplified View of Excitation Control

Referring again to Figure 7. I , let us examine briefly the function of each control element. Assume that the generating unit is lossless. This is not a bad assumption when total losses of turbine and generator are compared to total output. Under this assumption all power received as steam must leave the generator terminals as electric power. Thus the unit pictured in Figure 7.1 is nothing more than an energy conversion device that changes heat energy of steam into electrical energy at the machine terminals. The amount of steam power admitted to the turbine is controlled by the governor. The excitation system controls the generated EMF of the generator and therefore controls not only the output voltage but'the power factor and current magnitude as well. A n example will illustrate this point further.
Sa -t m ,e at pressure, P Enthalpy, h Power at voltage, V Turbine Generator

-+- I+

Power setpoint

+PI+p3.P
Firing control Governor Excitation

RE;

REF v

Fig. 7.1

Principal controls of a generating unit.

Refer to the schematic representation of a synchronous machine shown in Figure 7.2 where, for convenience, the stator is represented in its simplest form, namely, by an EMF behind a synchronous reactance as for round rotor machines at steady state. Here
233

234

I-&-+, \
E
9-

Chapter 7

'

+
Excitation

Fig. 7.2 Equivalent circuit of a synchronous machine.

the governor c n rols the torque or the shaft power input and the excitation system controls E,, the internally generated EMF.
Example 7.1 Consider the generator of Figure 7.2 to be operating at a lagging power factor with a current I, internal voltage E,, and terminal voltage V. Assume that the input power is held constant by the governor. Having established this initial operating condition, assume that the excitation is increased to a new value E;. Assume that the bus voltage is held constant by other machines operating in parallel with this machine, and find the new value of current I ' , the new power factor cos 0: and the new torque angle 6:

Solution This problem without numbers may be solved by sketching a phasor diagram. Indeed, considerable insight into learning how the control system functions is gained by this experience. The initial operating condition is shown in the phasor diagram of Figure 7.3. Under the operating conditions specified, the output power per phase may be expressed in two ways: first in terms of the generator terminal conditions

P = v~cose (7.1) and second in terms of the power angle, with saliency effects and stator resistance neglected,
P
=

(E, VIA') sin 6

(7.2) (7.3)
( 7.4)

In our problem P and V are constants. Therefore, from (7.1) ICOS~, = k where k, is a constant. Also from (7.2)
E, sin 6
=

k,

where k, is a constant.

Fig. 7.3 Phasor diagram of the initial condition.

Excitation Systems

235

p + II
I

A--

Fig. 7.4 Phasor diagram showing control constraints.

Figure 7.4 shows the phasor diagram of Figure 7.3, but with k, and k, shown graphically. Thus as the excitation is increased, the tip of Eg is constrained to follow the dashed line of Figure 7.4, and the tip of I is similarly constrained to follow the vertical I dashed line. We also must observe the physical law that requires that phasor T and phasor Tlie at right angles. Thus we construct the phasor diagram of Figure 7.5, which shows the before and after situation. We observe that the new equilibrium condition requires that ( I ) the torque angle is decreased, (2) the current is increased, and (3) the power factor is more lagging; but the output power and voltage are the same. By similar reasoning we can evaluate the results of decreasing the excitation and of changing the governor setting. These mental exercises are recommended to the student as both interesting and enlightening.

Fig. 7.5 Solution for increasing .Ep at constant P and V

Note that in Example 7.1 we have studied the effect of going from one stable operating condition to another. We have ignored the transient period necessary to accomplish this change, with its associated problems-the speed of response, the nature of the transient (overdamped, underdamped, or critically damped), and the possibility of saturation at the higher value of E,. These will be topics of concern in this chapter.
7.2
Control Configurations

We now consider the physical configuration of components used for excitation systems. Figure 7.6 shows in block form the arrangement of the physical components in

236
Input torque Drime mover

Chapter 7

rd

Generator

Output voltage

current

I I
Auwi I iary

Fig. 7.6 Arrangement of excitation components

any system. I n many present-day systems the exciter is a dc generator driven by either the steam turbine (on the same shaft as the generator) or an induction motor. An increasing number are solid-state systems consisting of some form of rectifier or thyristor system supplied from the ac bus or from an alternator-exciter. The voltage regulator is the intelligence of the system and controls the output of the exciter so that the generated voltage and reactive power change in the desired way. I n earlier systems the voltage regulator was entirely manual. Thus the operator observed the terminal voltage and adjusted the field rheostat (the voltage regulator) until the desired output conditions were observed. In most modern systems the voltage regulator is a controller that senses the generator output voltage (and sometimes the current) then initiates corrective action by changing the exciter control in the desired direction. The speed of this device is of great interest in studying stability. Because of the high inductance in the generator field winding, it is difficult to make rapid changes in field current. This introduces considerable lag in the control function and is one of the major obstacles to be overcome in designing a regulating system. The auxiliary control illustrated in Figure 7.6 may include several added features. For example, damping is sometimes introduced to prevent overshoot. A comparator may be used to set a lower limit on excitation, especially at leading power factor operation, for prevention of instability due to very weak coupling across the air gap. Other auxiliary controls are sometimes desirable for feedback of speed, frequency, acceleration, or other data [I].
7.3 Typical Excitation Configurations

To further clarify the arrangement of components in typical excitation systems, we consider here several possible designs without detailed discussion.
7.3.1
Primitive systems

First we consider systems that can be classified in a general way as slow response systems. Figure 7.7 shows one arrangement consisting of a main exciter with manual or automatic control of the field. The regulator in this case detects the voltage level and includes a mechanical device to change the control rheostat resistance. One such directacting rheostatic device (the Silverstat regulator) is described in reference [2] and consists of a regulating coil that operates a plunger, which in turn acts on a row of spaced silver buttons to systematically short out sections of the rheostat. In application, the device is installed as shown in Figure 7.8. In operation, an increase in generator output voltage will cause an increase in dc voltage from the rectifier. This will cause an increase in current through the regulator coil that mechanically operates a solenoid to insert exciter field resistance elements. This reduces excitation field flux and voltage, thereby lowering the field current in the generator field, hence lowering the generator

Excitation Systems
Commutator Exciter

237

Field

Exciter field rhecntat

* T

PTs

Manual control

Fig. 7.7

Main exciter with rheostat control.

voltage. Two additional features of the system in Figure 7.8 are the damping transformer and current compensator. The damping transformer is an electrical dashpot or antihunting device to damp out excessive action of the moving plunger. The current compensator feature is used to control the division of reactive power among parallel generators operating under this type of control. The current transformer and compensator resistance introduce a voltage drop in the potential circuit proportional to the line current. The phase relationship is such that for lagging current (positive generated reactive power) the voltage drop across the compensating resistance adds to the voltage from the potential transformer. This causes the regulator to lower the excitation voltage for an increase in lagging current (increase in reactive power output) and provides a drooping characteristic to assure that the load reactive power is equally divided among the parallel machines. The next level of complication in excitation systems is the main exciter and pilot

Generator

Fig. 7.8

Self-excited main exciter with Silverstat regulator. (Used with permission from Efecrricul Trammission
and Distribution Reference Book, 1950, ABB Power T & D Company Inc., 1992.)

238
&& e?

Chapter 7
Main exciter

Canmutator

Commutator

Slip

breaker

I
I

JI

Fig. 7.9 Main exciter and pilot exciter system.

exciter system shown in Figure 7.9. This system has a much faster response than the self-excited main exciter, since the exciter field control is independent of the exciter output voltage. Control is achieved in much the same way as for the self-excited case. Because the rheostat positioner is electromechanical, the response may be slow compared to more modern systems, although it is faster than the self-excited arrangement. The two systems just described are examples of older systems and represent direct, straightforward means of effecting excitation control. I n terms of present technology in control systems they are primitive and offer little promise for really fast system response because of inherent friction, backlash, and lack of sensitivity. The first step in sophistication of the primitive systems was to include in the feedback path an amplifier that would be fast acting and could magnify the voltage error and induce faster excitation changes. Gradually, as generators have become larger and interconnected system operation more common, the excitation control systems have become more and more complex. The following sections group these modern systems according to the type of exciter 131.

o Fig. 7.10 Excitation control system with dc generator-commutator exciter. ( IEEE. Reprinted from l E E E Trans., vol. PAS-88, Aug. 1969.) Example: General Electric type NA143 amplidyne system 141.

Excitation Systems

239

I'

Fig. 7.1 I

Excitation control system with dc generator-commutator exciter. (w IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Trans.. vol. PAS-88, Aug. 1969.) Example: Westinghouse type W M A Mag-A-Stat system [ 6 ] .

7.3.2

Excitation control systems with dc generator-commutator exciters

Two systems of U S . manufacture have dc generator-commutator exciters. Both have amplifiers in the feedback path; one a rotating amplifier, the other a magnetic amplifier. Figure 7.10 [3) shows one such system that incorporates a rotating amplifier or amplidyne [5] in the exciter field circuit. This amplifier is used to force the exciter field in the desired direction and results in much faster response than with a self-excited machine acting unassisted. Another system with a similar exciter is that of Figure 7. I I where the amplifier is a static magnetic amplifier deriving its power supply from a permanent-magnet generator-motor set. Often the frequency of this supply is increased to 420 Hz to increase the amplifier response. Note that the exciter in this system has two control fields, one for boost and one for buck corrections. A third field provides for self-excited manual operation when the amplifier is out of service.
7.3.3
Excitation control systems with alternator-rectifier exciters

With the advent of solid-state technology and availability of reliable high-current rectifiers, another type of system became feasible. I n this system the exciter is an ac generator, the output of which is rectified to provide the dc current required by the generator field. The control circuitry for these units is also solid-state in most cases, and the overall response is quite fast [3]. An example of alternator-rectifier systems is shown in Figure 7.12. In this system the alternator output is rectified and connected to the generator field by means of slip rings. The alternator-exciter itself is shunt excited and is controlled by electronically adjusting the firing angle of thyristors (SCR's). This means of control can be very FdSt

240
Exciter

Chapter 7

power

Fig. 7. I 2

Excitation control system with alternator-rectifier exciter using stationary noncontrolled rectifiers. (G IEEE. Reprinted from I E E E Trans.. vol. PAS-88, Aug. 1969.) Example: General Electric Alterrex excitation system 171.

since the firing angle can be adjusted very quickly compared to the other time constants involved. Another example of an alternator-rectifier system is shown in Figure 7.13. This system is unique in that it is brushless; i.e., there is no need for slip rings since the alternator-exciter and diode rectifiers are rotating with the shaft. The system incorporates a pilot permanent magnet generator (labeled PMG in Figure 7.13) with a permanent magnet field to supply the (stationary) field for the (rotating) alternator-exciter. Thus all coupling between stationary and rotating components is electromagnetic. Note, however, that it is impossible to meter any of the generator field quantities directly since these components are all moving with the rotor and no slip rings are used.
Rotating elemenk

Other inputs

----Fig. 7. I3 Excitation control system with alternator-rectifier exciter employing rotating rectifiers. (o IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Trans., vol. PAS-88, Aug. 1969.) Example: Westinghouse type WTA Brushless excitation system 18.91.

Excitation Systems
IConhollebl

24 1

Fig. 7.14 Excitation control system with alternator-SCR exciter system. ((c> IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Trans., vol. PAS-88, Aug. 1969.) Example: General Electric Althyrex excitation system I 1 11.

The response of systems with alternator-rectifier exciters is improved by designing the alternator for operation at frequencies higher than that of the main generator. Recent systems have used 420-Hz and 300-Hz alternators for this reason and report excellent response characteristics [S, IO].
7.3.4 Excitation control systems with alternator-SCR exciter systems

Another important development in excitation systems has been the alternator-SCR design shown in Figure 7.14 [3]. In this system the alternator excitation is supplied diLinear reactor

Fig. 7. I5 Excitation control system with compound-rectifier exciter. (o IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Trans., vol. PAS-88, Aug. 1969.) Example: General Electric SCTP static excitation system
[12,13].

242

Chapter 7

rectly from an SCR system with an alternator source. Hence it is only necessary to adjust the SCR firing angle to change the excitation level, and this involves essentially no time delay. This requires a somewhat larger alternator-exciter than would otherwise be necessary since it must have a rating capable of continuous operation at ceiling voltage. I n slower systems, ceiling voltage is reached after a delay, and sustained operation at that level is unlikely.
7.3.5 Excitation control systems with compound-rectifier exciter systems

The next classification of exciter systems is referred to as a compound-rectifier exciter, of which the system shown in Figure 7.15 is an example [3]. This system can be viewed as a form of self-excitation of the main ac generator. Note that the exciter input comes from the generator: electrical output terminals, not from the shaft as in previous examples. This electrical feedback is controlled by saturable reactors, the control for which is arranged to use both ac output and exciter values as intelligence sources. The system is entirely static, and this feature is important. Although originally designed for use on smaller units [ 12, 131, this same principle may be applied to large units as well. Self-excited units have the inherent disadvantage that the ac output voltage is low at the same time the exciter is attempting to correct the low voltage. This may be partially compensated for by using output current as well as voltage in the control scheme so that (during faults, for example) feedback is still sufficient to effect adequate control. Such is the case in the u n i t shown in Figure 7.15.
7.3.6 Excitation control system with compound-rectifier exciter plus potentialsource-rectifier exciter

A variation of the compound-rectifier scheme is one in which a second rectified outp u t is added to the self-excited feedback to achieve additional control of excitation.

Auxi I iory power input far start-up

Fig. 7. 16 Excitation control system with compound-rectifier exciter plus potential-source-rectifier exciter. (@ IEEE. Reprinted from lEEE Trans., vol. PAS-88, Aug. 1969.) Example: Westinghouse type WTA-PCV static excitation system [ 14).

Excitation Systems

243

This scheme is depicted in Figure 7.16 [3]. Again the basic self-excited main generator scheme is evident. Here, however, the voltage regulator controls a second rectifier system (called the Trinistat power amplifier in Figure 7.16) to achieve the desired excitation control. Note that the system is entirely static and can be inherently very fast, the only time constants being those of the reactor and the regulator.
7.3.7
Excitation control systems with potential-source-rectifier exciter

The final category of excitation systems is the self-excited main generator where the rectification is done by means of SCRs rather than diodes. Two such systems are shown in Figure 7.17 and Figure 7.18 (3). Both circuits have static voltage regulators that use potential, current, and excitation levels to generate a control signal by which the SCR gating may be controlled. This type of control is very fast since there is no time delay in shifting the firing angle of the SCRs.
7.4
Excitation Control System Definitions

Most of the foregoing excitation system configurations are described in reference [3], which also gives definitions of the control system quantities of interest in this application. Only the most important of these are reviewed here. Other definitions, including those referred to by number here, are stated in Appendix E. All excitation control systems may be visualized as automatic control systems with feed forward and feedback elements as shown in Figure 7.19. Viewed in this way, the excitation control systems discussed in the preceding section may be arranged in a general way, as indicated in Figure 7.20 and further described in Table 7.1. Note that the synchronous machine is considered a. part of the excitation control system, but the control elements themselves are referred to simply as the excitation system. The type of transfer function belonging in each block of Figure 7.20 is discussed in reference [ 151. The reference to systems of Type 1, Type 3, etc., in the last column of Table 7. I also refers to system types defined in that reference. This will be discussed in greater detail in Section 7.9. Our present concern is to learn the general configuration
Auxiliary power UII u inputfor stort-up&Te&

Fo[$jField breaker
power potential transfanner

CT

PTS

regulator

-----_I

Fig. 7. I7

Excitation control system with potential-source-rectifier exciter. (@ IEEE. Reprinted from / E Trans., vol. PAS-88. Aug. 1969.) Example: General Electric SCR static excitation system [14].

244
Auxiliary Rawer itput tor start-ur, Slia

Chapter 7

L5lment5 ---I

buildup

!__
~

J PT's

rm

Trinistat power amplifier

--II

Exci t a t im power potential transfoner

1 I

Excitation power

Regulator power

control)

--1
I

rifol;ag7 t

.
current
I

Reguloting system

Fig. 7.1 8

Excitation control system with potential-source-rectifier exciter. (c: IEEE. Reprinted from / L E E Trans.. vol. PAS-88. Aug. 1969.) Example: Westinghouse type WTA-Trinistat excitation system.

of modern excitation control systems and to become familiar with the language used in describing them.
7.4.1
Voltage response ratio

A n important definition used in describing excitation control systems is that of the defined in Appendix E, Def. 3.15-3.19. This is a rough measure of how fast the exciter open circuit voltage will rise in 0 . 5 s if the excitation control is adjusted suddenly in the maximum increase direction. I n other words, the voltage reference in Figure 7.20 is a step input of sufficient magnitude to drive the exciter voltage to its ceiling (Def. 3.03) value with the exciter operating under no-load conditions. Figure 7.2 I shows a typical response of such a system where the voltage u, starts at the rated load field voltage (Def. 3.21) that is the value of u,, which will produce rated
response ratio
Reference Directly control led

Feedback signal (Def 3.30)

I
(Def 2.05)

Fig. 7.19 Essential elements of an automatic feedback control system (Def. 1.02). (E. IEEE. Reprinted from / E Truns.. vol. PAS-88. Aug. 1969.) Note: In excitation control system usage the actuating signal is commonly called the error signal (Del. 3.29). (See Appendix E for definitions.)

Table 7.1.
I

Components Commonly Used in Excitation Control System


7

Type of exciter

mplifierl
2

Pre-

Power amplifier

Power sources

Manual control Signal modifiers

See note
6

dc Generatorcommutator exciter Alternatorrectifier exciter

;ee note Rotating, magnetic. 3 thyristor Rotating. thyristor

Self-excited or separately excited exciter Compensated input to power amplifier. Selfexcited field voltage regulator Exciter output voltage regulator Self-excited

MG set

MG set. synchronous machine shaf

Synchronous Synchronous machine machine shaf shaft. MG set. alternator output

Alternatorrectifier (controlled) exciter Compoundrectifier exciter Compoundrectifier exciter plus potential-soun:e rectifier exciter Potential-source rectifier (controlled) exciter
V

Thyristor

Alternator output

Synchronous machine shaf

Magnetic, thyristor Thyristor

Synchronous machine terminals Synchronous machine terminals

Synchronous machine terminals machine terminals

Compensated input to power amplifier

Thyristor

Synchronous machine terminals

Synchronous machine terminals

Exciter output voltage regulator. Compensated input to power amplifier

Source: c IEEE. Reprinted from / E Truns.. vol. PAS-88. Aug. 1969. 2. Primary detecting element and reference input: can consist of many types of circuits on any system including dil son. intersecting impedance. and bridge circuits. 3. Preamplifier: Cons.ists of all types but on newer systems is usually a solid-state amplilier. 6. Signal modifiers: (A) Auxiliary inputs-reactive and active current compensators: system stabilizing signals pro (B)Limiters-maximum excitation. minimum excitation. maximum V/Hz. 8. Excitation control system stabilizers: can consist of all types from series lead-lag to rate feedback around any ele *IEEE committee report [15].

246

Chapter 7

Power source [regulator)

( regulator

(exciter)

power source

**

Synchronous machine

i t"
I Power

stcbi lizer

(Def 2.14) (Def 2.11) (Def 2.03) (Def 2.13)


lnpuh

i i

Fig. 7.20 Excitation control systems. (,q IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Trans., vol. PAS-88. Aug. 1969.) Note: The numerals on this diagram refer to the columns in Table 7.1. (See Appendix E for definitions.)

generator voltage under nameplate loading. Then, responding to a step change in the reference, the open-circuited field is forced at the maximum rate to ceiling along the curve ab. Since the response is nonlinear, the response ratio is defined in terms of the area under the curve ab for exactly 0.5s. We can easily approximate this area by a straight line ac and compute Response ratio = cd/(Oa)(0.5) pu V/s (7.5) Kirnbark [I61 points out that since the exciter feeds a highly inductive load (the generator field), the voltage across the load is approximately u = k d $ / d t . Then in a short time A t the total flux change is

Ac$ =

1 JA' = area under buildup curve udt k

(7.6)

Time, s

0.5

Fig. 7.21

Delinition of a voltage response ratio.

Excitation Systems

247

Syl t m otfoining 95% ceiling in 0.1 I d hoving on expomntiol response

Synchronous machine mted Imd field voltoge (Lkf 3.21)


. I , , ,

0 1

9 101112 Response Rotio (Def 3.18)


4

7 8

Fig. 7.22 Exciter ceiling voltage as a function of response ratio for a high initial response excitation system. (z IEEE. Reprinted from /&E Trans.. vol. PAS-88. Aug. 1969.)

The time A t = 0.5 was chosen because this is about the time interval of older quickresponse regulators between the recognition of a step change in the output voltage and the shorting of field rheostat elements. Buildup rather than build-down is used because there is usually more interest in the response to a drop in terminal voltage, such as a fault condition. In dynamic operation where the interest is in small, fast changes, build-down may be equally important. Equation (7.5) is an adequate definition if the voltage response is rather slow, such as t h e one shown in Figure 7.21. It has been recognized for some time, however, that modern fast systems may reach ceiling in 0.1 s or less, and extending the triangle acd out to 0.5 s is almost meaningless. This is discussed in reference [3], and a new definition is introduced (Def. 1.05) that replaces the 0.5s interval Oe in Figure 7.21 by an interval Oe = 0.1 s for systems having an excitation voltage response time of 0.1 s or less [the voltage response time (Def. 3.16) is the time required to reach 95% of ceiling]. A comparison of three systems, each attaining 95% ceiling voltage in 0.1 s, is given in Figure 7.22 [3] and shows how close the 0.1-s response is to the ideal system, a step function.
7.4.2
Exciter voltage ratings

Some additional comments are in order concerning certain of the excitation voltage definitions. First, it may be helpful to state certain numerical values of exciter ratings offered by the manufacturers (see [2] for a discussion of exciter ratings). Briefly, exciters are usually rated at 125 V for small generators, say 10 MVA and below. Larger units usually have 250-V exciters, say up to l00MVA; with still larger machines being equipped with 350-V, 375-V, or 500-V exciters. The voltage rating and the ceiling voltage are both important in considering the speed of response [ I , 171. Reference [ I ] tabulates the pattern of ceiling voltages for various response characteristics in Table 7.2, which shows the improved response for higher ceiling voltage ratings (and the lower ceiling voltage for solid-state exciters). It is reasonable that an exciter with a high ceiling voltage will build up to a particular volt-

248

Chapter 7

age level faster than a similar exciter with a lower ceiling voltage simply because it saturates at a higher value. This is an important consideration in comparing types and ratings of both conventional and solid state exciters as shown in Table 7.2.
Table 7.2. Typical Ceiling Voltages for
Various Exciter Response Ratios Response ratio Per unit ceiling voltage conventional exciters*

SCR exciters

0.5

I .o I .5 2 .o

1.25- I .35 1.40- I .50 I .55- I .65 I .70- 1 .SO

4.0

...

I .20 1.20- I .25 1.30- I .40 1.45- I .55 2.00-2. IO

*Based on rated exciter voltage.

I n adopting a pu system for the exciter, there is no obvious choice as to what base voltage to use. Some possibilities are (also see [2]): (A) exciter rated voltage, (B) rated load field voltage, (C) rated air-gap voltage (the voltage necessary to produce rated voltage on the air gap line of the main machine in the case of a dc generator exciter), and (D) no-load field voltage. The IEEE [3] recommends the use of system 9, the rated load field voltage. Consider, as an example, an exciter rated at 250V. For this rating some typical values of other defined voltages are given in Figure 7.23. The pu system A

pu System

Fig. 7.23 Per unit voltages for a 250-V exciter.

of Figure 7.23 has little merit and is seldom used. System B is often used. System C is often convenient since, with rated air gap voltage as a base, pu exciter voltage, pu field current, and pu synchronous internal voltage are all equal under steady-state conditions with no saturation. System D is not illustrated in Figure 7.23 and is seldom used.
7.4.3
Other specifications

Excitation control system response should be compared against a suitable criterion of performance if the system is to be judged or graded. System performance could be measured under any number of forcing conditions. It is generally agreed that the quantity of primary interest is the exciter voltage-time characteristic in response to a step change in the generated voltage of from 10 to 20% [18,19]. The problem is how to state in words the various possible slopes, delays, overshoots, damping, and the like. One useful description, often used in control system specification, is that based on the

Excitation Systems

249

time

Tim.,

Fig. 7.24 Time domain specifications 1221.

curve shown in Figure 7.24. Here the curve is the response to a step change in one of the system variables, such as the terminal voltage. This response, based on that of a second-order system, is a reasonable one on which to base time domain specifications since many systems tend to exhibit two least-damped poles that give a response of this general shape at some value of gain [20,21]. Three quantities describe this response: the overshoot, the rise time, and the settling time. The overshoot is the amount that the response exceeds the steady-state responsein Figure 7.24, a , pu. The rise time is the time for the response to rise from IO to 90% of the steady-state response. The settling time is the time required for the response to a step function to stay within a certain percentage of its final value. Sometimes it is given as the time required to arrive at the final value after first overshooting this value. The first definition is preferred. The damping ratio is that value for a second-order system defined by f in the expression
G(s) = K/(s

+2

f ~+~ , w:)

(7.7)

and is related to the values a , and a2 of two successive overshoots [23]. The natural resonantfrequency w, is also of interest and may be given as a specification. In the case of the second-order system (7.7), the response to a step change of a driving variable is

c(r)
where

= 1

e-f**,{cosw,t

+ [{/(I
f2)Z

- f2)]sinw,tI

(7.8)

w, = w,

(I -

(7.9)

When f = 0, the system is oscillatory; when f = 0.7, it has very little overshoot (about 5%). Critical damping is said to occur when { = 1 .O. In dealing with an exciter being forced to ceiling due to a step change in the voltage regulator control, the system is often overdamped; i.e., f > I . In this case the voltage rise is more sluggish, as shown in Figure 7.25. Here the overshoot is zero, the settling time is T, (i.e., the time for the response to settle within k of its final value), and the rise time is TR. Reference (191 suggests testing an excitation system to determine the response, such as in Figure 7.25. Then determine the area under this curve for 0.5 s and use this as a specification of response in the time domain. For newer, fast systems reference [3] suggests simulation of the excitation as preferable to actual testing since on some systems certain parameters are unavailable for measurement [8,9].

250

Chapter 7

k
L

e ;
0
0.1

&

0.2

0.3
I

0.4

0.5

Time,

Fig. 7.25

Response of an excitation

system

7.5

Voltage Regulator

In several respects the heart of the excitation system is the voltage regulator (Def. 2.12). This is the device that senses changes in the output voltage (and current) and causes corrective action to take place. N o matter what the exciter speed of the response, it will not alter its response until instructed to do so by the voltage regulator. I f the regulator is slow, has deadband or backlash, or is otherwise insensitive, the system will be a poor one. Thus we need to be very critical of this important system component. In addition to high reliability and availability for maintenance, it is necessary that the voltage regulator be a continuously acting proportional system. This means that any corrective action should be proportional to the deviation in ac terminal voltage from the desired value, no matter how small the deviation. Thus no deadband is to be tolerated, and large errors are to receive stronger corrective measures than small errors. In the late 1930s and early 1940s several types of regulators, electronic and static, were developed and tested extensively [24,25]. These tests indicated that continuously acting proportional control increased the generator steady-state stability limits well beyond the limits offered by the rheostatic regulator [24,26]. This type of system was therefore studied intensively and widely applied during the 1940s and 1950s, beginning with application to synchronous condensers; then to turbine generators; and finally, in the early 1950s, to hydrogenerators. (Reference [24] gives an interesting tabulation of the progress of these developments.)
7.5.1
Electromechanical regulators

The rather primitive direct-acting regulator shown in Figure 7.8 is an example of an electromechanical regulator. In such a system the voltage reference is the spring tension against which the solenoid must react. It is reliable and independent of auxiliaries of any kind. The response, however, is sluggish and includes deadband and backlash due to mechanical friction, stiction, and loosely fitting parts. Two types of electromechanical regulators are often recognized; the direct-acting and the indirect-acting. Direct-acting regulators, such as the Silverstat [2] and the Tirrell(241, have been in use for many years, some dating back to about 1900. Such devices were widely used and steadily improved, while maintaining essentially the same form. As machines of larger size became more common in the 1930s the indirecracring rheostatic regulators began to appear. These devices use a relay as the voltagesensitive element [24]; thus the reference is essentially a spring, as in the direct-acting device. This relay operates to control a motor-operated rheostat, usually connected between the pilot exciter and the main exciter, as in Figure 7.9. This regulator is limited in its speed of response by various mechanical delays. Once the relay closes, to

Excitation Systems

25 1

short out a rheostat section, the response is quite fast. In some cases, high-speed relays are used to permit faster excitation changes. These devices were considered quite successful, and nearly all large units installed between about 1930 and 1945 had this type of control. Many are still in service. Another type of indirect-acting regulator that has seen considerable use employs a polyphase torque motor as a voltage-sensitive element [27]. I n such a device the output torque is proportional to the average three-phase voltage. This torque is balanced against a spring in torsion so that each value of voltage corresponds to a different angular position of the rotor. A contact assembly attached to the rotor responds by closing contacts in the rheostat as the shaft position changes. A special set of contacts closes very fast with rapid rotor accelerations that permit faster than normal response due to sudden system voltage changes. The response of this type of regulator is fairly fast, and much larger field currents can be controlled than with the direct-acting regulator. This is due to the additional current gain introduced by the pilot excitermain exciter scheme. The contact type of control, however, has inherent deadband and this, coupled with mechanical backlash, constitutes a serious handicap.
7.5.2 Early electronic regulators

About 1930 work was begun on electronic voltage regulators, electronic exciters, and electronic pilot exciters used in conjunction with a conventional main exciter (24, 251. In general, these early electronic devices provided better voltage regulation as well as smoother and faster generation excitation control (241 than the competitive indirectacting systems. They never gained wide acceptance because of anticipated high maintenance cost due to limited tube life and reliability, and this was at least partly justified in later analyses [25]. Generally speaking, electronic voltage regulators were of two types and used either to control electronic pilot exciters or electronic main exciters [25]. The electronic exciters or pilot exciters were high-power dc sources usually employing thyratron or ignitron tubes as rectifying elements.
7.5.3 Rotating amplifier regulators

In systems using a rotating amplifier to change the field of a main exciter, as in Figure 7.10, it is not altogether clear whether the rotating amplifier is a part of the voltage regulator or is a kind of pilot exciter. Here we take the view that the rotating amplifier is the final, high-gain stage in the voltage regulator. The development of rotating amplifiers in the late 1930s and the application of these devices to generator excitation systems (28, 291 have been accompanied by the development of entirely static voltage sensing circuitry to replace the electromechanical devices used earlier. Usually, such static circuits were designed to exclude any electronic active components so that the reliability of the device would be more independent of component aging. For example, devices employing saturable reactors and selenium rectifiers showed considerable promise. Such circuits supplied the field windings of the rotating amplifiers, which were connected in series with the main exciter field, as in Figure 7.10. This scheme has the feature that the rotating amplifier can be bypassed for maintenance and the generator can continue to operate normally by manual regulation through a field rheostat. This connection is often called a boost-buck connection since, depending on polarity, the rotating amplifier is in a position to aid or oppose the exciter field. The operation of a typical rotating amplifier regulating system can be analyzed by reference to Figure 7.10. The generator is excited by a self-excited shunt exciter. The

252

Chapter 7
Field

> u

e 0
V

>

u .U

Exciter Shunt Field Current

Fig. 7.26 V-l characteristic defining boost and buck regions.

field circuit can be controlled either manually by energizing a relay whose contacts bypass the rotating amplifier or automatically, with the amplifier providing a feedback of the error voltage to increase or decrease the field current. The control characteristic may be better understood by examining Figure 7.26. The field rheostat is set to intersect the saturation curve at a point corresponding to rated terminal voltage, i.e., the exciter voltage required to hold the generated voltage at rated value with full load. Under this condition the rotating amplifier voltage is zero. Now suppose the generator load is reduced and the generator terminal voltage begins to rise. The voltage sensing circuit (described later) detects this rise and causes the rotating amplifier to reduce the field current in the exciter field. This reduces the exciter voltage, which in turn reduces if, the generator field current. Thus the shaded area above the set point in Figure 7.26 is called the buck voltage region. A similar reasoning defines the area below the set point to be the boost voltage region. Rotating amplifier systems have a moderate response ratio, often quoted as about 0.5 (e.g., see Appendix D). The speed of response is due largely to the main exciter time constant, which is much greater than the amplidyne time constant. The ceiling voltage is an important factor too, exciters with higher ceilings having much faster response than exciters of similar design but with lower ceiling voltage (see [ 171 for a discussion of this topic). The voltage rating of the rotating amplifier in systems of this type is often comparable to the main exciter voltage rating, and the voltage swings of the amplifier change rapidly in attempting to regulate the system [24]. Magnetic amplifier regulators Another regulator-amplifier scheme capable of zero deadband proportional control is the magnetic amplifier system [6, 30, 311. (We use the generic term magnetic amplifier although those accustomed to equipment of a particular manufacturer use trade names, e.g., Magamp of the Westinghouse Electric Corporation and Amplistat of the General Electric Company.) I n this system a magnetic amplifier, i.e., a static amplifying device [32, 331, replaces the rotating amplifier. Usually, the magnetic amplifier consists of a saturable core reactor and a rectifier. It is essentially an amplifying device with the advantages of no rotating parts, zero warm-up time, long life, and sturdy construction. It is restricted to low or moderate frequencies, but this is no drawback in power applications.
7.5.4

Excitation Systems

253

u
Supply

oc

Sotwoble core
Laad

Fig. 7.27

Magnetic amplifier.

Basically, the magnetic amplifier is similar to that shown in Figure 7.27 [33]. The current Rowing through the load is basically limited by the very large inductance in the saturable core main windings. As the core becomes saturated, however, the current jumps to a large value limited only by the load resistance. By applying a small (lowpower) signal to the control winding, we control the firing point on each voltage (or current) cycle, and hence the average load current. This feature, of controlling a large output current by means of a small control current, is the essence of any amplifier. The fact that this amplifier is very nonlinear is of little concern. One type of regulator that uses a magnetic amplifier is shown in block diagram form in Figure 7.10 [4]. Here the magnetic amplifier is used to amplify a voltage error signal to a power level satisfactory for supplying the field of a rotating amplifier. The rotating amplifier is located in series with the exciter field in the usual boost-buck connection. One important feature of this system is that the magnetic amplifier is relatively insensitive to variations in line voltage and frequency, making this type of regulator favorable to remote (especially hydro) locations. Another application of magnetic amplifiers in voltage regulating systems, shown in Figure 7.1 1 (61, has several features to distinguish it from the previous example. First, the magnetic amplifiers and reference are usually supplied from a 420-Hz system supplied by a permanent-magnet motor-generator set for maximum security and reliability. The power amplifier supplies the main exciter directly in this system. Note, however, that the exciter must have two field windings for boost or buck corrections since magnetic amplifiers are not reversible in polarity. The main exciter also has a self-excited, rheostat-controlled field and can continue to operate with the magnetic amplifiers out of service. The magnetic amplifier in the system of Figure 7.1 I consists of a two-stage pushpull input amplifier that, with 1-mW input signals, can respond to maximum output in three cycles of the 420-Hz supply. The second stage is driven to maximum output when the input stage is at half-maximum, and its transient response is also about three cycles. The figures of merit (341 are about 200/cycle for the input stage and 500/cycle for the output stage. This compares with about 500/s for a conventional pilot exciter. The power amplifier has a figure of merit of 1500/cycle with an overall delay of less than 0.01 s. (The figure of merit of an amplifier has been defined as the ratio of the power amplification to the time constant. It is shown in [34] that for static magnetic amplifiers it is equal to one-half the ratio of power output to stored magnetic energy.) Reference [6] reviews the operating experience of a magnetic amplifier regulator installation on one 50-MW machine in a plant consisting of seven units totaling over 300 MW, only two units of which are regulated. The experience indicates that, since

254

Chapter 7

the magnetic amplifier regulator is so much faster than the primitive rheostatic regulator, it causes the machine on which it is installed to absorb much of the swing in load, particularly reactive load. In fact, close observation of operating oscillograms, when operating with an arc furnace load, reveals that both exciter voltage and line currents undergo rapid fluctuations when regulated but are nearly constant when unregulated. This is to be expected since the regulation of machine terminal voltage to a nearly constant level makes this machine appear to have a lower reactance, hence it absorbs changes faster than its neighbors. In the case under study, the machine terminal voltage was regulated to i0.25:(,,whereas a i 1% variation was observed with the regulator disconnected [ 6 ] .
7.5.5
Solid-state regulators

Some of the amplification and comparison functions in modern regulators consist of solid-state active circuits (31. Various configurations are used depending on the manufacturer, but all have generally fast operation with no appreciable time delay compared to other system time constants. The future will undoubtedly bring more applications of solid-state technology in these systems because of the inherent reliability, ease of maintenance, and low initial cost of these devices.
7.6
Exciter Buildup

Exciter response has been defined as the rate of increase or decrease of exciter voltage when a change is demanded (see Appendix E, Def. 3.15). Usually we interpret this demand to be the greatest possible control effort, such as the complete shorting of the field resistance. Since the exciter response ratio is defined in terms of an unloaded exciter (Def. 3.19), we compute the response under no-load conditions. This serves to satisfy the terms of the response ratio definition and also simplifies the computation or test procedure. The best way to determine the exciter response is by actual test where this is possible. The exciter is operated at rated speed (assuming it is a rotating machine) and with no load. Then a step change in a reference variable is made, driving the exciter voltage to ceiling while the voltage is recorded as a function of time. This is called a buildup curve. In a similar way, a build-down curve can also be recorded. Curves thus recorded do not differ a great deal from those obtained under loaded conditions. If it is impractical to stage a test on the exciter, the voltage buildup must be computed. We now turn our attention to this problem.
7.6.1 The dc generator exciter

I n dealing with conventional dc exciters three configurations (Le.. separately excited, self-excited, and boost-buck) are of interest. They must be analyzed independently, however, because the equations describing them are different. (Portions of this analysis parallel that of Kimbark [16], Rudenberg [20], and Dah1 [35] to which the reader is referred for additional study.) Consider the separately excited exciter shown in Figure 7.28. Summing voltage drops around the pilot exciter terminal connection, we have

A,
where A, R
=

-k

Ri

vp

(7.10)

i =

up =

flux linkages of the main exciter field, Wb turns main exciter field resistance, 0 current, A pilot exciter voltage, V

Excitation Systems
iF 0 = - c i

255

a-

Pi lot exciter

Ypcmbcbr
Main exciter

Fig. 7.28 Separately excited exciter.

It is helpful to think in terms of the field flux & rather than the field flux linkages. If we assume the field flux links N turns, we have N&

+ Ri =

up

(7. I I )

The voltage of the pilot exciter up may be treated as a constant [ 161. Thus we have an with all other terms constant. The problem is that i deequation in terms of i and pends on the exact location of the operating point on the saturation curve and is not linearly related to u,. Furthermore, the flux & has two components, leakage flux and armature flux, with relative magnitudes also depending on saturation. Therefore, (7.1 1) is nonlinear. in Since magnetization curves are plotted in terms of U , versus i, we replace (7.1 1) by a term involving the voltage ordinate u,. Assuming the main exciter to be running at constant speed, its voltage U , is proportional to the air gap flux 4,; Le.,
0 ,

(7.12)

The problem is to determine how 4, compares with &. The field flux has two components, as shown in Figure 7.29. The leakage component, comprising 10-20% of the total, traverses a high-reluctance path through the air space between poles. I t does not link all N turns of the pole on the average and is usually treated either as proportional to or proportional to i . Let us assume that r$4 is proportional to 4, (see [I61 for a more detailed discussion), then

44
where C is a constant. Also, since
@E

c4,

(7.13)
(7.14)

4a +

44

Fig. 7.29 Armature of air gap flux &, leakage flux 44. and field flux @ E = 9 + 4 4 . (Reprinted by per, mission from Power Sysiem Siabiliry, vol. 3 , by E. W. Kimbark. o Wiley, 1956.)

256

Chapter 7

we have

4E

(1

C)4

= r J 4

(7.15)

where u is called the coefficient of dispersion and takes on values of about 1 . I to 1.2. Substituting (7.15) into (7.1 I ) .
rECF

Ri

= up

(7.16)

where r E = ( N a / k ) s, and where we usually assume u to be a constant. This equation is still nonlinear, however, as U, is not a linear function of i. We usually assume up to be a constant. In a similar way we may develop the differential equation for the self-excited exciter shown in Figure 7.30, where we have hE + Ri = U, or N&

+ Ri

vF

(7.17)

i =O

P
Fig. 7.30 Self-excited exciter.

Following the same logic regarding the fluxes as before, we may write the nonlinear equation
rEbF + Ri =
V,

(7.18)

for the self-excited case where rEis the same as in (7.16). In a similar way we establish the equation for the self-excited exciter with boostbuck rotating amplification as shown in Figure 7.31. Writing the voltage equation with the usual assumptions,
rECF+ Ri = U,

+ V,

(7.19)

Kimbark [I61 suggests four methods of solution for (7.16)-(7.19). These are (1) formal integration, (2) graphical integration (area summation), (3) step-by-step integration (manual), and (4) analog or digital computer solution. Formal integration requires that the relationship between v, and i, usually expressed graphically by means of the magnetization curve, be known explicitly. An empirical relation, the Frohlich equation [35]

-y+
R

Fig. 7.3 I

Self-excited exciter with a rotating amplifier (boost-buck).

Excitation Systems

257

V, = ai/(b

+ i)

(7.20)

may be used, or the so-called modified Frohlich equation


vF
=

d/(b

+ i ) + ci

(7.21)

can be tried. I n either case the constants a, b, and c must be found by cut-and-try techniques. If this is reasonably successful, the equations can be integrated by separation of variables. Method 2, graphical integration, makes use of the saturation curve to integrate the equations. This method, although somewhat cumbersome, is quite instructive. It is unlikely, however, that anyone except the most intensely interested engineer would choose to work many of these problems because of the labor involved. (See Kimbark [ 161, Rudenberg [20], and Dah1 [35] for a discussion of this method.) Method 3, the step-by-step method (called the point-by-point method by some authors [ 16,35]), is a manual method similar to the familiar solution of the swing equation by a stepwise procedure [36]. I n this method, the time derivatives are assumed constant over a small interval of time, with the value during the interval being dependent on the value at the middle of the interval. Method 4 is probably t h e method of greatest interest because digital and analog computers are readily available, easy to use, and accurate. The actual methods of computation are many but, in general, nonlinear functions can be handled with relative ease and with considerable speed compared to methods 2 and 3. I n this chapter the buildup of a dc generator will be computed by the formal integration method only. However, an analog computer solution and a digital computer technique are outlined in Appendix B. To use formal integration, a nonlinear equation is necessary to represent the saturation curve. For convenience we shall use the Frohlich equation (7.20), which may be solved f or i to write

buF/(a - v,)

(7.22)

We illustrate the application of (7.22) by an example.


Example 7.2 A typical saturation curve for a separately excited generator is given in Figure 7.32. Approximate this curve by the Frohlich equation (7.22).

Solution By examination of Figure 7.32 we make the several voltage and current observations given in Table 7.3.
Table 7 3 Exciter Generated Voltages and Field Currents ..
i
UF

A V

1 30

2 60

3 90

4 116

5 134

6 147

7 156

8
164

9 172

IO 179

Since there are two unknowns in the Frohlich equation, we select two known points on the saturation curve, substitute into (7.20) or (7.22), and solve for a and b. One experienced in the selection process may be quite successful in obtaining a good match. To illustrate this, we will select two pairs of points and obtain two different solutions.

258
181

Chapter 7

16

14

12

c P

i i

p ; .d e
0 c

u' 10

I
8

1
1c

6 Exciter Field Current, i, enperer


4

Fig. 7.32 Saturation curve of a separately excited exciter.

Solution # I Select
i = 3,uF = 90
i
=

Solution #2

9,vF = 172

Then the equations to solve are 90 172


=

3a/(3 9a/(9

+ b) + b)

116 164

=
=

4 ~ / ( 4+ b) 8 ~ / ( 8+ b)

for which the solutions are


a, = 315.9 V

a2 = 279.9 V

b,

7.53 A

b2 = 5.65 A

Excitation Systems

259

Both solutions are plotted on Figure 7.32. For solution 1


U, = 315.9i/(7.53

+ i)
+ i)

or i
or i

7.53~,/(315.9 - u,)

(7.23)

and for solution 2


U, = 279.91/(5.65
=

5.65~,/(279.9 - u,)

(7.24)

Example 7.3 Approximate the saturation curve of Figure 7.32 by a modified Frohlich equation. Select values of i = 2 , 5, and IO.

Solution
i = 2 i = 5 i = IO 60
=

2 ~ / ( 2 6)

134 179

= 5a/(5
=

+ + 2~ + b) + 5c 10a/(10 + 6) + 1Oc
c
=

Solving simultaneously for a, b, and c,

359

-21.95

48.0

This gives us the modified formula


U, = 359i/(i - 21.95)

+ 48i

(7.25)

Equation (7.25) is not plotted on Figure 7.32 but is a better fit than either of the other two solutions.
Separately excited buildup by integration. For simplicity, let the saturation curve be represented by the Frohlich equation (7.22). Then, substituting for the current in (7. I ) 6,
TEOF

+ b R ~ , / ( a - uF)
-

up

(7.26)

This equation may be solved by separation of variables. Rearranging algebraically, we write


dI =
[TE(U

U,)/(UUp

- hU~)]du~

(7.27)

where we have defined for convenience, h


(1 to)/TE

up + bR. Integrating (7.27),


(7.28)

- (abR/h)In[(aU, - hu,)/(avp - hUFO)] This equation cannot be solved explicitly for u,, so we leave it in this form.
=

(I/h)(uF -

UFO)

Example 7.4 Using the result of formal integration for the separately excited case (7.28), compute the U, versus t relationship for values of I from 0 to Is and find the voltage response ratio by graphical integration of the area under the curve. Assume that the following constants apply and that the saturation curve is the one found in Example 7.2, solution 2.
N
u
= =

2500 turns 1.2

up = 125

34 S? 90 V

12,000

UFO =

260

Chapter 7

S o h I ion First we compute the various constants involved. From (7.16)


rE =

Na/k

(2500)(1.2)/12,000 0.25 s =

Also, from Example 7.2

279.9

280

5.65

Now, from the given data, the initial voltage uFois 90 V . Then from the Frohlich equation ( 7 . 2 2 ) we compute
io
=

5.65(90)/(280 - 90)

2.675 A

This means that there is initially a total resistance of

R,

12512.675

46.7 D

of which all but 34 52 is in the field rheostat. Assume that we completely short out the field rheostat, changing the resistance from 46.7 to 34 0 at t = 0. Since up is 125 V, we compute the final values of the system variables. From the field circuit,
i,
=

v p / R = 125134

3.675 A 110.3 V

Then, from the Frohlich equation the ceiling voltage is

uF,

ai,/(b

+ i,)

280(3.675)/(5.65 + 3.675)

Using the above constants we compute the uF versus I relationship shown in Table 7.4 and illustrated in Figure 7.33.
Table 7.4.

Buildup of Separately Excited uF for Example 7.4


90.00 95.85 100.12 103.18 105.35 106.87 107.94 108.68 109.19
0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85

0.00 0.05
0. IO

0.15 0.20 0.25


0.30 0.35

0.40

109.55 109.79 109.96 1 10.08 110.16 110.21 110.25 110.28 110.30

From Figure 7.33, by graphical construction we find the triangle acd, which has the same area as that under the uF curve abd. Then from (7.5) with cd = 2 7 . 9 V , as shown in the figure, the response ratio = 27.9/90(0.5) = 0.62.

Self-excited buildup by integration. For a self-excited machine whose saturation curve is represented by the Frohlich approximation (7.22),we have
T&F

+ bRUF/(a -

uF)

= UF

(7.29)

Excitation Systems

26 1

I4 2

A
0
0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

06 .

0.7

Time, I

Fig. 7.33 Buildup of the separately excited exciter for Example 7.4.

This is recognized to be identical to the previous case except that the term on the right side is U, instead of up. Again we rearrange the equation to separate the variables as dt
=

vF)dvF (a - bR)VF - V k
to to t

(7.30)

This equation can be integrated from

with the result

(7.31)
whereK
=

a - bR.

Example 7.5 Compute the self-excited buildup for the same exciter studied in Example 7.4. Change the final resistance (field resistance) so that the self-excited machine will achieve the same ceiling voltage as the separately excited machine. Compare the two buildup curves by plotting the results on the same graph and by comparing the computed response ratios.

Solution The ceiling voltage is to be 110.3 V, at which point the current in the field is 3.68 A (from the Frohlich equations). Then the resistance must be R = 110.3/3.68 = 30 9. Solving (7.31) with this value of R and using Frohlich parameters from Example 7.4, we have the results in Table 7.5 and the solution curve of Figure 7.34. The response ratio = 15.4/90(0.5) = 0.342 for the self-excited case.

262

Chapter 7

0.1

0.2

03 .

0.4
Time, I

0.5

0.6

0.7

0.8 0

Fig. 7.34 Buildup of the self-excited exciter for Example 7.5.

Table 7.5. Buildup of Self-excited up for Example 7.5


I
VF

VF

0.00 0.05

0.10 0.15
0.20

0.25 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.45

90.00 91.87 93.61 95.23 96.73 98.10 99.37 100.52 101.57


102.52

0.50 0.55

0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75


0.80 0.85

0.90

...

103.38 104.I5 104.85 105.47 106.03 106.52 106.96 107.36 107.71 ...

Boost-buck buildup by integration. The equation for the boost-buck case is the same as the self-excited case except the amplifier voltage is added to the right side, or
T&,

+ bRu,/(a

OF)

= U,

+ U,
ui)

(7.32)

Rearranging, we may separate variables to write


dt
=

TE(a - u,)du,/(A

+ Mu, -

(7.33)

where A = auR and M = a - uR - b R . Integrating (7.33), we compute


-=

TE

to

2a - M In ( M Q ( M -

QQ-

2u~)(M Q - ~UFO) + ~UFO)(M Q - ~ U F )

1 + -In 2

(A
(A

+ MU, - u:) + MU, - uX)

(7.34)

whereQ

d4A

+ M2.

Excitation Systems

263

Example 7.6

Compute the boost-buck buildup for the exciter of Example 7.4 where the amplifier voltage is assumed to be a step function at I = to with a magnitude of 50V. Compare with previous results by adjusting the resistance until the ceiling voltage is again 110.3 V . Repeat for an amplifier voltage of 100 V.

Solution With a ceiling voltage of 110.3 V and an amplifier voltage of 50V, we compute with 6, = 0 Ri, = uF + U, = 160.3. This equation applies as long as U, maintains its . value of 50 V. This requires that i , again be equal to 3.68 A so that R may be computed as R = 160.3/3.68 = 43.6 Q. This value of R will insure that the ceiling voltage will again be 110.3 V . Using this R in (7.34) results in the tabulated values given in Table 7.6. Repeating with U, = 100 V gives a second set of data, also tabulated. in which R = 57.2 Q.
Table 7.6.
I

Buildup of Boost-Buck UF for Example 7.6


VR =

U F for

50

UF

for U R

I00

0.00 0.05 0. IO 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90

90.00 94.23 97.70 100.50 102.72 104.47 105.84 106.90 107.72 108.34 108.82 109.19 109.47 109.68 109.84 109.96 I10.05 110.12 110.17

90.00 96.32 100.84 103.98 106.12 107.56 108.5 I 109.14 109.56 109.83 110.00 110.12 110.20 I 10.24 110.27 110.30 110.31 110.32 110.33

Th e r ults re plotted in Figure 7.35. Note that increasing he amplifier voltage has the effect of increasing the response ratio. In this case changing U, from 50 to 100 V gives a result that closely resembles the separately excited case. I n each case the response ratio (RR)may be calculated as follows: RR(u, = 50) = 2cd/Oa = 2(24.15)/90 = 0.537 R R ( u , = 100) = 2c'd/Oa = 2(29)/90 = 0.645
7.6.2
Linear approximations for dc generator exciters

Since the Frohlich approximation fails to provide a simple uF versus t relationship, other possibilities may be worth investigating. One method that looks attractive because of its simplicity is to assume a linear magnetization curve as shown in Figure 7.36, where

264

Chapter 7

Fig. 7.35 Buildup of boost-buck exciters for Example 7.6.

vF = mi

+n

(7.35)

Substituting (7.35) into the excitation equation we have the linear ordinary differential equation
TEi)F

v - (f?/m)(vF - n)

(7.36)

where v

= = =

up separately excited

v, self-excited uF

+ vR

boost-buckexcited

Exciter Field Current, i, amperes

Fig. 7.36 Linear approximation to a magnetization curve.

Excitation Systems

265

This equation may be solved by conventional techniques. The question of interest is, What values of m and n, if any, will give solutions close to the actual nonlinear solutions? This can be resolved by solving (7.36) for each case and then systematically trying various values of m and n to find the best fit. This extremely laborious process becomes much less painful, or even fun, if the comparison is made by analog computer. I n this process, both the linear and nonlinear problems are solved simultaneously and the solutions compared on an oscilloscope. A simple manipulation of two potentiometers, one controlling the slope and one controlling the intercept, will quickly and easily permit an optimum choice of these parameters. The procedure will be illustrated for the separately excited case.
Linear approximation of the separately excited case.

In the separately excited case


R/r,m

we set u

up so that (7.36) becomes 6 = k, - k2uFwhere ,

k, = ( I / T ~ ) ( u ~ + n R / m )
Solution of (7.37) gives

k2

(7.37)

u,(f)

(k,/k2)(l -

e-k2)u(t)

+ u,e-kZu(f)

(7.38)

Equation (7.38) is solved by the analog computer connection shown in Figure 7.37 and compared with the solution of (7.26) given in Appendix B, shown in Figure B.9.

. FO

L4-J
Fig. 7.37 Solution of the linear equation.

Adjusting potentiometers k, and k, quickly provides the best fit solution shown in Figure 7.38, which is a graph made directly by the computer. Having adjusted k, and k, for the best fit, the potentiometer settings are read and the factors m and n computed. I n a similar way linear approximations can be found for the self-excited and boost-buck connections.

lime, s

Fig. 7.38

Analog computer comparison of linear and Frohlich models of the separately excited buildup.

266 7.6.3 The ae generator exciters

Chapter 7

As we observed in Chapter 4, there is no simple relationship between the terminal voltage and the field voltage of a synchronous generator. Including all the detail of Chapter 4 in the analysis of the exciter would be extremely tedious and would not be warranted in most cases. We therefore seek a reasonable approximation for the ac exciter voltage, taking into account the major time constants and ignoring other effects. Kimbark [ 161 has observed that the current in the dc field winding changes much more slowly than the corresponding change in the ac stator winding. Therefore, since the terminal voltage is proportional to i (neglecting saturation), the ac exciter voltage , will change approximately as fast as its field current changes. The rate of change of field current depends a great deal on the external impedance of the stator circuit or on the load impedance. But, using the response ratio definition (see Def. 3.19, Appendix E) we may assume that the ac exciter is open circuited. I n this case the field current in the exciter changes according to the direct-axis transient open circuit time constant .io where
Ti0

= LF/r,T

(7.39)

This will give the most conservative (pessimistic) result since, with a load impedance connected to the stator, the effective inductance seen by the field current is smaller and the time constant is smaller. Using relation (7.39) we write, in the Laplace domain,

) where uF(s)is the Laplace transform of the open circuit field voltage and u ~ ( s is the transform of the regulator voltage. I f the regulator output experiences a step change of magnitude D at t = to, the field voltage may be computed from (7.40) to be

This linearized result does not include saturation or other nonlinearities, but does include the major time delay in the system. An ac exciter designed for operation at a few hundred Hz could have a very reasonablei&, much lower than that of the large 60-Hz generator that is being controlled.
7.6.4 Solid-state exciters

Modern solid-state exciters, such as the SCR exciter of Figure 7.14, can go to ceiling without any appreciable delay. I n systems of this type a small delay may be required for the amplifiers and other circuits involved. The field voltage may then be assumed to depend only on this delay. One way to solve this system is to assume that U, changes linearly to ceiling in a given time delay of t d s, where t d may be very small. This is nearly the same as per, mitting a step change in u. For such fast systems the time constants are so much smaller than others involved in the system that assuming a step change in U, should be fairly accurate.
7.6.5
Buildup of a loaded dc exciter

Up to this point we have considered the response characteristics of unloaded exciters, i.e.. with i, = 0. If the exciter is loaded, the load current will affect the terminal voltage of the exciter U, by an amount depending upon the internal impedance of the exciter. In modern solid-state circuits this effect will usually be small, amounting to

Excitation Systems

267

essentially a small series i,R drop. I n rotating dc machines the effect is greater, since in addition to the i F R drop there is also the brush drop, the drop due to armature reaction, and the drop due to armature inductance. (Dah1 [35]provides an exhaustive treatment of this subject and Kimbark [I61 also has an excellent analysis.) We can analyze the effect of load current in a dc machine as follows. First, we recognize that the armature inductance is small, and at the relatively slow rate of buildup to be experienced this voltage drop is negligible. Furthermore, if the machine has interpoles, we may neglect demagnetizing armature reaction. However, we do have to estimate the effect of cross-magnetizing armature reaction, which causes a net decrease in the air gap flux. Thus, the net effect of load is in the resistance drop (including brush drop) and in the decrease in flux due to cross-magnetizing armature reaction. To facilitate analysis, we assume the load current i, has a constant value. This means the i,R drop is constant, and the armature reaction effect depends on the value of current in the field, designated i in our notation. The combined effect is determined most easily by test, a typical result of which is shown in Figure 7.39. To the load

~~

Exciter Field Current, i, amperes

Fig. 7.39

No-load and load saturation curves. (Reprinted by permission from Power System Stability, vol. 3, by E. W. Kimbark. 9 Wiley, 1956.)

saturation curve is added the resistance drop to obtain a fictitious curve designated "distortion curve." This curve shows the voltage generated by air gap flux at this value of i , as a function of i, and it differs from the no-load saturation curve by an amount due to armature reaction. The magnitude of this difference is greatest near the knee of the curve. Kimbark [ 161 treats this subject thoroughly and is recommended to the interested reader. We will ignore the loading effect in our analysis in the interest of finding a reasonable solution that is a fair representation of the physical device. As in all engineering problems, certain complications must be ignored if the solution is to be manageable.
7.6.6
Normalization of Exciter Equations

The exciter equations in this book are normalized on the basis of rated air gap voltage, i.e., exciter voltage that produces rated no-load terminal voltage with no saturation. This is the pu system designated as C in Figure 7.23. Thus at no load and with no saturation, E,, = I .O pu corresponds to V, = 1.0 pu.

268

Chapter 7

The slip ring voltage corresponding to 1.0 pu E F D is not the same base voltage as that chosen for the field circuit in normalizing the synchronous machine. From (4.55) we have
VFB= VB~B/]FB =
SB/lFB

This base voltage is usually a very large number (163 k V in Example 4.1, for example). The base voltage for E F D , on the other hand, would be on the order of 100 V or so. Simply stated, the exciter base voltage and the synchronous machine base for the field voltage differ, and a change of base between the two quantities is required. The required relationship is given by (4.59), which can be written as
EFD

= (LAD/firF)

UF

pu

EFD

= (WBkMf/flrF)

' F

(7.42)

Thus any exciter equation may be divided through by VfB to obtain an equation in u, and then multiplied by L , D / f l r F to convert to an equation in EFD,,. For example, for the dc generator exciter we have an equation of the form T E f i , = f(uF) V. Dividing through by VFB we have the pu equation ~ ~ = f (f u F Ui ) . Multiplying by ~ ~ L A D / d r fwe write the exciter equation 7 E E F D u = f ( E F D u ) . , I t is necessary, of course, to always maintain the "gain constant" & r F / L A D between the exciter E F D output and the up input to the synchronous machine. This constant is the change of base needed to connect the pu equations of the two machines.
7.7 Excitation System Response

The response of the exciter alone does not determine the overall excitation system response. As noted in Figure 7.20, the excitation system includes not only the exciter but the voltage regulator as well. The purpose of this section is to compute the response of typical systems, including the voltage regulators. This will give us a feel for the equations that describe these systems and will illustrate the way a mathematical model is constructed.
7.7.1 Noncontinuously regulated systems

Early designs of voltage regulating schemes, many of which are still in service, used an electromechanical means of changing the exciter field rheostat to cause the desired change in excitation. A typical scheme is shown in Figure 7.40, which may be explained as follows. A n y given level of terminal voltage will, after rectification, result in a given voltage u, across the regulating coil and a given coil current i,. This current flowing in the regulating coil exerts a pull on the plunger that works against the spring K and dashpot B. Thus, depending on the reference screw setting, the arm attached to the plunger will find a new position x for each voltage V,. High values of V, will increase the coil voltage u, and pull the arm to the right, reducing x, etc. Note that the reference is the mechanical setting of the reference screw. Now imagine a gradual increase in V, that pulls the arm slowly to the right, reducing x until the lower contact L is made. This causes current to flow in the coil L, closing the rheostat motor contact and moving the rheostat in the direction to increase R,. This, as we have seen, will reduce V,. Note that there is n o corrective action at all until a contact is closed. This constitutes an intentional dead zone in which no control action is taken. Once control action is begun, the rheostat setting will change at an assumed constant rate until the maximum or minimum setting is reached. Mathematically, we can describe this action as follows. From (7.16) we have, for the separately excited arrangement,

Next Page
Excitation Systems

269

-Quick

raise

6 lower COntock , -Time delayed raise d lower contack

-0pemting

coils

Fig. 7.40 A noncontinuous regulator for a separately excited system. The scheme illustrated is a simplified sketch similar to the Westinghouse type BJ system (21. rECF =

up - Ri

(7.43)

and in this case the regulating is accomplished by a change in R. But R changes as a function of time whenever the arm position x is greater than some threshold value K,. This condition is shown in Figure 7.41 where the choice of curve depends on the rnagnitude of x being greater than the dead zone f K,. Note that any change in x from the equilibrium position is a measure of the error in the terminal voltage magnitude. This control action is designated the raise-lower mode of operation. It results in a slow excitation change, responding to a change in V, large enough to exceed the threshold K,, where the rheostat motor steadily changes the rheostat setting. A block diagram of this control action is shown in Figure 7.42. The balanced beam responds to an accelerating force

F,

K(x~

+.e) - F,

MR

+ B i + KX

(7.44)

where xo is the reference position; 4 is the unstressed length of the spring; F, is the plunger force; and M, B , and K are the mass, damping, and spring constants respectively. I f the beam mass is negligible, the right side of (7.44) can be simplified. In operation the beam position x is changed continuously in response to variations

.t
s a

a c

RH

t
lime, s

Fig. 7.4 I RH versus f for the condition 1 x

1 > K,

> 0.

Previous Page
270
Chapter 7

Plunger

PT & r u t

Fig. 7.42

Block diagram of the raise-lower control mode.

in V,. Any change in V, large enough to cause 1 x 1 2 K, results in the rheostat motor changing the setting of R H . As the rheostat is reset, the position x returns to the threshold region 1 x 1 < K, and the motor stops, leaving R at the value finally reached. H At any instant the total resistance R is given by

RQR + R ,

=
=

RQR + Ro - K,t (raise) R,, + Ro + K M t (lower)

(7.45)

Thus the exact R depends on the integration time and on the direction of rotation of the and Figure 7.41,R, is the value of R , retained following the rheostat motor. I n (7.45) last integration. This value is constrained by the physical size of the rheostat so that for any time t , R,, < ( R , f K,z) < R,,,. The foregoing discussion pertains to the raise-lower mode only. Referring again to Figure 7.40,a second possible mode of operation is recognized. If the x deflection is largeenough to make the QL or Q R contacts, the fixed field resistors R,, or RQR are switched into or out of the field respectively, initiating a quick response in the exciter. This control scheme is shown in Figure 7.43 as an added quick control mode to the original controller. The quick raise-lower mode is initiated whenever I x 1 > K,, with the resulting action described by

KL

Balanced beom

Raise- lower threshold

Rheostat motor

-1
Fc

1 -

'min Quick raise- lower

threshold

Plunger

PT 6 rect

Fig. 7.43 Block diagram of the combined raise-lower and quick-raise-lower control modes.

Excitation Systems

27 1

R, R,

x > K , (quick raise)

+ R,,

x < K, (quick lower)

(7.46)

If we set K, > K,, this control mode will be initiated only for large changes in V, and will provide a fast response. Thus, although the raise-lower mode will also be operational when 1 x I > K,. it will probably not have time to move appreciably before x returns to the deadband. The controller of Figure 7.43 operates to adjust the total field resistance R to the desired value. Mathematically, we can describe the complete control action by combining (7.45)-(7.46). The resulting change in R affects the solution for uF in the exciter equation (7.43). I f saturation is added, a more realistic solution results. Saturation is often treated as shown in Figure 7.44, where we define the saturation function

Fig. 7.44 Exciter saturation curve.

sE

('A

'B)/'B

(7.47)

Then we can show that


=

(I

+ SE)fB

E = (1 A

+ SE)EB

(7.48)

The function S E is nonlinear and can be approximated by any convenient nonlinear function throughout the operating range (See Appendix D). If the air gap line has slope l / G , we can write the total (saturated) current as
i
=

GuF(I

+ S,)

Gu, + GuFSE

(7.49) (7.50)

Substituting (7.49) into (7.43) the exciter equation is


~ E i ) p=

up - Ri = up - RGvF - RGvFSE

A block diagram for use in computer simulation of this equation is shown in Figure 7.45, where the exciter voltage is converted to the normalized exciter voltage EFD. The complete excitation system is the combination of Figures 7.43 and 7.45.
7.7.2 Continuously regulated systems

Usually it is preferable for a control system to be a continuously acting, proportional system, Le., the control signal is always present and exerts an effort proportional

272

Chapter 7

Fig. 7.45

Exciter block diagram.

to the system error (see Def. 2.12.1). Most of the excitation control systems in use today are of this type. Here we shall analyze one system, the familiar boost-buck system, since it is typical of this kind of excitation system. Consider the system shown in Figure 7.10 where the feedback signal is applied to the rotating amplifier in the exciter field circuit. Reduced to its fundamental components, this is shown in Figure 7.46. We analyze each block separately.

Potential transformer and rectifier. One possible connection for this block is that shown in Figure 7.47, where the potential transformer secondaries are connected to bridged rectifiers connected in series. Thus the output voltage GCis proportional to the sum or average of the rms values of the three phase voltages. If we let the average rms voltage be represented by the symbol I(,we may write
(7.5 I )

where KR is a proportionality constant and 7 R is the time constant due to the filtering or first-order smoothing in the transformer-rectifier assembly. The actual delay in this system is small, and we may assume that 0 < T R < 0.06 s.

Voltage regulator and reference (comparator). The second block compares the voltage V, against a fixed reference and supplies an output voltage K, called the error voltage, which is proportional to the difference; Le.,

(7.52)
This can be accomplished in several ways. One way is to providk an electronic difference amplifier as shown in Figure 7.48, where the time constant of the electronic amplifier is usually negligible compared to other time delays in the system. There is often an objection, however, to using active circuits containing vacuum tubes, transistors, and the associated electronic power supplies because of reliability and the need for replace-

Fig. 7.46 Simplified diagram of a boost-buck system.

Excitation Systems

273

t
I
'de

Fig. 7.47

Potential transformer and rectifier connection.

ment of aging components. This difficulty could be overcome by having a spare amplifier with automatic switching upon the detection of faulty operation. Another solution to the problem is to make the error comparison by an entirely passive network such as the nonlinear bridge circuit in Figure 7.49. Here the input current idc sees parallel paths io and ib or id, = .i + ib. But since the output is connected to an amplifier, we assume that the voltage gain is large and that the input current is negligible, or i, = 0. Under this condition the currents ia and ib are equal. Then the output voltage V , is

V,

= u,

- u,

(7.53)

The operation of the bridge is better understood by examination of Figure 7.50 where the u-i characteristics of each resistance are given and the characteristic for the total resistance R, + R , seen by io and ib is also given. Since ia = ibrthe sum of volt, age drops u, and u, is always equal to & the applied voltage. If we choose the nonlinear elements carefully, the operation in the neighborhood of VREF is essentially linear; Le., a deviation U, above or below VREF results in a change i, in the total current, which is also displaced equally above and below i R E F . Note that the nonlinear resistance shown is quite linear in this critical region. Thus we may write for a voltage deviation u,,
U N = U,

+ kNUA

V L = V,

+ kLU,

(7.54)

where k, > k,. Combining (7.54) and (7.53), we compute

V,
But for a deviation u,, V,

= -(kL

- kN)UA = - k U ,

(7.55)

= VREF

+ u,,
V,
=

which may be incorporated into (7.55) to write


k(V&

&c)

(7.56)

We note that (7.56) has the same block diagram representation as the difference amplifier shown in Figure 7.48(b), where we set 7 = 0 for the passive circuit.

Fig. 7.48 Electronic difference amplifier as a comparator: (a) circuit connection, (b) block diagram.

274

Chapter 7

Input to
amplifier

Fig. 7.49 Nonlinear bridge comparison circuit.

A natural question to ask at this point is, What circuit element constitutes the voltage reference? Note that no external reference voltage is applied. A closer study of Figure 7.50 will reveal that the linear resistance R , is a convenient reference and that two identical gang-operated potentiometers in the bridge circuit would provide a convenient means of setting the reference voltage. The nonlinear bridge circuit has the obvious advantage of being simple and entirely passive. I f nonlinear resistances of appropriate curvature are readily available, this circuit makes an inexpensive comparator that should have long life without component aging.

The amplifier. The amplifier portion of the excitation system may be a rotating amplifier, a magnetic amplifier, or conceivably an electronic amplifier. I n any case we will assume linear voltage amplification K A with time constant T ~or , (7.57) V = KAK/(l + AS) R
As with any amplifier a saturation value must be specified, such as VRmin< VR < VRmax. These conditions are both shown in the block diagram of Figure 7.5 1 .

The exciter. The exciter output voltage is a function of the regulator voltage as derived in (7.50) and with block diagram representation as shown in Figure 7.45. The major difference between that case and this is in the definition of the constant KE. Since the exciter is a boost-buck system, we can write the normalized equation
EFD

= (VR -

EFDsE)/(KE

TES)

(7.58)

where
KE=RG- 1 (7.59) The generator. The generator voltage response to a change in uF was examined in
'dc

R ~ + R ~

'REF

vc
"REF

'REF

-v

A
V

Fig. 7.50 The u versus i characteristics for the nonlinear bridge.

Excitation Systems

275

Fig. 7.51

Block diagram of the regulator amplifier.

Chapter 5. Looking at the problem heuristically, we would expect the generator to j 0 respond nearly as a linear amplifier with time constant . when unloaded and ~jwhen shorted, with the actual time constant being load dependent and between these two extremes. Let us designate this value as 7 and the gain as Kc to write, neglecting , saturation,

I n the region where linear operation may be assumed, there is no need to consider saturation of the generator since its output is not undergoing large changes. I f saturation must be included, it could be done by employing the same technique as used for the exciter, where a saturation function S, would be defined as in Figure 7.44.

Example 7.7 1 . Construct the block diagram of the system described in Section 7.7.1 and compute

the system transfer function.


2. Find the open-loop transfer function for the case where
7"

= =

0.1 0.5

TG

10 .
0.05

rR =

KE KA

= -0.05
=

40

KG =

1.0

3. Sketch a root locus for this system and discuss the problem of making the system stable.
Solution 1

The block diagram for the system is shown in Figure 7.52. If we designate the feed-forward gain and transfer function as K G and the feedback transfer function as H, the system transfer function is 1231
Y/%F

KG(s)/[I + KG(s)H(s)l

where, neglecting saturation and limiting, we have

t+rRI=
Fig. 7.52
KR

v,

Block diagram of the excitation control system.

276

Chapter 7

or

- v; -

KAKG(l

TRs)

VREF ( 1

7 , 4 ~ ) ( K+

7S( )I

+ TcS)(I + T R S ) + KAKGKR

and the system is observed to be fourth order.


Solution 2 The open-loop transfer function is KGH, or

KGH

KAKGKR
( 1 -k 7,4TAS)(Kf
=
7.$)(1

-k 7~S)(l -k 7 ~ s )

Using the values specified and setting K

400 KAKRKG, we have K


Ol( .)S

KGH

(s

IO)@ -

+
(pen)

I)(s

+ 20)
(reg)

(amp)

(ex4

Solution 3 Using the open-loop transfer function computed in Solution 2, we have the rootlocus plot shown in Figure 7.53, where we compute [22]

crossing

-10

origin

Fig. 7.53 Root locus for the system of Figure 7.52.

( I ) Center of gravity = ( C P - C Z ) / ( # P - # Z ) (2) Breakaway points (by trial and error):

-(30.9 - 0.0)/4

-7.75

left breakaway at - 16.4: right breakaway at -0.43:

1/3.6 = 1/6.4 + 1/15.4 + 1/16.5 0.278 E 0.281 1/19.57 + 1/9.57 + 1/0.57 = 1/0.53 1.91 1.89

(3) Gain at j w axis crossing: From the closed-loop transfer function we compute the characteristic equation

+(s) = S4
where K'
=

+ 30.9s' + 226.9s' +
=

177s

+ K'

400K - 20 and K

KAKRKG

40KR.

Excitation Systems

277

Then by Routh's criterion w e have


s4

s3
s2

s' so

226.9 30.9 I77 221.2 K' 177 - 0.14K' 0 K'


1

K'

For the first column we have: From row so

K'
From row s '

400K - 20 > 0

K > 0.05

K'

400K - 20 < (177/0.14)

1266

K < 3.21

We may also compute the point of j o axis crossing from the auxiliary polynomial in s2 with K' = 1266, or 2 2 1 . 2 ~ ~1266 +
=

s2 = -5.73

s = +j2.4

An examination of the root locus reveals several important system characteristics. We note that for any reasonable gain the roots due to the regulator and amplifier excite response modes that die out very fast and will probably be overdamped. Thus the response is governed largely by the generator and exciter poles that are very close to the origin. Even modest values of gain are likely to excite unstable modes in the solution. This can be improved by (a) moving the exciter pole into the left half of the s plane, which requires that R in (7.59) have a greater value; (b) moving the generator pole to the left, which would need to be done as part of the generator design rather than afterwards; and (c) adding some kind of compensation that will bend the locus to a more favorable shape in the neighborhood of the j o axis. Of these options only (c) is of practical interest.

Excitation system compensation. Example 7.7 illustrates the need for compensation in the excitation control system. This can take many forms but usually involves some sort of rate or derivative feedback and lead or lead-lag compensation. (It is
Olhcr

KG
I+rGs

"t

KR 1
+Tp,S

Fig. 7.54 Block diagram of a typical compensated system.

278

Chapter 7

interesting to note that Gabriel Kron recognized the need for this kind of compensation as early as 1954 when he patented an excitation system incorporating these features [37].) This can be accomplished by adding the rate feedback loop shown in Figure 7.54, where time constant T~ and gain KF are introduced. Such a compensation scheme can be adapted to bend the root locus near the j w axis crossing to improve stability substantially. Also notice that provision is made for the introduction of other compensating signals if they should be necessary or desirable. The effect of compensation will be demonstrated by an example.

Example 7.8

I . Repeat Example 7.7 for the system shown in Figure 7.54. 2. Use a digital computer solution to obtain the best values for mize the rise time and settling time with minimum overshoot. 3. Repeat part 2 using an analog computer solution.

7F

and KF to mini-

KA

1
b

KG
T
I

Vt

KF

1 + T

K
(1
+

~
T ~ S )

T ~ s ) ( K ~<)(1 + +

K+ (1

+lG4
+

KR

KG (1 + T+)

Fig. 7.55 Excitation system with rate feedback neglecting S, and limiter: (a) original block diagram, (b) with rate feedback take-off point moved to V,. (c) with combined feedback.

Excitation Systems

279

Solution 1 The system transfer function can be easily computed for S, = 0 and with limiting , ignored. Figure 7.55(a) shows a block diagram of the system with S = 0 and without the limiter. By using block diagram reduction, the takeoff point for the rate feedback signal is moved to V,, as shown in Figure 7.55(b), then the two feedback signals are combined in Figure 7.55(c). The forward loop has a transfer function KG(s) given by

KG(s)

K A KG ATETG

(s

I ~/TA)(S K E / ~ E ) ( ~ 1/76)

and the feedback transfer function H ( s ) is given by

H(s)

(KF7G/KG7F>s<s

+ 1/7R) + (KR/7R)(s (s + 1 / 7 F ) ( s + 1 / 7 R )
1/7G)(s

1/7F)

The open loop transfer function is thus given by

KGH

KAKF - s(s +
TA7TF

1/7G)(s

+ 1/7R) + (KRKGTF/7RTGKF)(S

l/TF)

(s

1/7~)(s
=

+ KE/TE)(S +
71 1

1/7~)(S

4- I / ~ F ) ( S

1/7~)

Substituting the values and KR = 1.0,

T~

0.1, T~
S(S

0.5,
I)(S

0.05, 7, = 1.0 KE = -0.05, KG = 1.0,

KGH

KF 20KA TF

(s

20) 1O)(s - O.l)(s


4-

20(7~/K~)(s I / l p ) + + l)(s + 1/7p)(s + 20)

(7.61)

A given T~ fixes all poles of (7.61). Then the shape of the locus depends on the location of the zeros. Thus we examine the zeros of (7.61). From the numerator we write
S(S

I)(s

+ 20) + 20(7,/KF)(s +
+

1 / ~ ~= ) 0

o=

I + 20(7,/K,)(s ss ( I( )s

+ 20)

1/7F) =

ss (

K ( s + a) + I)(s + 20)

(7.62)

where we let K = 20(rF/KF)and a = 1 / ~ ~ . The locus of the roots of (7.62), which gives the zeros of (7.61), depends upon the . value of a = 1 / ~ ~ There are three cases of interest (note that a > 0): Case I, 0 < a < 1; Case 11, 1 < a < 20; and Case 111, a > 20. These cases are shown in Figure 7.56 where - m is the location of the asymptote. Case I is sketched in Figure 7.$6(a), where a zero falls on the negative real axis at - a , which is between the origin and - 1. The locus therefore falls between the origin and - a . This means that (7.61) would have a zero on the real axis near the origin. Thus the open loop transfer function of (7.61) will have a pole at 0.1 and a zero on the real axis at - a . The locus of the roots for this system will have a branch on the real

CaseI: 0 < a < 1 -10.5<m<-10

CaseII: l < a < 2 0 l O c m < -0.5

case 111 : a > 20

- 0 . 5 ~m

Fig. 7.56

Locus o f zeros for the open loop transfer function o f (7.62).

280

Chapter 7

Case 1 A

Case 1 B

Case I1 A

Case I1 B

x-x

X -1

Case 111 A

Case Ill B

Fig. 7.57

Root loci of KGH

20K"

( K F / 7 F ) [ ~ ( I)(s + ~
(s

+ 20) + 20(s + a)] + 20)(s + IO)(s + I)(s - O.I)(s + a )

axis near the origin, and the system dynamic performance will be dominated by this root. Its dynamic response will be sluggish. Cases I1 and I11 are shown in Figures 7.56(b) and (c). I n both cases, the root-locus plots of (7.62) have branches that, with the proper choice of the ratio K, give a pair of complex roots near the imaginary axis. Again, these are the zeros for the system described by (7.61). However, in Case I1 the loci approach the asymptotes to the left of the imaginary axis, while for Case 111 the loci approach the asymptotes to the right of the origin. The position of the roots of (7.62) and hence the zeros of (7.61), are more likely to be located further to the left of the imaginary axis in Case I1 than in Case 111. A further examination of the possible loci of zeros in Figure 7.56 reveals that for the three zeros, two may appear as a complex pair. Thus there are two situations of interest: (A) all zeros real and (B) one real zero and a complex pair of zeros. Futthermore, both conditions can appear in all cases. Figure 7.57 provides a pictorial summary of all six possibilities. In all but two cases the system response is dominated by a root very near the origin. Only in Cases I I B and IIIB is there any hope of pulling this dominant root away from the origin; and of these two, Case IIB is clearly the better choice. Thus we will concentrate on Case IIB for further study. (Also see (381 for a further study of this subject.) From (7.61)the open loop transfer function is given by
KGH
=

KF s3 + 21s2 + 20(1 20KAT F (S + lO)(S - o l ( .)S

+ T ~ / K ~+) s 0 / K F 2 + l)(S + 20)(S + l / r F )

(7.63)

where 1 < I / T ~< 20.

Excitation Systems

281

20
T

=0.6, K ~ 0 . 0 1

15.

.- IO. E
f
5.

P 7 0.40.
: . 00. .0

0-

20
r = 06 K = 0 0 F ., F . 2

15

1.20.

.2 8 lo E 5

2 .

0.W

0.40.

-io

-is

-io
Real

r -5

00 .0 0.00

oh0

1:M)

2140

3:a

lime, I

2c

r = 0.6, KF = 0.03 F
15
x

a a

.- IO E E C 0

-20

-15

Reo1

-10

-5

Fig. 7.58(a) ElTect of variation of K F on dynamic response: T F = 0.6, K F = 0.01,0.02, and 0.03 respectively. Type I excitation system.

Solution 2 The above system is studied for different values of rF and K F with the aid of special digital computer programs. The programs used are a root-finding subroutine for polynomials to obtain the zeros of equation (7.63), a root-locus program, and a timeresponse program. Two sample runs to illustrate the effect of rF and KF are shown in Figure 7.58. I n Figure 7.58(a) r F is held constant at 0.6 while K, is varied between 0.01 and 0.03. Plots of the loci of the roots are shown for the three cases, along with the timeresponse for the rated value of KA. The most obvious effect of reducing KF is to reduce the settling time. In Figure 7.58(b), KF is held constant at 0.02 while T F is varied between 0.5 and 0.7. The root-locus plots and the time-response for the system are repeated. The effect of increasing r F is to reduce the overshoot.

282

Chapter 7

20
7

=0.5, K =0.02

qF -0.5. K =0.02

15

.E
E -

: IC :
5

0
Real

0.00

0.80

Time,

1.60
I

2.40

3.20

m.
7

=0.6, K =0.02 F

=0.6, K =0.02

15.

0 -20
-15

-10

Real

= 0.7, K -0.02

0.00

0.80

1.60
I

2.40

3.20

Time,

Fig. 7.58(b) Effect of variation O f T F on dynamic response: K F = 0.02, Type I excitation system.

TF =

0.5, 0.6, and 0.7 respectively.

From Figures 7.58(a) and 7.58(b) we can see that the values of T , and KF significantly influence the dynamic performance of the system. There is, however, a variety of choices of K, and T,, which gives a reasonably good dynamic response. For this particular system, T , = 0.6 and K, = 0.02 seem to give the best results.
Solution 3 An engineer with experience in s plane design may be able to guess a workable location for the zero and estimate the value of K , that will give satisfactory results. For most engineers, the analog computer can be a great help in speeding up the design procedure, and we shall consider this technique as an alternate design procedure. From Figure 7.54 we write, with V, = 0,

Excitation Systems

283

Fig. 7.59

Analog computer diagram for a linear excitation system with derivative feedback.

(7.64)

For the amplifier block of Figure 7.54 we have VR = K A V e / ( 1 rearranged as


R

T ~ s ) which ,

may be (7.65)

(l/S)[(KA/TA)

v, -

R1

Equation (7.64) may be represented on the analog computer by a summer and (7.65) by an integrator with feedback. All other blocks except the derivative feedback term are similar to (7.65). For the derivative feedback we have 4 = sKFEFD/(I+ 7 F ~ )which , can be rewritten as

= (KF/7F)EFD - (I/TpT)Vj

(7.66)

Using (7.64)--(7.66), we may construct the analog computer diagram shown in Figure 7.59. Then we may systematically move the zero from s = 0 to the left and check the response. In each case both the forward loop gain and feedback gains may be o ptim ized . Table 7.7 shows the results of several typical runs of this kind. In all cases KR has been adjusted to unity, and other gains have been chosen to optimize V, in a qualitative sense. The constants in these studies may be used to compute the cubic coefficients (7.62), and the equation may then be factored. I f the roots are known, a root locus
Table 7.7.
Run
00 =

Summary of Analog Computer Studies for Example 7.8


KF

TC

KA

Settling time, s

Percent overshoot 9.2

0-90%

rise time. s
0.37 0.30 0.25 0.215

I
2 3 4

1.75

0.16

50

ISO
I .25 1 .oo
0.75

0.16
0.16 0.16

50 50
50

I .35 1.05 I .05


2.05

8.0
22.8 42.0 70.0

0.16

50

very long

0.20

Chapter 7

Fig. 7.60 Analog computer results for Example 7.8. Solution 2.

may be plotted and a comparison made between this and the previous uncompensated solution. The actual analog computer outputs for run 2 are shown in Figure 7.60. Onesecond timing pulses are shown on the chart. The plot is made so that 20 such pulses correspond to 1 s of real time. This system is tuned to optimize the output which responds with little overshoot and displays good damping. Note, however, that this requires excessive overshoot of EFDand v,, which in physical systems would both be limited by saturation. Inclusion of saturation is a practical necessity, even in linear simulation.

v,

Examples 7.7 and 7.8 are intended to give us some feeling for the derivative feedback of Figure 7.54. A study of the eigenvalues of a synchronous machine indicates that a first-order approximation to the generator voltage response is only approximately true. Nevertheless, making this simplification helps us to concentrate on the characteristics of the excitation system without becoming confused by the added complexity of thegenerator. Visualizing the root locus of the control is helpful and shows clearly how the compensated system can be operated at much greater gain while still holding a suitable damping ratio. These studies also suggest how further improvements could be realized by adding series compensation, but this is left as an exercise for the interested reader.

Excitation Systems

285

7.8

State-Space Description of the Excitation System

Refer again to the analog computer diagram of Figure 7.59. By inspection we write the following equations (including saturation) in per unit with time in seconds.

t',

(KR/TR)y

(1/7R)6
(l/TF)

= ( K F / T F ) iFD

V,
vR

r',
EFD

= =

(KA/7A)ve
'R

(1/7A)vR

<

VRmax,

vR

>

VRmin

[(sE

+ KE)/7ElEFD
(7.67)
EFD,

V,=

VREF+

V,-

6 - V,

Since S, = S , ( E F D ) is a nonlinear function of point to write

we linearize at the operating

where we define the coefficient SL to describe saturation in the vicinity of the initial operating point. Suppose we arbitrarily assign a state to each integrator associated with the excitation. Arbitrarily, we set x8, x,, xlo.and xll to correspond to the variables VI, V3,Vl2 and E F D . In rewriting (7.67) to eliminate E F D in the second equation we observe that, when per unit time must be divided by wR for the system of units to the consistent. is used, the product (rFrE) The preliminary equations are obtained:

+
O I

(7.68)

In equation (7.68) the term ( K R / 7 R ) is a function of the state variables. From


(4.46) or (6.69)

V:

(I/~)(u;

+ u:)

(7.69)

where u,, and u, are functions of the state variables; thus (7.69) is nonlinear. If the system equations are linearized about a quiescent operating state, a linear relation between the change in the terminal voltage y,, and the change in the d and q axis volt-

286

Chapter 7

ages U d A and u,, is obtained. Such a relation is given in (6.69) and repeated here:

(7.70)
The linear model is completed by substituting for U d A and UqA in terms of the state variables and from (6.20) and by setting u, = ( f l r , / L A D ) EFD.
7.8.1
Simplified linear model

A simplified linear model can be constructed based on the linear model discussed in Section 6.5. The linearized equations for the synchronous machine are given by (the A subscripts are dropped for convenience)

(7.71) T,
= K , 6 -I K2E: = KS6

(7.72) (7.73) (7.74) (7.75)

V;
From (7.71)

+ KbE;

E: t

= -(l/K37;0)

E;

- (K4/?:0) 6 + (1/d0) EFD

From the torque equation (6.73) and (7.72)


=

T,,,/T, - (K1/7,) 6 - ( K ~ / T ,E; - ( D / T ~ ) ) w

and from the definition of q,


6 = W

(7.76)

The system is now described by (7.68) and (7.72)-(7.76). The state variables are V, V, V, E F D ] . The driving functions are V,,, and T,,, assuming that V, in (7.68) is zero. The complete state-space description of the system is given by
x' = [Eiwd

(7.77)

Excitation Systems

287

7.8.2

Complete linear model

By using the linearized model for a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus developed in Chapter 6, the excitation system equations are added to the system of (6.20). Before this is done, V; must be expressed in terms of the state variables, using (6.25) and (7.70). These are repeated here (with the A subscript omitted),

(7.78) From (7.78) and using

we get

(7.79) Substituting in the first equation in (7.68),

The remaining equations in (7.68) will be unchanged. The equations introduced by the exciter (for V, = 0) will thus become

This set of equations is incorporated in the set (6.20) to obtain the complete mathematical description. The new A matrix for the system is given by A = - M-K. M-'K. Note that in (7.80) the state variable for the field voltage is E F D and not u,. Thereu. , fore, the equation for the field current is adjusted accordingly. In this equation the term uF is changed to ( & r F //L A D ) ) EFD. U, rF LAD The matrices M and K are thus given by the defining equation v = -Kx - Mk, where

id iF iD

i,

i,

V,

V3

VR

E,

M is given by

288

Chapter 7

i,
k M,
1 I

I I I

Lf
M R
I

l
I

!
I I I I

I
I I I I I I I

i"
kM, 0
I I I
I
I
L
I

0
K

I I
I

- 2 doL,
'R

0
O
0

I
I

I I

-KRf - , -o
TR

1
I

I
I
I

0
I

0 0 0

I
1
I

0 0

I o

I ]
(7.81)

And the matrix K becomes

:I :
id

iF

iD

0
r,

0
O

l
I I

WJ,

0 0

I
I

0 0 rD ..............................

0
........

l o
r.:.-A,

0
. . . . .

l o
.r'
0
I

0
0

- , 4
0
P

-wokMF

-wokMD

l
;
1 1

R
0

0
. . . . . . . . . . . .I 1
rQ

-v3vwo
0 0 0
K,,

............................
K -

, ..............
-(-Ado L,i,) 1 3 I 0
K4 8

I o

I o
!

0
0

I . . . . . . . . . . . .

1(Aqo - L,iqo) - 1 kM& 3


3

1kMDiVoI
3
O
I I

kMQido

-D

j o
I O
I
I

0
&I

0 0 0
0 0

.....................................

-I
K,,

0 0
I I 71

. . . .I . .
I

0
0 0 0

I
I

I
I

I I
I

rn

V, V"

0 0 0

0
0

;
I

0 0
0

I O
I

I O I

7f

1
I
1

I o
I

0
S;

I O

i o

I -_
76

+ Kr
78

(7.82)

Excitation Systems

289

Example 7.9 Expand Example 6.2 to include the excitation system using the mathematical description of (7.80). Assume that the machine is operating initially at the load specified in Example 6.2. The excitation system parameters are given by
TR

00 S .1

3.77 P U 18.85 PU

78

K R = 1.0 TA = 0.05 s K A = 40

KE
KF

7. = 1
I=

0.5 s = 188.5 PU -0.05 0.715 = 269.55 P U 0.04

Let the exciter saturation be represented by the nonlinear function

Solution From the initial conditions


UdO

ug0 =
5 0

-1.148 1.675 1.172 (I/3)(uqo/v,o)


=

id0

=
=

- 1.59

&v,dO

= =

- 1.397
1.025

EFDO =

do
40

= (l/3)(Ud0/vro) = =

0.70 & V,,, 2.529 -(1/3)(1.148/1.172) = -0.3264 (1/3)(1.675/1.172) = 0.4762


i,,

The linear saturation coefficient at the initial operating point is


SEI = - =

aE ,

1.555 [0.0039 exp (1.555 x 2.529)]

0.3095

The exciter time constants should be given in pu time (radians). The new terms in the K matrix are -(1.0/3.77)(-0.326 x 0.02 - 0.476 x 0.4) = 0.0523 -(1.0/3.77)(-0.326 x 0.4 + 0.476 x 0.02) = 0.0321 -(1.0/3.77)(-0.326 x 0.70 + 0.476 x 1.59)0.4 = -0.0561 (1.0/3.77)(-0.326 x 1.025 + 0.476 x 1.397) = 0.0751 I / T ~ 0.265 = 1/71. = 0.0037 -O&F/TFTE = -0.04 X 377/(269.5 x 188.5) = -2.967 x X 0.26 = 7.7 X lo+ -wRKF(SA K E ) / T F T E = 2.967 X K A / ~ = 40/18.85 = 2.122 = K,,, A l / r A = 1/18.85 = 0.053 1 / =~ 0.0053 ~ ( A + K E ) / ~ = 0.15 X 0.0053 = 0.000796 S E C 3 r 1 . / W R kMF = C3(0.000742)/ 1.55 = -0.000829

The new K matrix is given by

290

Chapter 7

K -

The new M matrix is given by

2.100 1.550
1.550

1.550 1.651
1.550

1.550

I
I

1.550
1.605

I I

I
I I

I I I
I
I

I I I

I I I

2.040 1.490

1.490

I I
I O

I I

1.526

M =
0

I I I
I

- 0

o !

io o o
1 I I

iJ

The A matrix is given by


L

- 36.062
22.776

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.4388

14.142 1-3487.2 76.857


I

-2547.0 -2444.6
I

1751.3 -605.7

0
0 0
~

-0,4904 5.5317 -4.8673 0


0
. .- . .. .

12.472 -4.9503

1206.0

880.86 1608.6 ;
I I

845.46

I _ _ _ _ _ _ - - - - - .- _ _ _ _ _ . _ * _ - _ - .. - _-.- . . _ _ _ . _ _ _ . . . _ . ..... _ _ - _ . - _ I

4.3557 -96.017 1 2202.4 2649.7 2649.7 I -36.064

1544.0 -1106.1 1776.7

3590.0

90.072 I

2387.4

I
t

_ _ _ _ _ _ - . - - - . .- - - - -I- - - - - - - _ _ _ _ _ _ 4 I
-0.0078 -0.2027 -0.2027 t -0.7993

-3505.7 -2587.5 -2587.5

35.218 - 123.32 I - 1735.0 -2331.4 -0.4422 I


I

1 I

0 0 0 o i o 0 0 0 0 0 0 I loo0 I . . . - - - - - ... . .- - -. - - - - . . _ . _ _-_ __ _ _ _ I- - - - - - - - - - - - - J . - - - - - ---- -. _ _ I 0 0 25.394 55.361 134.50 124.15 211.02 -108.65'1 -265.26 56.019 0 0 1 1

0
0
._ .. .

lo-'

1!

0
0

0 O

0
0

0.0235 -0.077 -0.79581

-3.7099 0

0.2967 -5.3052 53.052

1
I

0
0

'

I o

-2122.1 -2122.1
0

292

Chapter 7

Table 7.9.

Eigenvalues for System of Example 7. IO (Loading of Example 5.1)


Exciter type W Brushless W low rE Brushless

W TRA

-0.03594 -0.03594 -0.265 x -0.09804 -0. I2299 -0.02536 -0.02536 -0.00076 -0.00076 -0.00340 -0.00340

+ j0.99826
IO2

- j0.99826

+ J0.03912 - j0.03912 + j0.02444 - j0.02444 + j0.00249


-

j0.00249

-0.03594 -0.03594 -0.265 x - 0.07300 -0.12315 -0.07870 -0.07870 -0.00071 -0.00071 -0.00447 -0.00447

+ j0.99826
-

j0.99826

IO2

+ j0.02139
j0.02139 + j0.02444 - j0.02444 + jO.OOl85 - jO.OOl85
-

-0.03594 -0.03594 -0.26525 -0.09763 -0.12302 -0,16664 -0.16664 -0.00082 -0.00082 -0.00177 -0.00177

+ j0.99827
x

j0.99827
IO2

+ j0.86637 + j0.02468 - j0.02468 + j0.00353


- j0.86637
-

j0.00353

The results tabulated in Table 7.9 are for the same machine and loading condition as used in Example 6.4 except for the addition of the exciter models. Comparing the results of Examples 6.4 and 7.10, we note that two pairs of complex eigenvalues and two real eigenvalues are essentially present in all the results. We can conclude that these eigenvalues are identified with the parameters of the machine and are not dependent on the exciter parameters. The additional eigenvalues obtained in Example 7.10 and not previously present are comparable in magnitude except for one complex pair associated with the W Low rE Brushless exciter. For this exciter a frequency of approximately 50 Hz is obtained, which might be introduced by the extremely low exciter time constant. The same example was repeated for the loading of Example 5.2 and for the same exciters. The results obtained indicate that only one pair of complex eigenvalues change with the machine loading. This pair is one of the two complex pairs associated with the machine parameters. The eigenvalues associated with the exciter parameters did not change significantly with the machine loading.
7.9 Computer Representation of Excitation Systems

Most of the problems in which the transient behavior of the excitation system is being studied will require the use of computers. I t is therefore recognized that the solution of systems can be greatly simplified if a standard set of mathematical models can be chosen. Then each manufacturer can specify the constants for the model that will best represent his systems, and the data acquisition problem will be simplified for the user. As the use of computers has increased and programs have been developed that represent excitation systems, several models have evolved for such systems. Actually, the differences in these representations was more in the form of the data than in the accuracy of the representation. Recognizing this fact, the IEEE formed a working group in the early 1960s to study standardization. This group, which presented its final report in 1967 [15], standardized the representation of excitation systems in four different types and identified specific commercial systems with each type. These models allow for several degrees of complexity, depending upon the available data or importance of a particular exciter in a large system problem. Thus, anything from a very simple linear model to a more complex nonlinear model may be formulated by following these generalized descriptions. We describe the four IEEE models below.

Excitation Systems

293

The excitation system models described use a pu system wherein 1 .O pu generator voltage is the rated generator voltage and 1.0 pu exciter voltage is that voltage required to produce rated generator voltage on the generator air gap line (see Def. 3.20 in Appendix E). This means that at no load and neglecting saturation, EFD = 1 . 0 ~ ~ gives exactly = 1 . 0 ~ ~ . Table 7.10 gives a list of symbols used in the four I E E E models, changed slightly to conform to the notation used throughout this chapter.
Table 7.10. Symbol

Excitation System Model Symbols


Symbol Description

Description

exciter output voltage


IF = generator field current

v,=

regulator amplifier time constant exciter time constant regulator stabilizing circuit time constant same as T~ for rotating rectifier system regulator input filter time constant rheostat time constant, Type 4 regulator output voltage maximum value of VR
minimum value of VR
VRH =

generator terminal voltage regulator gain exciter constant related to selfexcited field regulator stabilizing circuit gain current circuit gain in Type 3 system potential circuit gain in Type IS or Type 3 system fast raise/lower constant setting, Type 4 system
exciter saturation function auxiliary (stabilizing) input signal

I, = generator terminal current

K,
K,
KF K,

= = = =

K, = K,
=

s,

v.=

regulator reference voltage setting field rheostat setting -

Note: Voltages and currents a r e s domain

quantities.
acting regulator and exciter

7.9.1

Type 1 system-continuously

The block diagram for the Type 1 system is shown in Figure 7.61. Note that provision is made for first-order smoothing or filtering of the terminal voltage V, with a filter time constant of r R . Usually rR is very small and is often approximated as zero.

Fig. 7.61 Type I excitation system representation for a continuously acting regulator and exciter. (c IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Trans., vol. PAS-87, 1968.)

The amplifier has time constant T,, and gain K,, and its output is limited by VRmax and VRmin.Note that if we have no filter and the rate feedback is zero (KF = 0), the input to the rotating amplifier is the error voltage

v, =

VREF

r:

(7.83)

294

Chapter 7

, Fig. 7.62 Exciter saturation curves showing procedure for calculating the saturation function S . Reprinted from l E E E Trans.. vol. PAS-87. 1968.)

IEEE.

and this voltage is small, but finite in the steady state. The exciter itself is represented as a first-order linear system with time constant T,. However, a provision is made to include the effect of saturation in the exciter by the saturation function S,. The saturation function is defined as shown in Figure 7.62 by the relation

s ,

= (A

- B)/B

(7.84)

and is thus a function of E,, that is nonlinear. This alters the amplifier voltage VR by an amount SEE, to give a new effective value of pR,viz..
V R
=

V - SEE,, R

(7.85)

This altered value is operated upon linearly by the exciter transfer function. Note the that for sufficiently small EFD system is nearly linear (S, = 0). Note also that the exciter transfer function contains a constant K,. This transfer function

vR

G(s)

l/(K,

TES)

(7.86)

is not in the usual form for a linear transfer function for a first-order system (usually stated as 1/(1 + T S ) . From the block diagram we write EFD = f R / ( K , T,s), and substituting (7.85) for we have

c,

TEsEFD

= -KEEFD

VR

- SEE,,

(7.87)

which includes the nonlinear function SEE,,. domain to TEEFD =


-KEEFD

Equation (7.87) corresponds in the time

+ VR - S E E F D
bRVF/(U

(7.88)

Comparing with (7.32), for example, where we computed


TECF

= VF

+ VR

- VF)

with the nonlinearity approximated by a Frohlich equation, we can observe the obvious similarity. Reference [IS] suggests taking

Excitation Systems
KE

295

= S E I E ~ ~ ( 0= )

f lEFD(0)I

(7.89)

which corresponds to the resistance in the exciter field circuit at t = 0. Some engineers approximate the saturation function by an exponential function, i.e.,
sE

ft E f D )

exp (BE,%'EfD)

(7.90)

The coefficients A,, and BE, are computed from saturation data, where S, and E F D are specified at two points, usually the exciter ceiling voltage and 75% of ceiling. The function (7.90) is easy to compute and provides a simple way to represent exciter saturation with reasonable accuracy. See Appendix D. Finally we examine the feedback transfer function of Figure 7.61

H(s)

K,S/(l

TFS)

(7.91)

where K, and 7 F are respectively the gain constant and the time constant of the regulator stabilizing circuit. This time constant introduces a zero on the negative real axis. Note that (7.91) introduces both a derivative feedback and a first-order lag. Reference [ 151 points out that the regulator ceiling VRmar and the exciter ceiling EFDmax interrelated through S, and K,. Under steady-state conditions we compute are
VR

KEEFD

(7.92)

with the constraint VRmin< VR < VRmax, then

(7.93) (KE + SEmar)EFDmax Thus there exists a constraint between the maximum (or minimum) values of EfDmax and 'Rmax tEFDmm and R n ' mi ).
'Rrnax

7.9.2

Type 1S system-controlled rectifier system with terminal potential supply only

This is a special case of continuously acting systems where excitation is obtained through rectification of the terminal voltage as in Figures 7.17 and 7.18. I n this case the maximum regulator voltage is not a constant but is proportional to V , , Le.,
'Rmax

= KP<

(7.94)

Such systems have almost instantaneous response of their main excitation components such that in Figure 7.61 K, = 1 , 7, = 0, and S, = 0. This system is shown in Figure 7.63. A state-space representation of the Type IS system can be derived by referring to (7.67) (written for the Type 1 system), setting V = E F D and eliminating (7.65), with ,

+"

r j

Fig. 7.63

Type IS system. (! IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Trans.. vol. PAS-87, 1968.) e

296

Chapter 7

the result

pi

= (KR/~R)

v,- ( ~ / T R ) vi
6
(l/TA)

f,

= ( K F / ~ F ) ~ F D (1/7F) -

E F D = (K,4/TA)

<
v 3

'Rrnaxr

>

vRrnin

v, = v,,, + v, - v, -

(7.95)

By using (7.79) and substituting for id and iq, we can express as a function of the state variables. For the linearized system discussed in Chapter 6 where the state variables
x'
=

r:

[idi, iD iq iQ w 61

[xI x3x4x5x6x,] x2
1

we can show that

<=
0

hEFD

-k
k-I

h x k

(7.96)

where the f coefficients are constants. Rearranging, we write


1 - 0
TR

K 0 0 -F
TF

(7.97)
where
7

Note that only three states are needed in this case.


7.9.3 Type 2 system-rotating

rectifier system

Another type of system, the rotating rectifier system of Figure 7.13, incorporates damping loops that originate from the regulator output rather than from the excitation voltage [39] since, being brushless, the excitation voltage is not available to feed back. The IEEE description of this system is shown in Figure 7.64, where the damping feedback loop is seen to be different from that of Figure 7.61. Note that two time constants one of which approximates appear in the damping loop of this new system, r F , and rF2,

function

'REF

V.

Fig. 7.64 Type 2 excitation system representation-rotating printed from IEEE Trans., vol. PAS-87, 1968.)

rectifier system before 1967. (m IEEE. Re-

298

Chapter 7

If: A > 1 , V B ' o

Fig. 7.66 Type 3 excitation system representation-static with terminal potential and current supplies. (a IEEE. Reprinted from I Trans.. vol. PAS-87, 1968.)

Vc represents the self-excitation from the generator terminals. Constants K, and K, are proportionality factors indicating the proportion of the "Thevenin voltage," V , , due to potential and current information. Multiplying V , , is a signal proportional to I,, which accounts for variation of self-excitation with change in the angular relation of field current (IF) and self-excitation voltage ( V T H[)151. Obviously, systems of this type are nonlinear. To formulate a linearized state-space representation, we may write the self-excitation components as
Vc = Kl V,

+ K21, + K,IF

(7.100)

Then we write for the entire system


VB =

v, Vc KFE,s/(I

+ 7p~)

EFD= VB/(K.E 7 . ~ ~ 1 VR +
=

KRy/(I

[KA/(1 +

TAs)]

V,
(7.101)

TRS)

But we m a y write the terminal voltage in the time domain as


1

(7.102)

where for brevity we let u, be the term on the right. Also, for the terminal current we may write
i,
=

Mdid

+ Mqi, =

MdXl 4-

MqXq

(7.103)

If we define the states as in (7.68), we reduce (7.101)-(7.103) to the following form:

(7.104)

Note that u,, i,, and i , are all linear functions of xI-x,.

Excitation Systems

299

Fig. 7.67 Type 4 excitation system representation---noncontinuously setting regulator. Note: and VRmax;time constant of rheostat travel = T R H . between VR,,,~

VRH

limited

7.9.5

Type 4 system-noncontinuous

acting

The previous systems are similar in the sense that they are all continuous acting with relatively high gain and are usually fast acting. However, a great many systems are of an earlier design similar to the rheostatic system of Section 7.7.1 and are noncontinuous acting; i.e., they have dead zones in which the system operates essentially open loop. In addition to this, they are generally characterized as slow due to friction and inertia of moving parts. Type 4 systems (e.g., Westinghouse BJ30 or General Electric GFA4 regulated systems) often have two speeds of operation depending upon the magnitude of the voltage error. Thus a large-error voltage may cause several rheostat segments to be shorted out, while a small-error voltage will cause the segments to be shorted one at a time. The computer representation of a system is illustrated in Figure 7.67, where K , is the raise-lower contact setting, typically set at 5%, that controls the fast-change mechanism on the rheostat. If V, is below this limiting value of K,, the rheostat setting is changed by motor action with an integrating time constant of 7 R H . An auctioneer circuit sets the output V , to the higher of the two input quantities. Because the Type 4 system is so nonlinear, there is no advantage in representing it in state variable form. The equations for the Type 4 system are similar to those derived for the electromechanical system of Section 7.7.1. A comparison of these two systems is recommended.
7.10 Typical System Constants

Reference [ 151 gives, in addition to the system representations, a table of typical constants of physical systems. These data are given in Table 7. I I and, although typical, do not necessarily represent any physical system accurately. For any real system all quantities should be obtained from the manufacturer. Also note that the values in Table 7.1 1 are for a system with a response ratio of 0.5 which, although common, is certainly not fast by todays standards. The RR of modern fast systems are often in the range of 2.0-3.5. and VRmin given in Table 7.1 1 are unity in column I Note that the values of VRmax and higher values in columns 2 and 3. This difference is due to the different choice of base voltage for V , by the different exciter manufacturers and does not necessarily imply any marked difference in the regulator ceilings or performance. Changing the affects all the other constants in the forward loop. Therebase voltage of V , to VRmal

300
Table 7.11.

Chapter 7

Typical Constants of Excitation Systems in Operation on 3600 r/min Steam Turbine Generators (excitation system voltage response ratio = 0.5)
Self-excited exciters, commutator, or silicon diode with amplidyne voltage regulators
(1)

Symbol

Self-excited commutator exciter with Mag-A-Stat voltage regulator (2)

Rotating rectifier exciter with static voltage regulator


(3)

TR
KA
TA

0.0-0.06 25-SO* 0.06-0.20


1 .o - 1.0

0.0 400
0.05

'mx Ra 'm Rm
KF
TF

KE
TE SErnax

S E 75max

0 0 -0.08 .1 0.35- .O I -0.05 0.5 0.267 0.074

3.5 -3.5 0.04


1 .o

0.0 400 0.02 7.3 -7.3 0.03


1 .o 1 .o

-0.I7 0.95 0.95 0.22

0.80 0.86 0.50

*For generators with open circuit field time constants greater than 4 s.

fore, caution must be used in comparing gains, time constants, and limits for systems of different manufacture. As experience has accumulated in excitation system modeling, the manufacturer and utility engineers have determined excitation system parameters for many existing units. Since these constants are specified on a normalized basis, they can often be used with reasonable confidence on other simulations where data is unavailable. Tables 7.12-7. I5 give examples of excitation system parameters that can be used for estimating new systems or for cases where exact data is unavailable. Since the formation of the National Electric Reliability Council (NERC) a set of deTable 7.12.
Symbol

Westinghouse Excitation System Constants for System Studies (excitation system voltage response ratio = 0.5)
Mag-A-Stat Rotating-rectifier
BJ30 Rototrol

Silverstat

TRA

Excitation system type


TR

I
0.0

(s)

KA
TA

(s)
(Pu)* (Pu)*

EFDrnax
EFDmin

KE
KF T F (SI

0.0 400 0.05 4.5 -4.5 -0.17 0.04

400 0.02 3.9


I .o

K"
TRH

... ...
(Pu)* (Pu)*

1 .o

0.03 I .o

... ...

0.05 200 0.25 4.28 4.5 1.70 -4.5 1.0 -0.17 ... 0.105 ... 1.25 0.05 ... 20 ...
8.3 3.5 1 7 -3.5 . 0.95 0.95 0.22 0.22 0.76 0.85

... ... ...

0.02 200 0.I 4.5 0.3 -0.I 7 0.028 0.5

0.05 400
0.0

... ...

4.5 0.2 -0.I7 0.028 0.5

...
...

3600 r/min I800 r/min


'a Rx m

'i Rn m sErnax SE.lSmax 7E (s)

3.5 -3.5 0.95 0.22 0.95

1.3

-7.3 0.86 0.50 0.8

8.2 -8.2
11 .0

0.50 1.30

3.5 0.3 0.95 0.22 0.50

3.5 0.2 0.95 0.22 0.50

Source: Used with permission from Stability Program Data Preparation Manual, Advanced Systems Technology Rept. 70-736, Dec. 1972, 8 ABB Power T & D Company Inc., 1992. *Values given assume up (full load) = 3.0 pu. If not, multiply * values by ud3.0.

Excitation Systems
Table 7.13. Typical Excitation System Constants
Type of regulator
TR KA TA .ma, Rmin KF/TF
TF

301

Mag-A-Stat (Type 1) SCPT (Type 3) BJ30 (Type4) Rototrol (Type I ) Silverstat (Type I) TRA (Type I ) G FA4 (Type4) NAlOl (Type I ) Amplidyne N A 108 (Type 1 ) Amplidyne N A 143 (Type 1) Amplidyne < 5 k W NA143 (Type I ) Amplidyne > 5 kW Brushless (Type 2)
3600 r/rnin

0 0 20.0 0.05 0 0 0.05


0.06

400 120 0.05 200 200 400 20

0.05t 0.15 0 0.25 0.10

o.ost
0
0.2 0.2

3.5 I .2 8.3 3.5 3.5 3.5

I .o
I .o

-3.5 -1.2 1.8 -3.5 -0.05 -0.04 0 -1.0 -1.0

0.04 0.21 T&&

I .o
rj0/ 10.0 0
1.25 0.5 0.45 1 .o 0.35

0
0.084 0.056 0.056 0
I I .~SE/KA
rE/ KA
4TE/ K A 87E/KA

*
*

0 0 0 0 0

I .o

I .o
I.o
1 .o

* *
400 400

0.2
0.06
0.02 0.02

I .o
1 .o
7.3 8.2

-1.0
- 1.0
-7.8 -8.2

0.03

I .o
I .o

Brushless (Type 2) 1800 r / m i n

0.03

Source: Used bv . . . permission from Power System Stability Program Users Guide. Philadelphia Electric Co., 1971. *Data obtained from curves supplied by manufacturer. For typical values see Appendix D and Table
7.15.

tHigh-speed contact setting, if known.

sign criteria has been established specifying the conditions under which power systems must be proven stable. This has caused an enlarged interest and concern in the accuracy of modeling all system components, particularly the generators, governors, exciters, and loads. Thus it is becoming common for the manufacturer to specify the exciter model to be used in system studies and to provide accurate gains and time constants for the system purchased.
Table 7.14. Typical Excitation System Constants
Type of regulator KE -0.17
A EX
BEX

Mag-A-Stat (Type I SCPT* (Type 3) BJ30 (Type 4) Rototrol (Type I ) Silverstat (Type I ) T R A (Type 1) GFA4 (Type 4) Brushless (Type 2)
3600 r/min

I .o I .o

-0.17 -0.17 -0.17

0.05lt
1 .o

0.95 0.05 0.76 0.85 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.8 1.3

0.0039 0 0.0052 0.0039 0.0039 0.0039 0.00105 0.12 0.059

1.555

0
1.555 1.555 1.555 1.555 I .465 0.855

Brushless (Type 2)
1800 r / m i n

I .o

1.1

Source: Used by permission from Power System Stability Program Users Guide, Philadelphia Electric Co., 1971.
* K p = 1.19 K,= 1.19 -sin(cos-Fp)
Emax =

ap] [
study M V A base generator MVA base

~.~EFDFL

?High-speed contact setting, if known.

302
Chapter 7

.-

E .-

a2

0 C

Fig. 7.68 Full model generator response of lo"(, step increase in T,,, and
0

&FD.

Initial loading of Example 5.1. with no exciter and no generator saturation.

t "/\

, Fig. 7.69 Full model generator response to 10% step increase in T,,, and 5% step increase in V R E Fwith initial loading of Example 5.1. Exciter parameters (Westinghouse Brushless): KA - 400, sA = 0.02, K E = 1.0, TE = 0.8, KF = 0.03, TF = 1.0, KR = 1.0, T R = 0.0, V,,,, = 7.3, V R = ~ ~ ~ -7.3, = 3.93; no gen-. eratm o exciter saturation. r

304

Chapter 7

Table 7.15. Typical Excitation System Constants for Exciters with Amplidyne Voltage Regulators ( N A I O I , NA108, NA143)

0.5 I .o

-0.0445
-0.0333

0.5

1.5 2.0

-0.0240 -0.0171

0.25
0.1428

20~;0/3 IO~io/3

25 25

2OT;o

10~20

0.0833

25~;,/l3 25~;0/22

25
25

50 50 17~;~0/3 50 50 10~;0/3

0.0016 0.0058 0.0093 0.0108

1.465 1.06 0.898 0.79

Source: Used by permission from Power Sysrem Sra6ilir.v Program User's Guide. Philadelphia Electric Co.. 1971. * F o r a l l N A l O l . N A 1 0 8 . a n d N A 1 4 3 5 k W orless. tFor NA143 over 5 k W . $See (7.90).

7.1 1

The Effect of Excitation on Generator Performance

Using the models of excitation systems presented in this chapter and the full model of the generator developed in Chapters 4 and 5, we can construct a computer simulation of a generator with an excitation system. The results of this simulation are interesting and instructive and demonstrate clearly the effect of excitation on system perform ance. For the purpose of illustration, a Type 1 excitation system similar to Figure 7.61, has been added to the generator analog simulation of Figure 5.18. Appropriate switching is arranged so the simulation can be operated with the exciter active or with constant EFD. The results are shown in Figure 7.68 for constant EFDand Figure 7.69 with the exciter operative. The exciter modeled for this illustration is similar to the Westinghouse Brushless exciter. Both Figures 7.68 and 7.69 show the response of the system to a 10% step increase in T,, beginning with the full-load condition of Example 5.1. For the generator with no exciter, this torque increase causes a monotone decay in both A, and V; and an increase in 6 that will eventually cause the generator to pull out of step. This increase in 6 is most clearly shown in the phase plane plot. Adding the excitation system, as shown in Figure 7.69, improves the system response dramatically. Note that the exciter holds AF and V; nearly constant when T, is changed. As a result, 6 is increased to its new operating level in a damped oscillatory manner. The phase plane plot shows a stable focus at the new 6. Following the increase in torque the system is subjected to an increase in EFD. This is accomplished by switching the unregulated machine E F D from 100% to 110% of the Example 5.1 level. I n the regulated machine a 5% step increase in VREFis made. The results are roughly the same with increases noted in A, and V,, and with a decrease in 6 to just below the initial value. We conclude that for the load change observed, the exciter has a stabilizing influence due to its ability to hold the flux linkages and voltage nearly constant. This causes the change in 6 to be more stable. In Chapter 8 we will consider further the effects of excitation on stability, both in the transient and dynamic modes of operation. Problems
7.1
Consider thegenerator of Figure 7.2 as analyzed in Example 7.1. Repeat Example 7.1 but assume that the machine is located at a remote location so that the terminal voltage 4 increases roughly in proportion to Eg. Assume, however, that the output power is held constant by the governor.

Excitation Systems 7.2

305

7.3 7.4 7.5


1.6

7.1

Consider the generator of Example 7.1 connected in parallel with an infinite bus and operating with constant excitation. By means of a phasor diagram analyze the change in 6, I, and 8 when the governor setting is changed to increase the power output by 20%. Note particularly the change in 6 in both direction and magnitude. Following the change described in Problem 7.2, what action would be required, and in what amount, to restore the power factor to its original value? Repeat Example 7.1 except that instead of increasing the excitation, decrease Ex to a magnitude less than that of V,. Observe the new values of 6 and 8 and, in particular, the change i n 6 and 8. Comparing results of Example 7.1 and Problems 7.1-7.4, can you make any general statement regarding the sensitivity of 6 and 8 to changes in P and ER? Establish a line of reasoning to show that a heavily cumulative compounded exciter is not desirable. Assume linear variations where necessary to establish your arguments. Consider the separately excited exciter E shown in Figure P7.7. The initial current in the generator field is p when the exciter voltage uF = ko. At time t = a a step function in the voltage uF is introduced; Le., uF = k , + k , u(f - a).

+p-LqLF
Fig. P7.7

1.8

ComDute the current i F . Sketch this result for the cases where the time constant both very large and Lery small. Plot the current function i n the s plane. Consider the exciter shown in Figure P7.8, where the main exciter M is excited by a pilot exciter P such that the relation uF = k'wc z ki, holds. What assumptions must be made for the above relation to be approximately valid? Compute the current i2 due to a step change in the pilot exciter voltage, i.e., for up = u ( t ) .
L f / r F is

7.9

A solenoid is to be used as the sensing and amplification mechanism for a crude voltage regulator. The system is shown in Figure P7.9. Discuss the operation of this device and comment on the feasibility of the proposed design. Write the differential equations that describe the system.

Fig. P7.9

306
7.10

Chapter 7
A n exciter for an ac generator, instead of being driven from the turbine-generator shaft. is driven by a separate motor with a large flywheel. Consider the motor to have a constant output torque and write the equations for this system. Analyze the system given in Figure P7.1 I to determine the effectiveness of the damping transformer in stabilizing the system to sudden changes. Write the equations for this system and show that, with parameters carefully selected, a degree of stabilization is achieved, particularly for large values of R,. Assume no load on the exciter.

7.1 I

7.12

The separately excited exciter shown in Figure P7. I2 has a magnetization curve as given in Table 7.3. Other constants of interest are N = 2500 UP = 125V u = 1.2 R = 8 s2 in field winding k = 12,000 uF = 120 V (rated)

6 +--+ 2
Fig. P7. I 2

(a) Determine the buildup curve beginning at rated voltage; Le.. uFI = 120 V. What are the initial and final values of resistance in the field circuit? (b) What is the main exciter response ratio? 7.13 Given the same exciter of Problem 7.12, consider a self-excited connection with an amplidyne boost-buck regulation system that quickly goes to its saturation voltage of +IO0 V following a command from the voltage regulator. I f this forcing voltage is held constant, compute the buildup. Assume uF1 = 40 V, uF2 = 180 V. 7.14 Assume that the constants r A , r E , r,, K,, K,, and KA are the same as in Example 7.7. Let r R take the values of 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1. Find the effect of rR on the branch of the root locus near the imaginary axis.

Excitation Systems

307

7.15 Repeat Problem 7.14 with rR = 0.05 a n d f a r values of 7 = 0.05 a n d 0.2. 7.16 Obtain the loci of the roots for the polynomial of (7.63) for T~ = 0.3 and for values of KF between 0.02 a n d 0. IO. 7.17 Obtain (or sketch) a root-locus plot for the system of Example 7.8 for K, = 0.05 and
7F =

0.3.

7.18 Complete the analog computer simulation of the system of one machine connected to a n infinite bus (given in Chapter 5) by adding the simulation of the excitation system. Use a Type 1 exciter. Also include the e r e c t of saturation in the simulation. 7.19 For the excitation system described in Example 7.9 and for the machine model and operating conditions described in Example 6.6. obtain the A matrix of the system and find the
7.20 eigenvalues. Repeat Problem 7.19 for the conditions of Example 6.7. Repeat Example 7.9 for the operating condition of Example 6.1. Repeat Example 7.9 (with the same operating condition) using a Type 2 excitation system. D a t a for the excitation system is given in Table 7.1 I . Show how the choice of base voltage for the voltage regulator output VR affects other constants i n the forward loop. Assume the usual bases for a n d E,.

7.2 I
7.22 7.23

References
Generator excitation systems and power system performance. Paper 3 I CP 67-536, presented at the IEEE Summer Power Meeting, Portland, Oreg.. 1967. 2. Westinghouse Electric Corp. Elecfrical Transniission and Distribution Re/erence Book. Pittsburgh, Pa., 1950. 3. IEEE Committee Report. Proposed excitation system definitions for synchronous machines. I E E E Trans. PAS-88: 1248-58, 1969. 4. Chambers, G. S.. Rubenstein. A . S., and Temoshok. M. Recent developments in amplidyne regulator excitation systems for large generators. A I E E Trans. PAS-80: 1066--72,1961. 5 . Alexanderson. E. F. W..Edwards, M . A., and Bowman, K. K. The amplidyne generator-A dynamoelectric amplifier for power control. General Electric Rev. 43: 104-6. 1940. 6. Bobo, P. 0.. Carlson. J . T.. and Horton. J. F. A new regulator and excitation system. I E E E Trans. PAS-72:175-83. 1953. 7. Barnes. H . C., Oliver, J. A., Rubenstein. A. S.. and Temoshok. M. Alternator-rectifier exciter for Cardinal Plant. I E E E Trans. PAS-87:I 189-98. 1968. 8. Whitney, E. C.. Hoover, D. B.. and Bobo. P. 0. A n electric utility brushless excitation system. A I E E Trans. PAS-78:1821-24. 1959. 9. Myers. E. H.. and Bobo. P. 0. Brushless excitation system. Proc. Southwest I E E E Con/: (SWIEEECO). 1966. IO. Myers, E. H. Rotating rectifier exciters for large turbine-driven ac generators. Proc. Am. Power Con/:. Vol. 27, Chicago, 1965. I I . Rubenstein, A. S., and Temoshok. M. E_xcitationsystems-DesigFs and practices in the United States. Presented at Association des IngCnieurs Electriciens de Ilnstitute Electrotechnique Montefiore. A.I.M., Liege, Belgium, 1966. 12. Domeratzky. L. M., Rubenstein, A . S., and Temoshok, M . A static excitation system for industrial and utility steam turbine-generators. A I E E Trans. PAS-80 1072--77,1961 13. Lane, L. J., Rogers, D. F., and Vance, P. A. Design and tests of a static excitation system for indus1961. trial and utility steam turbine-generators. A I E E Trans. PAS-80 1077.~85. 14. Lee. C. H., and Kedy. F. W. A new excitation system and a method of analyzing voltage response. I E E E Int. Conv. Rec. 125- 14, 1964. 15. IEEE Committee Report. Computer representation of excitation systems. I E E E Trans. PAS-87: 1460-64, 1968. 16. Kimbark, E. W. Power S.v.sfein Stability, Vol. 3. Wiley. New York, 1956. 17. Cornelius. H. A., Cawson. W. F.. and Cory, H. W. Experience with automatic voltage regulation on a 115-megawatt turbogenerator. A I E E Trans. PAS-II:184-87. 1952. 18. Dandeno. P. L., and McClymont. K. R. Excitation system response: A utility viewpoint. A I E E Trans. PAS-76: 1497-1501, 1957. 19. Temoshok, M.. and Rothe. F. S. Excitation voltage response definitions and significance in power systems. A I E E Trans. PAS-76:1491-96. 1957. 20. Rudenberg, R. Transienf Performance o/ Electric Power Systems: Phenomena in Lumped Networks. McGraw-Hill, New York. 1950. (MIT Press. Cambridge, Mass., 1967). 21. Takahashi. J., Rabins. M . J.. and Auslander, D. M. Control and Dynamic S-vstems. Addison-Wesley, Reading, Mass., 1970.
I. Concordia, C.. and Temoshok. M .

308

Chapter 7

22. Brown, R. G . . and Nilsson, J. W. Inrroducrion to Linear Systents Analysis. Wiley, New York, 1962. 23. Savant, C. J.. J r . Basic Feedback Control Sysrennl Design. McGraw-Hill, New York, 1958. 24. Hunter. W. A.. and Temoshok, M. Development of a modern amplidyne voltage regulator for large turbine generators. A I E E Trans. PAS-71:894 -900, 1952. 25. Porter, F. M., and Kinghorn, J . H. The development of modern excitation systems for synchronous condensers and generators. A I E E Trans. PAS-65: 1070-27, 1946. 26. Concordia, C. Effect of boost-buck voltage regulator on steady-state power limit. A I E E Trun.s. PAS691380-84, 1950. 27. McClure, J. 8.. Whittlesley. S. I.. and Hartman, M. E. Modern excitation systems for large synchronous machines. A I E E Trans. PAS-65:939-45, 1946. 28. General Electric Co. Amplidyne regulator excitation systems for large generators. Bull. GET-2980, 1966. 29. Harder. E. L., and Valentine, C. E. Static voltage regulator for Rototrol exciter. Elecrr. Eng. 64: 601. 1945. 30. Kallenback. G. K.. Rothe, F. S., Storm. H. F.. and Dandeno, P. L. Performance of new magnetic amplifier type voltage regulator for large hydroelectric generators. A I E E Trans. PAS-7 1:201-6, 1952. 31. Hand, E. W., McClure. F. N., Bobo. P. 0.. Carleton, J. T. Magamp regulator tests and operatand ing experience on West Penn Power System. A I E E Trans. PAS-73:486-91,1954. 32. Carleton. J. T.. and Horton. W. F. The figure of merit of magnetic amplifiers. A I E E Trans. PAS71~239-45,1952. 33. Ogle, H. M. The amplistat and its applications. Genewl Electric Rev. Pt. I. Feb.: Pt. 2, Aug.; Pt. 3. Oct., 1950. 34. Hanna, C. R., Oplinger. K. A., and Valentine, C. E. Recent developments in generator voltage regulation. A I E E Trans. 58:838-44. 1939. 35. Dahl. 0 . G. C. Elerrric Power Circuits. Theoryand Application. Vol. 2. McGraw-Hill, New York, 1938. 36. Kimbark, E. W. Power Sysreni Stability. Vol. I . Elentents of Srability Calculations. Wiley. New York, 1948. 37. Kron. G. Regulating system for dynamoelectric machines. Patent No. 2,692,967, U.S. Patent Office, 1954. 38. Oyetunji. A. A. Effects of system nonlinearities on synchronous machine control. Unpubl. Ph.D. thesis. Research Rept. ERI-71130. Iowa State Univ., Ames. 1971. 39. Ferguson. R. W., Herbst, R., and Miller. R . W. Analytical studies of the brushless excitation system. A I E E Trans. PAS-78:1815-21, 1959. 40. Westinghouse Electric Corp. Stability program data preparation manual. Advanced Systems Technology Rept. 70-736, 1972. 41. Lane. L. J.. Mendel. J. E., Ewart, D. N.. Crenshaw. M. L., and Todd, J . M. A static excitation system for steam turbine generators. Paper CP 65-208, presented at the IEEE Winter Power Meeting, New York. 1965. 42. Philadelphia Electric Co. Power system stability program. Power System Planning Div., Users Guide U6004-2. 1971.

chapter

The Effect of Excitation on Stability

8.1

Introduction

Considerable attention has been given in the literature to the excitation system and its role in improving power system stability. Early investigators realized that the socalled steady-state power limits of power networks could be increased by using the then available high-gain continuous-acting voltage regulators [ I ] . It was also recognized that the voltage regulator gain requirement was different at no-load conditions from that needed for good performance under load. In the early 1950s engineers became aware of the instabilities introduced by the (then) modern voltage regulators, and stabilizing feedback circuits came into common use (21. In the 1960s large interconnected systems experienced growing oscillations that disrupted parallel operation of large systems [3-121. It was discovered that the inherently weak natural damping of large and weakly coupled systems was the main cause and that situations of negative damping were further aggravated by the regulator gain [ 13). Engineers learned that the system damping could be enhanced by artificial signals introduced through the excitation system. This scheme has been very successful in combating growing oscillation problems experienced in the power systems of North America. The success of excitation control in improving power system dynamic performance in certain situations has led to greater expectations among power system engineers as to the capability of such control Because of the small effective time constants in the excitation system control loop, it was assumed that a large control effort could be expended through excitation control with a relatively small input of control energy. While basically sound, this control is limited in its effectiveness. A part of the engineers job, then, is to determine this limit, i.e., to find the exciter design and control parameters that can provide good performance at reasonable cost [ 141. The subject of excitation control is further complicated by a conflict in control requirements in the period following the initiation of a transient. In the first few cycles these requirements may be significantly different from those needed over a few seconds. Furthermore, it has been shown that the best control effort in the shorter period may tend to cause instability later. This suggests the separation of the excitation control studies into two distinct problems, the transient (short-term) problem and the dynamic (long-term) problem. It should be noted that this terminology is not universally used. Some authors call the dynamic stability problem by the ambiguous name of steadystate stability. Other variations are found in the literature, but usually the two problems are treated separately as noted.
309

310

Chapter 8
8.1.1
Transient stability and dynamic stability considerations

In transient stability the machine is subjected to a large impact, usually a fault, which is maintained for a short time and causes a significant reduction in the machine terminal voltage and the ability to transfer synchronizing power. If we consider the one machine-infinite bus problem, the usual approximation for the power transfer is given by

(V,V,/x)sinb

(8.1)

where V, is the machine terminal voltage and V , is the infinite bus voltage. Note that if V, is reduced, P is reduced by a corresponding amount. Prevention of this reduction in P requires very fast action by the excitation system in forcing the field to ceiling and thereby holding V , at a reasonable value. Indeed, the most beneficial attributes the voltage regulator can have for this situation is speed and a high ceiling voltage, thus improving the chances of holding V , at the needed level. Also, when the fault is removed and the reactance x of (8.1) is increased due to switching, another fast change in excitation is required. These violent changes affect the machines ability to release the power it is receiving from the turbine. These changes are effectively controlled by very fast excitation changes. The dynamic stability problem is different from the transient problem in several ways, and the requirements on the excitation system are also different. By dynamic stability we mean the ability of all machines in the system to adjust to small load changes or impacts. Consider a multimachine system feeding a constant load (a condition never met in practice). Let us assume that at a given instant the load is changed by a small amount, say by the energizing of a very large motor somewhere in the system. Assume further that this change in load is just large enough to be recognized as such by a certain group of machines we will call the control group. The machines nearest the load electrically will see the largest change, and those farther away will experience smaller and smaller changes until the change is not perceptible at all beyond the boundary of the control group. Now how will this load change manifest itself at the several machines in the control group? Since it is a load increase, there is an immediate increase in the output power requirements from each of the machines. Since step changes in power to turbines are not possible, this increased power requirement will come first from stored energy in the control group of machines. Thus energy stored in the magnetic field of the machines is released, then somewhat later, rotating energy [( 1/2)mu2]is used to supply the load requirements until the governors have a chance to adjust the power input to the various generators. Let us examine the behavior of the machines in the time interval prior to the governor action. This interval may be on the order of 1 s. In this time period the changes in machine voltages, currents, and speeds will be different for each machine in the control group because of differences in unit size, design, and electrical location with respect to the load. Thus each unit responds by contributing its share of the load increase, with its share being dictated by the impedance it sees at its terminals (its Thevenin impedance) and the size of the unit. Each unit has its own natural frequency of response and will oscillate for a time until damping forces can decay these oscillations. Thus the one change in load, a step change, sets up all kinds of oscillatory responses and the system rings for a time with many frequencies present, these induced changes causing their own interaction with neighboring machines (see Section 3.6).

Effect of Excitation o n Stability

31 1

Now visualize the excitation system in this situation. In the older electromechanical systems there was a substantial deadband in the voltage regulator, and unless the generator was relatively close to the load change, the excitation of these machines would remain unchanged. The machines closer to the load change would recognize a need for increased excitation and this would be accomplished, although somewhat slowly. Newer excitation systems present a different kind of problem. These systems recognize the change in load immediately, either as a perceptible change in terminal voltage, terminal current, or both. Thus each oscillation of the unit causes the excitation system to t r y to correct accordingly, since as the speed voltage changes, the terminal voltage also changes. Moreover, the oscillating control group machines react with one another, and each action or reaction is accompanied by an excitation change. The excitation system has one major handicap to overcome in following these system oscillations: this is the effective time constant of the main exciter field which is on the order of a few seconds or so. Thus from the time of recognition of a desired excitation change until its partial fulfillment, there is an unavoidable delay. During this delay time the state of the oscillating system will change, causing a new excitation adjustment to be made. This system lag then is a detriment to stable operation, and several investigators have shown examples wherein systems are less oscillatory with the voltage regulators turned off than with them operating [7, 121. Our approach to this problem must obviously depend upon the type of impact under consideration. For the large impact, such as a fault, we are concerned with maximum forcing of the field, and we examine the response in building up from normal excitation to ceiling excitation. This is a nonlinear problem, as we have seen, and the shape of the magnetization curve cannot be neglected. The small impact or dynamic stability problem is different. Here we are concerned with small excursions from normal operation, and linearization about this normal or quiescent point is possible and desirable. Having done this, we may study the response using the tools of linear systems analysis; in this way not only can we analyze but possibly compensate the system for better damping and perhaps faster response.
8.2
Effect of Excitation on Generator Power limits

We begin with a simple example, the purpose of which is to show that the excitation system can have an effect upon stability.

Example 8.1 Consider the two-machine system of Figure 8.1, where we consider one machine against an infinite bus. (This problem was introduced and analyzed by Concordia [ 11.) The power output of the machine is given by P 6
=
=

[EIEz/(XI 6 + 62 1

+ X2)] 6 sin

Fig. 8.1

One machine-infinite bus system.

31 2

Chapter 8

Fig. 8.2 Phasor diagram for Example 8.1.

This equation applies whether or not there is a voltage regulator. Determine the effect of excitation on this equation. Solution We now establish the boundary conditions for the problem. First we assume that XI = X 2 = 1.0 pu and that V, = 1 .O pu. Then for any given load the voltages E , and E2must assume a certain value to hold at 1.0 pu. If the power factor is unity, E, and E2 have the same magnitude as shown in the phasor diagram of Figure 8.2. If E, and E2 are held constant at these values, the power transferred to the infinite bus varies sinusoidally according to (8.2) and has a maximum when 6 is 90". Now assume that E, and E2are both subject to perfect regulator action and that the key to this action is that V, is to be held at 1.0 pu and the power factor is to be held at unity. We write in phasor notation

E,

+ jf

dmej*/z

E2 = I - jf

= dme-j6/2

Adding these equations we have

E,

+ E2 = 2 = 2

r n C O S 6 / 2

I I

I I I I

I
Angle 6, degrees

Fig. 8.3 Comparison of power transferred at unity power factor with and without excitation control.

Effect of Excitation on Stability

313

or
El

= E2 =

I cos 612

(8.3)

Substituting (8.3) into (8.2) and simplifying, we have for the perfect regulator, at unity power factor,

tan612

(8.4)

The result is plotted in Figure 8.3 along with the same result for the case of constant (unregulated) E l and E 2 . In deriving (8.4), we have tacitly assumed that the regulators acting upon E l and E 2 do so instantaneously and continuously. The result is interesting for several reasons. First, we observe that with this ideal regulation there is no stability limit. Second, it is indicated that operation in the region where d > 90" is possible. We should comment that the assumed physical system is not realizable since there is always a lag in the excitation response even if the voltage regulator is ideal. Also, excitation control of the infinite bus voltage is not a practical consideration, as this remote bus is probably not infinite and may not be closely regulated.

Example 8.2

Consider the more practical problem of holding the voltage E2 constant at I .O pu and letting the power factor vary, other things being the same. Solution Under this condition we have the phasor diagram of Figure 8.4 where we note that the locus of E2 is the dashed circular arc of radius 1.0. Note that the power factor is constrained by the relation

e,

a2/2

(8.5)

where 8, = IT - 8 and 6 = 6, 6,. Writing phasor equations for the voltages, we have

Fig. 8.4 Phasor diagram for Example 8.2.

314

Chapter 8

Toque Angle,

4,

degrees

Fig. 8.5

System parameters as a function of 6 2 .

El = I + jT = I - [sine + j l c o s e = ~ , e ' " E2 = 1 - j r = I + Isin6 - jfc o s e = E2e-jb2 (8.6) where 6, el, A I , and a2 are all measured positive as counterclockwise. Noting that E2 =
1, we can establish that

I
sin 6

= =

2sin0, 2sin6,

E , sin6

= =

2sinJ2 sinb2/(2 - cos&)

03-71 Thus once we establish J2. we also fix 0, I, 6, and 6 , , although the relationships among these variables are nonlinear. These results are plotted in Figure 8.5 where equations (8.7) are used to determine the plotted values. We also note that
tan6,

V,~COS~
=

(8.8) sin a2 or
(8.9)

but from the second of equations (8.6) we can establish that I cos 8

sin&

so 62 also establishes P. Thus P does have a maximum in this case, and this occurs when 62 = 90" (E' pointing straight down in Figure 8.4). In this case we have at
maximum power

E, e

+ jl

2.235/26.6"

1.414

= -450

6 = 116.6"

The important thing to note is that P is again limited, but we see that 6 may go

Effect of Excitation o n Stability

315

90
Torque Angle

180

b, degrees

Fig. 8.6

Variation of

P with 6.

beyond 90" to achieve maximum power and that this requires over 2 pu E , . The variation of P with 6 is shown in Figure 8.6. These simple examples show the effect of excitation under certain ideal situations. Obviously, these ideal conditions will not be realized in practice. However, they provide limiting values of the effect of excitation on changing the effective systey parameters. A power system is nearly a constant voltage system and is made so because of system component design and close voltage control. This means that the Thevenin impedance seen looking into the source is very small. Fast excitation helps keep this impedance small during disturbances and contributes to system stability by allowing the required transfer of power even during disturbances. Finally, it should be stated that while the ability of exciters to accomplish this task is limited, other considerations make it undesirable to achieve perfect control and zero Thevenin impedance. Among these is the fault-interrupting capability.

8 3 Effect of the Excitation System on Transient Stability . In the transient stability problem the performance of the power system when subjected to severe impacts is studied. The concern is whether the system is able to maintain synchronism during and following these disturbances. The period of interest is relatively short (at most a few seconds), with the first swing being of primary importance. In this period the generator is suddenly subjected to an appreciable change in its output power causing its rotor to accelerate (or decelerate) at a rate large enough to threaten loss of synchronism. The important factors influencing the outcome are the machine behavior and the power network dynamic relations. For the sake of this discussion it is assumed that the power supplied by the prime movers does not change in the period of interest. Therefore the effect of excitation control on this type of transient depends upon its ability to help the generator maintain its output power in the period of interest. To place the problem in the proper perspective, we should review the main factors that affect the performance during severe transients. These are:
1. The disturbing influence of the impact. This includes the type of disturbance, its location, and its duration. 2. The ability of the transmission system to maintain strong synchronizing forces during the transient initiated by a disturbance. 3. The turbine-generator parameters.

The above have traditionally been the main factors affecting the so-called first-swing transients. The system parameters influencing these factors are:

316

Chapter 8

1. The synchronous machine parameters. Of these the most important are: (a) the inertia constant, (b) the direct axis transient reactance, (c) the direct axis open circuit time constant, and (d) the ability of the excitation system to hold the flux level of the synchronous machine and increase the output power during the transient. 2. The transmission system impedances under normal, faulted, and postfault conditions. Here the flexibility of switching out faulted sections is important so that large transfer admittances between synchronous machines are maintained when the fault is isolated. 3. The protective relaying scheme and equipment. The objective is to detect faults and isolate faulted sections of the transmission network very quickly with minimum disruption.

8.3.1

The role of the excitation system in classical model studies

In the classical model it is assumed that the flux linking the main field winding remains constant during the transient. If the transient is initiated by a fault, the armature reaction tends to decrease this flux linkage [15]. This is particularly true for the generators electrically close to the location of the fault. The voltage regulator tends to force the excitation system to boost the flux level. Thus while the fault is on, the effect of the armature reaction and the action of the voltage regulator tend to counteract each other. These effects, along with the relatively long effective time constant of the main field winding, result in an almost constant flux linkage during the first swing of 1 s or less. (For the examples in Chapter 6 this time constant K37j0is about 2.0 s.) It is important to recognize what the above reasoning implies. First, it implies the presence of a voltage regulator that tends to hold the flux linkage level constant. Second, it is significant to note that the armature reaction effects are particularly pronounced during a fault since the reactive power output of the generator is large. Therefore the duration of the fault is important in determining whether a particular type of voltage regulator would be adequate to maintain constant flux linkage. A study reported by Crary [2] and discussed by Young [ 151 illustrates the above. The system studied consists of one machine connected to a larger system through a 200mile double circuit transmission line. The excitation system for the generator is Type 1 (see Chapter 7) with provision to change the parameters such that the response ratio (RR)varies from 0.10 to 3.0 pu. The former corresponds to a nearly constant field voltage condition. The latter would approximate the response of a modern fast excitation system. Data of the system used in the study are shown in Figure 8.7. A transient stability study was made for a three-phase fault near the generator. The sending end power limits versus the fault clearing time are shown in Figure 8.8 for different exciter responses (curves 1-5) and for the classical model (curve 6). From Figure 8.8 it appears that the classical model corresponds to a very slow and weak excitation system for very short fault clearing times, while for longer clearing times it approximates a rather fast excitation system. If the nature of the stability study is such that the fault clearing time is large, as in stuck breaker studies [IS], the actual power limits may be lower than those indicated when using the classical model. In another study of excitation system representation [ 161 the authors report (in a certain stability study they conducted) that a classical representation showed a certain generator to be stable, while detailed representation of the generator indicated that loss of synchronism resulted. The authors conclude that the dominant factor affecting loss

Effect of Excitation on Stability


Exciter

317

Fault

Generator: xd = 0.63 pu x = 0.42 P U Xd = 0.21 pu 7


T ~ O =

Regulating system:
Pz = 20

H = 5.0 s 5.0 s

P,,= 4 r, = 0.47 s E,,, = 2.25 PU E,i, = -0.30 PU

x, = 0.10 pu Line: x = 0.8 Il/mi/line r = 0.12 Q/mi/line y = 5.2 x mho/mi/line


System:
x = 0.2 pu , H = 50.0 s

System damping: Fault on


rdll Td12 Td21 rd22

Fault cleared
4

I
0 15

3 3 18

Fig. 8.7 Two-machine system with 200-mile transmission lines.

of synchronism is the inability of the excitation system of that generator, with response f ratio o 0.5, to offset the effects of armature reaction. 8 3 2 Increased reliance on excitation control to improve stability .. Trends in the design of power system components have resulted in lower stability margins. Contributing to this trend are the following:
I . Increased rating of generating units with lower inertia constants and higher pu reactances. 2. Large interconnected system operating practices with increased dependence on the transmission system to carry greater loading.
These trends have led to the increased reliance on the use of excitation control as a

-0

i*
.a a

::I\
1.05

Curve

r? e

RR
3.0 2.0

2
L 1.00 ?
-. 50 9

I 2 3
0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 Fault Clearing Time, I

0.10

4 5 6

0.042 s 0.17 s 0.68 s 2.70 s 11.0 s

I .o

0.25 0.10

Classical model

Fig. 8.8 Sending-end power versus fault clearing time for different excitation system responses.

318

Chapter 8

00 .

1.0
Time,
I

20 .

3.0

6)

lime, s
(C

Fig. 8.9 Results of excitation system studies on a western U.S. system: (a) One-line diagram with fault location, (b) frequency deviation comparison for a four-cycle fault, (c) frequency deviation comparison for a 9.6-cycle fault: A = 2.0 ANSI conventional excitation system; B = low time constant excitation system with rate feedback; C = low time constant excitation system without rate feedback. (@ IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Trans.. vol. PAS-90, Sept./Oct. 1971.)

means of improving stability [ 17). This has prompted significant technological advances in excitation systems. As an aid to transient stability, the desirable excitation system characteristics are a fast speed of response and a high ceiling voltage. With the help of fast transient forcing of excitation and the boost of internal machine flux, the electrical output of the machine may be increased during the first swing compared to the results obtainable with a slow exciter. This reduces the accelerating power and results in improved transient performance.

Effect of Excitation on Stability

319

Modern excitation systems can be effective in two ways: in reducing the severity of machine swings when subjected to large impacts by reducing the magnitude of the first swing and by ensuring that the subsequent swings are smaller than the first. The latter is an important consideration in present-day large interconnected power systems. Situations may be encountered where various modes of oscillations reinforce each other during later swings, which along with the inherent weak system damping can cause transient instability after the first swing. With proper compensation a modern excitation system can be very effective in correcting this type of problem. However, except for transient stability studies involving faults with long clearing times (or stuck breakers), the effect of the excitation system on the severity of the first swing is relatively small. That is, a very fast, high-response excitation system will usually reduce the first swing by only a few degrees or will increase the generator transient stability power limit (for a given fault) by a few percent. In a study reported by Perry et al. [I81 on part of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company system in northern California, the effect of the excitation system response on the system frequency deviation is studied when a three-phase fault occurs in the network (at the Diablo Canyon site on the Midway circuit adjacent to a 500-kV bus). Some of the results of that study are shown in Figure 8.9. A one-line diagram of the network is shown in Figure 8.9(a). The frequency deviations for 4-cycle and 9.6-cycle faults are shown in Figures 8.9(b) and 8.9(c) respectively. The comparison is made between a 2.0 response ratio excitation system (curve A ) , a modern, low time constant excitation with rate feedback (curve B) and without rate feedback (curve C). The results of this study support the points made above.

8.3.3 Parametric study Two recent studies [ 17,191 show the effect of the excitation system on first-swing transients. Figure 8.10 shows the system studied where one machine is connected to an infinite bus through a transformer and a transmission network. The synchronous machine data is given in Table 8. I . The transmission network has an equivalent transfer reactance A, as shown in
Table 8.1.
xd

Machine Data for the Studies of Reference [ 191


T;O T;O

= 1.72 pu

X; = = = = X : =

XE

0.45
0.33

PU

PU

= 7;o =
7p

6.3 s 0.033 s 0.43 S


0.033s

1.68 PU 0.59 pu 0.33 PU

=
=

4.0 s

Fig. 8.10 System representation used in a parametric study of the effect of excitation on transient stability. (e IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Trans.. vol. PAS-89, July/Aug. 1970.)

320

Chapter 8

Figure 8.10. A transient is initiated by a three-phase fault on the high-voltage side of the transformer. The fault is cleared in a specified time. After the fault is cleared, the transfer reactance X , is increased from x , b (the value before the fault) to X,, (its value after the fault is cleared). The machine initial operating conditions are summarized in Table 8.2.
Table 8.2. Prefault Operating Conditions, All Values in p u
0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.94 0.90 0.91 0.97 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.39 0.45 0.44 0.44

With the machine operating at approximately rated load and power factor, a threephase fault is applied at the high-voltage side of the step-up transformer for a given length of time. When the fault is cleared, the transmission system reactance is changed to the postfault reactance X,, and the simulation is run until it can be determined if the run is stable or unstable. This is repeated for different values of X , until the maximum value of X,,, is found where the system is marginally stable. Two different excitation system representations were used in the study:

1. A 0.5 pu response alternator-fed diode system shown in Figure 8.1 1. 2. A 3.0 pu response alternator-fed SCR system with high initial response shown in Figure 8.12. This system has a steady-state gain of 200 pu and a transient gain of 20 pu. An external stabilizer using a signal V , derived from the shaft speed is also used (see Section 8.7).

REF

1 -0.0445 + 0 . 5

I I

FD

I
1
0.16s
+ I

Fig. 8.1 I

Excitation block diagram for a 0.5 R R alternator-fed diode system. (c IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Trans.,VOI. PAS-89, July/Aug. 1970.)

From the data presented in [ 191, the effect of excitation on the first-swing transients is shown in Figure 8.13, where the critical clearing time is plotted against the , transmission line reactance for the case where X = X , b and for the two different types of excitation system used. The critical clearing time is used as a measure of relative stability for the system under the impact of the given fault. Figure 8.13 shows that for the conditions considered in this study a change in exciter response ratio from 0.5 to 3.0 resulted in a gain of approximately one cycle in critical clearing time.

Effect of Excitation on Stability


"REF

321
t . pu 49

Fig. 8.12 Excitation block diagram for a 3.0 RR alternator-fed SCR excitation system. printed from IEEE Trans., vol. PAS-89, July/Aug. 1970.)

(@

IEEE. Re-

8.3.4

Reactive power demand during system emergencies

A situation frequently encountered during system emergencies is a high reactive power demand. The capability of modern generators to meet this demand is reduced by the tendency toward the use of higher generator reactances. Modern exciters with high ceiling voltage improve the generator capability to meet this demand. It should be recognized that excitation systems are not usually designed for continuous operation at ceiling voltage and are usually limited to a few seconds of operation at that level. Concordia and Brown [ I71 recommend that the reactive-power requirement during system emergencies should be determined for a time of from a few minutes to a quarteror half-hour and that these requirements should be met by the proper selection of the generator rating.
8.4
Effect of Excitation on Dynamic Stability

Modern fast excitation systems are usually acknowledged to be beneficial to transient stability following large impacts by driving the field to ceiling without delay. However, these fast excitation changes are not necessarily beneficial in damping the oscillations that follow the first swing, and they sometimes contribute growing oscillations several seconds after the occurrence of a large disturbance. With proper design and compensation, however, a fast exciter can be an effective means of enhancing stability in the dynamic range as well as in the first few cycles after a disturbance. Since dynamic stability involves the system response to small disturbances, analysis as a linear system is possible, using the linear generator model derived previously [ 1 I]. For simplicity we analyze the problem of one machine connected to an infinite bus

E 6

2 L
0.2
0.4

06 .

0.8

xeo = Xeb,

PU

Fig. 8.13 Transient stability studies resulting from studies of [19]: A = 0.5 RR diode excitation system; E = 3.0 pu RR SCR excitation system. (Q IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Trans., vol. PAS-89, July/Aug. 1970.)

322

Chapter 8

through a transmission line. The synchronous machine equations, for small perturbations about a quiescent operating condition, are given by (the subscript A is omitted for convenience)

T, E; V,

=
=

T ~ W S=

Kl6 K2E; [K,/(I K~T;oS)]EFD [ K i K 4 / ( 1 K56 + K6E; T,,, - T,

K~T;oS)]~

(8.10) (8.1 1)
(8.12)

(8.13)

where is the direct axis open circuit time constant and the constants K , through K6 depend on the system parameters and on the initial operating condition as defined in Chapter 6. In previous chapters it was pointed out that this model is a substantial improvement over the classical model since it accounts for the demagnetizing effects of the armature reaction through the change in E; due to change in 6. We now add to the generator model a regulator-excitation system that is represented as a first-order lag. Thus the change in EFD is related to the change in V, (again the subscript A is dropped) by

E F D / V ,= -Kc/(I
where K , is the regulator gain and
8.4.1
T,

+ 7,s)

(8.14)

is the exciter-regulator time constant.

Examination of dynamic stability by Rouths criterion

To obtain the characteristic equation for the system described by (8. l0)-(8.14), a procedure similar to that used in Section 3.5 is followed. First, we obtain
r

From (8.13) for T,,, = 0,


s26 = - ( W ; / T , ) T , = - ( w R / ~ H ) T ,

(8.16)

By combining (8.15) and (8.16) and rearranging, the following characteristic equation is obtained:

s4 + as + ps2
where
C Y

+ ys + 7

(8.17)

= = =

I/?, [(I

l/K3rAO

+ K3K6Kc)/K3T;OTr] + KI(WR/2H)

.=-[

wR (Ki/Tr 2H
WR

+ Ki/&T;O

- K2&/Th)
K2K4

2H

KI(I + K3K6Kr) K3 4 0 Tf

Applying Rouths criterion to the above system, we establish the array

Effect of Excitation on Stability

323

where

b2=O

c ~ = u ~ = v

(8.18)

According to Routh's criterion for stability, the number of changes in sign in the first column ( I , a, al , b l , and c I ) corresponds to the number of roots of (8.17) with positive real parts. Therefore, for stability the terms a,a l , l , and cI must all be greater than b zero. Thus the following conditions must be satisfied.
1. a
= 1/7,

l/K37;0 > 0, and since

7,

and ri0 are positive,

dO/T,

>

- 1/K3

(8.19)

K3 is an impedance factor that is not likely to be negative unless there is an excessive series capacitance in the transmission network. Even then 72,)/T, is usually large enough to satisfy the above criterion. 2. 01 = p - y/a > 0
(1

+ K3K6Kt
K3 T;O 7 ,

K~ z)- K3 4 2H K3T;O

0 1,

T,

2 k1 K ~ T ; o T ,) - q] (
Tt

+ K3dO

K2K4

, 0

or

(8.20)
This inequality is easily satisfied for all values of constants normally encountered in power system operation. Note that negative K , is not considered feasible. From (8.20) K , is limited to values greater than some negative number, a constraint that is always satisfied in the physical system.

We now recognize the first expression in parentheses in the last term of (8.21) to be the positive constant CY defined in (8.17). Making this substitution and rearranging

324

Chapter 8

to isolate K , terms, we have

(8.22)
The expressions in parentheses are positive for any load condition. Equation (8.22) places a maximum value on the gain K, for stable operation.

4. c

, = q > o

Since KIK6 - K2K5 > 0 for all physical situations, we have This condition puts a lower limit on the value of K,.

Example 8.3 For the machine loading of Examples 5.1 and 5.2 and for the values of the constants K, through K6 calculated in Examples 6.6 and 6.7, compute the limitations on the gain constant K , , using the inequality expressions developed above. Do this for an exciter with time constant 7, = 0.5 s.

Solution In Table 8.3 the values of the constants K, through K6 are given together with the maximum value of K, from (8.22)and the minimum value of K, from (8.23). The regulator time constant 7, used is O S s , 7 j 0 = 5.9s, and H = 2.37s. Case I is discussed in Examples 5 . I and 6.6; Case 2, in Examples 5.2 and 6.5. From Table 8.3 it is apparent that the generator operating point plays a significant
Table 8.3. Computed Constants for the Linear Regulated Machine
Constants Case I (Ex. 5.1) Case 2 (Ex. 5.2)

Kl K2
K3

K4 K S
K6

K2 K3K47t
K372cl

Tt

K37207t,

K2K41aTdo K45
a KS7d0
K47237,
1/7,

Kt K. <

1.076 1.258 0.307 1.712 -0.041 0.497 2.552 0.33 1 2.313 0.906 0.143 0.85 1 -0.616 5.051 4.000 - 2.3 269.0

I .448 t.317 0.307 1.805 0.029 0.526 2.552 0.365 2.313 0.906 0. I58 0.949 0.442 5.325 4.000 -3.2 1120.2

Effect of Excitation o n Stability

325

role in system performance. The loading seems to influence the values of K, and K , more than the other constants. At heavier loads the values of these constants change such that in (8.22) the left side tends to decrease while the right side tends to increase. This change is in the direction to lower the permissible maximum value of exciterregulator gain K,. For the problem under study, the heavier load condition of Case 1 allows a lower limit for K, than that for the less severe Case 2.

Rouths criterion is a feasible tool to use to find the limits of stable operation in a physical system. As shown in Example 8.3, the results are dependent upon both the system parameters and the initial operating point. The analysis here has been simplified to omit the rate feedback loop that is normally ar! integral part of excitation systems. Rate feedback could be included in this analysis, but the resulting equations become complicated to the point that one is almost forced to find an alternate method of analysis. Computer based methods are available to determine the behavior of such systems and are recommended for the more complex cases [20, 211. One special case of the foregoing analysis has been extensively studied [ I I]. This analysis assumes high regulator gain (K,K,K, > I ) and low exciter time constant > ( 7 , < K 3 ~ j O )I.n this special case certain simplifications are possible. See Problem 8.4. <
8.4.2

Furtfrer conridemtionr of the regulator gain and time constant

At no load the angle 6 is zero, and the 6 dependence of (8.10)-(8.23) does not apply. For this condition we can easily show that the machine terminal voltage V, is the same as the voltage E:. Changes in this latter voltage follow the changes in EFD with a time lag equal to 7A0. A block diagram representing the machine terminal voltage at no load is shown in Figure 8.14. From that figure the transfer function for V,/VREF can be obtained by inspection.
V,/~RW =

K,/l(1

+ K,) + ~ ( 7 + d o ) + do7,S2] ,
=

(8.24)

Equation (8.24) can be put in the standard form for second-order systems as

v /VREF

K/(.V*

+ 2{W,S +

W,)

(8.25)

where K = K , / 7 ; 0 7 , , W: = ( 1 + K,)/T&T,, 2 { w , = ( I / T * + 1/7i0). For good dynamic performance, i.e., for good damping characteristics, a reasonable value of { is I a For typical values of the gains and time constants in fast exciters / . we usually have T A ~ > T , and K , > 1. We can show then that for good performance > > T ; ~ / ~ T , This is usually lower than the value of gain required for steady-state . K, performance. In [ 1 I ] de Mello and Concordia point out that the same dynamic performance can be obtained with higher values of K , by introducing a lead-lag network with the proper choice of transfer function. This is left as an exercise (see Problem 8.5).

Fig. 8.14

Block diagram representing the machine terminal voltage at no load.

326
8.4.3

Chapter 8
Effect on the electrical torque

The electrical torque for the linearized system under discussion was developed in Chapter 3. With use of the linear model, the electrical torque in pu is numerically equal to the three-phase electrical power in pu. Equation (3.13) gives the change in the electrical torque for the unregulated machine as a function of the angle 6. The same relation for the regulated machine is given by (3.40). From (3.13) we compute the torque as a function of angular frequency to be

TJ6

K , - [K2K3K4/(I+ w 2 K : ~ 2 ) ] ( - J w K 3 ~ i 0 ) 1

(8.26)

The real component in (8.26) is the synchronizing torque component, which is reduced by the demagnetizing effect of the armature reaction. A t very low frequencies the synchronizing torque T, is given by
TsZZ Kl - K2KJK4

(8.27)

In the unregulated machine there is positive damping introduced by the armature reaction, which is given by the imaginary part of (8.26). This corresponds to the coefficient of the first power of s and is therefore a damping term. I n the regulated machine we may show the effect of the regulator on the electrical torque as follows. From (3.40) the change of the electrical torque with respect to the change in angle is given by

_ -K Te -

9 - -K2 K4

+ (]/re + K5K/K4Te)

I t can be shown that the effect of the terms K 2 K 4 (1 + 7 , s ) in the numerator is very small compared to the term K 2 K S K , . This point is discussed in greater detail in [ I I]. Using this simplification, we write the expression for Tc/6as

which at a frequency w can be separated into a real component that gives the synchronizing torque T, and into an imaginary component that gives the damping torque Td. These components are given by

(8.31)
Note that the damping torque Td will have the same sign as K S . This latter quantity can be negative at some operating conditions (see Example 6.6). In this case the regulator reduces the inherent system damping. At very low frequencies (8.30) is approximately given by

T, EZ K I - K 2 K s / K 6

(8.32)

which is higher than the value obtained for the unregulated machine given by (8.27).

Effect of Excitation on Stability

327

l c r r

Fig. 8.15 Block diagram of a linearized excitation system model.

Therefore, whereas the regulator improves the synchronizing forces in the machine at low frequencies of oscillation, it reduces the inherent system damping when K 5 is negative, a common condition for synchronous machines operated near rated load.
8.5
Root-locus Analysis of a Regulated Machine Connected to an Infinite Bus

We have used linear system analysis techniques to study the dynamic response of one regulated synchronous machine. In Section 7.8, while the exciter is represented in detail, a very simple model of the generator is used. In Section 8.4 the exciter model used is a very simple one. In this section a more detailed representation of the exciter is adopted, along with the simplified linear model of the synchronous machine that takes into account the field effects. The excitation system model used here is similar to that in Figure 7.54 except for the omission of the limiter and the saturation function S E . This model is shown in Figure 8.15. In this figure the function G&) is the rate feedback signal. The signal V , is the stabilizing signal that can be derived from any convenient signal and processed through a power system stabilizer network to obtain the desired phase relations (see Section 8.7). The system to be studied is that of one machine connected to an infinite bus through a transmission line. This model used for the synchronous machine is essentially that given in Figure 6.3 and is based on the linearized equations (8.10)-(8.13). To simulate the damping effect of the damper windings and other damping torques, a damping torque component - D w is added to the model as shown in Figure 8.16. The combined block diagram of the synchronous machine and the exciter is given in Figure 8.17 (with the subscript A omitted for convenience).

Fig. 8.16 Block diagram of the simplified linear model of a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus with damping added.

KR l + T S

Fig. 8.17 Combined block diagram of a linear synchronous machine an

Effect of Excitation on Stability

329

KA
]1+T
+

e)

& %

N(4

vt

KR
1 + 7 s

To study the effect of the different feedback loops, we manipulate the block diagram
so that all the feedback loops originate at the same takeoff point. This is done by standard techniques used in feedback control systems [22]. The common takeoff point

desired is the terminal voltage V , , and feedback loops to be studied are the regulator and the rate feedback GF(s). The resulting block diagram is shown in Figure 8.18. I n that figure the transfer function N ( s ) is given by N(s) = K3K6(2HS2 + DS + Kim) - mKzK3K5 (1 K ~ T A ~ s ) ( W S DS + Kim) - q K z K & f ~

(8.33)

Note that the expression for N ( s ) can be simplified if the damping D is neglected or if the term containing K, is omitted ( K , is usually very small at heavy load conditions). The system of Figure 8. I8 is solved by linear system analysis techniques, using the digital computer. A number of computer programs are available that are capable of solving very complex linear systems and of displaying the results graphically in several convenient ways or in tabular forms [20, 211. For a given operating point we can obtain the loci of roots of the open loop system and the frequency response to a sinusoidal input as well as the time response to a small step change in input. The results of the linear computer analysis are best illustrated by some examples. In the analysis given in this section, the machine discussed in the examples of Chapters 4,5, and 6 is analyzed for the loading condition of Example 6.7. The exciter data = 0.95, KR = 1.0 and T~ = 0. The machine = 0.05, KE = -0.17, are K, = 400, constants are 2H = 4.74 s, D = 2.0 pu and 7A0 = 5.9 s. The constants K I through K6 in pu for the operating point to be analyzed are
KI
= :

1.4479

KS

0.3072

K2 = 1.3174

K4 = 1.8052

KS K6

= 0.0294 = 0.5257

Example 8.4 Use a linear systems analysis program to determine the dynamic response of the system of Figure 8.18 with and without the rate feedback. The following graphical solutions are to be obtained for the above operating conditions:
1. Root-locus plot.

2. Time response of VA to a step change in VREF. 3. Bode diagram of the closed loop transfer function. 4. Bode diagram of the open loop transfer function.

Fig. 8.19 Root locus of the system of Figure 8.17: (a) without rate feedback, (b) with rate feedback.

Fig. 8.20 Time response to a step change in V R E F : GF(s)= 0, Ib) GF(s)# 0. (a)

Fig. 8.21

Bode plots of the closed loop transfer function: (a) GF = 0 (b) GF z 0. .

Effect of Excitation on Stability

33 1

Fig. 8.22 Bode plots of the open loop transfer function: (a) GI; = 0 (b) G F + 0. .

Compute these graphical displays for two conditions: (a) GI;(S) = 0 (b) GAS) = sK,/(l

+ T#),

with KF = 0.04, and

T~

= 1.0 s

Solution The results of the computer analysis are shown in Figures 8.19-8.22 for the different plots. I n each figure, part (a) is for the result without the rate feedback and part (b) is with the rate feedback. Figures 8.19--8.20 show clearly that the system is unstable for this value of gain without the rate feedback. Note the basic problem discussed in Example 7.7. With G&) = 0, the system dynamic response is dominated by two pairs of complex roots near the imaginary axis. The pair that causes instability is determined by the field
Table 8.4.
Condition

Root-Locus Poles and Zeros of Example 8.4


Zeros
Poles

(a) K F

-0.21097 + j10.45130 -0 21097 - j10.45130

(b) K F

0.04

- 1.19724 + j0.83244
- 1.19724 - j0.83244 -0.40337 + j10.69170 -0.40337 - j10.69170

- 0.27324 -20.00000 - 0. I7894 -0.35020 + j10.72620 -0.35020 - j10.72620 - 20.00000 -0.17894 -0.27324 -0.35021 + j10.72620 -0.35021 - j10.72620 - I .ooooo

332

Chapter 8

winding and exciter parameters. The effect of the pair caused by the torque angle loop is noticeable in the Bode plots of Figures 8.2 1-8.22. These roots occur near the natural frequency w, = (1.4479 x 377/4.74)'12 = 10.73 rad/s. The rate feedback modifies the root-locus plot in such a way as to make the system stable even with high amplifier gains. The poles and zeros obtained from the computer results are given in Table 8.4.

Example 8.5 Repeat part (b) of Example 8.4 with (a) D


Solution

0 and (b) K 5

0.

(a) For the case of D = 0 it is found (from the computer output) that the poles and zeros affected are only those determined by the torque angle loop. These poles now become -0.13910 + j10.72550 (instead of -0.35021 i j10.72620). The net effect is to move the branch of the root locus determined by these poles and zeros to just slightly away from the imaginary axis. (b) It has been shown that K 5 is numerically small. Except for the situations where K 5 becomes negative, its main effect is to change 0 to the value ,
w2n

( w R / ~ H ) (- , z K s / K ~ ) KK

The computer output for K 5 = 0 is essentially the same as that of Example 8.4. The root-locus plot and the time response to a step change in VREFfor the cases of D = 0 and K 5 = 0 are displayed in Figures 8.23-8.24. The examples given i n this section substantiate the conclusions reached in Section 7.7 concerning the importance of the rate feedback for a stable operation at high values of gain. A very significant point to note about the two pairs of complex roots that dominate the system dynamic response is the nature of the damping associated with them. The damping coefficient D primarily affects the roots caused by the torque angle loop at a frequency near the natural frequency w , . The second pair of roots, determined by the field circuit and exciter parameters, gives a somewhat lower fre-

Fig. 8.23

Root locus of the system of Example 8.5: (a) D

0, (b) K S = 0.

Effect of Excitation o n Stability

333

for Fig. 8.24 Time response to a step change in VREF the system of Example 8.5: (a) D

0, (b) K S = 0.

quency and its damping is inherently poor. This is an important consideration in the study of power system stabilizers.
8.6
Approximate System Representation

I n the previous section it is shown that the dynamic system performance is dominated by two pairs of complex roots that are particularly significant at low frequencies. In this frequency range the system damping is inherently low, and stabilizing signals are often needed to improve the system damping (Section 8.7). Here we develop an approximate model for the excitation system that is valid for low frequencies. We recognize that the effect of the rate feedback G&) in Figure 8.17 is such that 0) or near steady state (f a). it can be neglected at low frequencies (s = j w We have already pointed out that K S is usually very small and is omitted in this approximate model. The feedback path through K4 provides a small positive damping component that is usually considered negligible [ 1 I]. The resulting reduced system is composed of two subsystems: one representing the exciter-field effects and the other representing the inertial effects. These effects contribute the electrical torque components designated T,, and T,, respectively.

8.6.1

Approximate excitation system representation

The approximate system to be analyzed is shown in Figure 8.25 where the exciter and the generator have been approximated by simple first-order lags [ 1 I]. A straightforward analysis of this system gives

Gx 0)

Fig. 8.25 Approximate representation of the excitation system.

334

Chapter 8

(8.35)

where W , is the undamped natural frequency and { is the damping ratio: ,


(8.36)

We are particularly concerned about the system frequency of oscillation as compared to w , . The damping f, is usually small and the system is poorly damped. The function G,(s) must be determined either by calculation or by measurement on the physical system. A proven technique for measurement of the parameters of G,(s) is to monitor the terminal voltage while injecting a sinusoidal input signal at the voltage regulator summing junction [8, I 2 , 2 3 , 2 4 , 2 5 ] . The resulting amplitude and phase (Bode) plot can be used to identify G,(s) in (8.35). Lacking field test data, we must estimate the parameters of G,(s) by calculations derived from a given operating condition. It should be emphasized that this procedure has some serious drawbacks. First, the gains and time constants may not be precisely known, and the use of estimated values may give results that are suspect [IO, 12,241. Second, the theoretical model based on the constants K I through K6 is not only load dependent but is also based on a one machine-infinite bus system. The use of these constants, then, requires that assumptions be made concerning the proximity of the machine under study with respect to the rest of the system. A procedure based on deriving an equivalent infinite bus, connected to the machine under study by a series impedance, is given in Section 8.6.2.
8.6.2
Estimate of G,(s)

The purpose of this section is to develop an approximate method for estimating

K Ithrough K6 that can be applied to any machine in the system. These constants
can be used in (8.36) to calculate the approximate parameters for G,(s). The one machine-infinite bus system assumes that the generator under study is connected to an equivalent infinite bus of voltage Vm/cr through a transmission line of impedance z = Re + jX,. This equivalent impedance is assumed to be the The, venin equivalent impedance as seen at the generator terminals. Therefore, if the driving-point short circuit admittance E.i at the generator terminal node i is known, we assume that

z, = I / F i The equivalent infinite bus voltage vm calculated by is


from the generator terminal voltage cedure is illustrated by an example.

(8.37)

E,, where &

subtracting the drop &Ze is the generator current. The pro-

Effect of Excitation o n Stability

335

Example 8.6 Compute the constants K , through K6 for generator 2 of Example 2.6, using the equivalent infinite bus method outlined above. Note that the three-machine system is certainly not considered to have an infinite bus, and the results might be expected to differ from those obtained by a more detailed simulation. Solution From Example 2.6 the following data for the machine are known (in pu and s).
Xd2 =

0.8958 0.1 198

Xq2 =

xi2

0.8645 0.1969

0.0521 ~ i o 2= 6.0
X42 =

H2 =

6.4

We can establish the terminal conditions from the load-flow study of Figure 2.19:
1 2 k &
= =

1,2

+ J1,2

(6- j Q z ) / h
=

(1.630 - j0.066)/1.025

1.592/-2.339" pu

From Figure 5.6 t a n ( ~ 5 ~P 2 ) = X , ~ ~ , ~ -( xV 2 f X 2= 1.272 - ~ / q~ ) 620 - p = 51.818" 2 But from the load flow P2
=

9.280",
=

620

51.818

+ 9.280 = 61.098"

Then

P2 + d2 = 54.156"and

V2 = V2/& - 820 = 1.025 /-51.818" = V,,

+ jV,

= 0.634

12 = f 2 / - ( & 0

- P2 +

&) = 1.592 /-54.156" = f 4 2


=

- j0.806 pu jZ, = 0.932 - j1.290 pu

Neglecting the armature resistance, r

0,
~ ~ 2 1 4 2 =
Xd21dz

Eqoo = E20 =

v42

5 2

1.749 PU 1.789 P U

From Table 2.6 the driving-point admittance at the internal node of generator 2 is given by

Y2, = 0.420 - j2.724 pu

The terminal voltage node of generator 2 had been eliminated in the reduction process. However, since it is connected to the internal node by xi2, z, can be obtained by using the approximate relation Z , = l/Fz2- jxi2. The exact reduction process gives

z, = 0.0550 + j0.2388 = 0.2450/77.029"


Then we compute from (6.56)
KI
1/K3
=
=

pu

K3 =

1/[RZ (x, + X,)(X; X , ) ] = 1/0.39925 1 + K , ( X d - X ; ) ( X , + X , ) = 3.1476 0.3177

2.5084

We can compute the infinite bus voltage

Next Page
336
Chapter 8

v,

= = =

- ZJ, 1.02519.280" - (0.2450 /77.029")( I .592 /6.941")


V,/a
= v 2

0.9706 - j0.2226

0.9958 I- 12.914"

The angle required in the computations to follow is


y =
620

K,

= =

Kz = K4 = KS =

- CY = 61.098 - (-12.914) = 74.012" K,Vm(Eqao[R,siny (xi + X,)cosy] + I,o(x, - x;)[(x, + 2.4750 K,{R,E,,o + I,,[RZ + (x, + X,)']l = 3.0941 VmK,(xd- x;)[(x, + X,)siny - R,cosy] = 2.0265 (K,Vm/V,O)Ix;~qo[ReCOSy - (xq + Xe)sinyI - x q VdO[(x; + X,)cosy + R,siny]l = 0.0640

+ X,)siny

- R,cosyll

K6 = (V,O/KO)[I K,x;(xq + XP)I - (VO/V,o)K,xqRe = 0.5070 Summary: KJ = 0.318 KS = 0.064 K1 = 2.475 K = 3.094 2 K4 = 2.027 K6 = 0.507 Note that these constants are in pu on 100-MVA base whereas the machine is a 192MVA generator. The constants K, and K2 should be divided by 1.92 to convert to the machine base.

Example 8.7 The exciter for generator 2 of the three-machine system has the constants K, = 400 and r , = 0.95 s. Compute the parameters of G,(s). For the system natural frequency (see Example 3.4) calculate the excitation control system phase lag. (Here again we emphasize the need for actual measurement of the system parameters. Lacking such measurement, a judgment is made as to which parameters should be used. We use the regulator gain and the exciter time constant. It is judged that the latter is important at the low frequencies of interest. This point is a source of some confusion in the literature. It is sometimes assumed, erroneously, that the regulator time constant is to be used when the excitation system is represented by one time constant. This is not valid for low frequencies.) Solution From (8.36) we have
w, = d(0.507 x 400)/(6.0 x 0.93) = 5.967 rad/s

(0.95 + 0.318 x 6.0)/(2 x 5.967 x 0.318 x 6.0 x 0.95) = 0.132 and the excitation system is poorly damped. From Example 3.4 the dominant frequency of oscillation is approximately 1.4 Hz or w,,, z 8.8 rad/s. At any frequency the characteristic equation of G,(s) is obtained by substituting s = j w in the denominator of the first expression in (8.35):

5;

d( jw)

I - 0.028 Iw2

+ j0.0443~

At the frequency of interest ( w = 8.8 rad/s) we have d( jwosc) = - I . I761 + j0.3898 $,ag = tan-' (0.3898/- I . I76 I ) = I6 1.661

Previous Page
Effect of Excitation o n Stability

337

12

c = domping ratio
.Bo
' 4

>-

f Q

"
-18
2

3 4 5

00 .1

0.02

0.040.06

01 .
U

02 .
(a)

0 4 06 . .

' 0
-1 5

'

-30

-45
-60

-75
f = damping ratio

j -90
;l5 -o -120 -135
-150

-165
-180

0.01

0.03 0.060.1

03 .

06 .

I 3

1 0

30

60 !OO

(b)

Fig. 8.26 Characteristics of a second-order transfer function: (a) amplitude, (b) phase shift.

The excitation system phase lag in Example 8.7 is rather large, and phase compensa> tion is likely to be required (see Section 8.7). The phase lag is large because oorc w, and rx is small. For small damping the phase changes very fast in the neighborhood of w, (where ding = 90"). Many textbooks on control systems, such as [22], give curves ofphase shift as a function of normalized frequency, u = w/w,,, as shown in Figure 8.26. In the above example, with u = 8.8/5.967 = 1.47 and 5 = 0.13, it is apparent from Figure 8.26(b) that the phase lag is great.
8.6.3
The inertial transfer function

The inertial transfer function can be obtained by inspection from Figure 8.17. For the case where damping is present,

338
- =
re2

Chapter 8

-6

s2

+
=
=

wR/2H = D K ~ w R s2 -s + - 2 H 2H

+ ~J,,w,,s+ u,

wR/2H

(8.38)

Where onis the natural frequency of the rotating mass and 5;, is the damping factor,
O,

{, ,

I/KIwR/ZH D/4Hwn = D / 2 d 2 H K I w R

(8.39)

The damping of the inertial system is usually very low.

Example 8.8 Compute the characteristic equation, the undamped natural frequency, and the damping factor of the inertial system of generator 2 (Example 2.6). Use D = 2 pu.
Solurion From the data of Examples 2.6 and 8.6 we compute

d ( s ) = s2
w,, =

+ 0.156s + 72.894
=
=

8.538 rad/s {, = 2 / [ 2 ( 1 2 . 8 x 2.975 x 377)2] , d ( j w ) = 1 - 0 . 0 1 3 7 ~ ~J 0 . 0 0 2 1 4 ~ +


At the system frequency of oscillation w
= = w,,,
=

0.009

8.8 rad/s,

tan- [0.0183/(-0.0222

- 0.0604)] =

163.3

8.7

Supplementary Stabilizing Signals

Equation (8.31 ) indicates that the voltage regulator introduces a damping torque component proportional to K 5 . We noted in Section 8.4.3 that under heavy loading conditions K 5 can be negative. These are the situations in which dynamic stability is of concern. We have also shown in Section 8.6.2 that the excitation system introduces a large phase lag at low system frequencies just above the natural frequency of the excitation system. Thus it can often be assumed that the voltage regulator introduces negative damping. To offset this effect and to improve the system damping in general, artificial means of producing torques in phase with the speed are introduced. These are called supplementary stabilizing signals and the networks used to generate these signals have come to be known as power system stabilizer (PSS) networks. Stabilizing signals are introduced in excitation systems at the summing junction where the reference voltage and the signal produced from the terminal voltage are added to obtain the error signal fed to the regulator-exciter system. For example, in the excitation system shown in Figure 7.54 the stabilizing signal is indicated as the signal K . T o illustrate, the signal usually obtained from speed or a related signal such as the frequency, is processed through a suitable network to obtain the desired phase relationship. Such an arrangement is shown schematically in Figure 8.27.
8.7.1

Block diagram of the linear system

We have previously established the rationale for using linear systems analysis for the study of low-frequency oscillations. For any generator in the system the behavior

Effect of Excitation on Stability

339

Fig. 8.27

Schematic diagram of a stabilizing signal from speed deviation.

can be conveniently characterized and the unit performance determined, from the linear block diagram of that generator. This block diagram is shown in Figure 8.28. The constants K , through K 6 are load dependent (see Section 8.6 for an approximate method to determine these constants) but may be considered constant for small deviations about the operating point. The damping constant D is usually in the range of 1.0--3.0pu. The system time constants, gains, and inertia constants are obtained from the equipment manufacturers or by measurement. The PSS is shown here as a feedback element from the shaft speed and is often given in the form [ I I ]

(8.40)
The first term in (8.40) is a reset term that is used to wash out the compensation effect after a time lag 7 0 . with typical values of 4 s [ I I] to 20 or 30 s [ 121. The use of reset control will assure no permanent offset in the terminal voltage due to a prolonged error in frequency, such as might occur in an overload or islanding condition. The second term in G,(s) is a lead compensation pair that can be used to improve the phase lag through the system from VREF to u,, at the power system frequency of oscillation. Qualitatively, we can recognize the existence of a potential control problem in the system of Figure 8.28 due to the cascading of several phase lags in the forward loop. In terms of a Bode or frequency analysis (see [22], for example) the system is likely to have inadequate phase margin. This is difficult to show quantitatively in the complete system because of its complexity. We therefore take advantage of the simplified representation developed in Section 8.6 and the results obtained in that section.
8.7.2
Approximate model of the complete exciter-generator system

Having established the complete forward transfer function of the excitation control system and inertia, we may now sketch the complete block diagram as in Figure 8.29. We note that a common takeoff point is used for the feedback loop, requiring a slight modification of the inertial transfer function using standard block diagram manipulation techniques. We also note that the output in Figure 8.29 is the negative of the speed deviation. The parameters rx, w, and w, are defined in (8.36) and (8.39) respectively. Examining Figure 8.29 we can see that to damp speed oscillations, the power system stabilizer must compensate for much of the inherent forward loop phase lag. Thus the PSS network must provide lead compensation.

cn,

L 1

r
1

Fig. 8.28

Block diagram of a linear generator with an exciter and power syste

Effect of Excitation on Stability


Kz K/

Ten

Pt2C

x x

u s t o =

Kd
r=t2fwrto=
n n
n

--w

341

AU

Fig. 8.29 Block diagram of a simplified model of the complete system.

UL T
GSk)

8.7.3 Lead compensation


One method o providing phase lead is with the passive circuit of Figure 8.30(a). f I f loaded into a high impedance, the transfer function of this circuit is
- =

Ei

(i/a)(i + aTSj 1 + 7s

where (8.41) The transfer function has the pole zero confguration of Figure 8.30(b), where the zero lies inside the pole to provide phase lead. For this simple network the magnitude of the parameter a is usually limited to about 5 . Another lead network not so restricted in the parameter range is that shown in Figure 8.3 I [26]. For this circuit we compute
E= -O

I
(1

E,

+ 7 ~ S ) [ 1+ ( T c + T D ) S ]

(?A

+ TB)S

(8.42)

where

T,,

T~
T~

=
= = =

T~

Kl Kz

K I R C I = lead timeconstant R IC I = noise filter time constant < T,, < K z R C z = lag time constant R C , = stabilizing circuit time constant < rC < RB/(RA + RB) RD/(Rc + R D )
Eo/Ej
=

Approximately, then
( 1 -t
TAS)/(I

+ TCS)

(I

+ U T S ) / ( ~+ T S )

(8.43)

wherea

K l C I / K 2 C 2 1. >

; I: . Ei (0)

(b)

Fig. 8.30 Lead network: (a) passive network. (b) pole zero configuration.

342

Chapter 8
R

Fig. 8.31

Active lead network.

For any lead network the Bode diagram is that shown in Figure 8.32, where the , asymptotic approximation is illustrated [22]. The maximum phase lead 4 occurs at the median frequency w,, where w, occurs at the geometric mean of the corner frequencies; i.e..
Ioglowm = (1/2)[loglo(l/a7) + Io ~ I o ( I /T ) I
=

(1/2)log,o(l/aT*)

log,o(l/T4i)

Then
w, =
I / T f i

(8.44)

The magnitude of the maximum phase lead 4 is computed from ,

6 ,

arg[(l

+ jw,uT)/(l + j w , ~ ) ] = tan -lw,a ~ - tan-lw,T


tan (x - y )
=

= x

(8.45)

From trigonometric identities (tan x


-

tan y ) / ( I

+ tan x tan y )
W,T(U

(8.46)

Therefore, using (8.46) in (8.45) tan+,


= (w,a7

- W,T)/[I

+ ( w , u ~ ) ( w , ~ ) ]=
=

- 1)/(1

+ aw;~)

(8.47)

This expression can be simplified by using (8.44) to compute tan#,

(a - 1 ) / 2 f i

(8.48)

Now, visualizing a right triangle with base 2 f i , height (a - 1) and hypotenuse 6 ,


I I

I
db

I I

I/.

Fig. 8.32

Bode diagram for the lead network ( I

+ UTS)/( I +

TS)

where a > I .

Effect of Excitation on Stability

343

wecompute bZ = (a - I)*

+ 4a

(a

+
=

I)*or

sin&

(a - I)/@

I)

(8.49)

This expression can be solved for a to compute

(I

+ sin&)/(l

- sin&)

(8.50)

These last two expressions give the desired constraint between maximum phase lead and the parameter a. The procedure then is to determine the desired phase lead qjm. This fixes the parameter a from (8.50). Knowing both a and the frequency w,, determines the time constant T from (8.44). In many practical cases the phase lead required is greater than that obtainable from a single lead network. I n this case two or more cascaded lead stages are used. Thus we often write (8.40) as
G,(s)
= [K~T~s/(I

+ T O ~ ) l [ (+ a T s ) / ( ' l + i
=

T s ) ~

(8.51)

where n is the number of lead stages (usually n

2 or 3).

EJcample 8.9 Compute the parameters of the power system stabilizer required to exactly compensate for the excitation control system lag of 161.6"computed in Example 8.7.

S o h ion Assume two cascaded lead stages. Then the phase lead per stage is

$ ,I
From (8.50)

161.6/2

80.8"
=

= (1

+ sin 80.8)/( I

- sin 80.8)

154.48

This is a very large ratio, and it would probably be preferable to design the compensator with three lead stages such that 4,,, = 53.9'. Then

(I

+ sin 53.9)/( I

sin 53.9)

9.42
= w,,, =

which is a reasonable ratio to achieve physically. The natural frequency of oscillation of the system is w,, from (8.44)
T

8.8 rad/s. Thus

= I/w,,,G=

0.037

UT

0.3488

Thus
G,(s)
=

[K,T,,s/(~ +

TOS)][(~

+ 0.349~)/(1+ 0.037~)]'

A suitable value for the reset time constant is r0 = IO s. The gain KO is usually modest [26], say 0.1 < KO < 100, and is usually field adjusted for good response. It is also common to limit the output of the stabilizer, as shown in Figure 8.28, so that the stabilizer output will never dominate the terminal voltage feedback.
Example 8.10 Assume a two-stage lead-compensated stabilizer. Prepare a table showing the phase lead and the compensator parameters as a function of a.
Solurion As before, we assume that w,,,
=

8.8 rad/s.

344

Chapter 8

Table 8.5.
a

Lead Compensator Parameters as a Function of a


?'=

9m

29 ,

l / U r n 6

WHi =

117

a7

WLO =

]/a7

5 10 15 20 25

41.81 54.90 61.05 64.79 67.38

83.62 109.80 122.10 129.58 134.76

0.0508 0.0359 0.0293 0.0254 0.0227

19.68 27.83 34.08 39.35 44.00

0.254 1 0.3593 0.4401 0.5082 0.5682

3.935 2.783 2.272 I .968 I .760

These results show that for a large a or large 4, the corner frequencies wHi and wLo must be spread farther apart than for small 6,. See Figure 8.32 and Problem 8.1 1.
8.8
linear Analysis of the Stabilized Generator

I n previous sections certain simplifying assumptions were made in order to give an approximate analysis of the stabilized generator. In this section the system of Figure 8.28 is solved by linear system analysis techniques using the digital computer (see Section 8.5). The results of the linear computer analysis are best illustrated by an example.
Example 8. I I Use a linear systems analysis program to determine the following graphical solutions for the system of Figure 8.28: 1. 2. 3. 4. Root-locus plot Time response of wA to a step change in VREF Bode diagram of the closed loop transfer function Bode diagram of the open loop transfer function.

Furthermore, compute these graphical displays for two conditions, (a) no power system stabilizer and (b) a two-stage lead stabilizer with a = 25:

0 - 8 - 6

-4
Rea I

-2

7
Rea I

(a 1 (b) Fig. 8.33 Root locus of the generator 2 system: (a) no PSS, (b) with the PSS having two lead stages with a = 25.

Effect of Excitation on Stability


i

345

Fig. 8.34

Time response to a step change in V R E F(a) no PSS, (b) with the PSS having two lead stages with : a = 25.

G ~ ( s = [ IOS/( I )

IOS)] [( I

+ 0 . 5 6 8 S ) / ( I + 0.0227~)]*

The system constants are the same as Examples 8.7 and 8.8.
Solution

The system to be solved is that of Figure 8.28 except that the PSS limiter cannot be represented in a linear analysis program and is therefore ignored. The results are shown in Figures 8.33-8.36 for the four different plots. In each figure, part (a) is the result without the PSS and part (b) is with the PSS. In the root-locus plot (Figure 8.33) the major effect of the PSS is to separate the torque-angle zeros from the poles, forcing the locus to loop to the left and downward, thereby increasing the damping. The root locus shows clearly the effect of lead compensation and has been used as a basis for PSS parameter identification [27]. Note that

6)
Fig. 8.35 Frequency response (Bode diagram) of the closed loop transfer function: (a) no PSS, (b) with the PSS having two lead stages with a = 25.

346

Chapter 8

la)

(b)

Fig. 8.36 Frequency response (Bode diagram) of the open loop transfer function: (a) no PSS, (b) with the PSS having two lead stages with u = 25.

the locus near the origin is unaffected by the PSS, but the locus breaking away vertically from the negative real axis moves closer to the origin as compensation is added [this locus is off scale in 8.33(a)]. From the computer we also obtain the tabulation of poles and zeros given in Table 8.6. From this table we note that the natural radian frequency of oscillation is controlled by the torque-angle poles with a frequency of 8.467 rad/s. This agrees closely with w,, = 8.538 rad/s computed in Example 8.8 using the approximate model and also checks well with the frequency of b,, in Figure 3.3. Figure 8.34 shows the substantial improvement in damping introduced by the PSS network. Note the slightly decreased frequency of oscillation in the stabilized response.
Table 8 6 Root-Locus Poles and Zeros ..
Condition Poles Zeros

No PSS

WithPSSa

25

-20.000 + jO.000 0.I79 + jO.000 -0.102 + jO.000 -0.289 + j8.533 -0.289 - j8.533 - 1 .OOO + jO.000 -20.000 + jO.000 0.179 + jO.000 -0.010 + jO.000 -0.289 + j8.533 -0.289 - j8.533 - 1.000 + jO.000 -0.100 + jO.000 -45.500 + jO.000 -45.500 - jO.000

-0.944 + j0.955 -0.944 - j0.955 -0.452 + j8.467 -0.452 - j8.467 -0.100 + jO.000 -0.941 + j0.959 -0.941 - j0.959 -0.955 + j7.439 -0.955 - j7.439 -45.000 + j24.847 -45.000 - j24.847

Effect of Excitation on Stability

347

Figures 8.35 and 8.36 show the frequency response of the closed loop and open loop transfer functions respectively. The uncompensated system has a very sharp drop in phase very near the frequency of oscillation. Lead compensation improves the phase substantially in this region, thus improving gain and phase margins.
8.9
Analog Computer Studies

The analog computer offers a valuable tool to arrive a t an optimum setting of the adjustable parameters of the excitation system. With a variety of compensating schemes available to the designer and with each having many adjustable components and parameters, comparative studies of the effectiveness of the various schemes of compensation can be conveniently made. Furthermore, this can be done using the complete nonlinear model of the synchronous machine.
8.9.1
Effect of the rate feedback loop in Type 1 exciter

As a case study, Example 5.8 is extended to include the effect of the excitation system. The synchronous machine used is the same as in the examples of Chapter 4 with the loading condition of Example 5. I . Three IEEE Type I exciters (see Section 7.9.1) are used in this study: W TRA, W Brushless, and W Low T & Brushless. The parameters for these exciters are given in Table 1.8. The analog computer representation of the excitation system is shown in Figure 8.37. This system is added to the machine simulation given in Figure 5.18. Note that the output of amplifier 614 (Figure 8.37) connects to the terminal marked E,, in Figure 5.18, and the terminal marked u, in Figure 5 . I8 connects with switch 4 2 1 in Figure 8.37. The new "free" inputs to the combined diagram are VREF and T,,,. The potentiometer settings for the analog computer units are given in Tables 8.7, 8.8 and 8 . 9 for the three excitation systems described in Table 7.8. Saturation is represented by an analog limiter on VR in this simulation. With the generator equipped with a W TRA exciter, the response due to a increase in T,,,and 5% change in VREFand the phase plane plot of wA versus aA for the initial loading condition of Example 5.1 are shown in Figure 8.38. The results with W Brushless and W Low T~ Brushless exciters are shown in Figures 7.69 and 8.39 respectively.
Table 8.7.

Potentiometer Calculations for a Type 1 Representation of a W TRA Exciter ( a = 20)

0.4994

0.8O00 0. IO00

lim

800

. ..

800

...

.. .

...
,

, ,

..

...

..

..

.,. ...

V R m a x= 3.5 pu = 3.5 u VRmin = -3.5pu = -3.5L'

Fig. 8.37

Analog computer representation of a Type I excitation syste

Effect of Excitation on Stability

349

Table 8.8.
Amp.
out

potentiometer Calculations for a Type I Representation of a


W Brushless Exciter ( a
=

20)
Int.
(L~'Li)C

no. 601 601 800 701


800

L~
50
I I
IO

In
REF

L~
100

L ~ / L ~
0.50 0.50

constant

cap.

Amp. gain
I I
100

Pot. set.

VREF

vREF
VR

so

REF

io0
50

5'!,,OfP6Ol I + 2.6671400
=

1.0066

0.0252 0.5033 20.0 2.5 0.6250 0.0625


0.50 0.15
0.10

... ..
0.1
0.1 1.0 1.0

0.0252 0.5033 0.2000 0.2500 0.6250 0.0625


0.5000 0.1500

- V,
vR VR -EFD

0.02

KA/arA= 400/(20)(0.02)
1000

X00

VR -EFD -EFD V,

I I

1.00
10.00 1.00
0.50 5.00

I / a r A = I/(20)(0.02) = 2.5 I / a r E = 1/(20)(0.8) = 0.0625 KE/arE= 1/(20)(0.8) = 0.0625


I/TF= 1/1.0 = 1.0
=

IO
I I I I I I

801
801

IO
50 50 100 50

IO
100 10
50

802 802
810

V,,

v,
-V, V.

...
1.0

-EFD
V,

KF/rF= 0.03/1.0
I / u = 1/20 = 0.05 l / V T = 0.5773

0.03

...
...

803

v,

40

2.00 1.25

0.1000

0.7217

0.7217

Comparing the responses shown in Figures 8.38, 7.69, and 8.39 with that of Figure 5.20, we note that without the exciter the slow transient is dominated by the field winding effective time constant. The terminal voltage, the field flux linkage, and the rotor angle are slow in reaching their new steady-state values. From Figures 8.38, 7.69, and 8.39 we can see that the steady-state conditions are reached sooner with the exciter present. At the same time, the response is more oscillatory.
8.9.2

Effectiveness of compensation

A detailed study of the effectiveness of four methods of compensation is given in (281, by comparing the dynamic response due to changes in the mechanical torque T, and the reference excitation voltage VREF at various machine loadings. The dynamic response comparison is based on observing the rise time, settling time, and percent overshoot of either PeA or V,, in a given transient. For example, a 10% increase in the reference torque is made, and the change in electrical power output PeA is observed. The machine data and loading are essentially those given in the Examples 8.4 and 8.5.
Table 8.9.
Pot. no.

Potentiometer Calculations for a Type 1 Representation of a w Low 7 E Brushless Exciter ( a = 20)


C'
=

I I
Amp.
I

no.

out
VREF VREF
VR

constant 1,0066

Pot. set.

600 601 800


701

601 601 800 800 801


801

50 50 I

REF REF

100 100

0.50 0.50

5"., 0 1 P60 I I + 2.667/400

-v,
R '

50
I

0.02
1.00
10.00

VR
-EFD

I
10
IO

K A / a r A= 400/(20)(0.02) = 1000 I / a s A = I/(20)(0.02) = 2.5


\/(IT =

::EI ::: I
20.0
2.5

I
100

0.0252 0.5033 0.2000 0.2500 0.3333 0.3333 0.1000 0.4000

I 1
0.1
0.1

IO
IO0

801

VR
-EFD

I
IO

1/(20)(0.015)

33.333

3.3333
= =

703 802 810 812 803


lim 800

- E ~ D

1.00
0.50 5.00

KE/arE

1/(20)(0.015)

3.3333

802 802 810 803 800

v, v, -vv
V,

50 50

V,

100

-EFD
V, v,

IO
50

I/sF= 1/0.5 = 2.0 KF/+F = 0.04/0.5 = 0.08


I / u 7 1/20 = 0.05 I / Y 3 = 0.5773
V
VRmin

100 50

40

2.00 1.25

0.7217
LJ

...

0.1000 0.72 I 7

... ...

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

R = 6.96 PU = 6.96 U ~ ~ ~ = -6.96 PU = -6.96

h E

Fig. 8.38 System response to a step change in 7, and V R ~ ~ , generator equipped with

U m

C .-

Fig. 8.39 System response t o a step change in T,,, and VRE,, generator equipped with a

352

Chapter 8

However, the machine is fully represented on the analog computer. The excitation system used is Type 2, a rotating rectifier system (see Section 7.9.3). The data of the exciter are:
KA
7E

TA =

400 PU 0.02 s
0.015 s

KF

0.04

SEmax 0.86 =

7p = 7R =
K R

= =

0.05 s 0.0
1.0

SE27Smin

K,

1.0

0.50 VRmax 8.26 = VRmin= -8.26


=

EFDmax =

4.45

The methods of compensation used are:


7Fs) Rate feedback: sKF/(1 Bridge-T filter with transfer function:

C/R n

= (s2

+ m w , s + w;)/(s2 + nons + u;)

w, =
=

21 rad/s 2 r = 0.1

Power system stabilizer:

C
7 =

3.0 s

7, =

0.2 s

r2 =

0.05 s

A sample of data given in reference [28] is shown in Table 8.10 for the initial operating condition of Tm0 = 3.0 pu at 0.85 PF lagging.

Table 8.10.
Case Rise time

Comparison of Compensation Schemes


Settling time Overshoot /, Rise time Settling time Overshoot /,

Uncompensated Excitation rate feedback Bridged-T only Bridged-T, two-stage lead-lag and speed Power system stabilizer

0.06 0.06
0.05

0.22 0.22 0.23 0.2 I 0.2 I

86.6
80.0

0.20 0.98

0.60 4.20 0.56 0.37 0.42

10.0

60.0
33.0
5 .O

100.0

0.2 I

0.04
0.05

73.4 82.6

0.28 0.23

5-10

Source: Schroder and Anderson (281.

Other valuable information that can be obtained from analog computer studies is the response of the machine to oscillations originating in the system to which the machine is connected. This can be simulated on the analog representation of one machine connected to an infinite bus by modulating the infinite bus voltage with a signal of the desired frequency. This is particularly valuable in studies to improve the system damping. When growing oscillations occur in large interconnected systems, the frequencies of these oscillations are usually on the order of 0.2-0.3 Hz,with other frequencies superimposed upon them. Thus it is important to know the dynamic response of the synchronous machine under these conditions.

Effect of Excitation o n Stability

353

Fig. 8.40 Synchronous machine with PSS operating against an infinite bus whose voltage is being modulated at one-tenth the natural frequency of the machine.

A sample of this type of study, taken from [28], is shown here. The same machine discussed above, but operating under the heavy loading condition of Example 5.1, has its bus voltage modulated by a frequency of one-tenth the natural frequency. The modulating signal varies the infinite bus voltage between 1.02 and 0.98 peak. Figure 8.40 shows the effect of the PSS under these conditions. At time A the modulating signal of 2.1 rad/s is added. The PSS is removed at B, causing growing oscillations to build up especially on P,,, which would simulate tie-line oscillations. Note also that the frequency of these oscillations is near the natural frequency of the machine. When the stabilizer is reinstated at point C , the oscillations are quickly damped out. At point D the modulation is removed.
8.1 0
Digital Computer Transient Stability Studies

To illustrate the effect of the excitation system on transient stability, transient stability studies are made on the nine-bus system used in Section 2.10. The impedance diagram of the system (to 100-MVA base) and the prefault conditions are shown in Figures 2.18 and 2.19 respectively. The generator data are given in Table 2.1. The transient is initiated by a three-phase fault near bus 7 and is cleared by opening the line between bus 5 and bus 7. In this study the loads A , B, and C are represented by

354

Chapter 8

(1 +

TA1)(l

t ?$)

(1

O -

K,

Kz

I)(1

t-

K?
Kzo

T I )

+ + F e - Jdf
7

constant impedances; generators I and 3 are represented by classical models, Le., constant voltage behind transient reactance. For generator 2, provision is made for the excitation system representation. A modified transient stability program was used in this study. (It is based on a program developed by the Philadelphia Electric Co., with modifications to include the required new features.) When the excitation system is represented in detail, the model used for the synchronous machine is the so-called "one-axis model" (see Section 4.15.4) with provision for representing saturation. When the machine EMF E (corresponding to the field current) is calculated, an additional value EA is added due to saturation
Table 8.11. Excitation Systems Data
Parameter Amplidyne MagA-Stat SCPT

-0.044
0.0805

25

... ... I .o
-1.0

I .o

400 -0.17 0.04


I .o

120 1 .o

0.02
1 .o

... ...

...

3.5 -3.5

...

1.19 2.62 1.2 - 1.2 2.78


0.15 0.05

0.20
0.50 0.35

0.06
0.00I6 I .465

1 .o 0 0.0039

0.05 0.95

0.60

1.555

... ...

Note: See Figure 8.41 for BBC exciter parameters.

Effect of Excitation on Stability

355

l 120.

110-

- 100t
.U
al

.3
v

d
w B d

90-

//
1

----

---

BBC exciter -constant E Type

1 - 0.5 RR

80-

Mag-A-Stat BBC exciter 2 . 0 RR Classical model

I
0

I
0.2
821

0.1

I 0.3
Time, I

I
0.4

I
0.5

Fig. 8.42

for various exciters with a three-cycle fault.

effect and based on the voltage behind the leakage reactance E l . This is given by
EA = A,exp[B,(El - 0.8)]
(8.52)

The constants A, and BEare provided for several exciters [see (4.141)]. The types of field representation used with generator 2 are:
1. Classical model.

2. IEEE Type 1,0.5 pu response, amplidyne NAlOl exciter (see Figure 7.61). 3. IEEE Type I , 2.0 pu response, Mag-A-Stat exciter (see Figure 7.61). 4. IEEE Type 3, SCPT fast exciter, 2.0 pu response (see Figure 7.66).
5. Brown Boveri Company (BBC) alternator diode exciter (see Figure 8.41). The excitation system data are given in Table 8.1 1.
8.10.1
Effect of fault duration

Two sets of runs were made for the same fault location and removal, but for different fault durations. The breaker clearing times used were three cycles and six cycles. For a three-cycle fault, the results of generator 2 data are shown in Figures 8.42-8.46. Similar results for a six-cycle fault are shown in Figures 8.47-8.50.

356
1.2

Chapter 8

1.0-

0.8

-2--z----

---<----_----

- / e - - - E$

2 0.6ium
0 0

-- BBC exciter - 2.0 RR Mag-A-Stat -_- -0.5RR Type1


----/
I

>*

0.4

I
0

1
0.1

I
0.2

I
0.3
Time, I

I
0.4

I
0.5

0.6

Fig. 8.43

V, and E; for various exciters with a three-cycle fault.

Results with three-cycle fault clearing. Figure 8.42 shows a plot of the first swing of the angle d,, for different field representations. Note that the classical run gives the angle of the voltage behind transient reactance, while all the others give the position of the 9 axis. A run with constant E F D is also added. We conclude from the results shown in Figure 8.42 that for a three-cycle clearing time the classical model gives approximately the same magnitude of a,, for the first swing as the different exciter representations. When the exciter model was adjusted to give constant E F D , however, a large swing was obtained. From Figure 8.43 we conclude that the slow exciter gives the nearest simulation of a constant flux linkage in the main field winding (and hence constant E;) and minimum variation of the terminal voltage after fault clearing. The action of the exciter and the armature reaction effects are clearly displayed in Figure 8.44. It is interesting to note that the actual field current, as seen by the EMF E, is hardly affected by the value of E,, for most of the duration of the first swing after the fault is cleared. The effect of the armature reaction is dominant in this period. Figure 8.45 shows a time plot of P2 for this transient. Again it can be seen that the different models give essentially the same power swing for this generator. We note, however, that the minimum swing is obtained with the slow exciter while the maximum swing is obtained with the classical model. In Figure 8.46 the rotor angle d2, is plotted for a period of 2.0 s for the classical ~ ~ model, a slow IEEE Type 1 exciter, and a relatively fast exciter with 2 . 0 response. The plot shows that the first swing is the largest, with the subsequent swings slightly reduced in magnitude. Figures 8.42-8.46 seem to indicate that for this fault the system is well below the stability limit, since the magnitude of the first swing is on the order of 60". All generator

Effect of Excitation on Stability

357

Q
Y W

Lu

1.

I
0.1

I
0.2
Time, I

I
0.3

1
0.4

I
0.5

0 .

Fig. 8.44 EFD and E for various exciters with a three-cycle fault.

2 models give approximately the same magnitude of rotor angle and power swing and period of oscillation. Results with six-cycle fault clearing. For the case of a six-cycle clearing time, the plot of the angle d2, is shown in Figure 8.47 for the classical model and for two different types of exciter models. The swing curves indicate that this is a much more severe fault than the previous one, and the system is perhaps close to the transient stability limit. Here the swing curves for the generator with different field representations are quite different in both the magnitude of swings and periods of oscillation. The effect of the 2.0pu response exciter is pronounced after the first swing. The effect of the power system stabilizer on the response is hardly noticeable until the second swing. The magnitude of the first swing for the cases where the excitation system is represented in detail is significantly larger than for the case of the classical representation. The Type 1 exciter gives the highest swing. Comparing Figures 8.46 and 8.47, we note that for this severe fault the rotor oscillation of generator 2 depends a great deal on the type of excitation system used on the generator. We also note that the classical model does not accurately represent the generator response for this case.

358

Chapter 8

C h i c a l model
BBC exciter 2.0 RR Mag-A-Sa t Type 1 0.5 RR

im

80

0.1

02 .
Time,
I

03 .

0.4

0.5

Fig. 8.45 Output power P2 for various exciters with a three-cycle fault.

Fig. 8.46 Rotor angle 621 for various exciters with a three-cycle fault.

Effect of Excitation on Stability

359

I
0

0.2

0.4

06 .

0.8

lime, I

I 1.0

I 1.2

I 1.4

I
1.6 1.8

2.0

Fig. 8.47

Rotor angle 621 for various exciters with a six-cycle fault.

The output power of generator 2 is shown in Figure 8.48 for different exciter representations. While the general shape of these curves is the same, some significant differences are noted. The excitation system increases the output power of the generator after the first swing. The generator acceleration will thus decrease, causing the rotor swing to decrease appreciably. This effect is not noticed in the classical model. It would appear that for slightly more severe faults the classical model may predict different results concerning stability than those predicted using the detailed representation of the exciter. Figures 8.49 and 8.50 show plots of the various voltages and EMFS of generator 2 for the case of the 2.0pu exciter and the Type 1 exciter respectively. The curves for E: show that although the fault is near the generator terminal, the flux linkage in the main field winding (reflected in the value of E:) drops only slightly (by about 5%); and for the duration of the first swing it is fairly constant. The faster recovery occurs with the 2.0 pu exciter, and E; reaches a plateau at about I . 1 s and stays fairly constant thereafter. For the Type 1 exciter E; recovers slowly and continues to increase steadily. The oscillations of terminal voltage V, are somewhat complex. The first swing after the fault seems to be dominated by the inertial swing of the rotor, with the action of the exciter dominating the subsequent swings in y . Thus after the first voltage dip. the swings in V; follow the changes in the field voltage EFDwith a slight time lag. Again the recovery of the terminal voltage is faster with the 2.0 pu exciter than with the Type 1 exciter. We also note that the excitation system introduces additional frequencies of oscillation, which appear in the V, respocse.

360

Chapter 8

The plots of E clearly show the effect of the armature reaction. In the first 0.7s, for example, the changes in E , are reflected only in a minor way in the total internal EMF E. The component of E due to the armature reaction seems to be dominant because the field circuit time constant is long. The general shape of the EMF plot, however, is due to the effects of both E , and the armature reaction. From the data presented in this study we conclude that for a less severe fault or for fast fault clearing, the excitation representation is not critical in predicting the system dynamic responses. However, for a more severe fault or for studies involving long transient periods, it is important to represent the excitation system accurately to obtain the correct system dynamic response.
8.10.2
Effect of the power system stabilizer

For large disturbances the assumption of linear analysis is not valid. However, the

PSS is helpful in damping oscillations caused by large disturbances and can be effective
in restoring normal steady-state conditions. Since the initial rotor swing is largely an

Effect of Excitation on Stability

361

4.

-3.
Y

b
W
I

m u

1.10

$
2. 1.0

: a

Llw

0.9

i
P
3.8 .I.
0.7

Fig. 8.49 Voltages of generator 2 with BBC exciter.

-3
Y

-B
Y

2 a

e -

s;
2

1.10

10 .

>i;w e

0.9

P
0.8

Time,

Fig. 8.50 Voltages of generator 2 with Type I 0.5 R R exciter.

362

Chapter 8

I5 2

Ii
0

I!II

I 0.25

I
05 .0

I
0.75

1 .oo
Time, s

I
1.25

15 .0

1.75

2 .

= Fig. 8.51 Torque angle 621 for a three-phase Fault near generator 2, PSS with a = 25. wOEC 8.9 rad/s.

inertial response to the accelerating torque in the rotor, the stabilizer has little effect on this first swing. On subsequent oscillations, however, the effect of the stabilizer is quite pronounced. To illustrate the effect of the PSS. some transient stability runs are made for a threephase fault near bus 7 applied at t = 0.0167 s ( 1 cycle) and cleared by opening line 5-7

0.25

05 .0

07 .5

1 .oo
Time,
I

12 .5

15 .0

17 .5

20 .1

Fig. 8.52 Exciter voltage EFD with and without a PSS.

Effect of Excitation o n Stability

363

at t = 0.10s (6 cycles). Generator 2 is equipped with a Type 1 Mag-A-Stat exciter with constants similar to those given in Table 8.1 1. The PSS constants are the same as in Example 8.12 (a = 25) with a limiter included such that the PSS output is limited to *O.lOpu. Stability runs were made with and without the PSS. From the stability runs, data for the angle 6,, and the voltage E,, are taken with and without the PSS. The results are displayed in Figures 8.5 1 and 8.52. From the plot of d,, in Figure 8.51 note that while the change in the first peak (due to the PSS) is very small, the improvement in the peak of the second swing is significant. The comparison in E,,, shown in Figure 8.52, is interesting. Note that this exciter is not particularly fast (RR = O S ) , and the response tends to be a ramp up and then down. The phase of E,, changes when the PSS is applied to produce a field voltage that is almost 180 out of phase with &,, This results in a delayed E,, ramp as 6 swings downward, which tends to limit the downward 6 excursion by retarding the building in T,. The improvemew in the angle A,,, defined as 6 , , , = a, (no pss) - 6,, ,pss), has been , investigated for different PSS parameters. I t is found that this angle improvement is sensitive to both the amount of lead compensation and to the cutoff level of the PSS limiter. A comparison of several runs is shown in Table 8.12.
Table8.12. 6 , Improvement at Peak , of Second Swing
a
25 16 Limit
=

+0.10

Limit = *O.OS 4.6 3.7

5.8 5.4

8.1 1

Some General Comments on the Effect of Excitation on Stability

In the 1940s it was recognized that excitation control can increase the stability limits of synchronous generators. Another way to look at the same problem is to note that fast excitation systems allow operation with higher system reactances. This is felt to be important in view of the trends toward higher capacity generating units with higher reactances. For exciters to perform this function, they need high gain. Series compensation makes it possible to have a high dc gain and at the same time have lower transient gain for stable performance. Modern exciters are faster and more powerful and hence allow for operation with higher series system reactance. Concordia [ 171, however, warns that we cannot expect to continue indefinitely to compensate for increases in reactance by more and more powerful excitation systems. A limit may soon be reached when further increases in system reactance should be compensated for by means other than excitation control. The above summarizes the situation regarding the so-called steady-state stability or power limits. Regarding the dynamic performance, modern excitation systems play an important part in the overall response of large systems to various impacts, both in the so-called transient stability problems and the dynamic stability problems. The discussion in Section 8.3 and the studies of Section 8.10 seem to indicate that for less severe transients, the effect of modern fast excitation systems on first swing transients is marginal. However, for more severe transients or for transients initiated by faults of longer duration, these modern exciters can have a more pronounced effect. In the first place, for faults near the generator terminals it is important that the synchronous machine be modeled accurately. Also, if the transient study extends beyond the first swing, an accurate representation of the field flux in the machine is needed. If the excitation system is slow and has a low response ratio, optimistic results

364

Chapter 8

Shaft speed

Terminal volta

+=@a
=

Fig. 8.53 Block diagram of the PSS for the BBC exciter with a 2.0 RR: KQI = Kp3 T , = IO, 1 2 = 0.5, 1 3 = 0.05, 14 = 0.5, 1 5 = 0.05. limit = j~0.05 pu.

Ked

0,KQz

I,

may be obtained if the classical machine representation is used. Transient studies are frequently run for a few swings to check on situations where circuit breakers may fail to operate properly and where backup protection is used. I t should be mentioned that several transients have been encountered in the systems of North America where subsequent swings were of greater magnitudes than the first, causing eventual loss of synchronism. This is not too surprising in large interconnected systems with numerous modes of oscillations. I t is not unlikely that some of the modes may be superimposed at some time after the start of the transient in such a way as to cause increased angle deviation. As shown in Section 8.10, the effect of excitation system compensation on subsequent swings (in large transients) is very pronounced. This has been repeatedly demonstrated in computer simulation studies and by field tests reported upon in the literature [8, 9, 13, 23, 29, 30, 311. For example, in a stability study conducted by engineers of the Nebraska Public Power District, the effect of the PSS on damping the subsequent swings was found to be quite pronounced, while the effect on the magnitude of the first swing was hardly noticeable. The excitation system used is the Brown Boveri exciter shown in Figure 8.41. The PSS used is shown schematically in Figure 8.53, and the swing curves obtained with and without the PSS (for the same fault) are shown in Figure 8.54. Voltage regulators can and do improve the synchronizing torques. Their effect on damping torques are small; but in the cases where the system exhibits negative damping characteristics, the voltage regulator usually aggravates the situation by increasing the negative damping. Supplementary signals to introduce artificial damping torques and to reduce intermachine and intersystem oscillations have been used with great success. These signals must be introduced with the proper phase relations to compensate for the excessive phase lag (and hence improve the system damping) at the desired frequencies [ 321. Large interconnected power systems experience negative damping at very low frequencies of oscillations. The parameters of the PSS for a particular generator must be adjusted after careful study of the power system dynamic performance and the generator-exciter dynamic response characteristics. As indicated in Section 8.6, to obtain these characteristics, field measurements are preferred. I f such measurements are not possible, approximate methods of analysis can be used to obtain preliminary design data, with provision for the adjustment of the PSS parameters to be made on the site after installation. Usually the PSS parameters are optimized over a range of frequencies between the natural mode of oscillation of the machine and the dominant frequency of oscillation of the interconnected power system.

Effect of Excitation on Stability


165

365

,Without

PSS i n operation

d 0

With PSS in operation

Time, cycles

Fig. 8.54 Effect of the PSS on transient stability. (Obtained by private communication and used with permission.)

Recently many studies have been made on the use of various types of compensating networks to meet different situations and stimuli. Most of these studies concentrate on the use of a signal derived from speed or frequency deviation processed through a PSS network to give the proper phase relation to obtain the desired damping characteristic. This approach seems to concentrate on alleviating the problem of growing oscillations o n tie lines [ 1 I , 13, 14, 24, 26, 30, 33-39]. However, in a large interconnected system it is possible to have a variety of potential problems that can be helped by excitation control. Whether the stabilizing signal derived from speed provides the best answer is an open question. It would seem likely that the principle of optimal control theory is applicable to this problem. Here signals derived from the various states of the system are fed back with different gains to optimize the system dynamic performance. This optimization is accomplished by assigning a performance index. This index is minimized by a control law described by a set of equations. These equations are solved for the gain constants. This subject is under active investigation by many researchers [40-441.
Problems
8.1 8.2 8.3

8.4

Construct a block diagram for the regulated generator given by (8.10)-(8.14). What is the order of the system? Use block diagram algebra to reduce the system of Problem 8.1 to a feed-forward transfer function KG(s) and a feedback transfer function H ( s ) , arranged as in Figure 7.19. Determine the open loop transfer function for the system of Problem 8.2, using the numerical data given in Example 8.3. Find the upper and lower limits of the gain K, for (a) Case 1 and (b) Case 2. Repeat the determination of stable operating constraints developed in Section 8.4.1, with the following assumptions (see [ I I]):

366

Chapter 8 Recompute the gain limitations, using the numerical constants K , through K6 given in Table 8.3. T h e block diagram shown in Figure 8.14 represents the machine terminal voltage a t n o load. T h e s domain equation for y / VREFis given by (8.24). It is stated in Section 8.4.2 that a higher value of regulator gain K, can be used if a suitable lead-lag network is chorls)/(l q s ) , choose 71 a n d sen. If the transfer function of such a network is (1 such that the value of the gain can be increased eight times. In (8.30) and (8.31) assume that K6K, >> I/K3, and & > 7 , / K 3 . F o r each of the cases > in Example 8.3, plot T, and Td a s functions of w between w = 0.1 rad/s and w = 10 rad/s (use semilog graph paper). C o m p u t e the constants K , through K6 for generator 3 of Example 2.6. Determine the excitation control system phase lag of Example 8.7 if a low time constant exciter is used where K, = 400 and 7, = 0.05 s. C o m p u t e the open loop transfer function of the system of Figure 8.28 both with and without the stabilizer. Sketch root loci o f e a c h case. Analyze the system in Figure 8.29 for a stabilizing signal processed through a bridged Tfilter:

8.5

8.6

8.7 8.8
8.9

8. IO

Gs
8.1 I

= (s2

+ mw,s + w:)/(s2 + nuns + w i ) ,

8.12

8.13 8.14

8.15
8.16

where w, is the natural frequency of the machine, n = 2 a n d r = 0.1. Sketch Bode diagrams of the several lead compensators described in Example 8.10. Use a linear systems analysis program (if o n e is available) t o compute root locus. time response t o a step change in V,, and a Bode plot for Example 8.1 I with ,, ( a ) A dual lead compensator with a = 15. (b) A triple lead compensator with Q = IO. Perform a transient stability run, using a computer library program to verify the results of ; Section 8.10. Plot E and a s functions of time and comment on these results. Modify the block diagram of Figure 5 . I8 showing the analog computer simulation of the synchronous machine to allow modulating the infinite bus voltage. With the help of the field voltage equation (vF = rFiF AF), discuss the plots of EFD, E, a n d E; shown in Figures 8.43 and 8.44. Explain why the curve for constant EFD in Figure 8.42 shows a larger swing than the other field representation.

References
I . Concordia, C. Steady-state stability of synchronous machines as affected by voltage regulator characteristics. A I E E Trans. PAS-63:215-20, 1944. 2. Crary S. B. Long distance power transmission. A I E E Trans. 69. (Pt. 2):834-44, 1950. 3. Ellis, H. M., Hardy, J. E., Blythe, A. L., and Skooglund, J. W. Dynamic stability of the Peace River transmission system. I E E E Trans. PAS-85:586-600, 1966. 4. Schleif, F. R.. and White, J. H. Damping for the northwest-southwest tieline oscillations-An analog study. IEEE Trans. PAS-85: 1239-47. 1966. 5. Byerly, R. T., Skooglund. J. W., and Keay, F. W. Control of generator excitation for improved power system stability. Proc. Am. Power ConJ 29:lOll-1022. 1967. 6. Schleif. F. R., Martin, G. E., and Angell. R. R. Damping of system oscillations with a hydrogenating unit. I E E E Trans. PAS-86:438-42, 1967. W.. 7. Hanson, 0. Goodwin, C. J., and Dandeno, P. L. Influence of excitation and speed control parameters in stabilizing intersystem oscillations. IEEE Trans. PAS-87:1306- 13. 1968. 8. Dandeno, P. L., Karas, A. N.. McClymont, K. R., and Watson, W. Effect of high-speed rectifier excitation systems on generator stability limits. I E E E Trans. PAS-87: 190-201. 1968. 9. Shier, R. M., and Blythe, A. L. Field tests of dynamic stability using a stabilizing signal and computer program verification. I E E E Trans. PAS-87:3 15-22. 1968. IO. Schleif, F. R.. Hunkins. H. D., Martin, G. E., and Hattan, E. E. Excitation control to improve power line stability. I E E E Trans. PAS-87: 1426-34. 1968. 11. de Mello, F. P., and Concordia, C. Concepts of synchronous machine stability as affected by excitation control. I E E E Trans. PAS-88:316-29. 1969. 12. Schleif, F. R., Hunkins, H. D., Hattan, E. E., and Gish, W. 6. Control of rotating exciters for power system damping: Pilot applications and experience. I E E E Trans. PAS-88: 1259-66, 1969.

Effect of Excitation o n Stability


13. Klopfenstein. A.

367

14.
15.

16. 17. 18. 19.

20.
21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29.

30.
31.

32. 33. 34.

35.
36. 37.
38.

39. 40.
41.

42. 43. 44.

Experience with system stabilizing controls on the generation of the Southern California Edison c o . / Trans. PAS-90:698-706, 1971. de Mello. F. P. The effects of control. Modern concepts of power system dynamics. IEEE tutorial course. IEEE Power Group Course Text 70 M 62-PWR. 1970. Young. C. C. The art and science of dynamic stability analysis. IEEE paper 68 CP702-PWR, presented at the ASME-IEEE Joint Power Generation Conference, San Francisco, Calif., 1968. Ramey, D. G.. Byerly, R. T., and Sherman, D. E. The application of transfer admittances to the analysis of power systems stability studies. / E Trans. PAS-W.993-Ip00, 1971. Concordia, C.. and Brown, P. G. Effects of trends in large steam turbine generator parameters on power system stability. / E Trans. PAS-90221 1-18. 1971. Perry. H. R.. Luini. J. F.. and Coulter, J. C. Improved stability with low time constant rotating exciter. / Trans. PAS-902084-89. 197 I . Brown. P. G.. de Mello. F. P., Lenfest. E. H., and Mills. R. J. Effects of excitation. turbine energy control and transmission on transient stability. / E Trans. PAS-89 1247-53. 1970. Melsa, J. L. Cottipurer Progranis for Cottiputatiowl Assistance in the Studr of' Linear Control Theory. McGraw-Hill. New York, 1970. Duven. D. J. Data instructions for program LSAP. Unpublished notes, Electrical Engineering Dept., Iowa State University. Ames. 1973. Kuo. Benjamin C. Autonraric Control Systettrs. Prentice-Hall. Englewood Cliffs. N .J., 1962. . Gerhart. A. D., Hillesland. T.. Jr.. Luini. J. F.. and Rocktield, M. L . Jr. Power system stabilizer: Field testing and digital simulation. / E Trans. PAS-902095-2101, 1971. Warchol, E. J., Schleif. F. K., Gish, W. B. and Church, J. R. Alignment and modeling of Hanford excitation control for system damping. / E Trans. PAS-90714-25, 1971. Eilts. L. E. Power system stabilizers: Theoretical basis and practical experience. Paper presented at the panel discussion "Dynamic stability in the western interconnected power systems" for the IEEE Summer Power Meeting, Anaheim, Calif., 1974. Keay. F. W.. and South, W. H. Design of a power system stabilizer sensing frequency deviation. / E Trans. PAS-90707-14. 1971. Bolinger. K.. Laha. A.. Hamilton. R., and Harras. T. Power stabilizer design using root-locus methods. / E Trans. PAS-94: 1484-88. 1975. Schroder. D. C.. and Anderson, P. M. Compensation of synchronous machines for stability. IEEE paper C 73-3 13-4, presented at the Summer Power Meeting, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. 1973. Bobo. P. 0.. Skooglund, J. W., and Wagner, C. L. Performance of excitation systems under abnormal conditions. ITrans. PAS-87547-53, 1968. Byerly. R. T. Damping of power oscillations in salient-pole machines with static exciters. / E Trans. PAS-89:1009-21. 1970. McClymont. K . R., Manchur. G.. Ross, R. J., and Wilson, R. J. Experience with high-speed rectitier excitation systems. / Trans. PAS-87: 1464-70. 1968. Jones. G. A. Phasor interpretation of generator supplementary excitation control. Paper A75-437-4, presented at the IEEE Summer Power Meeting. San Francisco, Calif.. 1975. El-Sherbiny. M . K.. and Fouad. A. A. Digital analysis ofexcitation control for interconnected power systems. / E Trans. PAS-90441 -48. 1971. Watson. W.. and Manchur. G. Experience with supplementary damping signals for generator static excitation systems. /E Trans. PAS-92: 199-203. 1973. Hayes. D. R.. and Craythorn. G. E. Modeling and testing of Valley Steam Plant supplemental excitation control system. / Trans. PAS-92:464-70, 1973. Marshall. W. K.. and Smolinski. W. J. Dynamic stability determination by synchronizing and damping torque analysis. Paper T 73-007-2. presented at the IEEE Winter Power Meeting, New York. 1973. El-Sherbiny. M. K., and Huah. Jenn-Shi. A general analysis of developing a universal stabilizing signal for different excitation controls, which is applicable to all possible loadings for both lagging and lerding operation. Paper C74-106-1. presented at the IEEE Winter Power Meeting, New York. 1974. Bayne. J. P.. Kundur, P.. and Watson. W. Static exciter control to improve transient stability. Paper T74-521-1, presented at the IEEE-ASME Power Generation Technical Conference, Miami Beach, Fla.. 1974. Arcidiacono. V.. Ferrari. E., Marconato. R.. Brkic,T., Niksic, M.. and Kajari. M. Studies and experimental results about electromechanical oscillation damping in Yugoslav power system. Paper F75-460-6 presented at the IEEE Summer Meeting. San Francisco, Calif., 1975. Fosha. C., E.. and Elgerd. 0 . I. The megawatt-frequency control problem: A new approach via optimal control theory. / E Trans. PAS-89563-77. 1970. Anderson, T H.The control of a synchronous machine using optimalcontrol theory.Proc. IEEE-5925-35, . 1971. Moussa, H. A. M., and Yu. Yao-nan. Optimal power system stabilization through excitation and/or governor control. / E Trans. PAS-91: 1166-74. 1972. Humpage, W. D., Smith, J. R . and Rogers, G . T. Application of dynamic optimization to synchro. nous generator excitation controllers. Proc. /(British) 120:87-93. 1973. Elmetwally, M. M.. Rao. N. D. and Malik. 0 . P. Experimental results on the implementation of an optimal control for synchronous machines. / E Trans. PAS-94: I 192-1200. 1974.

chapter

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance Loads


9.1
Introduction

In this chapter we develop the equations for the load constraints in a multimachine system in the special case where the loads are to be represented by constant impedances. The objective is to give a mathematical description of the multimachine system with the load constraints included. Representing loads by constant impedance is not usually considered accurate. It has been shown in Section 2.1 1 that this type of load representation could lead to some error. A more accurate representation of the loads will be discussed in Part I11 of this work. Our main concern here is to apply the load constraints to the equations of the machines. We choose the constant impedance load case because of its relative simplicity and because with this choice all the nodes other than the generator nodes can be eliminated by network reduction (See Section 2.10.2).
9.2
Statement of the Problem

In previous chapters, mathematical models describing the dynamic behavior.of the synchronous machine are discussed in some detail. In Chapter 4 [see (4.103) and (4.138)] it is shown that each machine is described mathematically by a set of equations of the form
ir = ~ ( X , V T,,t) , (9.1) where x is a vector of state variables, v is a vector of voltages, and T, is the mechanical torque. The dimension of the vector x depends on the model used. The order of x ranges from seventh order for the full model (with three rotor circuits) to second order for the classical model where only w and d are retained as the state variables. The vector v is a vector of voltages that includes u d , uq, and up If the excitation system is not represented in detail, uF is assumed known; but if the excitation system is modeled mathematically, additional state variables, including up, are added to the vector x (see Chapter 7) with a reference quantity such as V, known. In this chapter ,, we will assume without loss of generality that uF is known. Consider the set of equations (9. I). In the current model developed in Chapter 4, it represents a set of seven first-order differential equationsfor each machine. The number of the variables, however, is nine: five currents, w and 6, and the voltages ud and uq. Assuming that there are n synchronous machines in the system, we have a set of 7n differential equations with 90 unknowns. Therefore, 2n additional equations are
368

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance Loads

369

needed to complete the description of the system. These equations are obtained from the load constraints. The objective here is to derive relations between udi and uqi,i = 1, 2, . . . , n, and the state variables. This will be obtained in the form of a relation between these voltages, the machine currents i9i and i d i , and the angles d i , i = I , 2, . . .,n. In the case of the flux linkage model the currents are linear combinations of the flux linkages, as given in (4.124). For convenience we will use a complex notation defined as follows. For machine i we define the phasors and 5 as

Vi

Vqi + j Vdi

Ii

Iqi

+ jIdi

(9.2)

where

(9.3) and where the axis qi is taken as the phasor reference in each case. Then we define the complex vectors and f by

(9.4) Note carefully that the voltage and the current 8 are referred to the q and d axes of machine i . I n other words the different voltages and currents are expressed in terms of different reference frames. The desired relation is that which relates the vectors andT. When obtained, it will represent a set of n complex algebraic equations, or 2n real equations. These are the additional equations needed to complete the mathematical description of the system.

9.3

Matrix Representation of a Passive Network

Consider the multimachine system shown in Figure 9.1. The network has n machines and r loads. It is similar to the system shown in Figure 2.17 except that the machines are not represented by the classical model. Thus, the terminal voltages y., i = I , 2, . . . , n, are shown in Figure 9.1 instead of the internal EMFS in Figure 2.17. Since the loads are represented by constant impedances, the network has only n active sources. Note also that the impedance equivalents of the loads are obtained from the pretransient conditions in the system. By network reduction the network shown in Figure 9.1 can be reduced to the n-node network shown in Figure 9.2 (see Section 2.10.2). For this network the node currents and voltages expressed in phasor notation are 4, &, . . . , and V,, 6 , . . . , Vn respectively. Again we emphasize that these phasors are expressed in terms of reference frames that are different for each node. At steady slate these currents and voltages can be represented by phasors to a com-

<

370

Chapter 9

rn

IFig. 9.1. Multimachine system with constant impedance loads.

mon reference frame. To distinguish these phasors from those defined by (9.2). we will use the symbols ii and vi, i = 1. 2, . . . , n, to designate the use of a common (network) frame of reference. Similarly, we can form the matrices i and 6. From the network steady-state equations we write (9'3) where

and

is the short circuit admittance matrix of the network in Figure 9.2.


9.3.1
Network in the transient state

-"I
... V"

(9.6)

Consider a branch in the reduced network of Figure 9.2. Let this branch, located between any two nodes in the network, be identified by the subscript k. Let the branch

+n

la---

', 1
t

-2 -1

+
va

' n

*O _____I,

Multimachine Systems with Constant impedance Loads

371

resistance be rk, its inductance be t k , and its impedance be T,. The branch voltage drop and current are vk and i,. I n the transient state the relation between these quantities is given by
v k
= tk;k

+ rkik

1,2, ..., b

(9.7)

where b is the number of branches. Using subscripts abc to denote the phases abc, (9.7) can be written as
vablk

kiahrk

+ rkiabck

1, 2, . . ,b

(9.8)

This branch equation could be written with respect to any of the n q-axis references by using the appropriate transformation P. Premultiplying (9.8) by the transformation P as defined by (4.5),
Vabrk

= t k p iobrk

rkp

iabr&

(9.9)

Then from (4.3I ) and (4.32)

jabr

;Odq

[-:I

(9. IO)

Substituting (9.10) in (9.9) and using (4.7).

(9.1 I )

which in the case of balanced conditions becomes

(9.12)
I t is customary to make the following assumptions: (1) the system angular speed wR and (2) the terms 4; are does not depart appreciably from the rated speed, or w negligible compared to the terms u t i . The first assumption makes the term @&(& approximately equal to x k i k ,and the second assumption suggests that the terms in ik are to be neglected. Under the above assumptions (9.12) becomes

(9.13)
Equation (9.13) gives a relation between the voltage drop and the current in one branch of the network in the transient state. These quantities are expressed in the q-d frame of reference of any machine. Let the machine associated with this transformation be i. The rotor angle Oi of this machine is given by

ei

oRt + 7r/2

+ ai

(9.14)

where ai is the angle between this rotor and a synchronously rotating reference frame.

372

Chapter 9

Reference frame at synchronous speed)

Fig. 9.3. Position of axes of rotor k with respect to reference frame

From (9.13) multiply both sides by l / d ; and using (9.3),


v ki q ()
rktqk(iJ

xktdk(ij

Vdk(i)

rktdk/iJ

+ xktqk(iJ

(9.15)

where the subscript i is added to indicate that the rotor of machine i is used as reference. Expressing (9.15) in phasor notation,

kliJ

= =

qk(iJ

+j
-

dk(il Xktdk(iJ)

(rktqk(iJ

+ j(rktdkliJ + XktqkliJ)

(rk

+ jxk)([qk

-k

jtdk)

or
(9.16) Equation (9.16) expresses, in complex phasor notation, the relation between the voltage drop in branch k and the current in that branch. The reference is the q axis of some (hypothetical) rotor i located at angle bi with respect to a synchronously rotating system reference, as shown in Figure 9.3.
9.3.2
Converting to a common reference frame

To obtain general network relationships, it is desirable to express the various branch quantities to the same reference. Let us assume that we want to convert the phasor = Vqi + j Vdito the common reference frame (moving at synchronous speed). Let the same voltage, expressed in the new notation, be = VQi + jVDi as shown in Figure 9.4. From Figure 9.4 by inspection we can show that

<

VQi

+ j VDi = (VqiCOS bi

vdi

sin S i )

+ j( Vqisin bi +

Vdi

COS

Si)

or

pi

vejai

(9.17)

Now convert the network branch voltage drop equation (9.16) to the system reference frame by using (9.17).
pke-j*i

= 2

k k

i e-jai
1.2. ..., b (9.18)

or
pk

zkjk

where b is the number of branches and 2, is calculated based on rated angular speed. Comparing (9.18) and (9.5) under the assumptions stated above, the network in the transient state can be described by equations similar to those describing its steady-state

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance loads

373

Vdi

- --

Fig. 9.4. T w o frames of reference for phasor quantities for a voltage Vi.

behavior. The network (branch) equations are in terms of quantities expressed to the same frame of reference, conveniently chosen to be moving at synchronous speed (it is also the system reference frame). Equation (9.18) can be expressed in matrix form
v b =

?.bib

(9.19)

where the subscript b is used to indicate a branch matrix. The inverse of the primitive branch matrix 4 exists and is denoted sib, thus
ib = y b v b

(9.20)

Equation (9.20) is expressed in terms of the primitive admittance matrix of a passive network. From network theory we learn to construct the node incidence matrix A which is used to convert (9.20) into a nodal admittance equation

i
where
A
=

(A'ybA)v

yv

(9.21)

v is the matrix of short circuit driving point and transfer admittances and
[a,,]
=

1 if current in branch p leaves node q

= -1 =

if current in branch p enters node 9 0 if branch p is not connected to node 9

(9.22)

withp = 1,2, . . . . b a n d q Since V-' Z exists,

1 ,2,..., n.

v-lj

zi

(9.23)

where z is the matrix of the open circuit driving point and transfer impedances of the network. (For the derivation of (9.21)-(9.23), including a discussion of the properties of the and matrices, see reference [ I ] , Chapter I I .)

9.4

Converting Machine Coordinates to System Reference

Consider a voltage V,bei at node i. We can apply Park's transformation to this voltage to obtain vdqi. From (9.2) this voltage can be expressed in phasor notation as y , using the rotor of machine i as reference. I t can also be expressed to the system reference as vi,using the transformation (9.17).

374

Chapter 9

Equation (9.17) can be generalized to include all the nodes. Let


eJ6I

;e.:; 1'
0

...

::: ...

(9.24)

(9.25)

Then from (9.2), (9.14), (9.17), and (9.25)


V
=

TV

(9.26)

Thus T is a transformation that transforms the d and q quantities of all machines to the system frame, which is a common frame moving at synchronous speed. We can easily show that the transformation T is orthogonal, Le.,

T-1
Therefore, from (9.26) and (9.27) Similarly for the node currents we get

T*

(9.27)

T*3

(9.28)

i
9.5

= Tf

T*P

(9.29)

Relation between Machine Currents and Voltages

From (9.22) f = YV. By using (9.29) in (9.22),

T f = VTV
Premultiplying (9.30) oy T - '

(9.30)

I
where

(T-IYT)V & FiV


M 2 (T-IYT)

(9.31)

(9.32)

and if

R-l exists,

- = (T-lvT)-'i = (T-'ZT)i V

(9.33)

Equation (9.33) is the desired relation needed between the terminal voltages and currents of the machines. It is given here in an equivalent phasor notation for convenience and compactness. It is, however, a set of algebraic equations between 2n real Id17 Id,,. voltages VqI, v d l , . . . , V n , Vdn, and 2n real currents IqI, . . . ,Iqnr

Example 9. I Derive the expression for the matrix

for an n-machine system.

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance Loads

375

Solution

The matrix

of the network is of the form

(9.34)

and from (9.24)

(9.35)
From (9.34) and (9.35)
y , ,,J(@ll+ a , )
YI2,J(@12+62)

...

y
In

eJ(@in+6n) eJ(82n+6n) 2n

VT

y2,,;(e21

+61)
22

eJVz~+6~i

...

...

yn l e J ( @ n i + 6 ~ ) yn2e J(un2+62)

... ... . . . Y,, e J ( U , + ~ , )


1

...

and premultiplying by T - ' , we get the desired result

To simplify (9.36), we note that


yikeJ(@ik-6ik)

(Gi, cos 6 ,

+ Biksin 6 , ) + j(Bikcos 6,
Gik COS aik

Giksin d i k )

Now define
FG+B(dik)
FB-G(Bik)

= FG+B =
= FB-G

+ Biksin 6,
(9.37) (9.38)

Bikcos dik - Gi, sin

Then the matrix %Tis given by

M = H + j S

where H and S are real matrices of dimensions ( n x n ) . Their diagonal and offdiagonal terms are given by

hii
Example 9.2

Gji

hik

FG+B(6jk)

Bii

sik

FB-G(6i&)

(9.39)

Derive the relations between the d and q machine voltages and currents for a twomachine system.

376

Chapter 9

Solution From (9.3 I ) and (9.38)

( H V , - SVd)

+ j ( S V , + HVd)

(9.40)

For a two-machine system the q axis currents are given by

and the d axis currents are given by

We note that a relation between the voltages and currents based upon (9.33) (i.e.. giving V , , . V,,, Vdl, and Vd2in terms of I q l .I,,, Idl. and I d , ) can be easily derived. I t would be analogous to (9.40) except that the admittance parameters are replaced with the parameters'of the matrix of the network.

Example 9.3. Derive the complete system equations for a two-machine system. The machines are to be represented by the two-axis model (see Section 4.15.3), and the loads are to be represented by constant impedances.
Solution The transient equivalent circuit of each synchronous machine is given in Figure 4.16. A further approximation, commonly used with this model, is that x i x i 2 x'. The network is now shown in Figure 9.5. The representation is similar to that of the are not constant. classical model except that in Figure 9.5 the voltages E; and The first step is to reduce the network to the "internal" generator nodes 1 and 2. Thus the transient generator impedances rl + j x ; and r, + j x ; are included in the net= ESI j E j l and E; = Ei2 jEj2, worky ( or Z ) matrix. The voltages at the nodes are and the currents are 6 = IqI + j I d l and & = I,, + j f d z . The relation between them is

+
Fig. 9.5. Network of Example 9.3.

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance Loads Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance Loads

377 377

given equation similar The equations for each given by an equation similar to (9.40). The equations for each machine, under the assumption that x x the two equations sumption that x ii zz x;,i , are the two axis equations of Section 4.15.3.

(9.41) (9.41) and (9.41) completely describe the replaced with Equations (9.40). with system. Each machine represents a fourth-order system, with state variables E& Eii, wi. and 6,. The complete system equations are given by

z',

(9.42) The system given by (9.42) is nor an eighth-order system since the equations are not independent. This system is actually a seventh-order system with state variables E i , , E ; , , Ei2, Ei2. w , , w 2 , and 6,2. The reduction of the order is obtained from the last two equations

a,,

= WI

w2

Furthermore, , 7 = D2/rj2 D / T (or Furthermore, if damping is uniform; i.e.. if D 1 / r jj,l = D2/rj2 = D/7i ~ if damping is not present) then the system is further reduced in order by one, and the two torque equations equations can be combined in the form

9.6

System Order

In Example 9.3 it was shown that with damping present the order of the system was reduced by one if the angle of one machine is chosen as reference. It was also pointed system out that if damping is uniform, a further reduction of the system order is achieved. We now seek to generalize these conclusions. We consider first the classical model with zero transfer conductances. We can show that the system equations are given by

378

Chapter 9

TJlbr D,w, =

2
I-

El~Bll(sin6; sin6,) -

Jfl

6,=w,

i = 1 , 2 ,..., n

(9.43)

where the superscript s indicates the stable equilibrium angle. Defining the state vector x, the vector I J , and the function f by
x' = Iw,, (Jz,

&(ak) =

. . . % ( 6 , - a;),(& - 6 % . . . ,(a" - 691 k = l , 2 , ...,m E,,E,B,,,(sin(u, + 6iq) - sin6;J


3

n(n

1)/2

and u = C x where C is a constant matrix. The system (9.43) may then be written in the form
i
=

A X - Bf(a)

(9.44)

where A and B are constant matrices. The order of the system (9.44) is determined by examining the transfer function of the linear part (with s the Laplace variable)
W(S)
=

C(s1

- A)-' B

(9.45)

This has been done in the literature [2, 3). Expanding (9.45) in partial fractions and examining the ranks of the coefficientsobtained, the minimal order of the system is obtained. It is shown that the minimal order for this system is 2n - I . For the uniform damping case, i.e., for constant D,/T,,, the order of the system becomes 2n - 2 (see also (41). The conclusions summarized above for the classical model can be generalized as follows. If the order of the mathematical model describing the synchronous machine i is k,, i = I , 2 , . . . ,n , and if damping terms are nonuniform damping, the order of the system is (E?=ki - 1). However, if the damping coefficients are uniform or if the damping terms are not present, a further reduction of the order is obtained by referring all the speeds to the speed of the reference machine. The system order then becomes (2?=1 - 2). kj The above rule should be kept in mind, especially in situations where eigenvalues are obtained such as in the linearized models used in Chapter 6. Unless angle differences are used, the sum of the column of 6's will be zero and a zero eigenvalue will be obtained (see Section 9.12.4).
9.7 Machines Represented By Classical Methods

In the discussion presented above, it is assumed that all the nodes are connected to controlled sources, with all other nodes eliminated by Kron reduction (see Chapter 2, Section 2.10.2). The procedure used to obtain (9.31) assumes that all the machines are represented in detail using Park's transformation. For these machines we seek a relation, such as (9.3 I). between the currents y and the voltages 9 . The former are either among the state variables if the current model is used, or are derived from the state variables if the flux linkage model is used (see [5]). If some machines are represented by the classical model, the magnitudes of their internal voltages are known. If machine r is represented by the classical model, the angle 6, for this machine is the angle between this internal voltage and the system reference axis. In phasor notation the voltage of that node, expressed to the system refer-

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance Loads

379

ence, is given by

V,

VQ, + j VD, = E, cos 6,

+ j E , sin 6,

(9.46)

At any instant if 6, is known, VQrand V,,, are also known. Since the voltage E, is considered to be along the q axis of the machine represented by the classical model, we can also express the voltage of this machine in phasor notation as

V,

E,

+ j0

1,2, ..., c

(9.47) Also from

where c is the number of machines represented by the classical model. (4.93) on a per phase base

Pe*

V,id

+ uqiq pu

Dividing both sides by three changes the base power to a three-phase base and converting to stator rms equivalent quantities. divides each voltage and current by fl, Thus we have
pe

= bfd

pu(3d)

and using (9.47),


Per

IqJr

~ ~ ( 3 4 )

(9.48)

Note that E, is in per unit to a base of rated voltage to neutral. Assuming that the speed does not deviate appreciably from the synchronous speed, P, and from the swing equation (4.90) on a three-phase base then T,
h = r
(I/~jr)(Tm,

EJqr)

(Dr/Tjr)wr

8,

wr

- 1

(9.49)

A machine r represented by the classical model will have only w, and 6, as state variables. I n (9.49) E, is known, while I,, is a variable that should be eliminated. To do this we should obtain a relation between I,, and the currents of the machines represented in detail. Similarly the voltages Vgi and bi of the machines represented in detail should be expressed in terms of the currents f q i and fdj of these machines and the voltages E, of the machines represented classically. To obtain the above desired relations, the following procedure is suggested. Let m be the number of machines represented in detail. and c the number of machines represented by the classical model; Le.,
A m + c = n

Let the vectorsTand

v be partitioned as

A =

V =

(9.50)

E,,

+ j0

380

Chapter 9

Then from (9.50) and (9.31)

where in (9.51) the complex matrix 11;T is partitioned. Now since Mrl1exists, (9.51) can be rearranged with the aid of matrix algebra to obtain

[;-I= [z-;-z-]E;]
MI1
a 1 2

(9.5 1)

M1 I 2

M*2

E]=[

R , I

-M;lmlz

-------!.--_---------

FiZIR,lI R,, - iv21M~liv12

I;[]

(9.52)

Equation (9.52) is the desired relation between the voltages of the machines represented in detail along with the currents of the machines represented classically, as functions of the current variables of the former machines and the known internal voltages of the latter group. We note that the matrices Mil, MI,, R,,, R2, are functions of and the angle differences as well as the admittance parameters.

Example 9.4 Repeat Example 9.2 assuming that machine 1 is represented in detail by the twoaxis model and machine 2 by the classical model.
Solution

From (9.37) and using

Fl2 = Y2, and 4, = -6,,,


(9.53)

and from (9.53) by inspection

(9.54)

(9.55)

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance l o a d s

38 1

or

+
Id2 =

[y,,c0se,2 - - cos(2e12 y:, YI I

ollj

E,

[I::

- sin(d1, -

ell +

cos(OI2-

el, + aI2) Id1


(9.56)

Yz: YZ2 e,, - - sin ( 2 4 , sin YI I

ell)] E,

Note that the variables needed to solve for the swing equations are only and Iq2.

%,, Vdl,

Example 9.5 Repeat Example 9.3, with machine 1 represented mathematically by the two-axis model and machine 2 by the classical model.
Solution Again the nodes retained are the internal generator nodes, and the transient impedances of both generators are included in the network (or E) matrix. The equations needed to describe this system are (9.41) for generator I , (9.49) for generator 2, and an additional set of algebraic equations relating the node currents to the node voltages. Since the two-axis model retains E; and E: as state variables, it is convenient to use (9.51). For the two-machine system this is the same as (9.40), with replacing VI and = E, + j 0 replacing The system is now fifth order. The state variables w The complete system equations are given by for this system are E i l , E:,, wI, 2 , and

r,.

7601

IBii(xql - xi)
EFDl
TmI

d o l Eil =
7jll
jZLjZ

= TmZ
WI

- IIE:I - (xql - x;)[G,iEil - FG+B(612)E21 + [Bll(xdl - xl) + (xdl - x;)[GllEjl + FB-G(aIZ)EZI - [Gll(Ej: + + FE-G(a12)E~IE2 + FG+E(aIZ)EiIEZI - FE-G(aZl)E:l + G22E21 - D2w2 - E2[FG+E(621)

6,, =
9.8

- w,

(9.57)

linearized Model for the Network

From (9.26) V = TV, where T is defined by (9.24) and 57 and V are defined by (9.4) and (9.17). Also from (9.31)T = where A is given by (9.32). Linearizing (9.3 I ) ,

mv,

382

Chapter 9

where a. is evaluated at the initial angles ,a i = 1,2,. . . , n, and , of the vector V. Let di = ai0 + ai,. Then the matrix R becomes
YlIeJel1 ~ , , ~ J ( ~ I Z - ~ I ~ O - ~ I ~ L \ )

vois the initial value


...

.. . ...

yIn

...
yn l e J ( e n l - 6 n l L l - * n I A )

...
yn2 eJ(@n2-6n20-6nZJ)

...
j(s..-a..
IJ IJo

(9.59)

The general term mij of the matrix Rl is of the form Yije

-8.. ) 'IA

,thus

z..Y..e =
IJ

j(9..-6..
IJ

IJo

)e-j6ijA

Using the relation cos 6,,

1, sin biiA

GijA, we get for the general term


(1 - j&jA)

ij

y,

ej(eij+6ij~)

(9.60)

Therefore the general term in M A given by is


mijA Y - j Y i j e

j(e..-a.. ) 'J0

6,,

(9.61)

Thus MAhas off-diagonal terms only, with all the diagonal terms equal to zero.

--

MAVO = -j

k-'

I
(9.62)

...

and the linearized equation (9.58) becomes

[
...

... ...

...

...

...
vkO Y n k e

...

I
(9.63)

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance loads

383

The set of equations (9.63) is that needed to complete the description of the system. A similar equation analogous to (9.63) can be derived relating to 1, and 6 i j A . The network elements involved in this case are elements of the open circuit impedance matrix Z. We now formulate (9.63) in a more compact form. From (9.24) let T = To + T to A compute

vA

T A Similarly, we let T-I

jTo6,
=

68

diag(blA,.

. .,&,A)

(9.64)

2N

No

+ NA to compute

We can Note carefully that T-I # Tcl + T i 1 and that (TA)-' # (T-I)A :NA. show, however, that (To)-' = (T-')o = No. Thus from % + MA we compute = Ho i Mo + MA = (No + NA)y (To+ TA). Neglectingsecond-orderterms,

MA

-J(T,'bAPTO - Ti1VT06,)

('9.66)

From matrix algebra we get the following relations,

&A

= r

... ...

...

Also

384

Chapter 9

e-J*.o

From (9.66), (9.67), and (9.68)

M A

= -j[6Amo

- mO6A]
mO6A]vO

(9.69) (9.70)

and the network equation is given by

1,

= M O T A

- j[6AMO

Note that (9.70) is the same as (9.63). To obtain a relation between and TA,wecan either manipulate (9.70) to obtain

vA

V A = mcl,-'TA

- j[6A

mc16Am,J]v0

(9.71)

or follow a procedure similar to the above. Define

Q
We can then show that

m-1 =

~ - 1 y - l ~

(9.72) (9.73)

VA

Q o L - j(aAQ0- Qo6A)&

Example 9.6 Derive the relations between 'iTA and 1, for a two-machine system. Solution From (9.53) we get for M o
(9.74)

(9.75)

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance Loads

385

(9.76)

Substituting (9.76), (9.77), in (9.70),

By separating the real and the imaginary terms in equation (9.78), we get four real equaV , tions between l q l A , I d l a , Iq2,3, and I d z A and CIA, d i A , Vq2,, V d 2 ~ and 6126. These are given below:

Example 9.7 Linearize the two-axis model of the synchronous machine as given by (9.41) and the classical model as given by (9.48).
Solution

From (9.41) we get


T;OE~A

- E i A - (x, - x')IqA

T ~ O E ~= E F D A A

T~&A =

EiA + (xd - x ' ) l d A TmA - DwA - (IdoEiA Iq0EiA


-

+ EioldA + E6oiqA)
(9.80)

6,
From (9.48) we get

= h)A

~ j & ,=

T m A - EIqA - DoA

8,

WA

(9.8 I )

386

Chapter 9

Example 9.8 Linearize the two-machine system of Example 9.5. One machine is represented by the two-axis model, and the second is represented classically. Solution From (9.79), (9.80), and (9.81) and dropping the A subscripts for convenience,

x =

Equation (9.82) is a set of five first-order linear differential equations. It is of the form Ax + Bu,where

(9.84)

E IAIo, From the initial conditions, which determine EAlo,E ~ I o ,2 , l;lo, and b120and from the network V matrix all the coefficients of the A matrix of (9.84) can be determined. Stability analysis (such as discussed in Chapter 6) can be conducted. We note again (as per the discussion in Section 9.6) that the order of the mathematical description of machine 1 is four, that of machine 2 is two. The system order, however, is 4 + 2 - 1 = 5 . If the damping terms are not present, the variables wI and w 2 can be combined in one variable w I 2 .
9.9 Hybrid Formulation

Where a combination of classical and detailed machine representations exists, a hybrid formulation is convenient. Let rn machines be represented in detail, and c machines represented classically, m + c = n. Then from (9.58),

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance Loads

387

From (9.70) (9.85) where the subscript m indicates a vector of dimension m. By comparing (9.85) and (9.63).

(9.86)

where Rm(aA)is an (m x I ) vector and if,(SA) is a (C x I ) vector. From (9.85) and (9.86) (9.87) Therefore (9.88) from which we get (9.89)
Example 9.9

Obtain the linearized hybrid formulation for the two-machine system in Example 9.4.
Solution

From Example 9.2

yI1 ejell
12 y, e j(@ + * 120)

yl

yz2 "22 e

Gnd from (9.78) and (9.86)

- 8 120) a

1 2 j

1 [""""""':,.I
e M Iz-

* 120)

_______-_-----

(9.90)

21A

- VI0 Y1ze j ( k + * n o )a

388

Chapter 9

Substituting in (9.89)

or

and

(9.92) Equations (9.91) and (9.92) are the desired relations giving K A and 72, in terms of and 8,,, . These complex equations represent four real equations:

TI,

9.10

Network Equations with Flux linkage Model

The network equation for the flux linkage description is taken from (9.33) and (9.72).

Qi

(9.94)

This is a complex equation of order n, or 2n real equations. If the flux linkage model is used, I, and I,, for the various machines are not state

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance Loads

389

variables. Therefore, auxiliary equations are needed to relate these currents to the flux linkages. These equations are obtained from Section 4.12. For machine i we have

Equations (9.94) and (9.95) are the desired network equations. Together with the machine equations they complete the description of the system. While the above procedure appears to be conceptually simple, it is exceedingly complex to implement. This is illustrated below. To simplify the notation, (9.95) is put in the form
Iqi Idi
F

UqiAqi UdiAdi

UQiAQi

+ UFiAFi + U D i A D i

i = 1.2,. .. ,n

(9.96)

The complex vector ithus becomes

uqn

UQn A Q n

Now the matrix 0 in (9.94) is of the form

......
nl

... ... ... ...


V q + jvd

Rll

...

...
Rnn

= QR

+ jQI
= =

Expanding (9.94), (QR + jQI)(Iq (QRIq - 414) + j(QIIq + ZlnCOS(flIn (9.99)

and substituting (9.97) into (9.99),


Rll

...
z nl c os( e n,- aril)

... ... .- .

...
Zn,sin(&,, - aril)

XI I

---

...

---

=[

[ ]
Iql

+ jld,

Iq2

+ jId2 ...

1qn

+ jbn

c q i Aqi

+ ...

UQIA"]

UdlAdl

UFIAFI

...

-t ~

DIADI

UdnAdn

UFnAFn

+ UDnADn

(9.97)

XI1 Znls i n ( h

...

...
- hnl)

...

Z I n (eln - &,,) sin

...

X""

(9.98)

...
Rnn

ZInsin(8,, -

...
xnn

aIn]

...
+
uFIAFI

dl Adl

...

+
+

uDIADl

udnAdn +

uDnAD

(9.100)

390

Chapter 9

(9.101) Equations (9.100) and (9.101) are needed to eliminate Ci and vdi in the state-space equations when the flux linkage model, such as given in (4. I38), is used. The above illustrates the complexity of the use of the full-machine flux linkage model together with the network equations. Much of the labor is reduced when some of the simplified synchronous machine models of Section 4.15 are used. For example, if the constant voltage behind subtransient reactance is used, the voltages Eli and E; become state variables. The network is reduced to the generator internal nodes. This allows the direct use of a relation similar to (9.31) to complete the mathematical description of the system model. This has been illustrated in some of the examples used in this chapter. The linearized equations for the flux linkage model are obtained from (9.97), which is linear, and (9.73). Following a procedure similar to that used in deriving (9.100) and (9.IOl), we expand (9.73) into real and imaginary terms as follows:

5 ,

= =

VA q

+ jVdA

(QRO JQ/o)(IqA + [ Q R o l q A - QioIdA

I ~~ J1dA) - J [ a A ( Q R o -t .iQfo) - (QRO+ ~ Q / o ) ~ A -k (Jho) o (aAQio - Q ~ o J A ) I ~ (~AQRO Q R O ~ A ) ~ ~ O ] o + j [ Q d q p -k QRoIdA - (~AQRo QRo8a)Iqo i ( ~ A Q I O - Q/o6a)Id0] (9.102) -

The terms in I,,, I,,, Iqo, and Id0 are substituted for by the linear combinations of the flux linkages given by (9.97).
9.1 1
Total System Equations

From (4.103) for each synchronous machine and hence for each node in Figure 9.2, the following relations apply
ik =
&k

dk =

-L;'(Rk + WkNk)ik - Li'vk (l/3Tjk)(-&kiqk Xqkidk - 3DkWk wk - I k = 1,2, ...,n

+ 3Tmk)
(9.103)

V& = and the matrices Rk, Lk and Nk are where ik = [idki~ki~ki~ki~k]', [vdk -vFk 0 vqk 0;' defined by (4.74). The whole system is of the form

X =

f(x,v,T,,t)

(9.104)

k (see [ 5 , 6, 7, 8, and 91). Assuming that VFk and Tmk, = 1.2,. . . ,n,are known, (9.104) represents a set of 7n nonlinear differential equations. The vector x includes all the staror and rotor currents of the machines, and the vector v includes the stator voltages plus the rotor voltages (which are assumed to be known). The set (9.31) provides a constraint between all the stator voltages and currents (in phasor notation) as functions of the machine angles. These equations are also nonlinear.

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance loads

39 1

By examining (9.103) and (9.31) we note the following: The differential equations describing the changes in the machine currents, rotor speeds, and angles are given in terms of the individual machine parameters only. The voltage-current relationships (9.31) are functions of the angles of all machines. This creates difficulties in the solution of these equations and is referred to in the literature as the interface problem [IO]. The nature of the system equations forces the solution methods to be performed in two different phases (or cycles). One phase deals with the state of the network, in terms of node voltages and currents, assuming known internal machine quantities. The other phase is the solution of the differential equations of (9.103) only. The solution alternates between these two phases. This problem is mentioned here to focus attention on the system and solution complexities. This problem will be discussed further in Part 111 of this work. Finally, if the flux linkage model is used (for the case where saturation is neglected), the system equations will be (4.138), (9. IOO), and (9.101). Again the interface problem and the computational difficulties are encountered.

Example 9.10 Give the complete system equations for a two-machine system with the machines represented by the voltage-behind-subtransient-reactance model and the loads represented by constant impedances.

Solution The network constraints for this system are given in complex notation in (9.31) or in real variables in (9.40), and the machine equations are given in Section 4.15.2. The machine equations are obtained from (4.234) and (4.270). They are E;

+ KZiADi b = --rildi - lqiAy + E$ i Gi = -rilqi + IdiiX: + E;


=

KI&

(9.105)

and
T&E$ = -E$ T&iA,i
T&iEii
T..&. 1: 1

(X .
qi

- x Ql . ) l . l ql

= = =

- Aoi + (xi,. - x&i)ldi EFDJ ( 1 + K d i ) E ; i Xdifdi -k Tmi- I pi.E. - Idi E qi di

KdiADi

gi =

wi

- 1

1.2

(9.106)

The network constraints are obtained from (9.40). The system has ten differential equations, six auxiliary machine equations, and four algebraic equations for the network (or two complex equations). As per the discussion in Section 9.6, some differential equations can be eliminated by using 6 , - 6, and w , - w2 as state variables. Some of the computational labor can be reduced if the subtransient reactances of the generators are included in the network matrix (or Z matrix). The network equations would then give relations between the currents lqiand l&,i = l , 2, and the voltages E; and E$, i = I , 2. The auxiliary equations for bi and <i can be omitted. Also in (9.40), E; and E: should replace Vgi and Vdi.

392
9.1 2 Multimachine System Study

Chapter 9

The nine-bus system discussed in Section 2.10 is to be examined for dynamic stability at the initial operating point given in Section 2.10. Linearized machine equations are to be used. The loads are to be simulated by constant impedances based on the initial operating conditions. The system under study comprises three generators and three loads. A one-line impedance diagram is given in Figure 2.18. The initial operating system condition, indicating the power flows and bus voltages, is given in Figure 2.19. Data for the three generators are given in Table 2.1 (some of which are repeated below for convenience). The synchronous machine models to be used are as follows: classical model for generator I , and the two-axis model for generators 2 and 3.
9.1 2.1 Preliminary calculations

Let the generator terminal voltage be V @ , and the q axis be located at angle 6. All angles are measured from reference. The generator current lags the terminal voltage by the power factor angle 4. The following relations, derived in Section 5.5, are used 0) to obtain the data in Table 9.1: (r

I,

+ j I,

= I

E:

tan(S - p) = xqIr/(V - xqI,) (P - jQ)/V % - I&: E: ZZ 6 + ZqX;

]/-(a - p + 4) = Iq

+ jI,
Generator 1 (classical)

V / @ - S = V,

+ jV,
Generator 3 (two-axis)

Table 9.1. Three-Machine System Data


Quantity
S
PU PU PU S PU S PU PU PU PU PU PU PU bU

Unit

Generator 2 (two-axis)

23.6400 17824.I400 0.0852 0.0361 0 0 8.9600 3377.8404

elec deg

0.6780 -0.2872 I .0392 -0.0412 2.27 1' 7 1 .OS66

6.4000 4825.4863 0.7760 0.1447 0.5350 201.6900 6.0000 226 1.9467 0.7882 -0.6940 0.9320 - 1.2902 0.6336 -0.8057 61.0975"

3.0100 2269.4865 1.1312 I .0765 0.6000 226.1900 5.8900 2220.4777 0.7679 -0.6668 0.6194 -0.561 5 0.6661 -0.7791 54.I43 1"

...

9.1 2.2

linearized network equations

e,

The network is assumed to include the transient reactances of the generators. The network is reduced to the generator internal nodes. At these nodes the voltages are and E;. From (9.63) with B replaced with 6 and for a three-machine system (using
=
-631).

4 2 = 421,613

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance loads

393

(9.107) With generator 1 represented classically, as the arbitrary reference node = E, (9.107) and using a = 6,, - 4,, ,
Y12eJ(@12120) -6
Y13eJ(B13 130) -

ElA = 0 and Elo

+ j0 =
-*

E ; ; and with node

E, (a constant).

1 Substituting in

-j

Yl,eJ(d12 120)

-j~&,Yl3eJ~@I3-*IM)

y23eJ(@23-d230) j[El yzleJ(@12 +*120)

-jEio Y23eJ(*23-62)o)
j [ E, YI]eJ(# I3
+

+
Yl2eJ(@23 D O ) +*
yl3eJ@33

Yz3eJ(@23 -*ZM)]

-jEio Y23eJ(e23* B O ) +

* 130)

y23eJ(e23+*2M)]

"IA-

(9.108) Separating real and imaginary parts and dropping the subscript A for convenience,

(9.109) Equation (9.109) is the desired linearized network equation. It relates the incremental currents to the incremental state variables Ei2, EA,, E&, EA3. aI2, and 613.
9.12.3
Generator equations

From Example 9.7 we obtain the following generator equations (again the subscript A is omitted): Generator I (classical) ~ j l h l= T,, - E,Iq, - DIU, A. = Ut (9. I IO)

394

Chapter 9

Generators 2 and 3 (two-axis model)


7;oiE;i ~ 7;oiE;i = E F D - E;{ +

- x,!)f,i (xdi - x ; ) l d i ~ j i & , T,i - Diwi - I,jioE:i - Iqio E;i - Eii0Idi - Ebi,Jqi
=
(x,i

-Eii -

a',

= wi

i = 2,3

(9.11 1)

Again we recall that, to obtain an independent set, the last equations in (9.110) and (9.1 1 1 ) are combined to give

a,,

= w,

wi

2,3

(9.1 12)

By using (9.109), I q 1 , I d l , I q 2 , t d 2 , Iq3, and I, are eliminated from (9.1 10) and , (9.1 1 1). The resulting system comprises nine linear first-order differential equations. The state variables are E i 2 ,E;*, E;, ,E i 3 ;wl,w 2 , w 3 , tS12, and 6 , ~ .
9.1 2.4
Development of the A matrix

The V matrix of the network, reduced to the internal generator nodes and including matrix. It is the generator transient reactance, is given in Table 2.6 as the prefault repeated here in Table 9.2. Data for the terms in (9.109) are calculated and given in Table 9.3.
Table 9.2.
Node

Reduced 7 Matrix for a Three-Machine System


2
=

3
=

0.8455 - j2.9883
=

3
=

0.2871 + j1.5129 1.5399 f79.25" 0.2096 + j I .2256 1.2434 /80.30"

0.2871 + j1.5129 1.5399 /79.25" 0.4200 - j2.7238 0.2133 + j1.0879 1. IO86 /78.9 I

0.2096 + j1.2256 1.2434 /80.30" 0.2133 + j1.0879 1.1086/78.91" 0.2770 - j2.3681

The coefficients of (9.109) and (9.1 I 1) are then calculated. The main system equations are given below. The incremental currents Iqiand Idi are calculated from (9.109).

1.I458

- 1.0288

-0.8347 0.9216 0.3434 1.0541 0.2770 -2.368 1

-0.9216 -0.8347

I .6062
0.1891

1.2642 0.0265 0.5805 -0.9666

1.0288 - 1.1458 0.4200 2.7239 0.4200 0.0800 1.1058

- 1.0541 - 1.1484
0.3434 2.3681 0.2770 2.4914 0.8160 -0.8305

- 1.1058
0.0800

- 1.4414
1.9859 (9.1 13)

The generator differential equations are: Generator 1 (classical)


(5, =

5.6104 x 10-5T,,,I - 5.6104 x 10-5D101 5.9279 - 10-51q1 -

6 1

= w)

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance loads

395

Table 9.3.
Nodes
Yij
eij

Preliminary Calculations for Three-Machine System


1-2

1-3

2-3

I .5399 79.2544 - 58.8259 aijo e.. - 6..0 138.0802 1 1 1 1 yijc0~(eij aijo) - 1. I458 Yijsin(Oij - aij0) I .0288 20.4285 eij + aijo 1.4431 Y ~ ~ c o+s 6(i j~ )~ ~ o Yij sin (e, + aiio) 0.5375

I .2434 80.2952 -5 I .87 I4 132.1666 -0.8347 0.92 I6 28.4238 I .0935 0.5919

I . IO86 78.9084 6.9545 7 I .9540 0.3434 I .054 I 85.8629 0.0800 I . I058

Generator 2 (two-axis)
E;,
&2

=
= =

-4.9581 x 10-3E;2 - 3.6923 x 10-31q2 4.4210 X 1 0 - 4 E ~ ~ 24.4210 X i0-4E62 + 3.4307 X 10-41d2 2.0723 x 10-4Tm2 2.0723 x 1 0 - 4 D z ~ 2 1.9314 x 10-4Ei2 + 2.6736 x 10-4E;2 + 1.4383 x 10-41d2 - 1.6334 x 10-41q2

62

= w2

Generator 3 (two-axis) rj;, E63 & 3


= = =

63 =

-4.4210 x 10-Ei3 - 4.7592 x 10-tq3 4.5035 X 1 0 - 4 E ~ ~ 34.5035 X 10-4E63 + 5.0944 X 10-41d3 4.4063 x 10-4T,,,3 - 4.4063 x 1 0 - 4 D 3 ~ 3 2.4741 x 10-4E;3 + - 2.7292 X 10-4Ed3 + 2.9380 X 1 0 - 4 f d 3 - 3.3836 X 10-41q3 w3 (9.1 14)

By using (9.1 13), the currents are then eliminated in (9.1 14). Combining terms and , , using the relation 6 = 6i - a, we obtain the linearized differential equations for the three-machine system. The results are shown in (9. I I5), which is o f the form
WI

E;,

21

W2

E;]

E;,

01

612

611

0.6099 1.4409
- 150. I554

0
0 0

0.4948 3.6163

0.5463 1.1781 38.9205 2.2156 1.4111

0
0 0 0

-0.9520

-0.7494 -3.3161
- 21.4333

8.5472 42.4023 5.4592 -4.2309 -38.8349 -5.2010


0
0

- 12.6793
0.9552
- 16.5675

- 1.1714
0.4076 52.6270 3.9766
0

-2.0723b1

-2.3385
10.1 170 68.5981

0
0

0
0

-13.1829

- 156.91 I7
-4.7247
0

- 10.6238
0 0

- 4.4063 D
0

10.71 16

- loo00
0

0
0

0.56ior.,
0

- loo00

4.421OEFD2 2.0723Tb2

+ lo-

4.5035 E,,
0

(9.1 15)

4.4063T.,
0 0

396

Chapter 9

i
where
x' = [wI Ed2 Ei2 w 2 Ed3Ei3 w3
U' = [ T m I '

AX

+ BU

a12a],]
=

E F DT~ 2 E F D Tm3I m ~

The eigenvalues of the A matrix are obtained for the case of D I = D2 1 .O pu, using a library computer program. They are
XI X2 X3 X4
= = = = =

D3

-0.002664 -k j0.034648 -0.002664 - j0.034648 -0.000622 + j0.022984 -0.000622 - j0.022984 -0.016644

X7 X8 X9

= =
=

-0.010373 -0.000455 -0.000199 + j0.000129 -0.000199 - j0.000129

All the eigenvalues have negative real parts, and the system is stable for the operating point under study. The dominant frequencies are about 2.1 Hz and 1.4 Hz respectively. These frequencies are the rotor electromechanical oscillations and should be very similar to the frequencies obtained in Example 3.4. Thus if we plot P I 2 from the data of Figure 3.8, we find that the dominant frequency is about 1.4 Hz, which checks with the data obtained here. A similar run was obtained for the same data except for D I = D2 = D3 = 0. The eigenvalues are

XI
A2

= = = =

X3
A4

As =

-0.000458 -0.000281 -0.010366 -0.016659 0

X7 As X9

= =

-0.000529 j0.022983 -0.000529 - j0.022983 -0.002459 + j0.034636 -0.002459 - j0.034636

Since this is a special case of uniform damping ( D / s j = 0), the system order is reduced by one. The frequencies corresponding to the electromechanical oscillations are almost unchanged, while the long period frequency has disappeared.

Problems
matrix of the network, reduced to the generator nodes, is such that 8, = 9.1 If the 90", i z j , derive the general form of the matrixm. 9.2 For the conditions of Problem 9.1, obtain the real matrices for I, and I,, in terms of V and V. Compare with (9.40) for a two-machine system with G,, = G 2 , = 0. , , 9.3 Repeat Example 9.3, using the synchronous machine model called the one-axis model (see Section 4.15.4). 9.4 Repeat Example 9.5, neglecting the amortisseur effects for the synchronous machine represented in detail (Section 4.15.1). 9.5 Linearize the voltage-behind-subtransient-reactancemodel of the synchronous machine. 9.6 Repeat Example9.8, using the results of Problem 9.5. 9.7 Develop (9.89) for a three-machine system with zero transfer conductances. 9.8 For the nine-bus system of Section 2. IO the dynamic stability of the postfault system (with line 5-7 open) is to be examined. The generator powers are the same as those of prefault conditions. a. From a load-Row study obtain the system Rows, voltages, and angles. b. Calculate the initial position of the q axes; I,o, I&), V,O, VdO, E ~ oand E;, for each ma, chine; and the angles 6120 and 6130. c. Obtain the A matrix and examine the system eigenvalues for stability.

Multimachine Systems with Constant Impedance l o a d s

397

References
I. Anderson, Paul M. Analysisof Faulted Power Sysiems. Iowa State University Press, Ames, 1973. 2. Pai, M. A., and Murthy. P. G. New Liapunov functions for power systems based on minimal realizations. Int. J . Conrrol 19401-15, 1974. 3. Willems, J. L. A partial stability approach to the problem of transient power system stability. Int. J . Control 19:l-14, 1974. 4. Pal, M. K. State-space representation of multimachine power systems. IEEE Paper C 74 396-8, presented at the Summer Power Meeting, Anaheim. Calif, 1974. 5. Prabhashankar, K.,and Janischewskyj, W. Digital simulation of multimachine power systems for stability studies. IEEE Trans. PAS-87:73-80, 1968. 6. Undrill, J. M. Dynamic stability calculations for an arbitrary number of interconnected synchronous machines. IEEE Trans. PAS-87:835-44, 1968. 7. Janischewskyj, W., Prabhashankar, K., and Dandeno, P. Simulation of the nonlinear dynamic response of interconnected synchronous machines (in two parts). IEEE Trans. PAS-91:2064-77. 1972. 8. Van Ness, J. E., and Goddard, W. F. Formation of the coefficient matrix of a large dynamic system. IEEE Trans. PAS-87:80-84, 1968. 9. Laughton, M. A. Matrix analysis of dynamic stability in synchronous multi-machine systems. Proc. IEE (British) I13:325-36, 1966. IO. Tinney, W. F. Evaluation of concepts for studying transient stability. IEEE Power Engineering Society Tutorial. Spec. Publ. 70 M62-PWR. pp. 53-60, 1970.

Part 111 The Mechanical Torque Power System Control and Stability

P. M. Anderson

chapter

10

Speed Governing

Prime mover governors, especially centrifugal flyball governors, have been in use since the late 1700s. James Watt first applied a centrifugal governor to a steam engine in about 1788. There is evidence that he considered a patent application for his governor and probably decided against it because of earlier patents for similar centrifugal devices used to regulate the speed of water wheels and windmills in the milling industry [l, 21. During the 19th century interest in speed governing intensified and a number of scholarly papers were written on the subject. Over 100 references on the subject are given in the Royal Society of London Catalogue of Scientific Papers, 1800-1900 [3]. Many of the prominent engineers and scientists of that era made contributions to the description and analysis of governors. These include C. W. Siemens, J. C. Maxwell, W. Thompson (Kelvin), J. B. L. Foucault, and I. Vyshnegradski. Pontryagin [4] refers to the work of the Russian engineer Vishnegradski (published in 1876) as of complete clarity and simplicity and credits him as being the originator of automatic controls (in Russia). Hammond [5] notes that J. C. Maxwell, writing in 1868, identified the instability of an early governor design as being due to a positive eigenvalue [6]. The mechanical flyball governor of Watt and Boulton came into wide use during the early 19th century and easily outstripped competing devices, such as the float valve regulator of French design. Watts governor is extensively treated in the literature of that era and even some elementary quantitative analysis is evident in works prior to 1850 [2]. However, the control dynamic problems inherent in feedback systems were not recognized until the second half of the 19th century. The dynamic problems associated with speed governing almost certainly provided the incentive for establishing the mathematical theory underlying automatic control. Mayr [2] lists the earliest contributors to this quantitative theory as G. B. Airy (1840/5l), J. C. Maxwell (1868), I. I. Vyshnegradskii (1876), E. J. Routh (1877), A. M. Lyapunov (1892), A. Stodola (1893/94), and A. Hurwitz (1895). Mostly, these works consisted of attempts to solve the differential equations by classical methods and did not present a generalized theory of feedback control. By the end of the 19th century, the dynamic speed control problem had been thoroughly documented in the technical literature, was presented in textbooks and handbooks, and was even the subject of historical studies [2]. The treatment in this book is therefore the restatement of a very old problem, but it is placed in a modern setting and is attacked with the tools of the control engineer developed in this century. In a steam or hydraulic turbine-generator system, the governing is accomplished by a speed transducer, a comparator, and one or more force-stroke amplifiers. Figure 10.1 shows the system block diagram for a steam turbine generator. The speed governor in the figure is a speed transducer, the output of which is typically the position (stroke) of a rod that is therefore pro-

401

402

Chapter 10
Load

Reference

Position

Fig. 10.1 Block diagram of steam turbine control system from [I I ] with permission.

portional to speed. This stroke is mechanically compared to a preset reference position to give a position error proportional to the speed error. The force that controls this position error is small and must be amplified in both force and stroke. This is the purpose of the two amplifiers labeled speed relay and servomotor. This same figure also describes a hydraulic turbine control system if the valve position is changed to a gate position and the steam valve block is considered the wicket gate and hydro turbine system, including the penstock. The speed transducer is the heart of the governor system and may be a mechanical, hydraulic, or electrical device. It must measure shaft speed and provide an output signal in an appropriate form (position, pressure, or voltage) for comparison against the reference, and the subsequent amplification of the error. The centrifugal flyball governor has historically been used for this purpose. Figure 10.2 shows three examples of flyball governors as conceived by different designers. All three have the same essential components: the flying weights (flyballs), the restraining spring (speeder spring), and a mechanical linkage that changes a shaft or collar position as the speed changes. An example of a hydraulic governor is shown in Figure 10.3 (also see Figure A.27 of Appendix A). In Figure 10.3, a main oil pump supplies high-pressure hydraulic fluid that flows through an orifice to the governor oil pump. The amount of governor oil flow is determined by the pressure produced by the governor oil pump, the output pressure of which is only one-fifth or so that of the main pump pressure. However, the governor pump pressure varies as the square of the speed. This controls the pressure downstream from the orifice, which is used to control the throttle setting through a hydraulic control system. Speed sensing may also be done electromechanically by coupling a small generator to the shaft, the output voltage or frequency of which is speed dependent. Examples are given in Appendix F. Such devices are not widely used for central station speed governors. The newest governor designs use high-speed electronic logic to control electrohydraulic force-stroke amplifiers. These electrohydraulic systems have high sensitivityand fast response. The analysis followed here is based largely on the mechanical flyball governor. This approach is used because mechanical devices are easy to understand and analyze, and because they are still widely used. In most cases, similar equations can be derived for other types of governors. Our motive is not to present any given system as being superior to others but to derive a typical mathematical model that will increase our understanding of the governor as a control system component and allow us to analyze systems similar to that of Figure 10.1. In writing the governor equations, it will be convenient to use several of the control system component descriptions and formulas given in Appendix A.

10.1 The Flyball Governor Consider the flyball governor shown in Figure 10.4 [4, 61. If we assume that the gravitational force is negligible compared to the centrifugal force F,, then there are two forces acting

Speed Governing

403

Arms

Governor Travel

Fig. 10.2 Examples of centrifugal flyball governors.

404

Chapter 10

Turbine Shaft

Main Oil Pump


I

Governor

Fig. 10.3 A hydraulic governor.

on the flyball-crankann system: an outward centrifugal force Fc acting on the masses, and a downward spring force Fsacting on the throttle rod. The reference position r is adjusted to correspond to the desired speed. The total outward force Fc on the two flyballs depends on the mass m,the peripheral velocity v, the downward force of the spring, and the radial displacement R of the mass m:

Fig. 10.4 A flyball governor.

Speed Governing

405

(10.1) Using the familiar relation between peripheral velocity v and shaft angular velocity JI we can write

v=RJI
Now, relating the governor speed to the turbine shaft speed through the gear ratio N,

(10.2)

*=No
we can write (10.1) as

(10.3)

Fc = 2mMRo2 N

(10.4)

where Fc is in Newtons, o is in radians per second, m is in kg, and R is in meters. By simple geometry, we can relate R to x1 and x as follows:
xl = R - d
= --x

b
a

= -C x

R=d-C,x
x as

(10.5)

where C, = bla is the lever ratio constant. Then the ballhead force Fc may be written in terms of

F, = 2mN2(d- C,.x)oZ
NOW, using Figure 10.5, we s u m the forces on the ballhead using Newtons law:

(10.6)

mx, = Z Forces = - - BXI - FC Fi 2 2

(10.7)

where Fi is the force due to the spring and BXl is the force required to overcome friction, both the applied at the ballhead. Equating moments about the pivot, we can relate Fi to Fs, actual spring force, as follows:

-Fib sin a = -Fsa sin a

1 2

1 2

(10.8)

Fig. 10.5 Crank arm geometty and forces.

406
and solve for F i with the result

Chapter 10

a 1 F i = -F s-- -F s-- Ki(r - x ) Cr Cr

(10.9)

where K: is the spring constant of the speeder spring. Substituting (10.6) and (10.9) into (10.7) we have

2mx, + 2Bk, -

Kl(r - x ) Cr

= 2mN2(d - C r x ) d

(10.10)

Now, from (10.5) x I = -Crx and the entire equation can be written in terms of the variables x and w with the result

2mP K , r - - - C r x ) d = 2mx + 2Bx + K? (d Cr

(10.11)

where we define an effective spring constant K, = KYCZ. Equation (1 0.1 1) shows clearly the nonlinearities of the system. Not only are the products and quadratic terms nonlinear, but the coefficients, particularly K, and B, can not be expected to be linear over a large range of x and x. Furthermore, there may be backlash in the gears and dead zones in the pivots or other mechanical connections, which introduces nonlinearities that are not continuous functions of x, w, and their derivatives. In order to gain a better grasp of governor behavior, we linearize (10.9) about a steady-state operating point (subscript 0 ) from which we will study small deviations (subscript A). This is rm justified since the speed will deviate f o its rated value only by small amounts in normal operation. Thus, we write

(10.12) At the quiescent points, with x, escent condition


= io 0, (10.1 1) must still be =

satisfied. This gives the qui-

(10.13) Now, substituting (10.12) into the system equation (10.11) and using (10.13) to simplifl the result, we compute

KJA -

4mN2wo
cr

(d - C,XO)OA 2mX~ 2 B x ~ (K, - 2mN2&)X~ = + +

(10.14)

which is a linear differential equation in the variables rA,xA, and wA. The ballhead force Fc acts in the x , direction (see Figure 10.5) on the total mass 2m. This force creates an equivalent force in the -x direction, which we shall call F;. From Figure 10.5 we readily compute

Fd = CrFc = 2mPCr(d - C r x ) d
Clearly, Fd is a function of both x and o.Upon linearization we can write

(10.15)

Fib = K,xA + K,oA

(10.16)

Speed Governing

407

where we define the positive constants The Ballarm Scale

K,

= - = 4mN2Cr(d Crxo)o,, -

aFi dw

The Ballhead Scale

(10.17)

Using these defined constants in (10.14) the system equation becomes

K,rA - K,wA = 2 m X ~ ~BXA (K, - K J x A

(10.18)

Taking the Laplace transform of this linear equation we can visualize the computation of x,, from the block diagram of Figure 10.6. The variable x,,, which relates to the throttle rod motion, can be applied directly to the throttle valve or, more commonly, applied first to a force-stroke amplifier that drives the throttle. The linear equation of motion of the governor is a second-order equation. We would expect a response that is probably oscillatory when a step change is made in or OJ,,, or a well-"tuned" governor may respond in a critically damped mode. In any event, the frequency of oscillation and the damping ratio are determined by the coefficients on the right-hand side of (10.18). Since the governor is physically small and it controls a massive turbine, we know that the solution of (10.18) will reach steady state much faster than the turbine shaft. We are interested primarily in the motion of the turbine shaft. Therefore, we will neglect the governor oscillatory behavior to write, as an estimate, (10.19) which will be sufficiently accurate in the longer time span of interest. This equation is algebraic and specifies that a reduction in speed results in an immediate increase in x,. Since a reduction in speed would normally accompany an increase in load on the turbine, the increase in x,, should be in a direction to further open the throttle valve. The linear equation (10.19) is commonly used to represent governor behavior in power system simulations. The assumption of linearity is justified since deviations from synchronous speed are small, even for large disturbances such as faults on the generator terminals. The spring constant K, is an important parameter in governor design. It determines the natural frequency of oscillation of the governor from (10.18), from which we compute (10.20) Furthermore, it is obvious that the system is unstable when K, < K, and K, is always positive. Therefore, a minimum spring stiffness exists for satisfactory operation.

2ms2+2Bs+(Ks-Kx)

Fig. 10.6 Block diagram of a linear speed governor.

408

Chapter 10

Also note that the system is designed for correct operation with K , > 0. From (10.17) this means that d > Cp,, but we see from Figure 10.4 and (10.5) that this inequality always holds. Finally, note carefully that rA,acting through the spring constant K,, is in fact the speed re$ erence. A simple manipulation of this position will cause a change in x and eventually, as the shaft responds, will cause o to seek a new steady-state value.

10.2 The IsochronousGovernor


The flyball governors similar to those shown in Figure 10.2 are capable of sensing changes in speed and responding by making a small change in a displacement or stroke (x) according to Equation (10.19). However, the force available to move a throttle mechanism in the x direction is small and the displacement is usually small as well. Therefore, what is needed is a force-stroke amplifier to magnify the stroke and exert a sufficient force to manipulate the valve. This is accomplished by means of a hydraulic amplifier or servomotor (see Appendix E). Consider the system shown in Figure 10.7, which consists of a flyball governor, a spool (pilot) valve, and a piston that is capable of exerting a large linear force.* The flyball governor equation is the same as (10.19) except that a new force, the hydraulic reaction force due to the spool valve, must be added. This hydraulic reaction force, or Bernoulli force, has two components; a steady-state component that is always proportional to x and acts in a direction to close the valve orifice, and a transient component that is proportional to i,,and may be either a stabilizing (closing) or a destabilizing (opening) force [7]. Since the valve transient period is very short compared to the turbine response time, we need to represent only the steady-state hydraulic reaction force, which we write as simply

Fh = KhXA

(10.21)

where the hydraulic reaction scale Kh depends on the orifice area gradient and the pressure drop across the orifice. A detailed discussion of (10.21) is given in Appendix F, which is recommended for further reading. Adding these forces to (IO.19), the governor-plus-spool valve equation can be written as

Pilot J Valve

1
Flow Control Valve

Fig. 10.7 The isochronous governor.

*Portions of the development here and in subsequent sections are similar to the treatment in Raven [7], which is recommended for further reading on the subject.

Speed Governing

409

KsrA - K,oA

= (K, - K,)xA

+ KhXA KgxA

(1 0.22)

where Kg = K, - K, + Kh. The new governor equation is basically the same as before except the xAcoefficient is largis er since the hydraulic reaction force is in opposition to the displacement [Fh subtracted from the right-hand side of (10.7) since Fhproduces a reaction in the -xA direction for an acceleration in the +xAdirection]. The hydraulic piston moves in the +y direction as long as there is a positive x displacement of the spool valve. From Appendix J, Equation (J.53), we write
K f l A = aIYA

(10.23)

where Kq is the spool valve volumetric flow per unit of valve displacement and a l is the piston area. Note that the spool valve-piston combination is in fact an integrator since the output y continues to increase as long as a positive x displacement exists. Substituting (10.22) into (10.23) and solving for the piston displacement, we have

(10.24)
and we see clearly the integrating effect of the hydraulic piston. It is convenient to normalize (10.24) on the basis of the full load rating of the generator. This is designated hereafter by a subscripted capital R. To do this, we define the per-unit (pu) quantities, with subscript u as follows.

(10.25)
Then (10.24) may be written in the Laplace domain as

(10.26)
The leading coefficient is interpreted as the inverse of a time constant T~ in seconds (the may be simplified by perreader may wish to veri@ the dimensions). The coefficient of wAU = forming the following conceptual test. Assume the system is initially in the steady state QA 0) and at rated full load (reference) condition (rA= rR)when the load is suddenly dropped, causing a change in speed of

*A= o - OR= RwR rads


Substituting into (10.24) we compute

(10.27)

(10.28)
Then the coefficient of oAU (10.26) can be determined from (10.28), with the result in

(10.29)
This is the same result as that discussed in Section 2.3. Thus (10.26) can be simplified to the normalized form

(10.30)

41 0

Chapter 10

Fig. 10.8 Block diagram of the isochronous governor.

where
7, =

KSKfR The integrating governor system described by (10.30) is called an isochronous governor since it attempts to integrate the speed error until the error vanishes. A block diagram of the isochronous governor is shown in Figure 10.8. Note that the comparator is due to the flyball governor and the integration is due to the hydraulic servomotor.

KgWR -

10.3 IncrementalEquations of the Turbine


In order to study the performance of the governor, it is desirable to develop the incremental (linear) equations of the controlled plant, in this case, the turbinegenerator system. It is not necessary here to provide a detailed analysis for large excursions since we are interested in the system behavior only in the neighborhood of the steady-state operating point. Therefore, we can estimate the behavior by taking partial derivatives in this neighborhood. As in many control system problems, it will be useful to develop the system and control equations such that a block diagram similar to Figure 10.9 can be constructed [7,9, 101. In the preceding section we developed the equations and the block diagram for the control section corresponding to an isochronous governor. The output of this control is the manipulated variable M(s) = yA(s), which corresponds to the valve position. This variable would correspond to the steam valve stroke (or valve area) for a steam turbine or the wicket gate position (or gate area) for a hydro turbine. The control transfer function and feedback function are, respectively,
1

(10.3 1)
as noted in Figure 10.8. The input transfer function A(s) = 1.O in this problem, so the command

signal U(s)and the reference R(s) are identical.

Command Signal

1 - 1

Fig. 10.9 General Block Diagram of a Control System [7,9].

Speed Governing

41 1

We now seek a general relationship for the plant transfer function Gp(s) the disturbance and function N(s) for a turbine, where the output speed C(s) = o is controlled by the governor. The flow control valve in Figure 10.7 admits steam (water for a hydro turbine or fuel mixture for a combustion turbine) as a function of valve area, which in turn is a function of the valve stroke y. Usually, the valve is designed such that valve area is linearly related to stroke (see Appendix F.7, function generators). The fluid flow rate W through the valve is proportional to the product of valve area A and fluid pressure P.

W=k2P
Then the incremental flow can be written as

= kyP

(10.32)

(10.33) For the analysis in this chapter we will consider the pressure to be constant such that we may write
wA = kyYA

(10.34)

where ky is a positive constant. The relationship between Wand the developed mechanical torque ky is a direct one since all working fluid entering the turbine produces torque with no appreciable delay [lo-121. In a steam turbine, there is a lag associated with the control valve steam chest storage and another greater lag associated with the reheater (see Chapter 11). There are also lags in hydro turbine systems (see Chapter 12). For the purpose of this elementary model, we include a simple firstorder lag T~for the turbine control servomotor system to write (10.35) where we combine the two constants Kt and Ky into the single positive constant K , . K1would be expected to have a normalized value of unity, but is approximately 0.6 in steam turbines due to valve nonlinearities [ 111. Finally, we write the swing equation, from (5.78):
2 H h ~ TmA- T,, - DoA P = U

(10.36)

which describes the inertial behavior due to any upset in torque. The term DwA is added to account for electrical load frequency damping and turbine mechanical damping. Combining the plant equations (10.35) and (10.36) with the control equations of Figure 10.8, we can construct the system block diagram shown in Figure 10.10. The steady-state operation of the general control system block diagram of Figure 10.9 can be evaluated in terms of the steady-state gain of each block [7]. Suppose we define for this purpose the steady-state gain functions

K, = G,.(O) Kp = Gp(0)

K N = N(0)

KH = H(0)

(10.37)

K = A(0) A

that is, we determine the gain of each block with s replaced by zero. Then, from Figure 10.9 we can write, in the steady state, (10.38)

412

Chapter 10

Z. A

I
Fig. 10.10 System block diagram for the isochronous governor.

Now, for the isochronous governor

K, = lim
s-a

rls(l + 7,s)

-m -

(10.39)

Since K, is infinite, the error E must be zero for steady-state operation. Indeed, this is the hs unique characteristic of any integral control system. T i means that, following any deviation in speed, the controller will drive the system until rAand CgwAare equal, or the steady-state speed is independent of load torque. For the system of Figure 10.10, the steady-state performance equation for zero error becomes
wss -rss =
cg

= Rrss

(10.40)

and the steady-state o is a constant for any T,. Another view of the steady-state operating characteristic of the isochronous governor is shown in Figure 10.1 1, where the manipulated variable T,,,is plotted against the controlled out, is put o.For each setting of the reference, o , constant from (10.40), even if the load torque T, changes. This is a desirable steady-state characteristic, but the transient response also needs to be considered. The transient response of the isochronous governor can be evaluated by plotting the roots of the open-loop transfer function or OLTF on the complex plane. For the isochronous system we can write

OLTF=
rls(l

+ rp)(D+ 2Hs)

cg

K s(s + b)(s + c)

(10.41)

The where we define the constants b = l/rs, c = D/2H, and K = K1Cg/2Hrlrs. root locus plot is sketched in Figure 10.12 for a typical small value of c and a larger value for b. The system is

Tm

.T

r, >r, >r,

Fig. 10.11 Steady-state operating characteristic of the isochronous governor.

Speed Governing

41 3

Fig. 10.12 Root locus plot for the isochronous governor.

stable for small values of the gain K but will have a sluggish response since two roots are very near the origin. We conclude that the isochronous governor has a desirable steady-state operating characteristic, is sluggish in its transient response, and becomes unstable for low values of gain. Furthermore, it the damping D is zero, the system is unstable.

10.4 The Speed Droop Governor


The isochronous governor, although having good steady-state characteristics,is very nearly unstable and with sluggish response for reasonable values of gain. A better control scheme for this application is to use proportional, rather than integral, control. This can be accomplished by using mechanical feedback in the form of a summing beam, as shown in Figure 10.13. This governor is called a speed droop governor or a regulated governor. The mechanical feedback transforms the hydraulic integrator into an amplifier, which is used to increase the force and stroke of the governor throttle rod position. Using the notation of Section 10.3 and (10.22), we s u m forces in the x direction to write

K,(xA + X i ) - K,xA
or

-k KhXA

+ K,wA

=0

(K, - K,
Using Kg = K, - K,

-+ Kh)XA-k K,XA = -K,Wp

(10.42)

+ K,,, this equation can be written as


(10.43)

For the summing beam, we can write the displacement equation, for small displacements, as (10.44) where L
=a

+ b. Substituting into (10.43) we get


(10.45)

For the hydraulic piston, we can again write, from (10.23),


KqxA = alYA

(10.46)

41 4

Chapter IO

Flow Control Valve


Fig. 10.13 The speed droop governor.

Combining (10.45) and (10.46) we have


(10.47)

This equation is normalized and rearranged to write, in the s domain


(1 0.48)

To determine the normalized coefficients in Equation (1 0.48) we perform two conceptual tests. The first test is conducted at full (rated) load with the system operating at steady-state rated speed. i.e.,
(10.49)
Substituting (10.49) into (1 0.47) we compute

(10.50)
which means that the coefficient of rAu (10.48) is unity. in For the second test, we remove the load, allowing the speed to increase, but with the reference held at the same position. The conditions for this test are, in the steady state

Speed Governing

415

(10.51) where we recognize that the speed change in going from full load to no load is, by definition, RwR. Substituting (10.5 1) into (10.47) and using (10.50), we compute (10.52) YR K ~ L R Thus, the coefficient of wAuin (10.48) is Cg= 1/R as in the isochronous case. Dropping the u subscript, we write the per-unit speed droop governor equation as (1 + T ~ S ) Y A = rA - CguA (10.53)

_ - aKs "R --

where r1= alK&/aK&. The governor block diagram is shown in Figure 10.14. Comparing this diagram with Figure 10.8 for the isochronous case, we see that the isochronous integrator l h l s has been transformed into the amplifier 1/(1 + 7,s) by means of mechanical feedback through the summing beam. Note that r1can be adjusted by changing the ratio d L . In order to analyze the performance of the speed droop governor, we interface the system of Figure 10.14 with a single turbine representation using one-time lag, together with the inertial torque equations derived in the previous section. The result is the system of Figure 10.15. Note that the integral control of the isochronous case has been replaced by an additional lag in the control system. We will now examine the steady-state and transient performance of this system. The steady-state performance of the speed droop governor is analyzed from (10.37) using the factors

(10.54) Then (10.55) for the speed droop governor. Clearly, the steady-state speed is now a function of both the reference setting rss and the generator load T,,. In particulary as T, is increased, the steady-state speed is reduced. The manipulated variable for this system is T,, the mechanical torque applied to the shaft. In the steady state, we can compute T,, to be
Tmss

= K1 ~

s= s

K I(rss - C G W ~

(10.56)

Fig. IO.14 Block diagram of the speed droop governor.

41 6

-------------I-------

Chapter 10

Fig. IO. I5 Typical system application block diagram.

where E, is the steady-state error. This equation describes a family of parallel straight lines in the Tm-oplane, each with Tmintercept K I and with slope -K,C,. Thus, the steady-state operating characteristic may be visualized as the family of curves shown in Figure 10.16. Note that, for each setting of the reference, the steady-state speed is dependent on the shaft load T, and that the higher loads cause a greater reduction in speed. Also note, from (10.56), that the error E,, is always greater than zero, whereas it was always integrated or reset to zero for the isochronous governor. A positive steady-state error signal is characteristic of a proportional control system. The characteristic of Figure 10.16 should be carefully compared with the operating characteristic shown in Figure 10.1 1 for the isochronous governor. The transient response of the speed droop governor may be analyzed by plotting the root locus of the open-loop transfer function (OLTfl:

OLTF =

K1 c g (1 + r1s)(1 + r$)(D + 2Hs)

K
(s

+ a)(s + b)(s + c)

(10.57)

where a = llr,, b = llr-, c = D/2H, and K = K,Cg/2Hrlrs.Note that K, b, and c are exactly the same as for the isochronous case. In most physical systems, we would expect to find r1< r,, with r, = 27, being about typical [l 11. Thus, the root locus takes the form of Figure 10.17. Compare this plot with that of Figure 10.11 for the isochronous governor. Note that the eigenvalues of the speed droop governor have much larger negative real parts than can be achieved for the isochronous governor. This means that the system can be satisfac-

Tm

f
I

Fig. 10.16 Steady-state operating characteristic of the speed droop governor.

Speed Governing

417

'\
\
Fig. 10.17 Root locus for the speed droop governor.

torily operated at much higher values of gain and with improved damping and smaller settling time. Overall, the performance of the speed droop governor is preferred because of its better transient response. The improvement in transient response is accomplished by moving the pole which is well to the leR in at the origin, for the isochronous governor case, to s = -a = -UT], Figure 10.17. We can analyze the closed-loop governor behavior by writing the closed-loop transfer function for a given electromagnetic torque, T,as

(10.58)

s3

1
(a

(ab + bc + ca)

s2
S I

+ b + c)
m

(abc + K )

so

(abc + K )

0 0

Then the necessary conditions for stability are found to be


a, b, c > 0

K>O (a + b + c)(ab + bc + CU) - ( U ~ C K ) + m= >O a+b+c


The latter of these constraints may be simplified by converting into the form

(10.59)

K < (a + b)[c2+ (a + b)c + ab]

(10.60)

41 8

Chapter 10

or, substituting gains and time constants and simplifying, we get


(10.61)

Since the damping D is always a stabilizing force, we examine (10.61) for the case where D = 0 to compute

3 < 2 4 $ + +) R

(10.62)

Now T~and H are fixed positive constants. The gain K1 is a function of the control valve and turbine design and is fixed for a given system, although it may vary slightly with the opervary with the lever ratio alL since we define, from (10.47) ating point. The quantities R and r1 and (10.50),

(10.63)

Thus, increasing a1L increases R and decreases which increases the stability margin. From Figure 10.13, we note that increasing the ratio alL moves the flyball connection with the summing beam to the right. This increases the negative feedback, increases the droop, and reduces the governor time constant. In the root locus plot of Figure 10.17, this increase in alL moves the pole at s = -a farther to the left. Finally, we compute the response of the system to a step increase in reference rA(or a step decrease in TeA). From (10.58) we have, with rA= A h ,
wA =

KJIs s3 + (a + b + c)s2 + (ab + bc + ca)s + (abc + K )

(10.64)

From the final value theorem we write


(10.65)

or, if D = 0, as a limiting case


@A(w)

(10.66)

The response to a step increase in the reference rAis shown in Figure 10.18 for two different values of the regulation R (ignoring any oscillatory behavior). Because of the change in speed that takes place with changes in load, the speed droop governor does not hold the frequency exactly constant, but as the load cycles up and down, the net error is usually small. Frequency corrections can be made by adjusting the reference thumbscrew T,shown in Figure 10.13. This thumbscrew is usually driven by a governor speed changer (GSC) electric motor. Each new setting of the reference moves the torque-speed curve (labeled r l , r2,or r3)to a new position in Figure 10.16. The droop or slope of the locus is rarely changed in operation. The speed droop governor is widely used for governing steam turbines and combustion turbines. Hydro turbines often use a special kind of speed droop governor discussed in Section
10.7.

Speed Governing

41 9

0
Fig. 10.18 Step response of the speed droop governor.

10.5 The Floating-Lever Speed Droop Governor


Another speed droop governor design is the floating lever governor shown in Figure 10.19(a). Here, the mechanical feedback acts directly on the servomotor pilot valve rather than on the speeder spring. However, the effect is the same as the design of Figure 10.13. The equations of motion of the floating lever governor are determined as follows. The force FG acting at point G on the walking beam is that produced by the governor and is positive for a drop in speed or an increase in the reference position. This results in a positive change in y i with its associated hydraulic reaction force of the pilot valve acting on the point P.A positive R movement in y i produces an upward force F due to the hydraulic piston acting at R. These forces are computed in the usual way to write

(10.67)
where P is the pressure of the hydraulic supply. Summing moments about R in the clockwise sense, we write, with L = a + b,

-LFG + bFp = 0

(10.68)

or, substituting from (10.67),


KJA - K,wA
= (Ks - K,)xA

bKh

(10.69)

Now we can also write the summing beam displacement equation and the hydraulic servomotor equations in the usual way, that is,

b a Y b = F x A - EYA Kqyb = a l L A
Combining (10.69) and (10.70) we get (10.71) (10.70)

420

Chapter 10

(a) Schematic diagram

Flow Control Valve

(b) Free body diagram of the walking beam


Fig. 10.19 The floating-lever speed droop governor.

where

Equation (10.69) is normalized in the usual way to write


rAu

- cgoAu = (l

$- TIS)YAu

(10.72)

Speed Governing

42 1

where

and
Cg= 1 R f.

Equation (10.72) identical with ( 0 5 ) Note, however, that the time constant T~ is deis 1.3. fined differently for the two governor designs.

10.6 The Compensated Governor


Another important governor design that is widely used, particularly in the control of hydraulic turbines, is the compensated governor shown in Figure 10.20.This governor incorporates an added feedback that gives it a unique operating characteristic. We have observed that the speed regulation provided by proportional (drooping) control is important in providing good response and also contributes to the stability of the prime mover

Increase ROW

Decrease Wow\

\ Flow Control Valve


Fig. 10.20 The compensated governor.

A22

Chapter

IO

system. Still, it would be desirable to have the governor hold nearly constant speed (frequency) if possible. This is particularly important on isolated systems where only one, or a very few, machines control the frequency. This need is satisfied by the compensated governor, which is a governor with two values of regulation. The principle of operation is to provide a given (relatively large) droop in response to fast load changes. The resulting speed deviation is gradually removed by slowly correcting the speed back to a second (relatively low) value of droop. Thus, the larger droop provides stability and the smaller droop provides good speed regulation in the long term. If the smaller value of droop is zero, the governing is a stable isochronous operation. The two values of droop are called the temporary and permanent droops and are both adjustable within certain limits. The time required to change from the temporary to the permanent droop is also adjustable. These objectives are met in the compensated governor design of Figure 10.20. The mechanical feedback provided by the summing beam c-d provides a temporary droop exactly as in the design of Figure 10.13. The added feedback involves a floating lever system a-b connecting the speeder rod (x), the pilot valve (u), and a receiving piston of area u3, which is held in its steady-state position by a spring. As long as the piston location z remains at its steady-state equilibrium position, the flyweights must also be in their equilibrium position if the pilot valve is held closed. This means that, following a disturbance, the ballhead would return to the same position when the receiving piston (z) returns to equilibrium, if there were no permanent droop through lever c-d. Thus, without lever c-d the compensated governor would act isochronously, but it would do this in a special way. Suppose that walking beam c-d were disconnected. Then, an increase in load would cause the governor to respond to positive displacements in x, u, and y. As piston ul moves in the +y direction, it causes transmitting piston u2 to be displaced downward. Since the hydraulic fluid in the chamber connecting pistons a2 and u3 is trapped, this will cause receiving piston u3 to move upward, pushing against its spring, tending to close the pilot valve. Note, however, that the hydraulic chamber also contains a needle valve that will allow hydraulic fluid to move in or out of the chamber slowly, the speed of entry or escape depending on the needle valve orifice area. The compressed spring on piston u3 will slowly force this piston downward, increasing the turbine power gradually and restoring the flyweights to their normal positions. Thus, the governor provides a temporary droop characteristic, but is isochronous in the long term. This gives the governor both a permanent and a temporary droop characteristic, each of which is adjustable. To analyze the compensated governor, it is helpful to break the system into subsystems and write the force and displacement equations for each subsystem. In doing this, it is essential that the defined positive directions of all variables be used in summing forces or moments. The first subsystem is the flyball governor system shown in Figure 10.21. Using the methods developed in previous sections, we can write equations for the forces acting at G and G as functions of the displacements x and X I , and of the speed o.Thus the force acting at G can be written as
F = -K,(xA G

+ x A) + KGA - K,oA

(10.73)

The force at G is equal and opposite to this force, or


(10.74) F&= K,(xA + x i ) - KJA + KmwA The second subsystem is the upper summing beam shown in Figure 10.22(a), for which we write both a displacement and a force equation. For incremental displacements, we can write

(10.75)

Speed Governing

423

Fig. 10.21 The flyball governor subsystem.

where LI= c + d. Summing moments about R in the clockwise sense, we compute

8MR= 0 = cF6 + LIFs


= cK,(xA

+ xA) - C K ~+ cK,oA + LlFS A

(10.76)

For the pilot valve beam of Figure 10.22(b) we can write, for incremental displacements (10.77) where L2= a + b. Then summing moments about G in the clockwise direction we have

XMG = 0 = aFp + L2FB


or

(10.78)

(10.79)

G'
h

Y
F,'
(a) Upper Summing Beam

1'

$ A

(b) Pilot Valve Summing Beam

(c) Compensator Summing Beam

Fig. 10.22 Mechanical beams of the compensated governor.

424

Chapter 10

The compensator beam of Figure 10.22(c) is nothing but a lever for which we can write the displacement equation

e Yd = -YA

(10.80)

and, summing moments in the clockwise sense about N, (10.81) where Psis the supply pressure behind the hydraulic ram and a l is the ram area. The compensator system is shown in Figure 10.23 on an enlarged scale. Here, we write the equations for the forces acting at B and E as (10.82) The equation for the volumetic discharge rate of fluid through the needle valve is

C$'A

=a3k

- a3ZA

(10.83)

where P A is the incremental pressure change in the chamber in Ibf/ft2, C, is the needle valve constant in ft5/slbf or in3/spsi, and other quantities are as previously defined. The final subsystem is the hydraulic piston or ram shown in Figure 10.24. Since the available force Fs is usually much greater than the load FV,and the load mass is small compared to this force, we write only the integrator equation

KquA = aIYA

(10.84)

for this subsystem. If load force and mass are important considerations, the complete equations for the piston should be written (see Appendix E). This completes the subsystem equations. We now collect the equations necessary to describe the total system behavior. From (10.75) and (10.76) we compute (10.85) But F, may be calculated from (10.81) and (10.82) with the result (10.86)

Fig. 10.23 The compensator system.

Speed Governing

425

Fig. 10.24 The hydraulic piston subsystem.

Substitutinginto (10.85) and rearranging, we have

From compensator equation (10.83) and beam equation (10.80) we compute


(10.88)

Also, from (10.82) and (10.79) we can write


(10.89)

and using (10.84) we compute


(10.90)

from which we can find P A as a function of zAand yA.Substituting this result into (10.88) and simplifyingwe have
(10.91)

which is the desired equation for the compensator. Note that (10.91) may be written in the form
7 y = ZA 3b

+ 72iA

(10.92)

where we define

r2= CdK r3=


But r3may also be Written as
(1 0.94)

a 3

ea I a3L2Kq + afa 1c&h fa:L2CdK&q

(10.93)

where 6' is defined as the coefficientmultiplying r2.

426

Chapter 10

We may also define, from (10.87)

bcKs 2fa3Ks Then the system equations (10.87) and (10.92) may be summarized as

K=

aLI(Ks- K,)

--ea2L:Kz

(10.95)

6 'r2$A

=ZA

+ 72ZA

(I 0.96)

Equation (10.96) can be normalized in the usual way to write

(10.97) The coefficients of (10.96) are determined from full-load and no-load steady-state tests. In performing these tests, we note from (10.96) that whenever y A = 0, then we also have zA = ZA = 0 as well, and that this always holds in the steady state. At full (rated) load and rated speed at steady state, equation (10.96) becomes (10.98) or (10.99) YR and the ?-&, coefficient of (10.97) is unity. Now, if the load is removed and the reference is held at rR the speed will reach wA = RwR at steady state and (10.96) becomes (10.100) Using (10.99) in (10.100) we compute (10.101) and the coefficients of wAu in the normalized equation (10.97) becomes Cg = 1/R as before. Now, if we arbitrarily let Z, = yR,then (10.96) may be written as (10.102) Equation (10.102) may be written in a slightly improved form by defining a new variable
vA = K?A
rR _ _--

(10.103)

If we multiply the compensator equation by K and define 6 = KS', where 6' is given by (10.94), we can write

Speed Governing

427

0,

IVA

1+z,s

I
( 10.104)

Fig. 10.25 Block diagram of the compensated governor.

This is the desired system description. If (10.104) is written in the s domain, the system block diagram is that given in Figure
10.25.

The block diagram helps clarify the role of the compensation feedback and the derivative effect of the temporary droop 6. Note that the signal vAwill always return to zero in the steady state and the system tends toward the speed droop governor similar to Figure 10.14 in the long term. Another form of the compensated governor derived by Ramey and Skoogland [ 13, 141 is shown in Figure 10.26. This form of representation is instructive as it directly parallels the permanent (R) and temporary (R6) droop factors and also shows the integrating effect of the servomotor in the absence of droop. To analyze the performance of the compensated governor, we again apply the governor as the controller in the system of Figure 10.15. The result is the composite system shown in Figure
10.27.

The steady-state performance of the system shown in Figure 10.26 is analyzed using
(10.37) with the result (10.105)

This is exactly the same result obtained for the speed droop governor with no compensation. This result was anticipated as the compensation signal vA goes to zero in the steady state. The transient performance of the compensated governor is not easily analyzed using the manual root locus or Routh techniques because of the added compensation. A computer root lo-

Fig. 12.26 Alternate form of compensated governor representation [I 3,141.

428

Chapter 10

Control

'
I

T A
I

Plant

Fig. 10.27 Typical system application block diagram for the compensated governor.

cus method can be used for numerical results, but this requires a cut and try procedure to optimize the variable parameters in the system. As an instructive alternative, one can use an analog computer or digital simulator to determine suitable values for all parameters and then examine the behavior in the s plane for further insight into the design optimization.

Prob1ems 10.1 Verify the development of equation (1 0.1 1). Give a physical explanation for the resulting effective spring constant of K, = K,'/C?. 10.2 Verify that the dimension of the leading coefficient on the right-hand side of (10.26) is in inverse of a time constant in seconds. 10.3 From Appendix E we find the mathematical statement in (C.32) that

"

m \

sin cpol

Based on this premise, find the expression for stability of the system. 10.4 Evaluate the function 1 - (sin 4Jsin 40)for values of C#J~ = 10,20, and 30 degrees, and for various positive values of +o between 0 and 75 degrees. Plot the results. 10.5 Perform a computer simulation of the isochronous, speed droop, and compensated governors. Use the following constants for all simulations.

~ ~ = O . lrs = 0 . 3 s 2H=4.74s D=2.Opu S

Cg=20pu

Determine suitable settings for the gain K , in all governors and for the parameters S and r2in the compensated governor.
References 1. Dickinson, H. W. and Rhys Jenkins, James Watt and the Steam Engine, Oxford, 1927. 2. May-r, Otto, The Origins of Feedback Control (translation of Zur FrGhgeschite der Technischen Regelungen), MIT Press, Cambridge,MA, 1970. 3. Royal Society of London, CataIog of Scientific Papers, 1800-1900, Subject Index, v. 11, Mechanics, Cambridge, 1900, pp. 136-137. 4. Pontryagin,L. S., Ordinary Differential Equations, Addison-Wesley, Boston, 1962. 5. Hammond, P. H., Feedback Theory and its Applications, Macmillan, New York, 1958.

Speed Governing

429

Maxwell, J. C., On Governors, Proc. Royal Society of London, v. 16, 1868, pp. 270-283. Raven, Francis H., Automatic Control Engineering, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1968. Merritt, Herbert E., Hydraulic Control Systems, Wiley, New York, 1967. Takahashi, Yasundo, Michael J. Rabins, and David M. Auslander, Control andDynamic Systems, Addison-Wesley, Boston, 1970. 10. Anderson, P.M., Modeling Thermal Power Plants for Dynamic Stability Studies, Project Report, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, San Francisco, 1972. 11. Eggenberger,M. A., A simplified analysis of the no-load stability of mechanical-hydraulicspeed control systems for steam turbines, Paper 60-WA-34, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, New York, N.Y., November 27-December 2,1960. 12. Eggenberger,M. A., Introduction to the basic elements of control systems for large steam hrbine-generators, GET-3096B, General Electric Co., 1970. 13. Ramey, D. G., Hydro unit transfer functions, IEEE Tutorial Course, The Role of Prime Movers in System Stability, IEEE pub. 70M29-PWR, 1970, pp. 34-39. 14. Ramey, D. G. and J. W. Skoogland,Detailed hydro governor representation for system stability studies, Sixth PICA Conf. Proc., May 1969,pp. 490-501.

6. 7. 8. 9.

chapter

11

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

1 1.1 Introduction
We begin this chapter with some general considerations of prime movers and how they are controlled. Following this general overview of prime movers, we concentrate on steam turbines and develop models that can be used to represent this type of machine in computer studies of the power system. Other types of prime movers are discussed in Chapters 12 and 13. Figure 11.1 shows on overview of a large power system and the generation control structure. The system control center measures the power produced by all generators and the interchange power with neighboring systems. It compares the tie line flows with their scheduled values, and these flows are coordinated with neighboring utilities. The control center receives measurements of all generator outputs and compares these values with desired values, which are based on the economic dispatch of generation considering individual unit generation costs. Then, as the system load varies, the control center can change the generation dispatch to economically meet the demand in the most efficient manner, while still maintaining prudent reserves to assure adequate generation if unforeseen unit outages should occur. Note that the control center does not measure the system loads. The measurement of system frequency is used to assure adequate total generation to meet load and maintain rated speed, thereby assuring constant long-term system frequency. The system dispatch computer sets the governor input signal to control the mechanical torque of the prime mover, computing a unit dispatch signal (UDS), as shown in Figure 11.2. The governor compares the speed reference or load control signal against the actual speed and drives the governor servo amplifiers in proportion to this difference, which can be interpreted as a speed error. The servomotor output is a stroke or position YsM,which indicates the position of the turbine control or throttle valves. Note that this control is different on an isolated system, where the governor input is set to hold constant speed or frequency. The fast dynamics of the generation of each unit is the solution of Newtons law, which we write per unit as (11.1) where 7j = a time contant related to the unit moment of inertia in seconds w = shaft angular velocity in radians per second T, = the mechanical torque output of the turbine in per unit Te = the electromagnetic torque or load of the generator in per unit Ta= the accelerating torque in per unit

430

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

431

r-----l
SYSTEM

TRANSMISSION

NETWORK

I I 1

, 1

Generator

Generation Unit Generated

Syste; Loads System

Tie Line Power

Tie Line Frequency Reference


Fig. 1 I . 1 Power system generationcontrol.

The excitation system is used primarily as a voltage controller and acts much as a single-input, single-output system with V, as the output. There exists a cross-couplingto the torque output T,,but this effect is secondary. The system dispatch computer determines the desired generator output and sets the governor input signal to control the mechanical torque of the prime mover. The governor compares the speed reference or governor speed changer (GSC) signal against the actual speed and drives the servomotor amplifiers in proportion to this difference, which can be interpreted as a speed error. The servo motor output is a stroke or position Y,,, which indicates the position of the turbine control or throttle valves. Finally, the prime mover term in Figure 11.2 is a transfer function that relates the turbine control valve position to the mechanical (shafi) torque. In some cases, this block can be represented by a constant and in others it may be a simple first-order lag. In general, if the system is to be studied over a long time period, the turbine should be represented in greater detail as an energy source transfer function. In some modem thermal units, for example, the energy source controller receives feedback signals from several points, including the generated power (or load control signal) and the turbine throttle pressure, to control simultaneously the turbine valve position, the boiler firing rate, and the condensate pumping rates.

432

Chapter 1 1

PTs and
VREF
I +

Tie Line Flqws

xcitation System

Fig. 11.2 Block diagram of a generating unit.

1 1.2 Power Plant Control Modes The controls of the steam generator and turbine in a power plant are nearly always considered to be a single control system. This is true because the two units, generator and turbine, operate together to provide a given power output and, since limited energy storage is possible in the boiler-turbine system, the two subsystems must operate in unison under both steady-state and transient conditions. In this section, the different control modes commonly used by the industry are presented and compared. 1 1.2.1 The turbine-following control mode The control system shown in Figure 11.3 is usually called the turbine-following control, although it is sometimes referred to as base boiler input and admission pressure control systems (the latter mostly in Europe). In this control mode, a load demand signal is used to adjust the boiler* firing rate and the fluid pumping rate. As the boiler slowly changes its energy level to correspond to the demand signal, the pressure changes at the throttle (the turbine control valves). Then a back-pressure control on the turbine changes to hold the throttle pressure constant. This back-pressure control is very slow, even for a rapidly responding boiler. Thus the system response is very slow, monotonic, and very stable. Turbine following may be used on a base-load unit, where the unit will respond only to changes in its own firing and pumping rates. It is often used in start-up or initial stages of unit operation. Turbine following is also used in some modem complex systems when the boiler capability is limited for some reason, such as a fan or pump outage. In general, turbine following is seldom used because of its slow response and its failure to use the heat storage capability of the boiler in an optimal manner to aid in the transition from one generator load level to another.
*The term boiler used here should be taken in a general way to indicate a steam generator and that receives its thermal energy from either a fossil fuel or nuclear energy source.

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

433

Fig. 11.3 The turbine-followingunit control system [I].

1 1.2.2 The boiler-followingcontrol mode


A more conventional mode of boiler control is called boiler-following mode. This control mode is shown in Figure 11.4. This control mode is sometimes called the conventional mode or (in Europe) the combustion control mode. This control scheme divides the control function such that the governor responds directly to changes in load demand. The response is an immediate change in generator load due to a change in turbine valve position and the resulting steam flow rate. The boiler follows this change and must not only catch up to the new load level, but also must account for the energy borrowed or stored in the boiler at the time the change was initiated. This type of control responds quickly, utilizes stored boiler energy effectively, and is generally stable under constant load [ 11. Boiler-following control has the disadvantage that pressure restoration is slow and the control is nonlinear. There also may be troublesome interactions between flow, pressure, and temperature variations. If a change in demand exceeds the boiler stored energy, the result may be an oscillation in steam flow and electric power output until the pressure reaches a final, stable value. Boiler-following control is widely used as the normal control mode of many thermal generating units, particularly the older drum-type boiler units. Many newer units employ a more complex control system in which all control functions are integrated into one master control, but even in these more complex controllers, boiler following is offered as an optional control mode that may be required if there are limitations in turbine operation.

1 1.2.3 The coordinated control mode


Most modern thermal generating units employ a control scheme that is usually called an integrated or coordinated control system. This type of system simultaneously adjusts firing rate,

Throttle Pressure
Fig. 11.4 The boiler-following unit control mode [I].

434
rinng

Chapter 1 1
Load
P,."h..-Sl

Loaa

IBoiler

Fig. 11.5 The coordinated control mode.

pumping rate, and turbine throttling in order to follow changes in load demand. Such a coordinated control mode is shown in Figure 11.5. In this type of control, both pressure and generated output are fed back for the control of both boiler and turbine. In this manner, it is possible to achieve the stable and smooth load changes of the turbine-following mode and still enjoy the prompt response of the boiler-following mode. This is accomplished by making maximum use of the available thermal storage in the boiler. Both pumping and firing rates are made proportional to the generation error so that these efforts are stabilized as the load approaches the required value. Pressure deviation is controlled as a function of both the thermal storage and the generation error. A comparison of the three control methods described above is shown in Figure 11.6

i
I

THROTTLE PRESSURE
*-e-----

* . e *

. 9

-.. . +--.____
-e----

set Point

COORDINATEDCONTROL SYSTEM

3 4 Time in minutes

Fig. 1 1.6 Comparison of the results of different control methods [2].

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

435

1 1.3 Thermal Generation


The most universal method of electric power generation is accomplished using thermal generation, and the most common machine for this production is the steam turbine. In the United States over 85% of all generation is by powered by steam-turbine-driven generators [l]. The size of these generating units has increased over time, with the largest units now being over 1200 MW. The prevalence of thermal energy production in the generation mix of the United States is shown in Table 11.1, which summarizes data compiled by the U.S. Department of Energy for the years 1997 and 1998. A more descriptive way to compare these results is by plotting the numerical values, as shown in Figure 11.7. Here, it is clear that coal is by far the largest energy source used in the United States, at least for the time period represented. As coal becomes depleted or more costly to extract, this could change. The second largest in order of size is nuclear generation. The role of hydro generation is rather small taken on a national basis; however, hydro is very important in certain regions, such as the Pacific Northwest, which is more dependent on this energy source. This is true in many parts of the world, where the predominant energy generation depends on available local natural resources. The steam used in electric production is produced in steam generators or boilers using either fossil or nuclear fuels as primary energy sources. Fossil generation uses primarily coal, natural gas, and oil as fuels. Nuclear generation uses fission reactors that operate by breakup of high-mass atoms to yield a high energy release that is much greater than that produced from chemical reactions such as burning. Fossil fueled plants generate the majority of the electrical energy, but this may gradually change as the sources of fossil fuels are depleted or become more expensive to recover and process than nuclear fuels. By thermal generation we usually mean a system that operates on the physical principle of the vapor power cycle or Rankine cycle. Usually, variations of the straight Rankine cycle are used, with two important innovations being the reheat cycle and the regenerative cycle. We will not belabor these concepts here as our primary motive is to study the system operation and control, but a thorough understanding of this important subject is available through many fine refer-

Table 11.1 Net Generation, U.S.Electric Power Industty by Energy Source in GWh

Energy Source
Coal (1)

1997, GWh 1,843,831 92,727 497,430 628,644 358,949 73,763 -4,040 3,137

1998, GWh 1,872,186 129,104 544,765 673,702 328,581 72,867 -4,478 2,905

1997,

1998,

Percent
53.76 2.65 14.23 17.99 10.27 2.11 -0.12 0.09

Percent
51.72 3.57 15.05 18.61 9.08 2.01 -0.12 0.08

Petroleum (2) Natural gas (3)


Nuclear

Hydro,conventional Other (4) Pump storage (5) Other (6)

(1) Includes coal, anthracite, culm, coke breeze, fine coal, waste coal, bituminous gob, and lignite waste. (2) Includes petroleum, petroleum coke, diesel, kerosene, liquid butane, liquid propane, oil waste, and tar oil. (3) Includes natural gas, waste heat, waste gas, butane, methane, propane, and other gas. (4) Includes geothermal, biomass (wood, wood waste, peat, wood liquors, railroad ties, pitch wood sludge, municipal solid waste, agricultural byproducts, straw, tires, landfill gases, and fish oils), wind, solar, and photo voltaic. (5) A more complete designation of this source is hydro pumped storage. (6) Includes hydrogen, sulfur, batteries, chemicals, and purchased steam.

436

Chapter 11

15x10
.. .1

'

................. ................. .....................................

E:

i......... 2 i 3 i 4
.'

coal

3 6
8

1.o

5 6 7 8

Petroleum NaturalGas Nuclear Hydro Geothermal, etc Pumped Storage Hydrogen, etc.

0.5

............. .................................................................

0.0

Fig. 11.7 Net generation by type of energy source, 1998 (top line) and 1997.

ences on the subject [2-51. Our objective here is to study the physical design of thermal power plants with the intention of understanding how these plants work and respond to controls.

1 1.4 A Steam Power Plant Model


Steam power plants are of two general types: those fueled by fossil fuels such as natural gas or coal, and those fueled by nuclear energy produced in a thermal reactor. The overall unit control is largely independent of the source of energy, as both types of plants must have a means of controlling the power output as well as the frequency. Figure 11.8 shows a block diagram of the controls for a thermal power plant, in which the source of thermal energy is a steam generator

Fig. 1 1.8 The control system for a thermal generating unit.

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

437

that could utilize either fossil or nuclear fuel. The term boiler is used here to designate any type of steam generator. The boiler control inputs are the unit demand signal (UDS), the generated power (PGEN), and the speed or frequency (w). The unit demand signal is set by the system dispatch computer based on the method of dispatch and on the level of load to be served. The generated power of the unit is fed back to the control center so that any error in generated power can be corrected. The unit speed is used by the speed governor as a first-order control on this parameter. The speed governor acts as a continuous, proportional controller to make fast, automatic adjustments to unit speed in response to a speed error. This mechanism is much faster than the governor speed changer (GSC) adjustment of the boiler controller. The input from the dispatch computer is optional and is not used when the unit is on local control. In that case, the U D S is hand set by the plant operator. Note also that the boiler controller can be turbine following (adjusting firing rate according to desired power), boiler following (adjusting firing rate to hold throttle pressure), or a completely integrated or coordinated control that does both simultaneously. The degree of detail required for computer simulation of the power system depends on the length of time required in the simulation. Studies of system performance of a few seconds, for example, need consider only those system components with response times of a few seconds, such as the generator, exciter, and speed governor. Studies of several minutes would usually require some consideration of the steam generator and steam system controls, and may require some consideration of the dispatch system. Thus, it is seen that the longer the desired simulation, the more system components that might enter into consideration. For very long periods of interest, the fastest responding components might be represented in a very simple manner and may not be required at all. In transient stability studies of 1-10 seconds duration, it is common to consider the generator, network, and the steam turbine and turbine controls. If there is interest in extending the studies to several minutes, then it is probably necessary to add at least a simple boiler model to the simulation, and it may be necessary to consider the dispatch computer as well. The general block diagram of Figure 11.8 would be applicable to these longer-duration studies.

1 1.5 Steam Turbines


A large portion of the conversion of thermal to electrical energy occurs in steam turbines. This is due to the many advantages of the steam turbine over reciprocating engines. Among these advantages are the balanced construction, relatively high efficiency, few moving parts, ease of maintenance, and availability in large sizes. Internally, the steam turbine consists of rows of blades designed to extract the heat and pressure energy of the steam, which is usually superheated, and convert this energy into mechanical energy. To accomplish this goal, high-pressure steam is admitted through a set of control valves and allowed to expand as it passes through the turbine, to be exhausted, usually to a condenser, at relatively low pressure and temperature. Thus, the type and arrangement of turbine blading is important in extracting all possible energy from the steam and converting this energy into the mechanical work of spinning the turbine rotor and attached electric generator. Two types of turbine blading are used; impulse and reaction blading. In impulse blading, the steam expands and its pressure drops as it passes through a nozzle, leaving the nozzle at high velocity as shown in Figure 11.9 (a). This kinetic energy is converted into mechanical energy as the steam strikes the moving turbine blades and pushes them forward. Reaction blading operates on a different principle, as illustrated in Figure 11.9 (b). Here the nozzle through which the steam expands is moving with the shaft, giving the shaft a torque due to the unbalanced forces acting on the blade intake and exhaust surfaces. A somewhat more realistic picture of the combined impulse-reaction blading is shown in Figure 11.10. The two moving stages on

430

Chapter 11

Fig. 1 1.9 Two types of turbine blading.

the left of the figure are impulse stages, whereas those on the right are reaction stages. In many turbines, impulse stages are used at the high-pressure, high-temperature end of the turbine and reaction blading at lower pressures. This is because there is no pressure drop across impulse stages and hence there is little tendency for the high-pressure steam to leak past these stages without doing useful work. As the steam expands in passing through the turbine, its volume increases by hundreds of times. At the lower pressures, reaction blading is used. Here, the steam expands as it passes through the blading and its pressure drops. The steam velocity increases as it passes through fixed blading as shown in Figure 11.10, but it leaves the moving blades at a speed about equal to the blade speed. The impulse stage nozzle directs the steam into buckets mounted on the rim of the rotating disk and the steam flow changes to the axial direction as it moves through the rotating disk. In reaction blading, the stationary blades direct the steam into passages between the moving blades and the pressure drops across both the fixed and moving blades. In impulse blading, pressure drops only across the nozzle. In the velocity compound stages, steam is discharged into two reaction stages. The velocity stage uses a large pressure drop to develop a high-speed steam jet. Fixed blades then turn the partially slowed steam before it enters the second row of moving blades, where most of the remaining energy is absorbed. Because of the tremendous increase in the volume of steam as it passes through the turbine, the radius of the turbine is increased toward the low-pressure end. In many turbines, the steam flow is divided into two or more sets of low-pressure (reaction) turbines. Figure 10.1 1 shows several typical tandem compound configurations and Figure 11.12 shows several typical crosscompound designs. In some designs, the steam is reheated between stages to create a reheat cycle, as noted in the figures, which increases the overall efficiency. In other designs, a portion of the steam is exhausted from the various turbine pressure levels to preheat water that is entering the boiler, which is called a regenerative cycle system. The various valves that control the turbine operation are shown in Figure 11.12 and will be discussed in the order encountered by the steam as it moves through the system. Steam leaves the main steam reheater of the boiler at high pressure and is superheated, in most cases, to high superheat temperature. For example, a large fossil fuel unit uses superheated steam at 2400 psi and 1000F for a 1.0 GW unit [15]. A modem 750 M W nuclear design uses 850 psi saturated (0.25 percent moisture) steam [16]. The steam heaters contain steam strainers

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

439

Steam Pressure

Fixed

Fixed

t t
Fixed

Fig. 1 1.10 Combined impulse and reaction blading [ 6 ] .

to catch any boiler scale that could damage the turbine. A typical steam generator and turbine system is shown in Figure 11.13 [7]. The main stop valve or throttle valve (#2 in Figure 11.13) is one means of controlling the steam admitted to the turbine. It is often used as a start-up and shut-down controller. During startup, for example, other inlet valves may be opened and steam admitted gradually through the stop valve to slowly bring the turbine up to temperature and increase the turbine speed to nearly synchronous speed, at which point the governor can assume control of the unit. This mode of control is known as full-arc admission. The main stop valve is also used to shut off the steam supply if the unit overspeeds. The unit may be under automatic or manual control, but is usually controlled automatically through a hydraulic control system. A typical example of the several valves controlling a large steam unit is presented in Figure 11.13 [7]. This system is typical of many large steam power plants, having both superheater and reheater boiler sections and three separate turbines, representing high pressure (HP), intermediate pressure (IP), and low pressure (LP) units. The admission or governor valves, also known as control vaZves (#3 in the figure), are located in the turbine steam chest and these valves control the flow of steam to the high-pressure turbine. In large units there are several of these valves, and the required valve position is determined by the governor (D in the figure). An overview of the turbine control for a typical steam power plant is shown in Figure 11.14. Steam is admitted through the main stop valves to a set of control valves and admission of steam into the high pressure turbine is regulated by a set of nozzles distributed around the periphery of the first stage of turbine blading. If only a few of the control valves are open, the

A40

Chapter 11

Single-Casing Single-Flow

t Single-Casing Opposed-Flow

t
Two-Casing Double-Flow Reheater Two-Casing Double-Flow-Reheat

Reheater

Three-Casing Tripple-Flow-Reheat

Reheater

Four-Casing Quadruple-Flow-Reheat

Fig. 1 1 . 1 I

Typical tandem compound steam turbine designs with single shaft [6].

steam is said to be admitted under partial arc of the first stage rather than through all 360 degrees of the circumference. This is called partial arc admission. Two types of overspeed protection are provided on most units. The first is the normal speed control system, which includes the control valves and the intercept valves. The second type of overspeed control closes the main and reheat stop valves, and if these valves are closed, the unit is shut down. Two types of control valve operation are used. In one type, the control valves are opened by a set of adjustable cum Zijlers, as shown in Figure 11.15. In this arrangement, the valves can be opened in a predetermined sequence as the cam shaft is rotated. In response to a load increase, the flow of steam to one input port may be increased and a closed port may simultaneouslybe cracked

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

44 1

Reheater

Reheater

t Two-Casing Double-Flow Two-Casing Double-Flow-Reheat

Four-Casing Quadruple-Flow-Reheat

r""l
I

Reheater

Four-Casing Quadruple-Flow-Reheat

Five-Casing Sextuple-Flow-Reheat

Six-Casing Sextuple-Flow-Double-Reheat

Six-Casing Octuple-Flow-Reheat

Fig. I 1.12 Typical cross-compound steam turbine designs with multiple shafts [ 6 ] .

442

Chapter 1 1

1rlll

Fig. 1 1.13

Example of a large boiler configurationshowing major system components and controls 171.

Steam Generator

I- - - - - - I

Main stop Valve

Crossover
F

-, , , ,-I

Overspeed
Trin - -_

'

I
I

High -b Pressur

-.

Intermediate Pressure

I I
I

Low Pressure-Turbines

n
Generator

--

Jr

! Valves L-----2&'

J .
Load

'

Intercept Valve Condenser Reheat

--

Reheater

Fig. 1 1 . I A reheat turbine flow diagram. 4

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

443

Fig. 1 1.15 Cam lift steam turbine control valve mechanism.

open. This distributes the steam around the periphery of the first stage, assuring a uniform temperature distribution and controlling the power input. The cam shaft is controlled by the governor acting through a power servomotor, as shown in Figures 11.13 and 11.14. The other type of steam admission control is called the bar lift mechanism. This type of valve control is shown in Figure 11.16; each valve in a line of valves is lifted using a bar, but each valve is a different length so that the valves open sequentially. As load is added to the turbine, the bar is raised and steam flow is not only increased to the first-opening valve, but additional valves are also opened. The separate valves feed steam to different input ports around the periphery of the first-stage blading and thus increase the power input to the turbine. The bar lift is actuated by the governor servomotor through a lever arrangement.

Fig. I 1 .I6 Bar lift steam turbine control valve mechanism [2].

444

Chapter 1 1

The high-pressure turbine receives steam at high pressure and high temperature, and converts a fractionfof the thermal energy into mechanical work. As the steam gives up its energy, it expands and is cooled. Steam is also bled from the turbine and piped tofeedwater heaters. This has proven economical in reducing the boiler size and also reducing the size required at the low-pressure end of the turbine. The turbine extraction points vary in number from one to about eight, the exact number being dictated by design and economy. In the reheat turbines, shown in Figure 11.14, the steam exhausted from the HP (high-pressure) turbine is returned to the boiler in order to increase its thermal energy before it is introduced into the intermediate-pressure (IP) turbine. This reheat steam is usually heated to its initial temperature, but at a pressure that is somewhat reduced from the HP steam condition. Following the reheater, the steam encounters two valves before it enters the IP turbine, as shown in Figures 1 1.13 and 11.14. One of these is the reheat stop valve and serves the function of shutting off the steam supply to the IP turbine in the event the unit experiences shut-down, such as in an overspeed trip operation. The second valve, the intercept valve, shuts off the steam to the IP turbine in case of loss of load, in order to prevent overspeeding. It is actuated by the governor, whereas the reheat stop valve is actuated by the overspeed trip mechanism. The IP turbine in Figure 1 1.13 is similar to the HP turbine except that it has longer blades to permit passage of a greater volume of steam. Extraction points are again provided to bleed off spent steam to feedwater heaters. The crossover, identified in Figure 1 1.14, is a large pipe into which the IP turbine exhausts its steam. It carries large volumes of low-pressure steam to the low-pressure (LP) turbine@). Usually, the LP turbine is double or triple flow as shown in Figures 11.11 and 11.12. Since a large volume of steam must be controlled at these low pressures, doubling or tripling the paths available reduces the necessary length of the turbine blades. The LP turbines extract the remaining heat from the steam before exhausting the spent steam to the vacuum of the condenser. It is desirable to limit condensation taking place within the turbine, as any water droplets that form there act like tiny steel balls when they collide with the turbine blades, which are traveling at nearly the speed of sound. We previously specified that the HP turbine extracts a fractionfof the thermal power from the steam. Then the IP and LP turbines extract the remaining 1 - f of the available power to drive the shaft. Usually,fis on the order of 0.2 to 0.3. For example, in a certain modern 330 MW turbine,fis determined to be 0.24. This is a rather typical value.

1 1.6 Steam Turbine Control Operations


The controls for a steam turbine can be divided into those used for control of the turbine and those used for the protection of the turbine. It is difficult to sketch a typical control system for a steam turbine since these controls depend on the age of the unit and the type of controls available at the time of unit installation. Since power plants operate for many years, there are likely to be many different controls, using different technologies, on any given power system. However, we can summarize the most common controls as being either traditional or modem, with those terms also having a somewhat variable meaning due to the steady advance in control technology. The control operations that are usually considered to be traditional are listed in Table 11.2. These are controls that have been required for many years and that require only the very basic technologies for their operation. It is apparent that plant control systems become more complex due to the demands of interconnected operation and the availability of more modem methods of control. The newer controls provide many functions that were not considered necessary for older units, and some that were not available due to limitations of the available technology at the time of manufacture.

Steam Turbine Prime Movers


Table 11.2 Traditional and Modem Steam Turbine Generator Controls

445

Traditional Controls
Speed control, near rated speed Overspeed protection Load control-manual or remote

Modem Controls All traditional controls and protections Long-range speed (zero to rated speed) Automatic line speed matching Load control; automatic load setback Admission mode selection Automatic safety and condition monitoring On-line testing of all safety systems Fast or early valve actuation Interface to the plant computer Interface to area generation control system

Basic control and protection Initial pressure Vacuum Vibration Others, as needed

Many of the plant controls are hydraulic, using high-pressure oil supplied by a shaftmounted main oil pump. These high pressures are practical for the operation of power servomotors for control purposes. For example, many control valves are actuated by hydraulic means. In modem plants, many systems also use electric controls as well. The control functions for the turbine include the servomotor-driven control or governing valves and the intercept valves, which control the amount of steam admitted to the turbine. Positioning intelligence for these valves comes primarily from the speed governor, the throttle pressure regulator, or from an auxiliary governor. There is also an interlocking protection between the control and intercept valves so that the control valves cannot be operated open when the intercept valves are closed. The protective controls include the main stop valve (throttle valve) and the reheat stop valve. The reheat stop valve is always either fully open or fully closed, and is never operated partially open. The main stop valve may operate partially open when used as a startup control. Both valves are under control of a device that can rapidly close both valves, shutting down the turbine on the occurrence of emergency conditions such as overspeed trip, solenoid trip, lowvacuum trip, low bearing oil trip, thrust bearing trip, or manual trip. During normal operation, both of these stop valves are completely open. A primary function of the main stop valve is to shut off the steam flow if the unit speed exceeds some predetermined ceiling value, such as 110% of the rated value. Steam turbine blading experiences mechanical vibration or oscillation at certain frequencies. The turbine designer assures that such oscillations occur above or below synchronous speed, with a generous margin of safety. Also, with the longer blades traveling at nearly the speed of sound, destructive vibration levels may be reached if the speed is permitted to increase substantially beyond rated speed. Thus, speed control on loss of load is very important and is a carefully designed control function. [9]. The operation of a steam turbine on loss of load is approximately as shown in Figure 11.17. It is assumed that the generator breaker opens at t = 0 when the unit is fully loaded. On loss of load, the turbine speed rises to about 109% in about one second. As the speed increases, the control valves and intercept valves are closing at the maximum rate and should be completely closed by the time the speed reaches 109% of the rated value, at which time the turbine speed begins to drop. At about 106%, the intercept valves begin to reopen so that a no-load speed of 105% might be achieved. If the speed changer is left at its previous setting, the unit will continue to run at 105% speed on steam stored in the reheater. There is usually sufficient steam for one to three minutes of such operation. Once the reheater steam supply is exhausted, the speed will drop to near 100% and the governor will reopen the control valves. The definition of what constitutes an emergency overspeed [IO] is a figure agreed upon by

446

Chapter 1 1

110-1 lo! 11 0

Intercept Valve starts

iliary Load
I

lo 1012 1

Remaining on Generator

-. -

on Generator

1 Time in minutes

rm Fig. I I . 17 Estimated speed versus time following sudden reduction f o a maximum load to the values noted.

turbine manufacturer and purchaser, but may be in the region of 1 10 to 120%of the rated value. If the speed reaches this range, an emergency overspeed trip device operates. Usually the overspeed trip mechanism depends on centrifugal force or other physical measurements that are not dependent on the retention of power supply. Some devices include an eccentric weight or bolt, mounted in the turbine shaft, with the weight being balanced by a spring. At a predetermined speed, such as 1 1 1%, the centrifugal force overcomes the spring force and the bolt moves out radially far enough to strike a tripper, which operates the overspeed trip valve.

1 1.7 Steam Turbine Control Functions


We now investigate the transfer functions that describe the operation and control of a typical steam turbine.* The system under investigation is the reheat steam turbine of Figure 1 1.13, with controls as described in the preceding sections. The block diagram for this system is shown in Figure 11.18 [lo], with controls as described in the preceding paragraphs. Our immediate concern is with the thermal system between the control valves, with input q2and turbine torque T. The symbols used in Figure 11.17 represent per-unit changes in the variables, as defined in Table 11.3. For the present, we will accept the transfer functions of governor and servomotor and reserve these for later investigation. Let us examine the functions between qz and T in Figure 1 1.18 more carefully. The control valve transfer function is nearly a constant and would be exactly 1 .O were it not for nonlinear variations introduced by control valve action. This is due to a combination of nonlinearities. First of all, the steam flow is not a linear function of valve lift, or displacement, as shown by the right-hand block of Figure 11.19. It is, in fact, quite nonlinear, exhibiting a definite saturation as the valve opening increases. One way to counteract this nonlinearity is to introduce a nonlinearity in the valve lifting mechanism, as shown in the left block of Figure 11.19. This is accomplished with a cam lift mechanism, as shown in Figure 11.20. Here, the cam acts as a function generator providing an output
*We follow closely here the excellent reference by the late M. A. Eggenberger [lo] who did significant work in this field. The authors are indebted to Mr. Eggneberger for having shared his work, some of which is unpublished.

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

447

.
Fig. 1 1.18 Block diagram of mechanical reheat turbine speed control [lo].

=f(v2, L)

(1 1.2)

in which the output L is a function not only of q2but also of L. In this way, the transfer function of the two blocks taken together are nearly linear for any given valve. Still, a small nonlinearity exists in the overall transfer function, as shown in Figure 11.18, due to valve points, as this phenomenon is known in the industry. This refers to the point at which one valve, or set of valves, approaches its rated flow and a new valve (or valves) begins to open.

Table 11.3 Definition of Per-Unit Change Variables

Per Unit Change Variable Speed of rotation Developed torque Load torque Steam flow Servomotorstroke Speed relay stroke Speedlloadreference Speed governor stroke Speed error signal Valve steam flow HP turbine torque Reheat pressure IP + LP torque Accelerating torque

Defining Equation
(T=

Remarks
N R = Rated speed

NA NR

q-=

TmA TmR

TmR = Rated full load torque

A=&
TeR

TeR = Rated electrical torque


QA

P=-

Q R = Rated steam flow in Ib/sec

QR

172 = Y2R

Y2A

YzR= Servomotorposition for steady rated load Y I R Speed relay stroke for full load = RR= Reference position at rated load and rated speed
XR= Speed governor stroke for 5% speed change

711 =

Y,R RA RR

YIA

P= -

l =XA
XR
E

EL
7HP

+R
q-IP&LP 7,

Speed relay input Control valve output HP turbine output variable Reheater output variable IP + LP turbine torque

Chapter 1 1

,&{
lift

k
(11.3) (11.4) (11.5)

Fig. 1 1.19 Block diagram for camshaft and valve function generators [IO].

This causes the transfer function to consist of a series of small curved arcs, as shown in Figure 11.18. To compute the transfer knction of steam flow versus servomotor stroke, we write

K3=

Pv

If it were not for valve points, the curve expressing the function K3 would be a constant with value of unity, with the incremental regulation at the operating point the same as that of the governor (usually 5%). If we define incremental regulation Rias [ 101
du R.= ' dP

where u is the per-unit speed, P is the per-unit power, and Riis evaluated at the operating point. If we let Rs be the steady-state regulation or droop

L Valve Lift

Fig. 1 I .20 Mechanical function generator (cam-operated control valve).

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

449

then we have K3=


RS

(11.6)

Eggenberger [lo] points out that Riis often between 0.02 and 0.12 over the range of valve strokes and may be taken as 0.08 as a good approximate value. Using this value, we would compute for a typical case 0.05 K3 = -= 0.625 0.08 (11.7)

From Figure 11.8, we see that the steam is delayed in reaching the turbines by a bowl delay T3,expressed in terms of servo stroke and turbine flow parameters as (11.8) where T3 is the time it takes to fill the bowl volume VB(ft3) with steam at rated initial conditions, with specific volume initially of v (lbdsec), or [ 101 T3 = -seconds
VQY

VB

(11.9)

Typical values of T3are given as 0.05 to 0.4 seconds. For a straight condensing turbine with no reheat, the torque versus servomotor stroke is given by (1 1.8). This situation is illustrated in Figure 11.21 and is accomplished mathematically by replacing p T in (1 1.8) by 7. This is equivalent to setting the fractionfof torque provided by the HP turbine to unity. For a reheat turbine, there is a large volume of steam between the HP exhaust and the IP inlet. This introduces an additional delay in the thermal system. From Figure 11.18 with elementary reduction, we have [ 101
( 11.10)

Fig. 1 1.21 Torque production as controlled by servomechanism stroke.

450

Chapter 1 1

wheref is the fraction of the total power that is developed in the high-pressure unit and is usualR ly between 0.2 and 0.3. The parameter T is the time constant of the reheater and is defined in a manner similar to (1 1.9) or (11.11) where VR= volume of reheater and piping, ft3 QR,.= full load reheater steam flow, lbdsec v, = average specific volume of steam in the reheater, Et3/lbm

R Since the reheat temperature is not constant, computation of T involves taking averages, but it is usually in the neighborhood of 3 to 11 seconds. This long time constant in the reheater causes a considerable lag in output power change following a change in valve setting. In HP turbines, there may be a delay of up to 0.5 seconds, depending upon control valve location. A much larger delay occurs in the IP and LP sections, however. This is due to the large amount of steam downstream of the control valves, and this steam must be moved through the turbines and reheater before the new condition can be established. These delays are both shown in Figure 11.22, where the control valve is given a hypothetical step change and the power output change is plotted [lo]. A five second value for TRis assumed. The speed-torque transfer function is given in Figure 11.18 as [101
-=-.

0
r

T4s

(11.12)

The time constant T4 is the total time it would take to accelerate the rotor from standstill to rated speed if rated torque, T,, is applied as a step function at t = 0. At rated speed, the kinetic energy in the rotating mass is 1 Wk = -J 2

w ~

(11.13)

70%

Control Valve Position

60%

4 5 Time, seconds

Fig. 1 1.22 Reheat turbine response to a control valve change.

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

45 1

and the differential equation of motion is

Jh = Ta = a constant
where we take
Ta = TmR

(11.14)

(11.15)

the rated value of torque. Solving (1 1.14) for constant torque gives

(11.16)
since T R= Pr/wR.From (1 1.16) and (1 1.13) we can compute m

T4 = -seconds Pr where the units must be consistent. We usually compute

wk

(11.17)

0.83(WR2)N,2 MWs 3600 x lo6 (WR2)N? seconds (2.165 x 109)Pr

so that
T4 =
where P,. = rated power in MW WR2 = rotor inertia in lbm-fi2 N = rated speed in rpm R Another useful constant is the so-called specific inertia of the turbine-generator [lo]:
JSP=

(11.18)

(F)( &)

WR2

lbm-ft/MW

(11.19)

and this is convenient since it usually turns out to be nearly unity. In terms of this constant,

T4 = 5.98 Jspseconds

(1 1.20)

Actually, as the turbine speed increases, the load torque increases and the loss torque varies as some power of the speed. Eggenberger [101 shows that this can be accounted for by replacing the single block in Figure 1 1.18 that relates (T to T by a feedback system wherein a portion of the speed increase is fed back as a negative torque [ 101. However, as the losses are very small, this is usually neglected. A set of typical constants for all values shown in Figure 1 1.18 is given in [ 101 and is valuable for making comparisons of the various system lags under consideration. These constants are shown in Table 1 1.4. Additional insight into the control of the steam turbine system is gained through an evaluation of system performance by the root locus method [12]. Referring to Figure 11.14 and equations (1 l .3) through (1 l . 12), we may write the open-loop transfer function as KG(s) =
S(S

K(s + llfT,) + ~/T,)(s 1/T2)(~ ~/T,)(s+ l/TR) + +

(11.21)

452

Chapter 11
Table 11.4 Typical Values of Constants Used in Steam Turbine Analysis

Parameter C ,

Non-reheat Turbine
20

Reheat Turbine
20

TI
T2 K3

T3
TR

T4

Normalized speed governor constant (5% regulation) Speed relay time constant Servomotor time constant Valve gain at no-load point Valve bowl time constant Reheater time constant Load on HP turbine per unit Turbine characteristictime

0.08 to 0.14 s 0.15 to 0.25 s 0.625 0.05 to 0.3 s


-

0.08 to 0.18 s 0.15 to 0.30 s 0.6 to 0.8 0.05 to 0.4 s


3tolls

6t012s

0.2 to 0.3 5to12s

where

Considering the range possible for each variable as shown in Table 11.4, we have a range of pole-zero locations and gains as shown in Table 11.5. The range of values shown in Table 11.5 has some influence on system behavior, as shown in Figure 11.23, where poles of a nonreheat turbine are plotted as a band of values rather than as a point in the s plane. It is obvious that, since the system response depends on these pole locations, this system may be designed with a wide range of response characteristics. This is especially true for the valve bowl delay, which may vary from 0.05 to 0.3 seconds [IO]. Other component values affect the response as well, especially the servomotor pole, which may be quite close to the origin. A similar plot for the reheat turbine is shown in Figure 11.24. Here, the four poles due to the inertia, servomotor, speed relay, and valve bowl are far enough from the origin to be offscale for the scale chosen for this figure. This means that the reheater pole and zero will always be relatively close to the origin and will, therefore, have a great influence on the system dynamic response, even for small disturbances. For large disturbances, the problem is greatly complicated because the reheater should then be treated as a nonlinear model to account for the spatial distribution of flow and pressure in both reheater and piping. A convenient method of analyzing steam turbine systems is to use the root locus technique [12]. Two examples, one for the straight condensing (nonreheat) turbine and one for the reheat turbine will illustrate the method.

Table 11.5 Range of Values for Poles, Zeros, and Gains

Item PoleIZero Pole Symbol 1/T, 11T2 l/T3


1/TR 1JJTR K

Nonreheat Minimum 7.15


4.00

Reheat Minimum 5.55 3.33 2.50 0.091 0.303 9.27 Maximum 12.50 6.67
20.00 0.333

MaximUln 12.50 6.67 20.00

3.33
-

Zero
Gain

1.667
1600

46.3

5340

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

453

I P
w
I

8 z mzAw
I

s 0

(I .

-- +5
fi .\I

Ilr

\)U

AA

\ u

0
\

-20

-15

-10
valve bowl delay

-5

---5
Fig. 11.23 s Plane plot of poles for the nonreheat turbine.

Example 11.1 Prepare a root-locus plot for a nonreheat turbine with the following constants: T = 0.1s I T = 0.2 s 2 T = 0.0667 s 3 T = 10.0 s 4

Determine the damping ratio and undamped natural frequency for the two least damped , roots if K3 = 0.625 and C = 20. Solution The block diagram for this system is that shown in Figure 11.25. The open-loop transfer function is

KG(s) =

K
s(s

+ 5)(s + lO)(s + 15)


K=

K
s4+ 30s3 + 225s2 + 750s

(1 1.22)

For the constants given in this example, we can compute the gain K as

KG
T,T2T3T4

= 937.5

(1 1.23)

<
I
1

Zero Range
I

F
1

-2

-1.5

-1

-0.5

llR

**

0 -

M
Range

-- -0.5

Fig. 1 1.24 Pole and zero for the reheater.

454

Chapter 11

Fig. 1 1.25 Block diagram for the nonreheat turbine

We also compute the following constants, which are required in order to construct the root locus plot: 1. The excess of poles over zeros = P - Z = 4 - 0 = 4 2. The asymptotes lie at angles of

e, =

(2+

1)O0

= *450,

*I350

P-z

(1 1.24)

3. The center of gravity is located at

C.G. =
4. Write the polynomial

XP - XZ = -=-7.5 -30 P-z 4


D(s) + KN(s) = 0

(1 1.25)

(1 1.26)

In our case, we have


s(s

+ 5)(s + lO)(s + 15) + K = s4 + 30s3+ 275s2 + K

(1 1.27)

From (1 1.27), we construct the Rouths table [131to find the critical value of gain and the point of the w-axis crossing:
s4

s3
S2 S
SO

1 30 740 55500 - 9K K

275 750 3K 0

K 0

For the first column in this array to be positive, we require that K 5 6167 The auxiliary polynomial [131 is 740s2+ 3(6167) = 0 or
s = *j5

(11.28)

5. The locus breaks away from the negative real axis at points kl and k2 defined by the equations

Next Page
Steam Turbine Prime Movers

455

1 -_-

k l

1 5-kl

+-+- 1 10-kl
1 kz-10

1 15-kl (1 1.29)

-=-

1 15-k~

1 1 +-k2-5 + -k2

We solve (1 1.29) by trial and error to find

k, E 1.91 (actually -1.91)


and, by symmetry,

(11.30)

k2 = 15 - 1.91 = 13.09

(11.31)

6. Incorporating information accumulated in equations (1 1.24) to (1 1.3l), we construct the root locus diagram shown in Figure 11.26. We can also locate the point corresponding to the assumed gain of 937. With this value of gain, the damping ratio is
s = 0.7

(1 1.32)

/
\ \ / /

Fig. 1 I .26 Root locus for a nonreheat turbine system.

Previous Page

456

Chapter 1 1

and the undamped natural frequency is

wn = 2.2 radiansls

(11.33)

These values are indicated in Figure 11.26. Also note in L.2 root locus plot that the poles are labeled to remind us of the reason for their existence. They can be moved by changing the appropriate design parameters. We now recognize the significance of the solutionjust obtained. Note that, corresponding to a gain of 937, there are actually four solutions, indicated by the dots on the locus. Two of these solutions correspond to responses that are very quickly damped out, being located at approximately -13.5 in the negative-real direction. By comparison, the least damped roots are located at

-50,

= -1.54

(1 1.34)

and we can neglect the quickly damped solutionswith very little error. Thus, our system will respond approximately as a second-order response [ 141: e-bnt a(t) = u(t) - -sin(w,t + 4) (11.35) k where k=

4 = tan-*-

w, = kwn u(t) = unit step function

This response is a damped oscillatory response and this is, generally speaking, what we would like. We would hope to have the damping factor 5 be fairly large for good damping and to prevent an overshoot or too long an oscillation. Certainly, 4' 2 0.2 is desirable as this corre0.7 sponds to about 50% overshoot (actually 52.6%).In our case, with l= there is practically no overshoot and the system is very well damped. If some oscillation can be tolerated, this system could be operated at a higher gain. Figure 1 1.27 shows a typical second-order response for values of 5 of 0.2 and 0.7. Note that when 5 = 0.7 there is very little overshoot, but with 5 = 0.2 the overshoot is about 50% (actually 52.6%)and oscillationsring down for almost four seconds. If some oscillation can be tolerated, this system could be operated at a higher gain.

Example 11.2 If the system of Example 11.1 is a reheat system, the fractionf of power generated by the HP turbine and the reheater time constant T R must be specified. Suppose we let
f = 0.2 TR=5s Then the open-loop transfer function becomes

KG(s) =
and the normal value of K is

K(s + 1) s(s + 5)(s + lO)(s + 15)(s + 0.2)

(11.36)

(1 1.37)

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

457
I
I

1.6

-0.2
I

Fig. 1 1.27 Step response of a second-ordersystem.

The block diagram for this new system is shown in Figure 11.28. The root locus plot is shown in Figure 11.29. From this plot, we observe that for a gain of about 187, the damping ratio is about 0.4, corresponding to an overshoot of about 25%, and the undamped natural frequency is about 0.5 radians per second. Thus the product

--&" -0.2 =

(11.38)

is much less than for the straight condensing turbine. Note also, however, that the system gain could be increased substantially with practically no change in 5 up to a frequency of about 1.5 or 2.0, which would improve the product by a factor of three or four and the oscillations would decay much faster as we see from the exponent of (1 1.35). The block diagram of a more detailed dynamic model of a reheat steam turbine system is shown in Figure 11.30. This more detailed model consists of high-pressure, intermediate-pressure, and low-pressure turbines on a single shaft, driving a generator and excitation system, as shown in Figure 1 1.14. The principal dynamic components that effect the time lag of delivered mechanical power are the speed relay, control valves, steam bowl, the drum,and the feedwater heaters. In normal operation, the intercept valve is fully open, but the control valve may be only partially open, depending on the scheduled generation output of the unit. These dynamic components are connected in the system diagram of Figure 11.30 by solid lines.

Fig. 11.28 Block diagram of a reheat turbine system.

458
\

Chapter 1 1

c= 0.4
\

b0

\
\

\ \

*
-1 5

bowl delay

speed relay

\ \

/' servo

K = 187 -

/ /
/ / / /

/
/

\
\

\I
\
\

/'

Y'
\
\

Fig. 1 1.29 Root locus for a reheat steam turbine system.

The dashed lines in Figure 11.30 show the connection of an overspeed protection system. This system will initiate fast turbine control and intercept valve closure in the event of a load rejection. The control logic operates by comparing the turbine power, which is determined by measuring cold reheat pressure, and the generated power, measured by the generator current. This protection will operate if the difference between these measured power values becomes greater than a preset value, typically about 40% of full load, and the rate-of-change in generator current is also greater than a set point value. This provides overspeed protection for the generating unit that might follow a loss of load.

1 1.8 Steam Generator Control The expansion of power system interconnections has necessitated more precise control in order to hold the fiequency stable and to control disturbances. It has also introduced a new class of stability problems that are not so much concerned with system recovery following major impacts, such as faults, as with the control and damping of sustained oscillations over periods of several minutes duration. Thus, system components that are usually thought of as quite slow in response must be investigated for possible behavior that might be detrimental to system damping. The steam generator is such a component. Steam generators can be either fossil or nuclear fuel systems, but here we shall concentrate on fossil-fueled boilers. The recovery time of boiler pressure following a sudden change in turbine control valve setting is measured in minutes for systems of conventional design. During this period, the boiler-turbine system is operating with

Fig. 11.30 Typical turbine control dynamic for a reheat steam tur

460

Chapter 1 1
Table 11.6 Normal Boiler Single Variable Controls

IndependentVariable Desuperheatingspray Firing rate Burner tilt Feedwater flow

Controlled Variable Main steam temperature Output (drum) pressure Reheat temperature Drum level

its open-loop gain changing and possibly oscillating slowly. How these low-frequency oscillations will affect the overall system behavior is not always clear, but they can hardly be considered to be beneficial. The introduction of the once-through boiler in the late 1950s also focused attention on boiler control. This type of boiler, because of its thermal design, requires a more sophisticated control. This increased interest in boiler control has affected later designs for drum-type boilers too, with the result that faster response and more precise control are being realized. Traditionally, the control system for a boiler has been accomplished by using analog devices, which respond to an error in a single variable. Any response to such an error will, in most cases, cause errors to appear in other variables. For example, in most boilers, the usual single-variable controls are those shown in Table 11.6 [151. With this type of system, a step change in any of the independent variable references or in load will cause a readjustment of all variables, each responding in its own way. Thus, a chain reaction of controlled responses follows the change in one error and may unbalance the system for several minutes while all systems readjust themselves. One alternative to this situation is the use of one multivariate controller [15, 161, so that several input variables can actuate a number of actuators simultaneously, as indicated in Figure 11.31. In this kind of control, the outputs x are related to all inputs m by a matrix G(s) in the equation

x(s) = G(s)m(s)

(11.39)

Each element of G(s) may be found by setting all inputs m to zero except one. The output x corresponding to this component of m determines one column of the transfer function G. Repeating for other components of m determines G completely. This kind of system model causes cross coupling between variables, as shown in Figure 11.3 1. The size of the off-diagonal terms, G&), i Zj,is an indication of the cross coupling that exists in the system. Such controllers should force the system toward the new steady-state position in a much more optimal manner. However, the design of a multivariable controller requires the use of an accurate model of the

Fig. 11.3 1 Block diagram of a coupled two-variable process.

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

46 1

Throttle Pressure
* I 4

VJ

5 8 P
8
A

Tilt Feedwater Turbine Valve;

Boiler Main Steam Temperature Reheat Steam Temperature > Turbine' Drum Level > System Steam Flow Rate
~

3 li >

8 '53

Excess Air

Fig. 11.32 A multivariable process.

controlled plant and this is not available for many problems. Applying this concept to a steam generator system, we can construct the system model as shown in Figures 1 1.32 and 11.33.

1 1.9 Fossil-Fuel Boilers As the technology has evolved, two distinct types of fossil-fueled steam generators have been designed and are widely used; drum-type boilers and once-through boilers. A simple comparison of these two types of boilers is illustrated in Figure 1 1.34. As suggested by its name, the drum boiler employs a large drum as a reservoir for fluid that is at an evaporation temperature. The once-through (or once-thru, as it is often called) design has no drum and the fluid passing through the system changes state into steam and then into su-

Fuel Air Tilts spray reedwater

' Process
'r.

1 Pressure
SP! Trottle Temp SP

Including
>.

Actuators

-1

Controller Matrix

k%'

Fig. 11.33 Multivariable control.

462
6

Chapter 11
I

:o
I
- ) - -

0:

It

I I I I
E
FP

I I

P
Drum-Type Boiler
T S

Once-Thru Boiler
Legend

--- Water Steam --+-Flue Gas +


_ _ _ a _

Line Types

Tube Waterwall Sections


Superheater Section Evaporator Section

E D

Drum

F F
WC 0

Feedhmp Water Circulating Pump Steam Output to Turbine

Fig. 11.34 Drum and once-through boiler configurations. Figures adapted from similar items in Power Station Engineering andEconomy, G . Bemhardt, A. Skrotski, and W. A. Vopat, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1960.

perheated steam. The once-through design contains less fluid than the drum-type design and generally has faster transient response.

1 1.9.1

Drum-type boilers

A simplified sketch of the working fluid path in a drum-type boiler is given in Figure 11.35. In such a system, the drum serves as a reservoir of thermal energy that can supply limited amounts of steam to satisfy sudden increases in demand. It also serves as a storage reservoir to receive energy following a sudden load rejection. Since the fuel firing and pumping systems lag behind the drum demand by several seconds, the drum serves as a buffer between the turbine-generator system and the boiler-firing system. It is, however, a very elastic connection as the drum is not an infinite bus of thermal energy. Some of the major control systems for the drum-type boiler are the following [16]:

(a) Combustion control-he1 and air control (b) Burner and safety control (c) Boiler temperature control-burner tilt, gas recirculation (d) Feedwater control (e) Superheater temperature control-desuperheating (f) Reheat temperature control-gas recirculation

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

463

Fig. 1 1.35 A drum-type boiler arrangement.

Some other control systems are: (a) Feedwater heating system control (b) Air heater temperature control (c) Fuel oil temperature control (in an oil fired boiler) (d) Turbine lubricating oil temperature control (e) Bearing cooling water temperature control (f) Mill temperature control (in a coal burning boiler)

464

Chapter 11

These controls are usually single-variable control loops. In order to apply advanced control concepts, it is necessary to have an adequate mathematical model of the process. Some valuable work [17-191 has added to our knowledge of boiler behavior as an element in a dynamic system. One boiler representation [20] considers the drum as a lumped storage element as shown in Figure 11.36 (a) and is easily studied by means of an electric analog as shown in Figure 11.36 (b). This simplified model assumes that feedwater effects can be neglected and that the feedwater control satisfies the drum requirements. It also ignores the geometry of the boiler, which is actually a huge distributed parameter system. Still, it should provide at least a rough idea of the system behavior and permit us to study various control arrangements without becoming burdened by system complexity. Such is the approach presented in [20]. A certain mass of steam is stored in the boiler and any change in this mass affects the boiler pressure. Such changes result from transient effects wherein the steam generated and the steam demanded by the turbine are unbalanced. Thus,boiler pressure depends on steam flow. We also recognize that the pressure at the drum is not the same as pressure at the control valves because of the pressure drop across the superheater, which vanes as the square of steam flow rate. If we linearize about a quiescent operating point, however, the change in pressure drop is proportional to the change in flow rate and we are justified in using the linearized model of Figure 11.36 (b) Referring to the linear circuit of Figure 11.36 (b), we define the following analogous quantities:

VRT throttle pressure = V, = drum pressure Z,= steam generated Z2= steam flow to turbine R = friction resistance of the superheater R = resistance of the turbine at a given valve opening T

(1 1.40)

Drum

Pressure I

Throttle Pressure Superheaters Turbine

Steam How
(a) Schematic of Boiler-Turbine System

(b) Electric Analog of Boiler Pressure Phenomenon


Fig. 1 I .36 A simplified boiler-turbine representation [20].

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

465

In this model, a change in control valve opening is represented by a change in RT. We may then write

v c = H2 + R T I ~
V O + VCA = R(I20 + ZZA) + (RTO + RTA)(z20 + z2A) C

(11.41)

and solving for I z A we get (1 1.42) will experience a drop proportional to RTA, the change in valve and the throttle pressure VTR opening. The value of R is a function of the quiescent point of operation (the load level). In terms of system quantities, we write the pressure drop from drum to throttle as PD(in lb-mass) or, at constant firing rate:

Po = KQz

(1 1.43)

where K is the friction coefficient and Q is the steam flow rate in l b d s . Then, for small perturbations, we can write

PDA ( ~ K Q o ) Q A =
where Qo is the steady-state flow rate and QA is the change in flow rate. In the analog,

(11.44)

R = 2KQo

(1 1.45)

and is a function of Qo as noted. The steam flow to the turbine, Q , is a function of the throttle pressure, PT,and a coefficient Kv proportional to the valve opening, i.e.,

Q = KVPT
Linearizing, we write

(1 1.46)

(1 1.47) where K , is a function of load level. The steam generated by the boiler is proportional to the heat released in the furnace, but lags behind this heat release by 5 to 7 seconds, as an estimate [20].If we let Qw be the flow of steam from the boiler, then we can think of the generated steam as being delayed by a time constant Tw, waterwall time constant. the The boiler storage effect is an integration with capacitance (or thermal inertia or time constant) C. This gives the needed relationship between the net unbalance in boiler steam flow to the drum pressure. Finally, the fuel system dynamics can be represented by a delay and dead time. The delay time constant TFis typically about 20 seconds and the dead time Td depends on the type of fuel system, and may be anything from zero to about 30 seconds [20]. All of the above relationships, linearized about a quiescent operating point, may be represented by the lumped parameter model shown in Figure 11.37. To study the control of the boiler dynamics, the system can be arranged as shown in Figure 11.38. With this configuration, it is possible to investigate the nature of the control system and also to optimize the effect of both

466

Chapter 1 1

I I I I I I Fuel I pBr Air - y C - - - - - - - - - - - - - - B o i l e i


System
Fig. 1 1.37 Block diagram of a lumped parameter drum-type boiler.

pressure and flow changes. The configuration of Figure 11.38 is recognized to be a boilerfollowing control arrangement. Multivariable controllers have an additional problem not usually present in single variable controllers-the consistency of results [ 191. Thus, in a boiler, an increase in firing rate will always produce an increase in pressure; an increase in air flow will always decrease boiler pressure; an increase in desuperheat spray will always decrease throttle temperature, and so on. These are primary or dominant effects and their sign is always the same. Some effects, on the other hand, are opposing. Thus, an increase in fuel increases steam pressure and this tends to increase steam flow. Increased steam flow tends to decrease temperature, whereas the increase in fuel input would ordinarily increase temperature. Thus, the exact operating point plus conditions of soot, slag, etc. will effect the response and its direction.

Generation

Generation

Combustion Control

output - Control

Desired steam

0
output -Generator - +

Boiler

Fig. 1 I .38 Typical control system configuration for a drum-type boiler.

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

467

One of the problems in designing an appropriate controller is that of starting with a good mathematical model of the system. This is especially difficult in boiler systems because of the difficulty in modeling a distributed parameter system and also because of the nonlinear character of steam properties. The equations of the system are those of mass flow and heat transfer in superheater and reheater tubes, and these equations -are nonlinear partial differential equations in space and time. The usual approach to the solution of these equations is to break the space continuum into a series of discrete elements and convert the partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations in the time domain [18,19]. These equations may be solved by digital computer. Models of this kind have been studied but are beyond the scope of this book. The references cited will be helpful to one who wishes to pursue the subject further. Finally, before leaving the subject of drum-type boiler control we note one type of multivariable control that has been used on both drum-type and once-through boilers. This system, shown in Figure 1 1.39, is called a Direct Energy Balance Control System [21] by its manufacturer. This kind of control is designed to perform the following operations:
1. Adjust both boiler and turbine-generator together, as required by automatic or manual controls. 2. Observe load limit capabilities of boiler, turbine, and generator. 3. Reduce operating level (runback) to safe operating level upon loss of auxiliaries.

Figure 1 1.39 displays the major components of this type of system. Referring to the figure, the desired unit demand signal (from the automatic load control device), actual unit generation, main steam pressure, and desired steam pressure are all input quantities to the controller. Computer outputs are generated to the combustion and governor controllers. Thus, the system does not simultaneously adjust all possible variables, but it does deal with the primary variables. Compare Figure 11.39 with Figure 11.38 to see the difference between the two types of controls. The controller of Figure 11.39 is shown in block diagram form in Figure 11.40. It consists of two components: the boiler-turbine governor and the unit coordinating assembly. The boiler-turbine governor produces a required output set point that takes into account the capa-

Desired Unit Generation

Actual Unit Generation

V
Direct Energy Balance Control System

Y
Combustion Control

A
1

Governor Control

Boiler

Main Steam Pressure

Generator

Fig. 1 1.39 A multivariable control system [2 11.

468

Chapter 1 1

Generation
- - _ - _ * * - - - * - - - - -

Generation
I
I I
I

Boiler Turbine
Governor

I I I

I
I

I
I I

Frequency Bias
(Rates of Change)

I
I I I I I

I I

(Limits) (Runbacks)

To Combustion Control

;:sid
Pressure

61
Miin Steam Pressure

To Governor Control

Fig. 11.40 Block diagram ofa controller [21].

bilities of all components-boiler, turbine, and auxiliaries. It also fixes the rates of change according to a preselected setting and provides for emergency runbacks and limits. The unit coordinating assembly coordinates the combustion control with the turbine-governor control. Both of these blocks are described in greater detail below. The boiler-turbine governor is shown in greater detail in Figure 11.41. When operating under automatic load control, a signal is received from the load control unit. This fixes the desired generation for this unit. When not on automatic control, a selector switch provides an input signal from a manual setting, properly biased when system frequency is other than normal. For any size step change in the manual output setter, the unit automatically achieves the new setting at a preset maximum rate of change, taking limits into account as noted. The unit coordinating assembly is shown in greater detail in Figure 11.42. This unit compares the required output for the unit against the actual unit generation and computes an error signal from which the governor and fuel-air systems are controlled. At the same time, the measured pressure is compared against a desired pressure set point and this produces a pressure error that is used to bias both the governor and fuel-air action, but in opposite directions. This is because the governor (control) valves and fuel-air systems have opposite effects on pressure; an increase in governor setting tends to reduce the pressure but an increase in fuel-air setting tends to increase it. The overall effect of the control is to take appropriate action for changes in both load and pressure as noted in Table 11.7. In practice, the control just described may be operated in any one of the following four modes. The operator selects the operating mode he wishes to use. 1. Base input control. In this mode, the operator adjusts the boiler inputs and the turbine governor manually. 2. Base input-turbine follow. In this mode, the governor adjusts the pressure automatically, as shown in Figure 11.3, and the turbine follows the boiler. The operator runs only the

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

469

Generation Setter

Other

Runback Actions
I I I

of Change

Setter Min. Fuel Min. Air


Limit

Max. Fuel Max. Air Max. Feedwater Governor Open Limit High Deviation

Required Output
To Unit Coordinating Assembly
Fig. 11.41 Boiler-turbine governor control unit [19].

boiler inputs, either automatically or manually. This mode is often used during startup and certain unusual operating conditions. It frees the operator from having to watch both the boiler and the turbine. 3. Direct energy balance automatic control. This mode is the normal operating mode for this type of control and is the mode for which the system was designed. 4. Automatic control-boiler follow. This mode is like the conventional mode as illustrated in Figure 11.4, except that use is made of the required output signal, which provides several advantages over conventional boiler-follow control, such as providing frequency bias, limiting and runback actions, and fixed rates of change. It also couples the governor and the fuel-air controls to provide an anticipatory boiler signal to accompany governor changes due to a load change. This automatic boiler-follow mode is shown in Figure 1 1.43.

1 1.9.2 Once-through boilers


Since the late 1950s, an increasing number of large boilers installed have been of the once-through design. The striking difference between this type of boiler and the conventional drum-type boiler of Figure 11.35 is the absence of the drum, down comers, and waterwall risers. Instead of these features, water from the boiler feed pump passes through the economizer, furnace walls, and superheater to reach the turbine, passing from liquid to vapor along the way. See Figure 11.34 for a simple description of the two types of boilers. In the once-through boiler,

470

Chapter 1 1

Required

Unit

Pressure

Control System To Turbine Governor


Fig. 11.42 The unit coordinating assembly [21].

the pumping rate has a direct bearing on steam output as well as the firing rate and turbine governing. A simplified flow diagram of a typical once-through boiler is shown in Figure 11.44 [221. The once-through boiler has a significantly smaller heat storage capacity than a drum-type boiler of similar rating, since it contains much less fluid. It also costs less, because of the absence of the drum, and has lower operating costs. It does, however, require a more intelligent control system. In operation, the once-through boiler is much like a single long tube with feedwater flowing in one end and superheated steam leaving at the outlet end. A valve at the discharge end can be used to control the pressure. If the pressure is constant, heat is absorbed by the fluid at a constant rate and the steam temperature is a function of the boiler throughput (pumping rate). The heat absorbed (Btu/hr) divided by throughput (lbm/hr) gives the enthalpy (Btu/lbm). Thus, for steady-stateoperation,the control must equate flow into and out of the tube, holding steam tem-

Table 11.7

Net Control Action by the Unit Coordinating Assembly [I91

Steam Pressure High Low Low


High

Generator output
High

Action Applied To Governor Difference = Zero Difference= Decrease Difference= Zero Difference = Increase

Action Applied To Fuel and Air Inputs


Sum = Decrease Sum = Zero Sum = Increase Sum = Zero

High Low Low

Steam Turbine Prime Movers


Desired Unit
tieneration

471

Boiler Turbine Governor

Actual Unit tieneration

Pressure Error

Generation Error

v
Combustion

Governor Control Main Steam Pressure

v 4
Turbine Generator

output

perature at the desired value by maintaining the correct ratio of heat input (fuel and air) to throughput (flow rate). Transient conditions are difficult to control because of the limited heat storage in the fluid. Thus, when load is increased, the pumping rate must be increased to satisfy the increased load and provide greater energy storage, and heat input must simultaneously be increased to match load and the increased storage level [23].

&Finishing Enclosures

urbine Throttle Valve

I
I

0?-Lower Furnace F 'd

Air I

Superheater aid Reheater D m e s apr

Reheat
r----

th

Feedwater 1 Heating System I Boiler Feedpump

Economizer

,,,,,, L

Fig. 1 1.44 Fluid path for a once-through boiler [22].

472

Chapter 1 1

Partly because of the lower storage of the once-through design, the response to sudden load changes is much faster than that of the drum-type boiler. The time required for water to pass through the boiler and be converted to superheated steam is only two or three minutes compared to six to 10 minutes for the dnun-type designs [24]. Also, since the pumping rate is directly coupled to the steam produced, there is little of the cushioning effect that exists in drum-type boiler designs. Rigorous analysis of the once-through boiler, like the drum-type boiler, is a difficult problem, but such analysis is necessary if a control system is to be designed accurately. A common approach is to lump the spatial variation and waste heat transfer equations for each lump. This method has been used on a supercritical unit for a 191 M W unit in which the analysts divided the boiler into 14 sections or lumps [25]. Another report describes the use of 36 lumps to describe a large boiler used to supply a 900 MW generating unit [26]. Having eliminated the spatial parameter by lumping, the resulting ordinary differential equations are nonlinear. Assuming operation in the neighborhood of a quiescent point results in a linearized system of equations that may be numerically integrated by known digital techniques. Comparison of such results with field tests have generally been quite good [25,26]. Another approach to this problem has been pursued [22] in which the boiler is lumped into 30 or so sections and the nonlinear equations for each lump are solved iteratively by digital computer. This method is more time consuming than the linearized model, but it is also more accurate for larger excursions from the quiescent point. A flow diagram of the iterative process is shown in Figure 11.45. The solutions obtained by this process, give the boiler open-loop re-

Iterated Pump Speed Presssure, flow rate, and density profile from iterative solution of pressure drop, Turbine Valve Position continuity, pressure-temperature-density Spray Valve Position steam table relations, turbine pressure, temperature and f o relations as well as lw pump characteristics

Density Specific Heat Flow Rate Profile

and Transport Delays Metal Heat Storage Heat Transfer Metal


T----...-d..--

Gas to Metal Heat Flux Profile


i

Gas Path Energy Balance Radiation, Convection, Heat Transfer

Firing Rate 4Air Flow

<

By-Pass Damper Position

Steam Turbine Prime Movers

473

sponses to step changes in turbine valve position, pump speed, spray flow, and heat flux. These results have been used in the synthesis of a control philosophy and control hardware, a portion of which is described below. The control system of Figure 11.46 is basically the direct energy balance system of Figure 11.39, but shown in block diagram form. This scheme has been used for many once-through boiler installations. Considering this control scheme, we investigate various innovations that may improve response. Referring to Figure 11.46, we examine the significance of combining MW error into the control scheme. If we let Po be the pressure set point, PA the pressure error, MW the megawatt level, and KY a constant proportional to the valve opening, then, from [l 13

MW = KvP = Kp(f'0
or

i-PA)

MW - KVPA = KvPo

(1 1.48)

This difference is proportional to the load level and is interpreted as the turbine valve opening. The authors of [22] present variations to the basic control scheme of Figure 11.46. Basically, the problem is to design an adaptive control system that has the ability to alter its control parameters to satisfy the changing, nonlinear needs of the system at various load levels and to do this in the shortest possible time.

1 1.9.3 Computer models of fossil-fueled boilers


From the foregoing discussion, it is clear that large fossil-fuel boilers are large complex systems. Detailed mathematical models of these systems have been constructed and are used by system designers and control experts. However, these large detailed models are not appropriate for use in power system stability analysis. Our interest is simply in the ability of the boiler to maintain steam pressure and flow for a few seconds or, at most, a few minutes.

Frequency

Speed

MW

Position Control

Demand For: Feedwater Firing Rate

Pressure Anticipatory Feed Forward Action From Desired MW

I IBoif aria besy d y

Etc

Fig. I I .46 Coupling of turbine load controls with boiler controls [22].

474

Chapter 1 1

Boiler control, on the other hand, involves