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Swashbuckling Horror in the

GRR1018e

BY T.S. Luikart, Gareth-Michael Skarka, and Ian Sturrock


Requires the use of the Dungeons & Dragons, Third Edition Core Books, published by Wizards of the Coast, Inc.

TM

SWASHBUCKLING HORROR IN THE GOLDEN AGE OF PIRACY


Special Sins! Why, I have been guilty of all the sins in the world! I know not where to begin. I may begin with gaming! No, whoring, that led on to gaming; and gaming led on to drinking; and drinking to lying, and swearing and cursing, and all that is bad; and so to thieving; and to this! --John Brown, convicted pirate Design: Ian Sturrock, T.S. Luikart, and Gareth-Michael Skarka Additional Design: Laura Hanson Development and Editing: Jim Bishop, Kevin Kulp, Steve Miller, and Chris Pramas Editorial Assistance: Christina Stiles and Evan Sass Graphic Design: Hal Mangold Green Ronin Staff: Nicole Lindroos, Hal Mangold, Chris Pramas, and Evan Sass Cover Art: David Leri Interior Art: Andrew Baker, Richard Becker, Larry Byrd, Tim Divar, Steve Lawton, Mike Swann, Joel Talacko and Brian Wells Cartography: Shawn Brown Playtesters: Adrian Bott, Bridie Przibram, John Brooman, Niall Sweby, Carol Johnson, David Thomas, Max de Vries, Jon Crew, Lucy Bond, Pete Wardle, Matthew Chronister, David Vicente Vega, David T. Margieson, Andrew Old Ned Cook, Erik Skov, Hugh Belmont
Skull & Bones, Mythic Vistas, Green Ronin, and their associated logos are Trademarks of Green Ronin Publishing. Copyright 2003 Green Ronin. All Rights Reserved. Dungeons & Dragons and Wizards of the Coast are Registered Trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, and are used with permission. D20 System and the D20 System logo are Trademarks owned by Wizards of the Coast and are used according to the terms of the D20 System License version 4.0. A copy of this License can be found at www.wizards.com/d20. The Adamant Entertainment logo is a Trademark of Adamant Entertainment. Adamant Entertainment will be supporting Skull & Bones with a series of sourcebooks and adventures. Go to http://www.adamantentertainment.com for more information. The following text is designated as Open Game Content: Chapters 1-13 and 15, except the non-bracketed text in the Legends of Piracy sidebars; all charts in the Appendix. Printed in the U.S.A. Green Ronin Publishing P.O. Box 1723 Renton, WA 98057-1723 Email: custserv@greenronin.com Web Site: www.greenronin.com

Requires the use of the Dungeons & Dragons Players Handbook, published by Wizards of the Coast, Inc. This product utilizes updated material from the v.3.5 revision.

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Table of Contents
CREDITS ........................................................................................................ 1 CONTENTS .................................................................................................. 2 CROGANS CHANCE.................................................................................4 INTRODUCTION .........................................................................................6
Voodoo Rituals .................................................. 87 Christianity ........................................................ 94

CHAPTER X: OF SHIPS AND THE SEA ..................................96


Ships Crew ........................................................ 96 Other Shipboard Jobs ........................................ 99 The Crew Roster ............................................. 100 Ships and the Sea ............................................ 102 Ships of the Sea ............................................... 104 Sailing .............................................................. 108 Winds and Tides ............................................. 109 Battles on the High Seas ................................. 113

PLAYERS SECTION ................7


CHAPTER I: CHARACTER CREATION ............................................8
Race ..................................................................... 8 Classes ................................................................. 8 Skills and Feats .................................................... 9 Character Description ......................................... 9 Equipping the Character ..................................... 9 New Character Creation Steps ............................ 9

GRASS & SEA......................................................................................120

CHAPTER II: CORE CLASSES ..........................................................11


Buccaneer .......................................................... 11 Sea Dog ............................................................. 13 Shantyman......................................................... 15 Bokor ................................................................. 17 Hougan .............................................................. 19

GAME MASTERS SECTION ..........................123


CHAPTER XI: RUNNING A SKULL & BONES CAMPAIGN.........................................124
Rules for Rolling the Bones ............................. 124 Skull & Bones Campaigns............................... 125 Nine Ways to Run a Skull & Bones Campaign126 Name that Ship! .............................................. 130

CHAPTER III: SKILLS & FEATS..............................................22


New Uses for Old Skills .................................... 22 New Skill ........................................................... 23 New Feats .......................................................... 23

CHAPTER XII: PLUNDER ..........................................................132


Typical Plunder ............................................... 132 Plunder in Detail ............................................. 132 Sample Magical Items ..................................... 136 The Spanish Treasure Fleets ............................ 137

CHAPTER IV: BACKGROUNDS AND FORTUNES .................27


Backgrounds ...................................................... 27 Fortunes ............................................................. 29

CHAPTER V: PRESTIGE CLASSES ..............................................36


Diestro ............................................................... 36 Master of Fence ................................................. 38 Master of Scrimia .............................................. 40 Mystic Navigator ............................................... 45 Ofcer Prestige Classes ..................................... 47 Sea Ofcer ......................................................... 48 Warrant Ofcer ................................................. 49

CHAPTER XIII: FRIENDS AND FOES.................................139


Sample Contactsand Generic NPCs ............... 139 Monstrous Races ............................................. 140 Djab ................................................................. 152

CHAPTER XIV: ISLANDS OF THE CARIBBEAN ............162


Explanation of Headings ................................. 162

CHAPTER XV: WELCOME TO THE ACCOUNT ............. 174


A Wretched Hive . . . ....................................... 174 Dramatis Personae ........................................... 177

CHAPTER VI: EQUIPMENT ........................................................... 51


A Silver World................................................... 51 Reading the Equipment Lists ............................ 52 Weapons ............................................................ 52 Armor ................................................................ 59 Poisons ............................................................... 61 Goods and Services ........................................... 63

APPENDIX: REFERENCE TABLES ............................................178 INDEX ......................................................................................................189 SHIP & CREW SHEET ....................................................................191 CHARACTER SHEET ........................................................................192

CHAPTER VII: COMBAT..................................................................64


Parrying ............................................................. 64 Damage in Skull & Bones ................................. 65 Lives and Death inSkull & Bones ..................... 66 Rolling the Bones .............................................. 66

TABLES
Table 2-1: Buccaneer Level Progression ........................ 12 Table 2-2: Sea Dog Level Progression .......................... 13 Table 2-3: Sea Dog Favored Ships ................................ 15 Table 2-4: Shantyman Level Progression ...................... 16 Table 2-5: Vaporing ....................................................... 17 Table 2-6: Bokor Level Advancement .......................... 18 Table 2-7: Hougan Level Advancement........................ 20 Table 3-1: Knowledge (Navigation ) ............................. 22 Table 3-2: Knowledge (Sea Lore) ................................. 22 Table 4-1: Wastrel ......................................................... 35 Table 5-1: Diestro Level Progression ............................ 37 Table 5-2: Master of Fence Level Progression .............. 39 Table 5-3: Botta Segrette............................................... 41 Table 5-4: Master of Scrimia Level Progression............ 42 Table 5-5: Coupe de Jamac............................................ 42 Table 5-6: Master of Winds .......................................... 45

CHAPTER VIII: A PIRATES LIFE ........................................68


Wages ................................................................ 68 Vices and Pleasures............................................ 68 Fame .................................................................. 70 Sway .................................................................. 71 Code Duello ...................................................... 74 Slavery ............................................................... 77

CHAPTER IX: SPELLS AND MAGIC..........................................78


Real Religions in Skull & Bones ....................... 78 Voodoo .............................................................. 78 The Loa ............................................................. 81 Possession .......................................................... 87

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OPEN GAME LICENSE Version 1.0a The following text is the property of Wizards of the Coast, Inc. and is Copyright 2000 Wizards of the Coast, Inc (Wizards). All Rights Reserved. 1. Denitions: (a)Contributors means the copyright and/or trademark owners who have contributed Open Game Content; (b)Derivative Material means copyrighted material including derivative works and translations (including into other computer languages), potation, modication, correction, addition, extension, upgrade, improvement, compilation, abridgment or other form in which an existing work may be recast, transformed or adapted; (c) Distribute means to reproduce, license, rent, lease, sell, broadcast, publicly display, transmit or otherwise distribute; (d)Open Game Content means the game mechanic and includes the methods, procedures, processes and routines to the extent such content does not embody the Product Identity and is an enhancement over the prior art and any additional content clearly identied as Open Game Content by the Contributor, and means any work covered by this License, including translations and derivative works under copyright law, but specically excludes Product Identity. (e) Product Identity means product and product line names, logos and identifying marks including trade dress; artifacts; creatures characters; stories, storylines, plots, thematic elements, dialogue, incidents, language, artwork, symbols, designs, depictions, likenesses, formats, poses, concepts, themes and graphic, photographic and other visual or audio representations; names and descriptions of characters, spells, enchantments, personalities, teams, personas, likenesses and special abilities; places, locations, environments, creatures, equipment, magical or supernatural abilities or effects, logos, symbols, or graphic designs; and any other trademark or registered trademark clearly identied as Product identity by the owner of the Product Identity, and which specically excludes the Open Game Content; (f ) Trademark means the logos, names, mark, sign, motto, designs that are used by a Contributor to identify itself or its products or the associated products contributed to the Open Game License by the Contributor (g) Use, Used or Using means to use, Distribute, copy, edit, format, modify, translate and otherwise create Derivative Material of Open Game Content. (h) You or Your means the licensee in terms of this agreement. 2. The License: This License applies to any Open Game Content that contains a notice indicating that the Open Game Content may only be Used under and in terms of this License. You must afx such a notice to any Open Game Content that you Use. No terms may be added to or subtracted from this License except as described by the License itself. No other terms or conditions may be applied to any Open Game Content distributed using this License. 3.Offer and Acceptance: By Using the Open Game Content You indicate Your acceptance of the terms of this License. 4. Grant and Consideration: In consideration for agreeing to use this License, the Contributors grant You a perpetual, worldwide, royalty-free, non-exclusive license with the exact terms of this License to Use, the Open Game Content. 5.Representation of Authority to Contribute: If You are contributing original material as Open Game Content, You represent that Your Contributions are Your original creation and/or You have sufcient rights to grant the rights conveyed by this License. 6.Notice of License Copyright: You must update the COPYRIGHT NOTICE portion of this License to include the exact text of the COPYRIGHT

NOTICE of any Open Game Content You are copying, modifying or distributing, and You must add the title, the copyright date, and the copyright holders name to the COPYRIGHT NOTICE of any original Open Game Content you Distribute. 7. Use of Product Identity: You agree not to Use any Product Identity, including as an indication as to compatibility, except as expressly licensed in another, independent Agreement with the owner of each element of that Product Identity. You agree not to indicate compatibility or co-adaptability with any Trademark or Registered Trademark in conjunction with a work containing Open Game Content except as expressly licensed in another, independent Agreement with the owner of such Trademark or Registered Trademark. The use of any Product Identity in Open Game Content does not constitute a challenge to the ownership of that Product Identity. The owner of any Product Identity used in Open Game Content shall retain all rights, title and interest in and to that Product Identity. 8. Identication: If you distribute Open Game Content You must clearly indicate which portions of the work that you are distributing are Open Game Content. 9. Updating the License: Wizards or its designated Agents may publish updated versions of this License. You may use any authorized version of this License to copy, modify and distribute any Open Game Content originally distributed under any version of this License. 10 Copy of this License: You MUST include a copy of this License with every copy of the Open Game Content You Distribute. 11. Use of Contributor Credits: You may not market or advertise the Open Game Content using the name of any Contributor unless You have written permission from the Contributor to do so. 12 Inability to Comply: If it is impossible for You to comply with any of the terms of this License with respect to some or all of the Open Game Content due to statute, judicial order, or governmental regulation then You may not Use any Open Game Material so affected. 13 Termination: This License will terminate automatically if You fail to comply with all terms herein and fail to cure such breach within 30 days of becoming aware of the breach. All sublicenses shall survive the termination of this License. 14 Reformation: If any provision of this License is held to be unenforceable, such provision shall be reformed only to the extent necessary to make it enforceable. 15 COPYRIGHT NOTICE Open Game License v 1.0, Copyright 2000, Wizards of the Coast, Inc. System Reference Document Copyright 2000-2003, Wizards of the Coast, Inc.; Authors Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams, Bruce R. Cordell, based on original material by E. Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson. Seas of Blood Copyright 2001 Mongoose Publishing Fading Suns: d20 Copyright 2001 Holistic Design, Inc. Skull & Bones 2003, Green Ronin, Green Ronin Publishing; Authors Ian Sturrock, T.S. Luikart, and Gareth-Michael Skarka

Table 5-7: Mystic Navigator Level Progression ............ 46 Table 5-8: Master of the Reef........................................ 46 Table 5-9: Land Ho!...................................................... 46 Table 5-10: Sculpt the Sea ............................................. 46 Table 5-11: Maximum Ofcer Level ............................. 47 Table 5-12: Sea Ofcer Level Progression .................... 49 Table 5-13: Warrant Ofcer Level Progression ............. 50 Table 5-14: Back from the Brink ................................... 50 Table 6-1: Currency....................................................... 51 Table 6-2: Currency Conversions .................................. 51 Table 6-3: Melee Weapons ............................................ 54 Table 6-4: Grenadoe Fuses ............................................ 55 Table 6-5: Gunpowder Weapons ................................... 56 Table 6-6: Gunpowder Weapon Ammunition and Accessories .............. 58 Table 6-7: Powder Deterioration ................................... 59 Table 6-8: Armor........................................................... 60 Table 6-9: Poisons ......................................................... 61 Table 6-10: Good and Services ..................................... 62 Table 6-11: Container Sizes .......................................... 63 Table 7-1: Parrying Modiers ....................................... 64 Table 7-2: Hit Point Recovery....................................... 65 Table 7-3: Afictions..................................................... 67 Table 8-1: Wages ........................................................... 68 Table 8-2: Fame............................................................. 71 Table 8-3: Sway Modiers............................................. 71 Table 8-4: Sway Checks ................................................ 72 Table 9-1: Hougan Material Components .................... 79 Table 9-2: Bokor Arcane Wanga ................................... 80 Table 9-3: Hougan Divine Spells .................................. 81 Table 9-4: Possession ..................................................... 87

Table 9-5a: Old World Loa Voodoo Burdens ............... 88 Table 9-5b: Old World Loa Voodoo Burdens ............... 88 Table 9-5c: The Exceptions Voodoo Burdens ............... 89 Table 9-6: Voodoo RitualsCheck Modiers ................. 90 Table 9-7: Engagement Ritual Summary ...................... 90 Table 9-8: Unique Favors .............................................. 91 Table 10-1: Crew Quality ............................................ 101 Table 10-2: Ship Size .................................................. 102 Table 10-3: Skeleton Crew .......................................... 103 Table 10-4: Wind Speed ............................................. 108 Table 10-5: Bearing ..................................................... 108 Table 10-6: Sails .......................................................... 108 Table 10-7: Crew Modiers to Speed ......................... 109 Table 10-8: Daily Movement Rates ........................... 109 Table 10-9: Ship Critical Damage............................... 112 Table 10-10: Distance to the Horizon ........................ 113 Table 10-11: Sighting Distance ................................... 113 Table 10-12: Sighting Modiers ................................. 114 Table 10-13: Crew Movement Effect.......................... 114 Table 10-14: Crew Reload Modiers .......................... 115 Table 10-15: Ramming Damage ................................. 116 Table 10-16: Creature Ramming Damage .................. 116 Table 10-17: Locked Ship Modiers .......................... 116 Table 10-18: Morale Checks ....................................... 117 Table 10-19: Boarding Attack Modiers .................... 117 Table 10-20: Boarding Action Crew Combat ............. 118 Table 10-21:Boarding Action Morale Check DC ....... 118 Table 10-22: Cannon Type .......................................... 118 Table 11-1: Rolling the Bones ..................................... 124 Table 11-2: Ship Names .............................................. 131 Table 13-1: Zombie Attacks........................................ 151

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Crogans Chance
By T.S. Luikart

or ten damned years, each a half-shot short of eternity, Crogan had waited. Waited and watched. Ragged and worn in frame, seemingly long broken in spirit, none of the Rape o the Winds wretched crew ever suspected how deep his anger rode. Any spare hours hed managed to steal had been spent down in the hold, knee deep in bilge water, plotting. A fortnight ago he had stood on the deck of a slaughtered Spanish galleon, feeling the great vessel beneath his feet slide into the brine, and as he wiped the blood of newly dead men from his cutlass he heard Kayemba speak of omens and eclipses. With the bokors words, he knew his time had come. The last week of waiting was the worst of Crogans existence. He thought it must be carved upon his face, so sure was he that eyes were marking his every move. He lost at dice, so he had to take the late watch. He made certain he was partnered with Southard, who was a drinker still. A bottle of rum he had secreted under broken barrels and slime was his only ally. He made certain that Southard happened on it by accident, to belay his suspicions. He tried his best to smile as his health was toasted and as shadow stole over the Moons face, he managed it, though the thought that Southard would be ayed and drowned for what he was about to do might also have helped. In the swiftest hour, the one that lurks beyond the fourth bell, Crogan leapt from a half-deck down, down into the darkness about the ship. He prayed to a God that he had long abandoned for a salvation he suspected he didnt deserve. Let the sounds of the surf cover me, he wouldve whispered aloud though he didnt dare, let Southard be to drunk to awaken. The ocean battered him against the Rape o the Winds hull once before he found his bearings and plunged under the waves, pushing hard for the shore. The shore and freedom. The shallows bolder sh nipped him as he passed, but he paid them no mind. They were nothing when set against what Crogan left behind. The sea above him grew lighter as all too revealing dawn slipped in from the east. His fears rose as he ed: too long, his mind screamed, too long and not far enough. His ngers brushed sand and if it were possible, he wouldve sobbed aloud. Into the swell he moved, struggling against the currents, till nally he was lifted up and dashed amidst the tide pools. He pulled his broken form forward, clawing for handholds on the slippery rocks. But ever, ever, he was soundless. A single backward glance at the ship in the harbor he gave, then swiftly away, afraid that it may feel his attention and note his absence. As he crawled from the surf, he paused to bury his face in soft white sand. Against his will, a moan escaped him. His body rebelled as his hands began to tear at the earth, raking great furrows. But Crogan had not come so far to fail. Not there, not on a shore, not where they might see. He stopped his writhing ngers and shufed forward, opping ungainly against the shifting ground. A picture of the hordes of baby turtles that birth in their thousands and rush for the sea came, unbidden, to his mind, and he almost laughed. Softly man, youre thinking youre out, though the race isnt over, steady, Crogan, steady, he thought to calm himself. The protecting shelter of the islands foliage rose before him and the tears he thought lost in the tide threatened to return. He made the tree line before he heard the sounding bell and knew he had lost. No help for it, he thought. He leapt to his feet and prepared to bolt into the lush green canopy. He turned back, one last time, to curse at his pursuers, but his thoughts scattered as he stared in astonishment at the great billowing sails and the brig that ew them as it entered the harbors mouth. It wasnt Crogan that was hunted. The brigantine sailed in, oblivious to the danger and all Crogan had to do was leave. No matter how fast they took the brig, he would still be free. His salvation had been granted; his prayers answered. And then he saw her. Balanced on the bowsprit, she was clothed in deep indigos and bright blues, shining with the dawn, and looking as if she knew nothing of fear. She laughed with the joy of the bright Caribbean morning, and each peal the waves carried struck Crogan surer than well-aimed shot. She couldnt have been more than seven. The same age his Isana had been, when they had been taken. What his former shipmates would do to her was unspeakable. A pox on God, cursed Crogan. He turned his head down the beach, towards the Rape. His rotting prison of the last decade had already unfurled her grisly sails: the skins of naval ofcers snapped in the wind. He knew the brigantine couldnt see her; knew they wouldnt see her till it was too late by far. He remembered his daughters pleading eyes, and the articles he had signed, he thought, to save her. He had not saved his Isana, but it was just that his damnation might truly save another mans daughter. He pulled an oiled sack from his breeches and withdrew a pistol from it. All pretense of stealth gone, he ran to large rocky outcrop that jutted out from the bay and leapt to the top of it. The Rape began to pass and a cry went up as the lookout spotted him. He aimed at the quarterdeck and waited till the Captain appeared. The ery-blue hell-pits that served as the Captains eyes regarded him. Crogan put a shot into the right one, and ed for the jungle, roaring with laughter as he ran. Come and catch me, you sodding bastards! he yelled over his shoulder. It wasnt until that moment that Crogan truly felt free. He knew they would pursue. They had no choice. Hadnt he participated in similar hunts over the years? They would come and they would catch him, but if the brigantines captain had a lick of sense, he was eeing as swiftly as his sails would carry him. The raucous jungle fell silent as he passed. Neither vines nor branches hindered him, but still, they were gaining and he knew it. He chose a clearing with roughly at ground to make his stand. A pair of massive yopa trees served to guard his back. His single shot was spent, and all he had was a dirk.

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Come on then! he yelled. A single shot rang out and caught him in the knee. He roared with pain, pain and shock that the wound hurt at all.

You should nae o left laddie, came Blacklocks rumble through the trees. What did you . . . ? Silver mixed into the lead, dipped in holy water. Stings, dun it? Let me die, God curse you. Youre already dead, Crogan. Then leave me be, you bastard. The Rape o the Winds Quartermaster shook his head as he entered the clearing. Small silver bells hed threaded through his hair tinkled merrily as he did. Ya signed the articles, man. No one gets ou till weve all made our share. No one. He snorted. But ya knew tha didnt ya? I didnt know when I signed. Hell take you all. Blacklock nodded gamely. Mores the pity. He turned and gestured with his head. From behind him, Sitgreaves and Landseer stalked forward. Sitgreaves was more akin to ape then man, but still breathed air. Landseers mouth was stitched, his eyes vacant. They were Blacklocks favorite pair when it was time to deal out punishment. Crogan set himself as Sitgreaves charged him, wielding a massive boarding axe he had clenched in one mighty paw. He swung it round in a decapitating arc as he came. Crogan dropped to his good knee, under the blow and Sitgreaves buried the blade deep into a tree trunk. Coming up from the ground, Crogan slashed a furrow across his foes forearms and Sitgreaves staggered back without his axe, bellowing in rage. Crogan surged forward and seized him about the waist. Far more than mortal sinew exed and heaved as Crogan swung the apish man into the air and hurled him bodily at Blacklock. The ailing man caught the Quartermaster in the midst of drawing another pistol and the pair went down in a heap. Crogan spun towards Landseer, but too late, for the zombis iron grip caught him as he turned and dashed him to the ground. Crogan felt bones snap as he impacted, but still managed to roll out of the way of the iron hard nails that scored the rock where he had just been. He turned and lunged back, burying his dirk hilt-deep in the zombis chest. Crogans eyes blazed with green re as he thrust his hands into Landseers torso. Despite the stitching on his face, Landseer managed to scream as Crogan seized his spine through his chest and tore it forward. Long dead bone cracked and twisted as Crogan broke the zombi in half. Well done, laddie, said Blacklock. Crogan felt pain like he had never known when he was alive pass through him as Blacklocks second shot caught him high in the shoulder. The dark uid that passed for his blood dripped down onto the stone before him and he slumped against a tree. To his surprise, he found his chest was heaving, though he hadnt needed to breathe in many a year. Ill give ya this, when ya mutiny, ya do it propa. I dont eva member the Captain being so furious. Hell probably turn ya inta our colors. Or maybe hell strap ya to the anchor fer a few years. Crogan looked at the Quartermaster but his thoughts were lost in shock as Sitgreaves punched Blacklock full in the face. The Quartermaster slumped unconscious to the ground, accompanied by the tinkling of bells. Sitgreaves normally impassive face split into a wide grin as he regarded Crogan, mirth dancing in his dark eyes. It seems youve come to the crossroads, Nathaniel Crogan. What? How do you . . . Crogans eyes widened. Who are you? Ah, now that has many answers. Ask rather, what am I to you, Nathaniel Crogan. All right. What are you to me? Im your last chance, boy. Im the one that comes unexpected. He smiled. Im the graves laughter. Im the reason you can still dance jigs on lifeless limbs. I am Ghede. Crogan wouldve gasped if he still drew breath. The Loa? Is there any other? Well . . . well, no, I guess not. What did you mean by last chance? I like you, Nathaniel Crogan. Such as you are rare. Zombies? Ha! Mindless esh. But your kind are more rare by far. He leaned forward. I cant make such as you, boy. I can only permit it. Crogan shook his head; he knew little of Voodoo, and less of what to expect of the being before him. What do you want of me? I told you Nathaniel Crogan: to give you a chance. Serve me and serve me well and I will set you free. Crogans thoughts raced. How long? Less than eternity. A better offer than Lyras ever gave you. Lyras? The one you called Captain. Why? Why did you save the ship? Crogan looked up at the possessed man in surprise. Because of the girl. Sitgreaves body nodded slowly. Im also the patron of children. So, whats it to be? Servant of Ghede or prey for the damned? Crogan smiled grimly and took his chance.

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Introduction
Skull & Bones is d20 campaign setting detailing the Golden Age of Piracy. The main focus of this setting is the Caribbean in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. This era witnessed the greatest ourishing of piracy in the history of the world, and is the source of the genres most memorable characters, such as Blackbeard, Anne Bonny, Mary Read, and Calico Jack Rackham. Never before and never since has the world seen piracy on such a wide scale. Now, with this roleplaying game supplement and the d20 core rules, you can take your gaming group to the high seas.

THE GOLDEN AGE OF PIRACY


1690-1720 Timeline 1692 Port Royal, Jamaica destroyed by Earthquake. Henry Every leads mutiny aboard privateer and begins pirate career William Kidd abandons privateer contract and takes up piracy in the Red Sea. William Kidd executed

A Brief History of the Golden Age of Piracy


The largest factor in creating the Golden Age of Piracy was money. On his search for a faster route to the wealth of Asia, Christopher Columbus found a continent that had been hitherto completely unknown in Europe. Following the routes charted by Columbus, the Spanish crown began the systematic exploration, colonization, and exploitation of the New World. Within a few years, a vast, seemingly endless stream of gold, silver, and jewels made its way by sea into the coffers of the Spanish monarchy. This windfall was invested rst in shipbuilding and armaments, which led to a ourishing merchant community and the rise of banking in Europe, bringing more wealth to all nations. However, the plunder from the New World still made Spain the envy of Europe.

tarting in the middle of the fteenth century, technological innovations led to signicant developments in the science of sailing. Progress in ship design was especially importantthree-masted vessels with square driving sails on the main and foremasts began to replace older single-masted vessels with triangular sails, making longer voyages a possibility.

1697

1707 Act of Union joins England, Scotland and Wales to form the United Kingdom of Great Britain 1714 End of the War of the Spanish Succession, privateers switch over to piracy New Providence in the Bahamas becomes a base for pirates Edward Teach (Blackbeard) arrives in New Providence and joins the crew of Benjamin Hornigold Stede Bonnet turns to piracy Ex-privateer Woodes Rogers made governor of New Providence Charles Vane uses a reship and escapes New Providence on arrival of Woodes Rogers Blackbeard dies in battle with British Navy Lieutenant Maynard near Ocracoke inlet, Carolinas Jack Rackham, Anne Bonny, and Mary Read tried for piracy

COMPETITION IN THE NEW WORLD


When the English were prohibited from trading with Spanish ports, they began raiding Spanish merchant vessels. To protect its interests, Spain erected massive forts at ports in its colonial holdings. In 1522, Francois the First, king of France, was heard to express a desire to see the clause in Adams will that divided up the New World between Portugal and Spain. The French soon joined the English in harassing Spanish shipping and clamoring for a foothold in the New World. In 1654, England attempted to gain a foothold in the Caribbean with an attack on Santo Domingo, the capital of Spains Hispaniola. When the attack was repulsed, the English retreated to Jamaica, beginning a presence in the area that continues to the present day. Hispaniola was also home to roving bands of French outlaws that settled the wilder parts of the island and naturally came into conict with the Spanish authorities. It was from these outlaws practice of smoking meat on wooden racks called boucan that they became known as boucaniers or buccaneers. They soon spread to other islands, in a never-ending search to nd a home free of any Colonial authority. The Spanish, however, were the most pervasive power in the area. The Caribbean coasts of Panama, Colombia and Venezuela were known collectively as the Spanish Main. This was the source of the Spanish wealth, and the vast treasures of the South American native empires were funneled out through the islands of the Caribbean, across the Atlantic, and beyond. These treasure eets had to run a gauntlet of the Caribbean islands, making the area a haven for sneak-attacks. The age of piracy had begun.

1714

1716

1717 1717

PIRATES AND PRIVATEERS


Nations issued pirates ofcial licenses to prey upon the shipping of their enemies. These Letters of Marque turned pirates into privateersvolunteer naval vessels of a European power. Of course, such letters were not recognized by the enemy nation, and privateers were often hung as pirates anyway. Too often, a privateer continued his sacking of enemy vessels after a treaty had been signed, or simply made the choice to take a prize from a nation not covered by the Letter of Marque . . . including ships of their benefactor nation. Pirates and privateers alike found friendly ports in which to trade, ranging from the pirate ports of Port Royal, Jamaica, to New Providence and Nassau in the Bahamas, to the Colonial cities of New York and Boston in the North. Here, pirates could sell their loot to colonists who welcomed goods without the massive taxes levied by the European crowns. Of course, the winds changed quickly, and a port that was once friendly to pirate trade could change to one where all a pirate could expect was a swift trial followed by public execution. By the 1720s, power in the region had swung from the Spanish crown to the English, bolstered by the power and success of their North American colonies. The English navy soon poured men and ships into the New World to protect their holdingssomething that the Spanish had not done on any large scale.

1718

1718

1720

END OF AN ERA
By the end of the 1720s, the fast, powerful ships of the Royal Navy had hunted most of the pirates down. Many were killed, while others retired under the Kings Pardon and became respectable (if scandalous) members of society, living on their illgotten gains to a ripe old age. The Golden Age of Piracy was over.

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Players

Section

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Chapter I: Character Creation


Creating a character for the Skull & Bones campaign follows the basic rules outlined in the PH, with the following additions and modications.

- Race -

lves, dwarves and many of the trappings of standard fantasy have little place in the sun-drenched reaches of the Caribbean. There is only one race available for player characters in the Skull & Bones settinghuman. However, there are a number of non-human races included in the Chapter XIII: Friends and Foes that could be used as player character races at the GMs discretion.

- Classes ive new player character classes designed specically for use in a Skull & Bones campaign are introduced in the Classes chapter, but many of the core PC classes can also be used with a little modication. The following list details the changes that must be made to the classes from the PH to make them suitable for the Skull & Bones setting. Universal: Classes that are normally procient with crossbows are instead procient with simple gunpowder weapons. Barbarians are unchanged in Skull & Bones, and can represent many of the natives of the New World, Africans, and even Scottish Highlanders. Bards are mostly replaced by shantymen, who are much more appropriate to pirate campaigns. A shore-based bard is identical to a bard from the PH, but lacks spells and spellcasting ability. The GM may wish to give bards a few rogue abilities or bonus feats to make up for the lack of spells, but in most cases a player is better off simply playing a shantyman. Clerics are not suitable as a player character class, since in Skull & Bones they have no access to divine magic unless they bear a holy relic. See the Chapter IX: Spells and Magic for full details on the capability of clerics in this setting. Druids are long gone from Europe, with its intolerance of all religions other than Christianity. Something similar to the d20 class may occasionally be found as an NPC medicine man or shaman among barbarian tribes, but he is unlikely to be an adventurer. His magic derives from his role in the tribe, not from any innate power, and if he leaves his tribe he will lose his magic. Former apprentices to such gures make good bokors or hougans, if they can nd the right teacher. Fighters and monks are unchanged from their base form. Fighters are as common in Skull & Bones as they are in traditional d20 campaigns, but monks come only from the great Asian martial temples, and are extraordinarily rare on the Continent and in the New World. The monk class skill of knowledge (arcana) should be replaced with knowledge (religion). Like clerics, paladins are not able to cast spells in the Skull & Bones setting unless they are in possession of a holy relic. Paladins also do not have the ability to heal the wounded with a touch of their hand, nor can they ever summon a warhorse, but they retain all other class abilities and restrictions. To make up for these lost abilities, GMs should consider giving paladins good Will saves and granting them a bonus feat from the ghter list at levels 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20. Note that paladins are a bad t for most swashbuckling campaigns, and at the GMs discretion they may be restricted to campaigns where all the characters belong to an organization devoted to God and country. One such group is the Knights of Malta, who are dedicated to destroying the Barbary Pirates in the Mediterranean.

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Rangers never gain spells under any circumstances, but the class otherwise functions as described in the core rules. The class skill of knowledge (dungeoneering) should be replaced with knowledge (sea lore). Rogues function as described in the PH, except that their prociency with crossbows is replaced by prociency with pistols and pocket pistols. Sorcerers and wizards are unsuitable for the Skull & Bones campaign setting, and both classes are disallowed. The era when powerful magic was available without dire consequences is long gone.

- Skills and Feats -

irates live not only by their wits, but by skill and experience. The bloodthirsty temperament will get one a certain distance, but without the right skills, tha hangmans noose often awaits. Characters in Skull & Bones acquire skills and feats as described in the core rules. New skills and feats are listed in Chapter III: Skills and Feats, and characters can also take most feats from the PH. The following feats are disallowed. All item creation feats, except for Brew Potion. All metamagic feats. Augment Summoning Eschew Materials Extra Turning Improved Counterspell Improved Turning Natural Spell Spell Mastery Spell Penetration and Greater Spell Penetration

- Character Description -

B C C

ackground elements such as culture and religion are especially important for characters in Skull & Bones. The historical avor will help bring your game to life. Much of this detail is augmented by elements in Chapter IV: Backgrounds and Fortunes. Chapter VIII: A Pirates Life contains a number of mechanics that enhance the avor and nature of the Golden Age of Piracy.

- Equipping the Character -

haracters buy starting equipment with the starting money indicated in the class description. Since a Skull & Bones campaign takes place in a different historical period than that reected in the core rules, some pieces of equipment are either extremely rare or not available at all. A complete list of weapons, armor, and goods is found in Chapter VI: Equipment.

- New Character Creation Steps haracters in Skull & Bones go through four additional steps to generate their background, contacts, fortunes, and lives. A complete description of backgrounds and fortunes is found in Chapter IV.

BACKGROUNDS
At least to start, where someone has come from helps dene who he is. As described in Chapter IV, backgrounds exchange four skill points from a characters initial allotment in return for an assortment of appropriate contacts, skill ranks and modiers to charisma-based skill checks.

CONTACTS
In the Skull & Bones setting, who a character knows is as important as what he knows. The Caribbean of the Golden Age of Piracy is awash with colonists, rogues, nobles, bureaucrats, sea dogs, priests, natives, and pirates, and some are even on

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the PCs side. Every character has a number of contactsNPCs who are willing to assist him when it suits their interest. Characters in Skull & Bones begin the game with a number of contacts equal to their Charisma modier (minimum 1), and gain additional contacts through their choice of Backgrounds (as explained below). Basic contacts have 1 to 3 levels in suitable classes, and possess slightly above-average ability scores. A player can chose to convert two basic contacts into one advanced contact (level 4+) at the GMs discretion. As PCs go up in level, their contacts advance as wellat a rate of one level for every three gained by the PC, unless the contact is actively putting himself at risk alongside the PC. In this case, the contact should gain levels at the same rate as the PC. Contacts can, obviously, take some time for the GM to create. If a GM is willing to be exible about it, contacts dont have to be rigidly dened at the start of a game; they can be chosen during the course of the campaign. Some sample contacts are provided in Chapter XIII: Friends and Foes for GMs who prefer to rm things up quickly. New contacts can be acquired during play if the GM feels a PC has been as useful to an NPC as an NPC may have been to a PC. Further, additional basic contacts are acquired from Backgrounds, a new step in character creation that is described on the previous page.

FORTUNES
Also described in Chapter IV, Fortunes are extra details that round out a characters personality. They provide some details about his habits or reveal some quirky trait dealt to him by Fate or experience. Starting characters can select up to four fortunes. Any or all of a characters fortunes may be of the general variety, but each good fortune chosen must be balanced by an ill fortune.

LIVES
In the swashbuckling, high-adventure environment of the Skull & Bones setting, characters are hard to kill. In fact, they get to die several times. Every PC (and key non-player character) has a number of lives which they expend over the course of their adventuring career, till they at last run out of tales. Each starting PC in Skull & Bones has 1d4 + 2 lives, with a few exceptions noted later. The GM rolls for each character and keeps track secretly of how many lives each PC has left.

- Legends of Piracy HENRYLONG BEN EVERY


Years of Operation: 1691-1695 Operational Area: Atlantic The Englishmen Henry Every [Buc2/Sdg5/Sof6, hp 102] was regarded as the most renowned pirate of his day. Tales claim he joined the Royal Navy, was a buccaneer, a logwood freighter captain, a slaver, or a pirate under Red Hand Nicolls. In 1694 he served as rst mate under one Captain Gibson, a drunk, aboard the Charles II. Every and his cohorts seized the ship and sailed out of the Spanish port, La Caruna, for a life of piracy. His ship, renamed Fancy, joined with ve other vessels to take two of the Grand Moguls ships. The haul included 500,000 Pieces of Eight, gold, jewels, and a ruby-encrusted saddle, one of the largest prizes in history. This ultimately proved dangerous, as the Grand Mogul forced the East India Company to put a 500 pound bounty on each of Everys crew. Every eventually made his way back to Ireland in a small sloop. Twenty-four of his men were arrested and six hanged soon after. Every escaped, though tales vary on whether he retired wealthy or died penniless, cheated of his diamonds by merchants. Regardless of his fate, his success convinced many to take up life On the Account.

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Chapter II: Core Classes


This chapter presents ve new core classes for the Skull & Bones campaign setting. The three more common classesbuccaneer, sea dog, and shantymanare described rst, followed by the two magic-using classes, bokor and hougan. The latter two classes are intimately tied up with voodoo and use a great deal of terminology that may be foreign to you. The rst time you read this book, you might want to skip over the bokor and hougan classes until you have read and absorbed Chapter IX: Spells and Magic.

- Buccaneer The rst buccaneers were rootless wanderers and escaped servants, mostly French, who settled on small islands largely abandoned by the Spanish. They fed on the pigs and other livestock the Spanish had left behind, hunting them with their characteristic long muskets and using res to cook them slowly on the boucan racks that gave them their name. Later, English sailors, escaped slaves, bankrupted Dutch merchants, and every other outcast of the Caribbean swelled their numbers. The buccaneers began to use their small dugout canoes to raid passing ships, particularly Spanish ones, for the Spaniards had mounted several expeditions to destroy them. Their reputation for savagery and greed grew with every galleon they plundered, and their expert knowledge of the reefs and bays let them plunder many. Soon they were recruited by pirates and privateers, and put to work as raiders against Spanish towns deep in the jungles of the Main. Some buccaneers turned pirate captain themselves, taking a prize ship as their own and lling it with their own kind.

ugged outlaws of the coves and beaches, buccaneers (abbreviated Buc) live by hunting game in the jungles and by conducting stealthy, nighttime attacks on richly laden ships.

ADVENTURES
The hectic lifestyle of buccaneers often throws them into dangerous situations as a matter of survival, rather than choice. When they do choose to adventure, it is usually because the opportunity arose, rather than because the buccaneers sought the venture out. Their astonishing tenacity and endurance brings them through many a perilous situation with nothing to show for it but scars.

CHARACTERISTICS
The unifying aspect of buccaneers is that they are the rejects and outcasts of society. They have seen the bottom of life and they are determined to never end up there again. They are not known for their loyalty, but a strong leader, a cause that interests them, or the promise of wealth can win the loyalty of buccaneers. . . . for a time.

ALIGNMENT
Buccaneers can be of any alignment, but they are most often neutral and chaotic neutral. Lawful evil buccaneers often emerge as leaders of their kind. Hit Die: d8.

CLASS SKILLS
The buccaneers class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Appraise (Int), Balance (Dex), Climb (Str), Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Heal (Wis), Hide (Dex), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Knowledge (geography) (Int), Knowledge (local) (Int), Knowledge (nature) (Int), Knowledge (navigation) (Int), Knowledge (sea lore) (Int), Listen (Wis), Move Silently (Dex), Profession (Wis), Ride (Dex), Search (Int), Speak Language (None), Spot (Wis), Survival (Wis), Swim (Str), Use Rope (Dex). Skill Points at 1st Level: (6 + Int modier) x 4. Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 6 + Int modier.

CLASS FEATURES
All of the following are class features of the buccaneer.

WEAPON AND ARMOR PROFICIENCY


Buccaneers are procient with all simple and martial weapons, light armor, medium armor, and shields. Note that armor check penalties for armor heavier than a buff coat apply to the skills Balance, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Move Silently, Sleight of Hand, and Tumble. Also, Swim checks are subject to double the normal armor check penalty and encumbrance penalty, as described in the Core Rules.

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BONUS FEAT
At 1st and then at 5th level, a buccaneer gains a bonus feat selected from the following list: Alertness, Athletic, Endurance, Great Fortitude, Iron Will, Lightning Reexes, Point Blank Shot, Power Attack, SelfSufcient, and Toughness.

SURVIVOR (EX) BUCCANEER CUISINE


Buccaneers pride themselves on eating better than sea dogs and even most landlubbers. Barbecued goat, spiced sh, stewed sea turtle, and fresh fruit are favorites. However, they are well used to all manner of hardships, including starvation, and are able to function regardless. Henry Morgan led a buccaneer army through the jungles and swamps of the Mosquito Coast to sack Panama. The trek took longer than they had expected, and they ran out of food. Although most survived to take and loot Panama, they became so desperate for food en route that we have the following record of their recipe for eating leather: Take one satchel or shoe. Cut the leather into pieces, then soak, beat, and rub between stones to tenderize. Scrape off the hair, and roast or grill. Cut into smaller pieces and serve with plenty of water. At 1st level, buccaneers gain a +1 insight bonus on all Listen, Spot, Swim, and Survival checks so long as they are in the Caribbean area, either on an island or in the sea within sight of shore. This bonus increases by +1 at 4th level, and by a further +1 every three levels thereafter.

EXPERT PILOT (EX)


At 2nd level, buccaneers gain a +2 competence bonus on all Knowledge (navigation) checks.

RESILIENT (EX)
Beginning at 3rd level, the buccaneers remarkable stamina and determination grant him a +2 resistance bonus on Fortitude saves to remain conscious due to Con damage (see Chapter VII: Combat).

NIGHT RAID (EX)


At 6th level, the buccaneer can organize a night raid on a ship with great care and precision. So long as he has the time and basic resources with which to prepare the attack (at least three hours), he may use his own Move Silently and Hide skills to sail a boat up to 25 ft. long in silence and hidden from any lookouts. The boat may move at up to one quarter speed, and must be provided with mufed oars, lamp-blacked crew, etc.

HUNTERS PATIENCE (EX)


At 8th level, the buccaneer can spend extra time to aim at a target, so long as he is armed with a long musket or rie. For each round he spends doing nothing but aiming, he gains a +1 circumstance bonus on his attack roll when he nally res his shot. The maximum bonus that can be attained through Hunters Patience is equal to half the buccaneers base attack bonus (round down). For example, Pierre Larousse is a 9th level buccaneer. His base attack bonus

TABLE 2-1: BUCCANEER LEVEL PROGRESSION


Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Base Attack Bonus +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6/+1 +7/+2 +8/+3 +9/+4 +10/+5 +11/+6/+1 +12/+7/+2 +13/+8/+3 +14/+9/+4 +15/+10/+5 +16/+11/+6/+1 +17/+12/+7/+2 +18/+13/+8/+3 +19/+14/+9/+4 +20/+15/+10/+5 Fort Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12 Ref Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 Will Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 Special Bonus feat, survivor (+1) Expert pilot Resilient Survivor (+2) Bonus feat Night raid Survivor (+3) Hunters patience Survivor (+4) Ferocious attack Survivor (+5) Hunters patience (damage bonus) Survivor (+6) Warding Survivor (+7) Hunters patience (Con damage)

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is +9, so his maximum additional bonus for Hunters Patience is +4, which he will gain if he spends four rounds aiming. If there are any distractions during the aiming period, the buccaneer must make a Concentration check (DC 10 + rounds spent aiming + any damage inicted) to continue to aim. If he fails the check, he loses any bonus so far accumulated, but may start aiming again the following round if he wishes. Starting at 14th level, the buccaneer gains a +2 damage bonus when using Hunters Patience, so long as he spends at least three rounds aiming. At 20th level, if the buccaneer spends at least six rounds aiming with Hunters Patience and successfully hits his opponent, the opponent must immediately make a Fortitude check, DC 10 + the damage suffered, or take Con damge instead of hit point damage.

FEROCIOUS ATTACK (EX)


By the time a buccaneer reaches 11th level, his battle-scarred appearance and savage combat style are enough to make his foes ee in terror or surrender outright. In the rst round of any combat, the buccaneer may declare a Ferocious Attack. This attack has a +1 bonus on attack and damage rolls, but the buccaneer suffers a 2 penalty to his AC until the start of his turn on the next round. If the Ferocious Attack hits, any living opponents hostile to the buccaneer within 30 feet must immediately make a Will save (DC 10 + Cha bonus + buccaneer level) or become frightened (see Condition Summary in the DMG) for 1d6 rounds. Characters who succeed in their Will save are unaffected by witnessing a Ferocious Attack by the same buccaneer in the future.

WARDING (EX)
Starting at 17th-level, the buccaneer gains a +2 circumstance bonus on all saves against spells or spell-like abilities, so long as the buccaneer is aware of the spell being cast and has a hand free to perform some quick, superstitious action (perhaps a gesture, phrase, or a touch of a lucky charm). If no saving throw is permitted, this ability has no effect.

- Sea Dog -

hether crewing a pirate sloop, a merchantman, or a man o war, the sea dog (abbreviated Sdg) is at home on the deck or in the rigging of any ship, large or small. The oceans hold a myriad of dangers, from lethal storms to enemy warships, and the sea dog is capable of dealing with any of them as a matter of course. To such men, land is less familiar than the rolling waves.

ADVENTURES
Many sea dogs rst go to sea in search of a life of high adventure. They are rugged and exible enough to adapt to many situations both at sea and on shore, and willing to try almost anything if theres a chance of wealth, or even just to satisfy their curiosity. Some sea dogs ght for a cause, whether in a navy for King and Country or as idealistic outlaws who believe that they can create a lawless utopia.

CHARACTERISTICS
Sea dogs are hard workers who form communities. They tend to be loyal rst to other sea dogs, and only secondarily to the ofcers of their ship. This loyalty does not usually extend to mutinous behavior or anything that puts the crew or the ship in danger.

TABLE 2-2: SEA DOG LEVEL PROGRESSION


Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Base Attack Bonus +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6/+1 +7/+2 +8/+3 +9/+4 +10/+5 +11/+6/+1 +12/+7/+2 +13/+8/+3 +14/+9/+4 +15/+10/+5 +16/+11/+6/+1 +17/+12/+7/+2 +18/+13/+8/+3 +19/+14/+9/+4 +20/+15/+10/+5 Fort Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12 Ref Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12 Will Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 Special Enlightened/superstitious, close quarters +1, dodge 1st favored ship Mobility Close quarters +2 2nd favored ship Spring attack Close quarters +3, 3rd favored ship

4th favored ship Close quarters +4 5th favored ship Close quarters +5

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Sea dogs arent soldiers or willing ghters, but when it comes time to defend themselves and their ship from attack they join battle with uncommon ferocity. Sea dogs are typically superstitious; anything from a bird in the sky to the way a piece of rope coils on the deck can be a sign of bad luck or impending doom. The few sea dogs who arent tend to reject superstition entirely.

ALIGNMENT
Sea dogs can be any alignment, but most are neutral. Those of strongly evil or chaotic alignment seldom last long on civilized ships, but thrive in the company of pirates. Hit Die: d10.

CLASS SKILLS
The sea dogs class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Appraise (Int), Balance (Dex), Climb (Str), Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Hide (Dex), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Knowledge (geography) (Int), Knowledge (local) (Int), Knowledge (navigation) (Int), Knowledge (sea lore) (Int), Listen (Wis), Move Silently (Dex), Perform (Cha), Profession (Wis), Speak Language (None), Spot (Wis), Swim (Str), Use Rope (Dex). Skill Points at 1st Level: (4 + Int modier) x 4. Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 4 + Int modier.

CLASS FEATURES
All of the following are class features of the sea dog.

WEAPON AND ARMOR PROFICIENCY


A sea dog is procient with all simple and martial weapons and with light and medium armor, but not with shields. Note that armor check penalties for armor heavier than buff coat applies to the skills Balance, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Move Silently, Sleight of Hand, and Tumble. Also, Swim checks suffer a 1 penalty for every 5 pounds of armor and equipment carried.

BONUS FEATS
When wearing light armor or no armor, a sea dog can ght as though he had the Dodge feat. In addition, a sea dog of 4th level or higher wearing light armor or no armor can ght as though he had the feat Mobility; and, if of 8th level or higher, the feat Spring Attack. He loses these special bonuses when wearing medium or heavy armor.

ENLIGHTENED/SUPERSTITIOUS (EX)
All sea dogs begin play with either the Enlightened or the Superstitious fortune. This is a free bonus fortune, and does not count toward the usual limit of four fortunes. Most sea dogs are Superstitious, but the Enlightened option is offered for characters such as the rational sea captain.

CLOSE QUARTERS (EX)


When ghting with either cutlass or handaxe below decks on any ship, the sea dog gains a +1 circumstance bonus on damage rolls. This bonus increases to +2 at 5th level, +3 at 10th level, +4 at 15th level, and +5 at 20th level.

FAVORED SHIP (EX)


At 2nd level, a sea dog may select a type of sea-going vessel as a favored ship. His expertise and training with that particular type of ship gives him a +2 bonus on Profession (sailor), Balance, Climb, Hide, Move Silently, Search, and Use Rope checks while aboard (or attempting to board) such a vessel. He may select a new favored ship at 6th level and each four levels thereafter (10th, 14th, and 18th level). Each time he gains a new favored ship, the bonus associated with every previous favored ship goes up by +1. Example: Captain Lambkin is a 13th level sea dog and has three favored ships: English warships with a bonus of +4, English ships with a bonus of +3, and Spanish merchantmen with a bonus of +2.

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TABLE 2-3: SEA DOG FAVORED SHIPS


Ship Category English Boats English Ships English Warships English Merchantmen Spanish Boats Spanish Ships Spanish Warships Spanish Merchantmen French Boats French Ships French Warships French Merchantmen Dutch Boats Dutch Ships Dutch Warships Dutch Merchantmen Swedish Vessels Prussian Vessels Danish Vessels American Vessels Ships covered Tiny and Small ships All Medium-size ships All military ships of Large size and above All commercial ships of Large size and above Tiny and Small ships All Medium-size ships All military ships of Large size and above All commercial ships of Large size and above Tiny and Small ships All Medium-size ships All military ships of Large size and above All commercial ships of Large size and above Tiny and Small ships All Medium-size ships All military ships of Large size and above All commercial ships of Large size and above All Swedish boats and ships, whatever the size All Prussian boats and ships, whatever the size All Danish boats and ships, whatever the size Boats and ships of any size built in North America Examples Rowboat, Fishing Boat Frigate, Schooner 4th Rate, 1st Rate Brigantine, Pinnace Rowboat, Fishing Boat Frigate, Schooner 4th Rate, 1st Rate Brigantine, Pinnace Rowboat, Fishing Boat Frigate, Schooner 4th Rate, 1st Rate Brigantine, Pinnace Rowboat, Fishing Boat Frigate, Schooner 4th Rate, 1st Rate Brigantine, Pinnace Any Any Any Any

Table 2-3 gives categories and types for a sea dogs favored ship. It should be noted that the nationality of a ship refers to the original place in which a ship was built, even if it is currently being crewed and commanded by a different nationality. Most of the ships encountered on the Spanish Main are built in England, France, Spain, and Holland. By the beginning of the 18th century, Salisbury in New England has become an important shipbuilding center, and the rst American-built ships are seen plying the waters of the Antilles. The table given reects the ships most likely found in a Caribbean-based campaign, so the powers that have only a small number of ships in the area (such as Denmark) are covered by a single choice of favored ship category. GMs may wish to adjust the ships covered by different categories if their campaign is more wide-ranging, or for a campaign set specically around Madagascar, for example.

- Shantyman Historically, these men were divided into two groups: ships musicians, who played hornpipes and jigs for the crew, and shantymen, who sang songs of the sea, usually containing call-and-response verses to make a days work go more smoothly. For the purposes of Skull & Bones, we use the name shantyman for both.

usicians have always played an important role on sailing vessels, and pirate ships are no exception. These entertainers provide the crew with diversion in times of boredom and routine, and with rhythm during group efforts.

ADVENTURES
Shantymen seek adventure with their ships crew, but rarely go looking for it alone. However, when the ship is in a tight spot, or if a shantyman is part of an adventure that will lead to riches, he always pulls a full load. Shantymen are also more interested in learning about the world and picking up new songs and new bits of information than they are in merely accumulating wealth. Of course, they want their share of any booty, but they see more value in establishing friendly contacts and good will in any port they visit than most other common sea folk in the Skull & Bones campaign setting. For the shantyman, an adventure is more important as an opportunity to learn something new or establish a new contact than just as a source of wealth.

CHARACTERISTICS
Shantymen get on well with sea dogs, who consider them good luck to have aboard a vessel, and who make for an appreciative audience. They may respect hougans (depending upon their own beliefs), but in general are wary of bokor. Shantymen care for their instruments and always work to keep them in good repair. Whenever possible, they take them along whenever off ship. Shantymen adherents of voodoo tend towards drums as their preferred instrument, while Protestant and Catholic shantymen tend to stick to whistles, fes, ddles, and pipes.

ALIGNMENT
Shantymen can be any alignment, but lawful and evil examples are hard to nd. Most shantymen are chaotic or neutral, and they are frequently good Hit Die: d8.

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CLASS SKILLS
Appraise (Int), Balance (Dex), Bluff (Cha), Climb (Str), Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Disguise (Cha), Escape Artist (Dex), Forgery (Int), Gather Information (Cha), Hide (Dex), Knowledge (all skills, taken individually) (Int), Perform (Cha), Profession (sailor) (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), Sleight of Hand (Dex), Speak Language (None), Swim (Str), Tumble (Dex), Use Rope (Dex). Skill Points at 1st Level: (4 + Int modier) x 4. Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 4 + Int modier.

CLASS FEATURES
All of the following are class features of the shantyman.

WEAPONS AND ARMOR


Shantymen are procient with all simple weapons (including simple rearms), and any two of the following: longsword, rapier, whip, cutlass, pistol, or musket. They are not procient with any type of armor or shields.

BARDIC MUSIC
Shantymen display the same musical abilities described in the entry for bards in the PH.

BARDIC KNOWLEDGE
Shantymen amass a wide variety of information during their travels. Their broad and esoteric knowledge is reected in this special ability, which is described in the entry for bards in the PH.

BONUS CONTACT
Shantymen perform aboard many ships during their careers, playing for their passage from one port to another. During their travels, they meet many people. To reect this, the shantyman gains an additional contact at 1st level, and at every 3 levels thereafter. These contacts remain undened until such time as the player chooses to reveal them (with the GMs approval). At the players discretion, two undened contacts may be converted into a single ally (as per the Ally good fortune; see Chapter IV: Backgrounds and Fortunes) instead.

TABLE 2-4: SHANTYMAN LEVEL PROGRESSION


Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Base Attack Bonus +0 +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6/+1 +6/+1 +7/+2 +8/+3 +9/+4 +9/+4 +10/+5 +11/+6/+1 +12/+7/+2 +12/+7/+2 +13/+8/+3 +14/+9/+4 +15/+10/+5 Fort Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 Ref Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12 Will Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12 Special Bardic music, bardic knowledge, bonus contact Vaporing Bonus contact Fame tale Bonus contact Bonus contact Bonus contact Bonus contact Improved vaporing Bonus contact

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VAPORING (EX)
During naval combat ships musicians aboard a pirate vessel lead the crew in creating a cacophony of soundsblasts from horns, shrieking pipes, pounding drums, chanting, screaming . . . all designed to throw fear into the hearts of the prey vessel. This practice was known as vaporing. At 2nd level, shantymen gain the ability to lead a pirate crew in this practice, which affects the crew of a target vessel as the cause fear spell (see the PHB; use the shantymans class level and Cha modier to determine DC). The crew of the target vessel is allowed a collective saving throw (using the crew collectivity rules presented in Chapter X: Of Ships and the Sea). Important NPCs and PCs receive individual saving throws if targeted by a vaporing (and, as per the spell, characters with 6 or more levels are immune to this effect). Vaporing can only be used against an enemy ship once per combat.

TABLE 2-5: VAPORING


Target Crew Quality Rabble Poor Average Superior Expert Circumstance Target Outnumbered Target Damaged Pirates Outnumbered Pirates Damaged Famous Pirate Captain DC 10 15 20 25 30 Check Modier +2 +2 -2 -2 + Fame score

The shantyman must rst make a successful Perform check to lead the vaporing, with the DC based upon the quality of the target crew. If he fails the shantyman may not try again this combat. On Table 2-5, pirate refers to the crew of the shantymans ship (and pirate captain to its captain).

FAME TALE (EX)


At 5th level, a shantyman can increase the Fame score of any character by composing a story or a ballad of their exploits. This tale must be successfully performed to a third-party group so that the tale will spread. The shantyman must make a Perform check (DC 35, minus the current Fame score of the individual in question). A successful check increases the Fame score of the individual by 1 point. This can be performed more than once, but requires a new audience and a new performance check each time it is attempted.

IMPROVED VAPORING (EX)


As vaporing, but the enemy crew is affected as per the fear spell. Duration is based on half the shantymans level (or 1 round in the case of a successful save; see the spell text). The shantyman gains this ability at 17th level.

- Bokor here are as many tales of the bokor (abbreviated Bok) and their magic powers as there are raindrops in a storm. Some say that they are a dark reection of the tribal priests, others, that they stole their power from the Otherworld or tricked the Loa for it. All stories agree on one point: the bokor are fading. As the years turn, their sorceries are dying. No longer do they lay waste to cities or blight whole crops. But they still bear the old re and in the heart of the wild Caribbean, where doubting eyes are far away, their power is still great. Bokor have come to the New World in many ways. Some underwent the Baka ritual and ew over the Atlantic on birds wings. Others bore the vast indignity of a slaves voyage before shattering their chains (and often, their captors skulls) with a word and walking off into the jungles alone. They hold their secrets dear and seldom take apprentices. It is not their way. Some bokor plot to end the white mans reign in the New World, while others have ambitions of their own empire. Most are content to summon the myriad Djab that inhabit the Caribbean and trade in knowledge beyond the ken of most mortals. A scant few have gone on the account (ie taken up the pirate life) to see what the roving life of a pirate has to offer them.

ADVENTURES
Bokor seldom lead quiet lives. They are forever searching for scraps of lost lore and the means to greater power. They value secrets that the ancient peoples of the Caribbean considered dangerous, such as the names of various Djab, and are willing to go to great lengths to acquire them.

CHARACTERISTICS
No one chooses to become a bokor for benevolent reasons. The path of the bokor is the road to personal power at any cost. Those who become bokor take many risks: the power that they wield is not theirs by right and many are burned at the stake for witchery. A bokors power is versatile but unpredictable, and they use it only in dire need.

ALIGNMENT
Bokor can be of any alignment, but a good-aligned bokor is rarer than an honest pirate. Hit Die: d6.

CLASS SKILLS
The bokors class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Bluff (Cha), Concentration (Con), Craft (Alchemy) (Int), Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge (all skills, taken individually) (Int), Sense Motive (Wis), and Voodoo Ritual (Cha). Skill Points at 1st Level: (4 + Int modier) x 4. Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 4 + Int modier.

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CLASS FEATURES
All of the following are class features of the bokor.

WEAPON AND ARMOR PROFICIENCY


Bokor are procient with all simple weapons (including simple rearms). They are not procient with any type of armor or shields. Armor interferes with wanga (see below) that have somatic components, just as it interferes with arcane spellcasting in the core d20 rules. See the Armor Chart in the Chapter VII: Combat for details.

WANGA
Bokor cast wanga very much like sorcerers cast spells, but in many ways these arent spells. Bokor call on ancient pacts and stolen power to produce their effects. They use the arcane spells from the bokor arcane wanga list for their wanga, but spells from the list are all modied in several ways. All wanga have a verbal component and no wanga have material components. Bokor do not have to prepare wanga before casting, and they learn all spells at a given spell level when they gain access to any spells at that level. Metamagic feats have no effect on a bokors wanga (and are not allowed in a Skull & Bones campaign in any event). Bokor dont receive bonus wanga for having high ability scores. The DC to save against a bokors wanga is 10 + the wangas level + half the bokors level rounded down.

THE PRICE
There is a price for the versatile power the bokor wields. Every time a bokor casts a wanga, he burns with the power of it. A bokor suffers 1d4 + wanga level in damage when he invokes a wanga. Nothing can prevent this. Every time a bokor attempts to cast a wanga, he must make a Concentration skill check with a DC equal to 10 + the damage dealt by invoking the wanga. If he succeeds, the wanga is cast normally. If he fails, the wanga is disrupted and he loses the slot the wanga occupied on his list. If the wangas damage runs the bokor out of hit points, it becomes Con damage (see Chapter VII: Combat for details on hit points and Con damage in Skull & Bones). A bokor can continue to take wounds to cast wanga, but if this reduces his Con to 0, he suffers a fatal event and may lose a life (see Rolling the Bones in Chapter VII for details). Because of their supernatural ties, bokors are unaffected by healing magicincluding cure spells, healing potions, and favors (see the description of the hougan class on page 19). While the price is high indeed, the faster healing rates of Skull & Bones are of great help to the bokor.

TABLE 2-6: BOKOR LEVEL PROGRESSION


Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Base Attack Bonus +0 +1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6/+1 +6/+1 +7/+2 +7/+2 +8/+3 +8/+3 +9/+4 +9/+4 +10/+5 Fort Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 Ref Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 Will Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12 Special Bonus feat 0 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 Wanga per Day 1 2 3 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 4 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5

Djabs call The hidden re Djabs pact The ancient re Djabs trust Echoes of the past

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RITUALS
Bokor learn to cast rituals as they advance in level. See Chapter IX: Spells and Magic for details.

THE PATRONS
Bokor have a complex relationship with Voodoo. Many of their powers were supposedly stolen from the Loa long ago. The Loa obviously have a grudge against them, since hougans are forbidden from healing them. Some bokor choose to deal with the Djab in general and ignore the Loa as much as they are able, while others align themselves with one of the three Great Patrons of the bokor (see below). There are benets and drawbacks to having a patron. Unaligned bokor do as they please, beholden to none. Bokor who have a patron have tasks to perform and occasionally have to go on quests. A bokor may start the game already aligned with a patron, or they may acquire one during play through roleplaying. The patrons and the benets the bokor derives from serving them are as follows: Carrefour: The Lord of the Midnight Crossroads bokor act as border patrol guards between the worlds of esh and spirit. They frequently have to deal with unruly Djab, which has made them skilled diplomats used to dealing with extremely dangerous beings in difcult situations. Carrefours bokor acquire the spell-like ability to cast banishment once per day as an 11th level spellcaster, and they are effectively 4 levels higher for the purposes of banishing outsiders. As long as a bokor is acting on behalf of Carrefour, he takes no damage when he casts banishment. When using the various summoning rituals, these bokor can summon and make pacts with creatures with up to 4 HD more than the ritual normally allows. Baron Samedhi: Those that follow the Zombi Lord are feared and shunned by all. When faithful Voodooists whisper of the dark and terrible acts that bokor regularly commit, they are talking about the chosen of Samedhi. They are the stealers of gros-bon-anges and the makers of zombi. They delight in terrible poisons and letting loose the most wicked of Djab. Baron Samedhi asks only one thing of his bokor: that they spread terror in His name. How they choose to go about it is up to them. All damaging necromantic wanga they cast deal maximum damage (if appropriate). In addition, they receive the baka and the zombi rituals as they achieve the appropriate skill levels (see Chapter IX: Spells and Magic). Simbi: Bokor who follow Simbi are wise and frequently enigmatic. They are scholars, hermits, madmen, and prophets. Simbi asks that they search for new knowledge and for answers to puzzling questions. Simbis bokor can cast 1 additional wanga at each spell level.

BONUS FEAT
At 2nd level bokor gain Iron Will or Toughness as a bonus feat.

DJABS CALL (SU)


At 7th level bokor automatically acquire the Djabs call ritual. See the Voodoo Rituals in the Spells and Magic chapter.

THE HIDDEN FIRE (SU)


At 10th level a bokor may attempt to cast a 5th-level wanga once per day. He suffers 2d8+5 damage as a result.

DJABS PACT (SU)


At 11th level bokors learn the Djabs pact ritual.

THE ANCIENT FIRE (SU)


At 13th level a bokor may attempt to cast a 6th-level wanga once per week. He suffers 2d8+6 damage as a result.

DJABS TRUST (SU)


At 15th level bokors learn the Djabs trust ritual.

ECHOES OF THE PAST (SU)


At 18th level, bokors learn to pull forth the power that once made the Old World tremble. Once a month, a bokor can cast any wanga of 7th or 8th-level. He permanently sacrices 1d6 hp to do so.

- Hougan -

hat do you do when you lose everything you hold dear? Many of the children of Africa in the West Indies have nothing but hope and faith left to them. Hope that they may one day be free, and faith that their gods still watch over them. In shadowy elds and darkened ships holds, this great faith is rewarded when the Loa ride their brethren and speak of what will one day be. The spirits of guinea have not abandoned their people; neither have their hougans. Hougans (abbreviated Hgn) are the priests of Voodoo. They speak with and interpret the will of the deities of Voodoo, the Loa. They are more than simple priests; hougans serve as leaders, spiritual advisors, confessors, and trusted doctors. Many of them came to the New World chained alongside their people, despite the fact that they could have easily convinced the Loa to break their bonds. The hougans responsibility to his people prevents him from running free while the faithful are chained. Some slip off into the jungles to help those who have already escaped, and a scant few are called upon by the Loa to go on even stranger quests, but most hougans remain with their charges. The Voodoo faith is like a crazy quilt that is tattered, fragmentary, and yet strangely beautiful. Many tribes have been so decimated by slavery and disease that their original beliefs and practices have disappeared. Voodoo practitioners gather the

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TABLE 2-7: HOUGAN LEVEL PROGRESSION


Base Fort Level Attack Bonus Save 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 +0 +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6/+1 +6/+1 +7/+2 +8/+3 +9/+4 +9/+4 +10/+5 +11/+6/+1 +12/+7/+2 +12/+7/+2 +13/+8/+3 +14/+9/+4 +15/+10/+5 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12 Ref Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 Will Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12 Special Caille ritual Spells per day 0 1 2 3 4 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 2 2 1 3 2 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 3 2 4 3 2 4 3 2 4 3 3 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 3 Favors 5 6 7 8 9 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 2 1 3 3 2 1 3 3 2 2 1 3 3 3 2 1 3 3 3 2 2

Wisdom of the past The engagement

Improved Turning

Extra Turning

many pieces of these different faiths together to form a coherent whole. Hougans that cling to the deities of Africa worship the Old World Loa. Those that have started fresh in the West Indies have embraced the New World Loa. There is no formalized structure to Voodoo: no ranks, no central organization. Every hougan is free to interpret the will of the Loa as he sees t. The respect that hougans afford to other hougans is almost entirely based on personal power and the Loas regard. After all, if the Loa think one individual is more important than another, what faithful hougan would argue? Hougans of the New and Old World faiths cooperate and get along well. In many cases, they have to; they are all their people have. Note: Female priestesses of Voodoo are called mambos. In all ways, they are the equals of hougans and their duties are identical.

ADVENTURES
It is the lot of all priests to tend to the faithful, and hougans are no exception. Still, more than a few hougans nd that the Loa have different plans for them, and many go through a time of wandering before they settle into a hounfour permanently.

CHARACTERISTICS
Hougans speak with their gods regularly, and that simple fact profoundly changes their outlook on the world. Concrete proof of their faith is delivered frequently, sometimes daily. Then again, the Loa are difcult to deal with, and even the most faithful hougan nds them exasperating on occasion. The faithful trust their hougans, and heed their advice happily. Every hougan must choose whether they will serve the Old World or New World Loa. Once theyve made the choice, there is no going back. The various Loa factions are unwilling to offend one another and will not accept a recalcitrant hougan. In addition to Loa from their faction, hougans can call the various exception Loa as well as a rare few Djab, though most avoid dealing with the Djab on general principles. It is a gross generalization to think of the Old World Loa as good and the New World Loa as evil. Voodoo practitioners often say that the Petro family, the New World Loa, is raide meaning stern or hard of aspect. While this is so, the Old World Loa can be just as demanding and sometimes even more ruthless when the situation calls for it. See the Spells and Magic chapter for more on Voodoo and the Loa.

ALIGNMENT
Hougans can be any alignment, but as a rule those of the Old World faction favor law and those of the New World, chaos. Hit Die: d8.

CLASS SKILLS
The hougans class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Bluff (Cha), Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Heal (Wis), Knowledge (arcana) (Int), Knowledge (religion) (Int), Sense Motive (Wis), and Voodoo Ritual (Cha), Skill Points at 1st Level: (2 + Int modier) x 4. Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 2 + Int modier.

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CLASS FEATURES
All of the following are class features of the hougan.

WEAPONS AND ARMOR


Hougans are procient with all simple weapons (including simple rearms). They are not procient with any type of armor or shields. Hougans never wear armor of any kind; the Loa believe their protection should be sufcient and take it as an insult when a hougan presumes to believe otherwise. If a hougan wears armor, he loses his ability to cast spells and call upon favors for one week, or until he makes appropriate sacrice (GMs discretion).

DIVINE SPELLS
All power that a hougan wields comes from his inuence over the Loa. If he serves the Loa faithfully, he accumulates divine spells that he can call upon for aid. The number of divine spells a hougan can cast per day is on Table 2-7. This can be more difcult than it sounds though. Hougans have to invoke the Loa weekly using the great caille ritual, which they learn at 1st level, to gain the Loas favor and a portion of their power with which to work their magic. If they upset any of the Loa, prohibitions are placed against them that they must follow if they wish to have spell access that week. The DC to save versus a hougans spell is 10 + the spells level + half the hougans level rounded down. Note that high characteristics do not give hougans bonus spells, but neither do they need to prepare spells in advance. They can use any spell from the hougan divine spell list without restriction, at the levels they can cast, provided they are in good standing with the Loa.

FAVORS
Hougans wishing for the most powerful interventions from the Loa have to bargain for them. These interventions are called favors and hougans have to produce appropriate sacrices to secure them. At 8th level all hougans learn the engagement ritual, which is detailed in the Voodoo Rituals portion of Chapter IX: Spells and Magic. This ritual allows a hougan to secure one or more powerful favors from a specic Loa for future use. The hougans player must keep track of which Loa all of their favors are with, because the nature of the Loa dictates the nature of the favor. Unlike a hougans divine spells, favors never accumulate automatically. Indeed, many hougans are content with the spells the Loa bestow and never attempt to acquire favors. Others simply dont have the resources. The maximum number of favors a hougan can ever have at one time is on Table 2-7. Hougans get no bonus favors for high characteristics.

SPELLCASTERS AND DC IN SKULL & BONES


Magic in Skull & Bones is quite different than the system presented in the PH. In particular, the way spell DCs are calculated is decidedly non-standard. In the Skull & Bones system, a spellcasters raw power increases as he rises in level. Even his 1stlevel spells become harder to resist the more powerful he becomes. In this system level trumps ability scores. If you nd the Skull & Bones system too far off the beaten path, you may apply more standard rules at your option. Spell DCs for a bokor should be 10 + wanga level + Int modier. Spell DCs for a hougan should be 10 + spell/ favor level + Wis modier.

TURN OR REBUKE UNDEAD


Starting at 1st level, hougans can turn or rebuke undead a number of times per day equal to 3 + Charisma modier. The ability functions as described for the cleric class in the PH. Hougans deal with all sorts of spirits on a regular basis and often prefer to talk rst, banishing or destroying only as a last resort. Hougans may choose whether they are going to turn or rebuke on a case-by-case basis, regardless of their alignment. Be aware that even Baron Samedhi is not big on hougans having undead servants; such things are left for the darker-aspected bokor.

THE GREAT CAILLE RITUAL


At 1st level all hougans learn the caille ritual. This ritual is the foundation of the bond between hougan and Loa. Through weekly practice of this ritual, hougans gain divine spells, but improper behavior can lead to censure. See Chapter IX: Spells and Magic for more on Voodoo Rituals.

WISDOM OF THE PAST


When a hougan has 10 or more ranks in the Voodoo Rituals skill, he may learn the wisdom of the past ritual.

THE ENGAGEMENT RITUAL


Beginning at 8th level, hougans can attempt to learn the engagement ritual. This ritual allows hougans to sacrice for favors, as well as imparting the knowledge of how to call in said favors.

IMPROVED TURNING
At 13th level hougans gain Improved Turning as a bonus feat.

EXTRA TURNING
At 17th level hougans gain Extra Turning as a bonus feat.

EX-HOUGANS
Under normal circumstances, a hougan can never permanently lose his connection to the Loa; they always regard him as their subject, regardless of multiclassing. However, any hougan who takes a level of bokor becomes a hunted enemy of all the Loa, and loses his hougan class abilities permanently.

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Chapter III: Skills & Feats


This chapter presents new skills, new uses for old skills, and new feats for the Skull & Bones campaign setting.

- New Uses for Old Skills KNOWLEDGE (NAVIGATION) (INT)


Use this skill to guide an ocean-going vessel from one port to the next with the aid of instrumentation, charts, the stars, and coastal landmarks. Check: A successful Knowledge (navigation) check keeps your ship on course for one day. Retry: A character can make one Knowledge (navigation) skill check per vessel per day. A failed check adds 10% to the total required travel time, rounded up to the nearest hour. For example, on an ocean voyage of 480 nautical miles a ship making 5 knots would normally complete the journey in 4 days (96 hours). Each failed Knowledge (navigation) check during the voyage would add 10 hours to this total. Additionally, each failed check on a given voyage adds +2 to the DC of the next check, making a lost ship likely to become even more lost. DC 5 8 12 15 18 22 25 30

TABLE 3-1: KNOWLEDGE (NAVIGATION )


Condition Clear weather, sailing along a familiar coastline Clear weather, sailing in familiar waters among islands Overcast weather (sun or stars occasionally visible), sailing in familiar waters among islands Clear weather, sailing in unfamiliar waters near islands Clear weather, heading across open sea Overcast weather (sun or stars occasionally visible), heading across open seas Stormy weather (sun or stars never visible), heading across open seas Violent, stormy weather with no stars or landmasses visible

If the DC for this check becomes impossible for everyone on board, the ship is said to be hopelessly lost. They have no chance of reaching their desired destination, and their fate is literally in the GMs hands. Several results are possible: the ship could discover an unexplored island or landmass, it could land at a different destination, or it could simply run out of provisions on the high seas and face mutiny and starvation. Equipment: The DCs listed above assume that you have charts and other tools needed to properly guide a ship from one port to another. These tools include charts, sextants, and spyglasses. If you do not have appropriate tools, the DC increases by 10. Special: Characters with 5 or more ranks in Knowledge (sea lore) receive a +2 synergy bonus on Knowledge (navigation) checks.

KNOWLEDGE (SEA LORE) (INT)


You can read cloud formations, scent the wind, and read the colors of the sky to determine what the weather and open sea have in store for your ship. Check: Depending on the result of a Knowledge (sea lore) check, you can predict the weather up to 10 days into the future. The GM should make this check, so that the PC does not know if his check was a failure. GMs are encouraged to invent outlandishly false predictions for failed checks.

TABLE 3-2: KNOWLEDGE (SEA LORE)


Result 0-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30+ Duration of Accurate Prediction False prediction for next 1-10 days Today and next day Today and next three days Today and next ve days Today and next seven days Today and next ten days

Additional Uses: Knowledge (sea lore) can also be used to answer questions related to sea life, weather, tides, and other nautical topics. The DC for this check is 10 for easy questions, 15 for basic questions, and 20 to 30 for really tough questions. Retry: A character can only make one Knowledge (sea lore) skill check to predict the weather per day. Successful retries during a period already covered by a successful check extend the duration of the prediction.

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Synergy: Characters who have 5 or more ranks in Survival receive a +2 synergy bonus on all Knowledge (sea lore) checks.

- New Skill VOODOO RITUALS (CHA; TRAINED ONLY)


You can prepare and conduct Voodoo rituals. Check: Most of the uses for this skill are explained in the section on Voodoo Rituals in the Chapter IX: Spells and Magic. This skill can also be used to determine what ceremonies have been recently performed in a given area, or that are prepared for performance. Most questions (Whats that rattle for?) have a DC 10. Questions that draw on the history of Voodoo tend to lead back to Africa and are far more difcult, typically DC 20 to 30. Determining what rituals have occurred in an area recently requires a DC 15 check. Retry: No. Given the complexity of Voodoo beliefs there is no way to guess about most rituals and voodoo practices.

- New Feats ARMED TO THE TEETH (GENERAL)


You may use a melee weapon in your primary hand and a pistol in your off hand to gain an extra attack. Prerequisites: Base attack bonus +5 or higher, Crack Shot. Benet: When attacking with a melee weapon in your primary hand and a light rearm in your off hand, you gain the benets of the Two Weapon Fighting feat. Furthermore, shots from your pistol do not provoke attacks of opportunity. Normal: You cannot use rearms with Two Weapon Fighting and attacking with a ranged weapon in melee provokes an attack of opportunity. Note: This feat only applies when shooting the rearm, not when using it as a club. Once the weapon is discharged, it is treated as any other light melee weapon for the purposes of Two Weapon Fighting. Many pirates, of course, carried extra pistols and this can be quite effective when combined with Quick Draw.

ABOUT DROGUES
Drogues are the most common type of magic item in Skull & Bones. A bokor with the Craft Drogue feat can gather together appropriate materials in a small bag and imbue it with one or more wanga. The nished product is called a drogue. Drogues are not really permanent magic items, per se. No matter how well made they are, their power will fade, subject to time and use. Correspondingly, all drogues have both charges and a nite duration. Bokor often refer to drogues as if they were sentient creatures. A drogue only works for someone who properly owns it. Ownership of a drogue must be voluntarily passed; a drogue that is stolen or swindled from its rightful owner will not function. Note that choosing to hand over ones drogue at gunpoint is voluntary, but a corpse does not willingly relinquish the rights to its possessions unless there was a will or spoken agreement involved before they perished. To activate a drogue, its owner must grasp it and will it to function. The owner has an instinctive idea of what a drogue can do, as well as its approximate level of power and rough number of charges remaining. Bokor call drogues jealous because they will not function while their owner possesses more than two. Drogues are typically worn on a cord around the neck or stuffed into a pocket, though some may prefer to tie them to a weapon or hat.

CRABS RUSH (GENERAL)


Your scuttling, side-to-side movement in combat makes you hard to hit. Prerequisites: Dodge, Mobility. Benets: When you choose to ght defensively, you suffer a 2 penalty on all attacks in that round, and gain a +2 dodge bonus to AC against melee attacks, as well as a +4 dodge bonus to AC against ranged attacks. Normal: Without this feat, you suffer a 4 penalty on attacks while ghting defensively, and have no special protection against ranged attacks.

CRACK SHOT (FIGHTER, GENERAL)


Your skills with a chosen rearm let you ght with it as if it were a melee weapon. Prerequisite: Weapon Focus with rearm. Benet: When wielding a loaded rearm with which you have Weapon Focus, you threaten adjacent areas with this weapon and can make attacks of opportunity against enemies within 5 feet who provoke normal attacks of opportunity. Attacks of opportunity using this feat do not themselves provoke attacks of opportunity. Normal: You do not threaten enemies with ranged weapons.

CRAFT DROGUE (ITEM CREATION)


You can create drogues (magic items that store wanga; see sidebar). Prerequisite: Bokor level 6+. Benet: You can create any drogue whose prerequisites you meet. Crafting a drogue takes one day, but gathering all the required materials can take much longer. To craft a drogue, you must spend 1/25 of its base price in XP and use up raw materials costing half of its base price. You can imbue a drogue with one wanga for every 5 levels you have in the bokor class.

CRAFT GARDE (ITEM CREATION)


You can create gardes (raised scarication marks that store divine spells). Prerequisite: Hougan level 5+. Benet: You can create any garde whose prerequisites you meet. Crafting a garde takes one hour. To craft a garde, you must spend 25 XP and 50 reales worth of materials, and the recipient of the garde must spend another 25 XP. No individual can have more than two active gardes at any time. Any single spell from the following list can be added to the garde: bless, cure light wounds, divine favor, endure elements, entropic shield, pass without trace, protection from evil, remove fear, or shield of faith. Each garde is created with a number of charges equal to 1d4 + half the hougans level, rounded down. To call upon a gardes power, its owner must lay their hand upon it and invoke the Loa whose name it was carved in as a standard action. Each

CRAFTING A DROGUE
Before you can craft a drogue, you must rst determine the materials that are required to suit the wanga you want to -continued on next page

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use costs one charge. Spells are resolved using the hougans caster level at the time of the gardes creation. At the stroke of midnight on a solstice or equinox, gardes are completely drained of all remaining charges and become inert (the scars, of course, remain). Gardes cannot be recharged.

CREATE ZOMBI (ITEM CREATION)


You can turn a fresh corpse into an undead servant. Prerequisite: Bokor level 6+. Benet: You can animate any humanoid corpse that has been dead less than 24 hours. The process takes one hour, and requires a packet of herbs and other materials worth 50 doubloons. You must stuff this packet down the corpses throat, sew its mouth shut with hempen thread, carve a verver into the corpses forehead (usually of Legba or Carrefour), and anoint the corpse with a small amount of your blood. imbue. This requires a Knowledge (arcana) check with a DC equal to 10 + the total levels of all wanga to be added to the drogue. You cannot take 20 on this check, and if you fail the check you cannot attempt to craft the same drogue again until you gain another bokor level. The materials required to craft a drogue have a base cost equal to the total levels of all wanga to be added to the drogue x caster level x 10 in doubloons. This is a lot of gold for most Skull & Bones campaigns, and the GM is encouraged to allow the bokor to collect special ingredients as part of a quest or series of quests, instead of simply buying the ingredients in the market. Once these materials are gathered, it takes one day to actually enchant the drogue. Next, you must decide how many charges you want the drogue to have. You must spend XP equal to 1/25 of the base cost of the drogue for each charge. Note that each charge applies to all wanga stored in the drogue equallyyou do not have to spend XP on charges for each wanga individually. Additionally, you take damage for crafting the drogue as though you cast all imbued wanga at once. You dont have to make a Concentration check, since all damage from casting is suffered simultaneously. If you take damage equal to 50 hp or more, you are subject to the Massive Damage rule and must succeed at a Fortitude save (DC 15) or die. The maximum number of charges that can be placed in a drogue is equal to the creators caster level. Drogues are inherently unstable, and they lose one charge after -continued on next page To complete this ritual you must succeed at a Voodoo Rituals check (DC 20). If successful, the corpse twitches and arises as a simple zombi (see Chapter XIII: Friends and Foes for details) under your control. If the check fails, the packet of herbs is spoiled and the corpse can never be turned into a zombi. You can maintain a number of simple zombi under your control equal to half your bokor level, rounded down.

CRIMP (GENERAL)
A crimp is someone who gains the condence of sailors and sells them to press gangs. If you are a crimp, you always give the impression that youre talking sense, and are sincere in what youre saying and genuinely concerned for the interests and welfare of your mark. Long John Silver, in Treasure Island, is the archetypal crimpdespite the ease with which he betrays those around him, people cant help liking and trusting him. Prerequisite: Charisma 15+. Benet: You receive a +2 bonus on Sway checks (see Chapter VIII: A Pirates Life) when you are either the Captain or in support of the Captain. You also receive a +4 bonus on Sway checks when you are a Rogue-a-Plotting or are making a leadership challenge. These bonuses only apply if you have served with the crew on at least one voyage.

FALSE ATTACK (FIGHTER, GENERAL)


You can make a feint to set your opponent up for a devastating attack on a vital area. Prerequisites: Weapon Focus, Int 13+, ve or more ranks in Bluff. Benets: By taking the full attack action, you can make a single false attack with any weapon with which you have Weapon Focus. If you miss, your opponent may immediately make an attack of opportunity on you. If you hit, you deal +3 damage.

FIREARMS DRILL (GENERAL)


You have spent long hours drilling with rearms, making loading second nature. Prerequisites: Base attack bonus +5 or higher, Dex 13+. Benet: Each time you take this feat (to a maximum of three times) you can reduce your reload time with any rearm by one full-round action.

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FORGE SILVER SHOT (GENERAL)


You can create a silver slug for use in rearms that will injure supernatural creatures. Prerequisite: 4+ ranks in Craft (gunsmithing) Benet: The character knows that by mixing one-third silver with two-thirds lead when creating shot for gunpowder weapons, he can create a slug that can injure a being that otherwise might seem impervious to harm. The character needs about one unclipped real per shot and a devout priest of any religion to bless effort when it is done. The resulting shot grants no attack or damage bonuses, but is treated as a magic and holy weapon for the purposes of damage reduction.

LOAS GRACE (GENERAL)


You are protected by the will of the Loa. Prerequisite: Hougan level 3+. Benet: As long as you are in good standing with the Loa, you benet from a deection bonus to your AC equal to your (positive) Charisma bonus, with a minimum of +1. Each Loa you upset at your weekly Caille ritual (see the Spells and Magic chapter for more on Voodoo Rituals) costs you one point from this bonus. Even if your Charisma bonus is negative or zero, or if you offend more Loa than your total bonus, you still retain a minimum deection bonus of +1 to your AC. every month they are not used. Drogues cannot be recharged.

EXAMPLE
Nyamau, a 15th level bokor, decides to craft a drogue. He wants to imbue aming sphere (2nd level), pyrotechnics (2nd level) and protection from elements (re) (3rd level) into it. He then attempts a Knowledge (arcana) check against a DC of 17 (DC10 + 2 + 2 + 3 = 17). He succeeds at his check and discovers that he must collect obsidian from a live volcano, ash from ten different bonres, and gunpowder. The GM thinks gunpowder is a little too simple and asks for more materials to be added. Nyamaus player says his components will be gathered into a small burlap bag, which will come from a burlap sack used to transport sulfur at a mine famous for explosions. The bag will then be tied off with a fuse that Nyamau will steal from an infamous pirates ship. The GM, who is amused, approves. Nyamau, having survived his collection trips, is ready to create his drogue. The materials cost for his drogue is 1,050 doubloons, but the GM rules that his adventuring for components has fullled this cost. A single charge for each of the wanga imbued into the drogue costs 42 XP, and deals 3d4+7 damage to Nyamau. Nyamau decides to imbue the drogue with 12 charges total, 4 for each wanga. This costs 168 XP, and causes him to suffer 12d4+28 damage. If Nyamau suffers over 50 points of damage, and he must attempt a Fortitude Save (DC15) or perish.

MURMUR OF THE EARTH (GENERAL)


You can turn to the Nature Loa of the Caribbean for advice. Prerequisite: Hougan level 4+. Benet: A number of times per day equal to your level divided by four (so once per day at 4th-7th level, twice per day at 8th11th level, and so on), you can ask local nature spirits for advice about a course of action. Asking for advice takes 10 minutes, and requires access to a quiet, dark space where you can concentrate, but no other material components. It otherwise functions exactly like the 4th-level cleric spell divination. Due to the need for a quiet and dark space, this feat does not work in any environment that would cause a concentration check of DC 10 or higher. Thus, ship on a calm day would be ne, but a ship in a storm would not. Special: This feat only works when you are in a natural environment, such as in a forest, the open sea, or a cavern formed by natural forces.

PORT SAVVY (GENERAL)


You are particularly familiar with the customs and power structures of seaside communities. Prerequisite: Five or more ranks in Knowledge (sea lore). Benet: You receive a +3 bonus on all Gather Information and Diplomacy checks when in seaside communities. This bonus stacks with bonuses gained from the Skill Focus, Investigator, Negotiator feats.

QUICKSILVER EYES (GENERAL)


A brush with death has given you the ability to see through the veil of mundane reality. Prerequisites: Wisdom 13+, must have lost at least one life. Benet: Once per day, you can take a full-round action to enter a state of profound concentration. In this state, you can see invisible and ethereal creatures within 30 feet. Using this ability in a threatened square provokes attacks of opportunity; if you are struck, you must attempt a Concentration check (DC 10 + damage dealt) to maintain your concentration. You can remain in this state for a number of minutes equal to your Constitution bonus (minimum one minute). Special: You have a strange, supernatural appearance that unsettles superstitious people. Your eyes might have a silvery sheen, or your hair might have gone prematurely white. Regardless of the physical manifestation, you suffer a 2 penalty to Charisma-based skills and checks when interacting with any character with the Superstitious fortune.

RIPOSTE (FIGHTER, GENERAL)


You can turn a successful parry into a devastating counterattack. Prerequisites: Base attack bonus +6 or higher, Int 13+, Expertise, Improved Disarm. Benet: When you successfully parry an attack (as explained in Chapter VII: Combat), you can make an immediate counterattack against that opponent at your highest attack bonus. No matter how many attacks you parry, you may only make one riposte attack in a round. Special: This riposte attack counts against the maximum number of attacks of opportunity that you can make in a round. It does not affect the number of attacks that you may make on your next turn, as parrying does.

SEAGOING (GENERAL)
You were born to a life of the sea, and you take to it like a sh to.. well, you know. Benet: The skills Knowledge (Sea Lore) and Profession (Sailor) become class skills for you.

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- Legends of Piracy HOWELL DAVIS


Time of Operation: July 1718June 1719 Operational Area: West Africa to the Caribbean Davis [Sdg3/Rog6/Sof1, hp 48] was a charismatic Welshmen, virtually raised on ships, who became the chief mate of a slaver. In 1718 an encounter with Edward England led him to take up a pirates life. His journey to the Bahamas in hopes of mustering a crew was thwarted by Woodes Rogers preceding him. Davis was put on a cargo ship crewed by Rogers men, but at Martinique he raised a mutiny and was chosen captain. He earned a reputation as a clever rogue, with exploits such as using one captured ship to trick another into surrender and slipping into the Royal African Companys fort at Gambi River dressed as a dandy to relieve the governor of 2000 in gold. He took a number of rich prizes before passing himself off to the Portuguese governor of Principe Island as a pirate hunter, which he proved by seizing a French ship that he claimed had been trading with pirates! Davis career came to an abrupt end as he was ambushed leaving the governors palace. It took ve bullets and a cut throat to put him down. His death was avenged by his crew, who red the fort and shelled the nearby town.

SWASHBUCKLING (GENERAL)
Your ingenuity and air for combat makes you especially effective at disarming and tripping your opponents, and allows you to make a special charge attack. Prerequisites: Weapon Display, Weapon Focus, Dex 13+, Cha 13+. Benet: You receive a +2 bonus on all disarm and trip checks. This bonus stacks with bonuses gained from the feats Improved Disarm and Improved Trip. Additionally, you may use a rope, tapestry, or similar object to make a swinging charge attack with an additional bonus of +2 to hit. This bonus stacks with the +2 bonus to hit granted by the Charge action.

SWORDSMANS GAMBIT (FIGHTER, GENERAL)


You can draw enemy into a risky contest of wits and skill. Prerequisites: Wis 13+, base attack bonus +4 or higher. Benet: When you make a parry attempt (as explained in Chapter VII: Combat), you can attempt a gambit. You and your opponent both make a base attack check (1d20 + base attack bonus). If you win, you receive a +4 bonus on the parry, and if your parry is succsessful and you have the Riposte feat, your counterattack receives a +2 bonus to attack and damage. If your opponent wins, he gains +4 on his attack roll.

WEAPON DISPLAY (FIGHTER, GENERAL)


Your ghting style is so beautiful and captivating that you can momentarily stun your opponents. Prerequisites: Weapon Focus, Dex 13+, Cha 13+, ve or mre ranks of Intimidate. Benet: If you take the full attack option, you can execute a bewildering display of ashing steel instead of attacking. All living opponents within 10 with an Intelligence greater than 3 must attempt a Will save (DC 10 + half your level + your Charisma modier), or suffer a 2 morale penalty on attack and damage when attacking you for the rest of the combat. This ability can only be used with a weapon with which you have Weapon Focus.

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Chapter IV: Backgrounds and Fortunes


BACKGROUND EXAMPLE
Jill creates a character named Anne Seymour. She imagines that Anne came from a highborne background, but was forced into life among pirates. While Anne may have found more excitement in the New World than she had initially counted on, Jill knows that a restless spirit and a lust for adventure drew Anne there. Therefore, Jill chooses to give Anne the background of Lady Adventurer. After talking about the campaign theyre going to play, Jill and her GM decide that Jills character, Anne Seymour (the Lady Adventurer mentioned above), rose to lead a pirate crew through a series of misadventures, coupled with a blend of cajoling, threats and promises. Initially there was resentment and occasional open rebellion as the rough pirates tested the mettle of their new leader (during which Anne suffered the 2 circumstance penalty for dealing with the lower classes). However, after they took several rich prizes together, her crew came to regard her as their lucky charm, and she eventually won their loyalty (the 2 penalty no longer applies to her crew, although it will still apply to any new recruits, as well as any potential rivals that may be hiding among the crew).

ackgrounds and fortunes are new character creation steps unique to the Skull & Bones setting. They are designed to esh out a characters personality and motivations, and while they do carry mechanical benets, they are primarily tools for roleplaying.

A characters background describes his upbringing and early experiences, and also denes his place in society. Each character may choose a single background. Fortunes provide details about the characters personality and quirks, and make excellent roleplaying hooks. Unlike backgrounds, which deal with the characters past, fortunes dene who the character is in the present. There are three types of fortunes (General, Good, and Ill), and each character can have up to four. Individual players and GMs should work together to pick the characters fortunes.

- Backgrounds -

s the player is thinking about what class his new character will take, he should consider the characters background. Backgrounds come at the cost of 4 skill points and they must be selected at rst level. In essence, characters are exchanging their 4 extra skill points for being human for a background. The game benets of each background are described in the following pages.

SKILL RANKS GAINED FROM BACKGROUNDS


Each background provides a number of free skill ranks. Each skill is gained at the full number of ranks listed in the description, but backgrounds do not grant these as class skills. You must buy new ranks in these skills normally, depending on the skill list for your class. Note that the granted benet is skill ranks, not skill points.

CHARISMA CHECK MODIFIERS FROM BACKGROUNDS


Backgrounds provide circumstance bonuses and penalties to Charisma-based skills when dealing with certain other groups and individuals. These modiers represent the initial reaction to a character, based on his background and social class. The character may lose either the penalty or the bonus with people who know him well, depending on their opinion of him (at the GMs discretion).

CONTACTS GAINED FROM BACKGROUNDS


Backgrounds are also an excellent source for contacts; any character of average or lower charisma will acquire more contacts through their background than by any other means. While supercially well disposed toward a PC, a contact is not necessarily a loyal friend, but is more commonly a useful source of information and the occasional favor. Contacts expect the same help in return. A long and prosperous relationship (or a short but intensely bonding one) may lead to a contact becoming an ally, but until such time contacts wont put their life on the line for a PC. They may be willing to part with dangerous information if they see a good reason for it, but thats about as far as most will go. There is one small catch in regards to contracts gained from backgrounds and charisma: one of every characters contacts is out to kill him, but only the GM knows which one is the traitor, at least until the turncoat strikes. Trust is rare commodity to those on the account, and even the rmest friend may just be a mask behind which lurks the deadliest of enemies.

BACKGROUND DESCRIPTIONS
This section describes the various backgrounds available to a starting character.

COLONIST
You were born in the New World or migrated there in your youth, and now consider yourself one of the local people. You might be a plantation owner, a shopkeeper, a craftsman, or even a religious leader. Free Skill Ranks: Knowledge (local) 2, Profession (any) 2. Bonuses and Penalties: You receive a +2 circumstance bonus to Charisma-based skills and checks when dealing with other colonists. You suffer from a 2 circumstance penalty to these same checks when dealing with native Europeans. Contacts: Two free contacts with colonists of your choice, or one free contact of the GMs choice with a highly inuential

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colonist, such as the owner of a large plantation, or the owner of a local shipping company.

GENTLEMAN-ADVENTURER (OR LADY-ADVENTURER)


You grew up in privileged surroundings and beneted from a proper upper-class upbringing. Free Skill Ranks: Diplomacy 2, Knowledge (any) 2.

BACKGROUND EXAMPLE 2
Bald Jake is a 1st-level rogue with an Intelligence of 11. He has a total of 36 skill points (32 for being a rogue and 4 for being human), and spends 4 of them on the Sea Devil background, leaving him with 32. Sea devil provides one skill that is cross-class for rogues: Survival. Jake gains two ranks of Survival, as specied in the background. However, if he later spends skill points on Survival, he still only gets half a rank per skill point spent, and his maximum ranks in Survival are currently 2, just like other cross-class skills. Unknown to Bald Jake, the pirate captain he gained as a contact is someone he wronged years before; he robbed him of some valuable booty, and to add insult to injury, the contacts sister killed herself after a man forced himself upon her. Whether this man was Bald Jake or not is unknown and completely irrelevant. The contact believes it was Jake. When the contact recognized Jake but was not recognized by Jake, he decided to bide his time and wait for the perfect moment to gain his revenge.

Bonuses and Penalties: You receive a +2 circumstance bonus to Charisma-based skills and checks when dealing with legitimate authority or members of the upper class. You suffer from a 2 circumstance penalty to these same checks when dealing with lower classes (usually includes those with a buccaneer, indentured servant, pressed man, scum, or slave background). Contacts: Two free contacts with upper class people of your choice, or one free contact of the GMs choice with a highly inuential upper class person, such as a governor or even a king (very useful for getting Letters of Marque or pardons).

INDENTURED SERVANT
You were shipped out to the Caribbean for incurring debts or being convicted of a crime, and forced into hard labor on a plantation or work crew. Free Skill Ranks: Listen 2, Bluff 2. Bonuses and Penalties: You receive a +2 circumstance bonus to Charisma-based skills and checks when dealing with lower class workers. You suffer from a 2 circumstance penalty to these same checks when dealing with the upper classes. Contacts: Two free contacts with indentured servants of your choice, or one free contact with an inuential servant of the GMs choice, such as the governors butler.

NATIVE
You are a member of a Native American tribe, possibly the Carib or Arawak, or even a North American tribe such as the Apache or Lakota. You are now far from home, and eager to make a name for yourself. Free Skill Ranks: Heal 2, Move Silently 2. Bonuses and Penalties: You receive a +2 circumstance bonus to Charisma-based skills and checks when dealing with members of ones own tribe and any allied tribes. You suffer from a 2 circumstance penalty to these same checks when dealing with enemy tribes. Contacts: Although you might expect to have your entire tribe as an ally, in most cases this is not so: after all, you left your tribe, probably at quite a young age, for a life at sea. You get two free contacts (of your choice) with members of your own or allied tribes, or one free contact of the GMs choice with an inuential member of your own tribe or an allied tribe, such as the chief or medicine man. Alternatively, if you prefer to play a native who is less integrated with colonial or nautical life, you can treat your entire tribe as contacts, half of whom will also count as allies. In this case, the reaction penalties are more severe: you suffer from a 2 circumstance penalty to Charisma-based skills and checks when dealing with anyone who is not either from your tribe or an allied tribe.

PRESSED MAN
You took to the sea not by choice, but after an encounter with a press gang. Navy life did not agree with you, and you jumped ship or mutinied at your rst opportunity. Free Skill Ranks: Profession (gunner) 2, Profession (sailor) 2. Bonuses and Penalties: You receive a +2 circumstance bonus to Charisma-based skills and checks when dealing with all ordinary sailors. You suffer from a 2 circumstance penalty to these same checks when dealing with ofcers. Contacts: Two free contacts with ordinary sailors of your choice, or one free contact of the GMs choice with an inuential sailor (this does not include ofcers, but may include a pursers mate, gunners mate, and so on).

SCUM
You were born in the gutter and grew up in the bilges, unable or unwilling to learn any kind of honest living.

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Free Skill Ranks: Hide 2, Sleight of Hand 2.

Bonuses and Penalties: You receive a +2 circumstance bonus to Charisma-based skills and checks when dealing with criminal classes. You suffer from a 2 circumstance penalty to these same checks when dealing with ofcials and authorities of all kinds. Contacts: Two free contacts with underworld characters of your choice, or one free contact with an underworld leader of the GMs choice, such as a smuggler boss or racketeer.

SEA DEVIL
You are a second-generation pirate, born on the beaches and totally unused to civilized life. Your associates are fellow outlaws and outcasts. Free Skill Ranks: Profession (sailor) 2, Survival 2. Bonuses and Penalties: You receive a +2 circumstance bonus to Charisma-based skills and checks when dealing with others who live on the fringes of society, including buccaneers, natives, barbarians, and pirates. You suffer from a 2 circumstance penalty to these same checks when dealing with members of the middle and upper classes. Contacts: Two free contacts with buccaneers or pirates of your choice, or one free contact of the GMs choice with a highly inuential buccaneer or pirate, such as a pirate captain.

SEAMAN
You went to sea by choice and have served on one ship or another for your entire adult life. Free Skill Ranks: Climb 2, Profession (sailor) 2. Bonuses and Penalties: You receive a +2 circumstance bonus to Charisma-based skills and checks when dealing with anyone who has ranks in the Profession (sailor) skill, except pirates and buccaneers. You suffer from a 2 circumstance penalty to these same checks when dealing with pirates and buccaneers. Contacts: Two free contacts with seamen of your choice, or one free contact of the GMs choice with an inuential seaman or person associated with sea commerce, such as a captain, or the owner of a shing eet.

SLAVE
You were forcibly taken from their homeland, treated like an animal, tortured, and nally worked to exhaustion in the New World. You escaped at the earliest opportunity, and now seek a life as an outlaw or pirate to wreak revenge on your former oppressors. Free Skill Ranks: Escape Artist 2, Bluff 2. Bonuses and Penalties: You receive a +2 circumstance bonus to Charisma-based skills and checks when dealing with other slaves or former slaves. You suffer from a 2 circumstance penalty to these same checks when dealing with slaveowners and the upper classes. Contacts: Two free contacts of your choice with slaves or former slaves, or one free contact of the GMs choice with an inuential slave or former slave, such as an escaped slave turned pirate captain, or the leader of a band of escaped slaves now turned to outlaw and rebellion.

- Fortunes -

ortunes are extra details that round out a characters personality, providing some details about his habits, or some quirky trait dealt to him by Fate or experience. Starting characters can select up to four fortunes. Any or all of a characters fortunes may be of the general variety, but each good fortune chosen must be balanced by an ill fortune. Additionally, some fortunes may be gained or lost during play, at the GMs discretion.

GENERAL FORTUNE DESCRIPTIONS


General fortunes provide a mix of good and bad game effects.

CODE OF HONOR
You have a strong code of honor that guides your actions. You must work with your GM to dene this code, and you should both have a good idea of your characters attitudes towards key Skull & Bones themes such as slavery, piracy, colonialism, Christianity, Voodoo, the taking of life, the treatment of women and minorities, and the relationship between the Old and New worlds. This code must include at least one provision that is difcult to follow: you might be a ery abolitionist or believe that all of the New World belongs to the Catholic Churchin any case, this belief should be something that brings you into conict with commonly-held conceptions of the world. Benets: You receive a +2 circumstance bonus on all Charisma-based skills and checks when dealing with any other character with this fortuneeven if your codes directly clash. You also receive a +4 morale bonus on Will saves if failing the save would cause you to break your code. Finally, you gain a +1 bonus to Fame so long as you faithfully follow your beliefs. Special: If you ever knowingly violate your code of honor you suffer a 3 penalty to Fame and suffer one point of temporary Wisdom damage per day until you perform an act of contrition. Furthermore, no Wisdom damage is recovered until the act is performed. What constitutes an appropriate act of contrition is up the GM.

DOLLS EYES
You have the cold, predatory eyes of a shark. While they are menacing, they do not invite sympathy. Benets and Drawbacks: You receive a +2 circumstance bonus on all Intimidate checks, but suffer a 2 circumstance penalty on all Bluff or Diplomacy checks made to gain someones trust.

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DROWNIN LOOK
You have a faintly shy countenance, as if Neptunes mark were already upon you and the sea gods will soon claim you for their own. Benets and Drawbacks: You suffer from a 4 penalty on all Swim and Profession (sailor) checks made to avoid drowning, but if ever tried in a court of law, mitigating circumstances will always reduce your sentence to one you will survive, as though the sea gods were keeping you safe till the day you join them. Special: If you take the Drowin Look fortune, you cannot also take Hangin Look.

ENLIGHTENED
As a true product of the Enlightenment, you have a rm belief that science and mathematics can explain any phenomenon. As far as you are concerned, there are no spirits, magical powers, lucky charms, or the like. You may still accept such practices as astrology and alchemy as parts of science, but will have no truck with sorcery or superstitions. Benets and Drawbacks: You benet from a +2 luck bonus to all Will saves against spells and spell-like effects. However, you must attempt a saving throw when affected by any spell that allows ityou cannot waive your right to a save when targeted by a harmless effect (such as a cure spell). Special: This fortune is not available to bokor or hougan. An Enlightened character may not also take the Superstitious fortune.

EX-ZOMBI
You used to be undead, but you got better. You were rescued from a delusional zombi state by luck, fate, or good friends. Despite the rescue, your skin is still pale and you have the gaunt look of a cadaver. Benets and Drawbacks: You suffer a 2 circumstance penalty to Bluff and Diplomacy checks due to your disconcerting appearance. The advantage to this condition is that you gain immunity to fear spells and effects, and a +2 circumstance bonus on your modied level check when attempting to resist a hostile Intimidate attempt. Hell, youve died and returned from a grave, nothing else really fazes you after that.

FAVORED HORSE
One of the Loa has decided it enjoys walking around in your skin. Benets and Drawbacks: Your Loa rider may possess you and ght on your behalf when you are in dire straits, but might also decide to go for a ride at the exact wrong time (such as when dining with the governors daughter). The exact benets and drawbacks of this fortune are up to the GM, and depend largely on the specic Loa that chooses you. Note that a belief in Voodoo is not required for you to take this fortune.

HANGIN LOOK
You have a deeply suspicious look and are clearly destined for an end on the gallows. Benets and Drawbacks: Any judge who tries you for any crime will respond to your look by sentencing you to death by hanging. Of course, it is always possible for your crewmates to contrive a prison breakout or similar rescue. It is not the death by hanging thats inevitable, only the sentence. On the up side, you are unlikely to drown, since your fate is reserved for the gallows. You receive a +4 luck bonus on all Swim and Profession (sailor) checks made to avoid drowning. Special: If you take the Hangin Look fortune, you cannot also take Drowin Look.

KID
You are a young lad who ran away to a life at sea or were sent by your family into the Navy. Once aboard a ship, you found employment as a powder monkey assisting the gunners, or a cabin boy serving the captain or other ofcers as a steward. Families of sufcient wealth and inuence sometimes arrange for a 2nd or 3rd son to serve as a midshipman, a junior ofcer. Benets and Drawbacks: You begin the game at age 13, with a 3 penalty to Strength. This penalty drops by 1 every year, until you reach your full Strength at age 16. Until you reach 16 years of age, you cannot die from failed saving throws or skill checks. The worst possible result from failing a saving throw or skill check is that you may be gravely injured, knocked cold, or captured by an enemy. Special: If you take the Kid fortune, you cannot take the Old Salt or Been-Round fortunes.

OLD SALT
Grizzled and weather-beaten, you are an old sea dog who has served time on dozens of vessels, in navies, merchant ships, pirates, and privateers. Benets and Drawbacks: At character creation you receive 4 free starting skill points, one free bonus feat, and two bonus contacts. You also start the game aged 40+2D6 years, with the usual penalties and bonuses for being middleaged. In addition, you must pick one afiction from Chapter VIII: A Pirates

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ANNE BONNY

- Legends of Piracy -

Time of Operation: 1719-1720 Operational Area: The Caribbean Anne [Ftr5/Sdg3, hp 46] was born to a County Cork lawyer and his maid. Disgrace forced Annes father to relocate to the colonies, where he soon acquired wealth and a plantation. A sailor of dubious reputation, James Bonny, married Anne, whose father soon disowned her, preventing James hopes of ever acquiring her fathers wealth. Anne Bonny soon left her husband for the pirate Calico Jack Rackham, whose main claim to fame seems to be his association with Bonny and Mary Reade. Bonny fought in mens clothes, and was a erce ghter who gave no quarter. In October of 1720 the governor of Jamaica sent a sloop to capture Calico Jack and his crew, which they easily accomplished, as Bonny and Reade were the only crewmembers who werent too drunk to ght. Both women pleaded their bellies at trial, stating that they were pregnant, which put off their executions for a time. Bonny was never hung, and vanishes from history soon after, supposedly due to the machinations of her father.

MARY READE
Time of Operation: 1719-1720 Operational Area: The Caribbean Reade [Ftr7/Sdg4, hp 64] was born in London and raised as a boy by her widowed mother. She soon ed to the sea before joining an army regiment. She fought bravely at Flanders and enlisted with a horse brigade, in which she fell in love with a fellow soldier. After revealing her gender to him, they were married and opened an inn called the Three Horseshoes. Her husband succumbed to a disease, and Mary Reade set out for a new life in the Caribbean. Her ship was seized by Calico Jack and she was taken within a cabin by Anne Bonny, who intended to have her way with the handsome sailor. To Bonnys surprise, Reade revealed her sex and asked to join Rackhams crew. She was accepted, and soon after fell for another sailor. Unfortunately, Reades lover got into a quarrel with a far more experienced pirate, who she knew would kill him in a duel. Reade provoked a ght with the older pirate, demanding that it be settled instantly. She fought well, and distracted her foe by exposing her breasts before killing him. Reade and her lover were soon married, but immediately thereafter, Rackhams ship was captured. Mary Reade died of a fever in prison.

Life, such as a missing eye, a hook hand, or a peg leg. This injury is another indication that you are a little closer to death than most starting characters, for your luck has begun to run out.

QUICK-FINGERED
Your manual dexterity is incredible. You must have a Dex of 15+ to take this fortune. Benets and Drawbacks: You begin the game with the Deft Hands feat as a free bonus feat, and benet from a +2 circumstance bonus on Open Lock and Escape Artist checks. The only drawback to this is your tendency to dget. Any time youre attempting a Move Silently, Hide, Balance, Bluff, or Diplomacy check, you must make a Concentration check each round (DC 15) or suffer a 2 circumstance penalty to your use of that skill.

STRANGE LUCK
Your life has been one long series of strange occurrences, and it does not look like that trend is going to change any time soon. Benets and Drawbacks: Whenever you roll a natural 1 or a natural 20, something bizarre happens. You benet from an extraordinary success whenever you roll a natural 20 on a successful skill check (even if you dont beat the DC by 20 or have at least 10 ranks in the skill). If you roll a natural 20 on a successful attack roll or save, you gain a +2 circumstance bonus on all attacks and saves against the same target or source of damage for the next hour. However, if you roll a natural 1 on any skill check or saving throw it is an automatic failure, and a natural 1 on an attack roll is a critical failure: you drop your weapon, slip on a patch of oil, or otherwise trip up. Critical failures do not typically deal damage directly to the character, but they might cause you to lose a round, or to suffer an attack of opportunity by moving to retrieve a lost weapon.

SUPERSTITIOUS
Your awe of magic and deep belief in the power of the supernatural makes you especially susceptible to spells and spell-like effects. Benets and Drawbacks: All benecial spells that target you take effect as if they were empowered (cure spells restore half again as many hit points as usual, for example). Note that this effect only applies to you, not to any others targeted by the same spell. You also suffer a 2 luck penalty on all Will saving throws against spells and spell-like effects. Special: A Superstitious character may not also take the Enlightened fortune.

TOUCHED
You are insane, a sorcerer, or possibly both. Benets and Drawbacks: You receive a +2 luck bonus on all Voodoo Ritual and Knowledge (arcana) skill checks, but your obsessive mind cause you to suffer a 2 penalty on all attack rolls, saves, and skill checks when you are grappling with

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an arcane or magical problem (GMs discretion). You also suffer a 2 luck penalty on Charisma-based skills and checks when dealing with anyone who has the Enlightened fortune. You do, however, receive a +2 circumstance bonus on these same checks when dealing with Superstitious characters.

WOMAN DISGUISED AS A MAN


Many a bold lass has taken to the seas or joined the army, dressed and living as a man. You have created an entire male identity, in which you live all or most of your life. Benets and Drawbacks: Your cunning disguise does not suffer from the usual 2 penalty for masquerading as a member of the opposite sex, and indeed you gain a +4 circumstance bonus to your Disguise skill check when you are disguised in your usual, established male persona. You need to take steps to keep your true sex hidden, which is the main disadvantage to this fortune. Some pirate ships are used to having women aboard, in which case the crew might have no particular prejudices against a female pirate. If the campaign is based around such a ship and crew, Woman Disguised as a Man should be treated as a good fortune, rather than a general fortune. The GM and players should discuss their preferences beforehand. A game in which female pirates are openly accepted may be easier to play and run, but feisty cross-dressing pirate amazons are such a core part of pirate myth that it would be a shame to leave them out.

WORM
You are beneath contempt. You have made cringing, sniveling, and fawning into an art form. Of course, this does have its upside. Youre such a groveling nobody that even the most ruthless of villains seldom wants to waste their time killing you and most people dont pay much attention to what you do. Benets and Drawbacks: You benet from a +2 luck bonus on Sleight of Hand and Hide checks, and on Bluff checks if you are groveling for time. However, you suffer a 2 luck penalty on Intimidate and Sway checks, and you suffer an additional 2 morale penalty when resisting a hostile Intimidate attempt.

GOOD FORTUNE DESCRIPTIONS


Good fortunes have exclusively positive effects, but you must take one ill fortune for every good fortune chosen. Good fortunes acquired during play do not need to be balanced by ill fortunes.

ALLY
One of your contacts is willing to risk his life to help you. Benets: Choose one of your contacts. This contact becomes an ally, and is willing to take almost any risk on your behalf. Like all contacts, this character expects assistance and help in return.

BEEN-ROUND
You belong to an elite group of sailors who have circumnavigated the globe. Benets: You benet from a +2 insight bonus on all Knowledge (sea lore), Profession (sailor), and Swim checks.

BOOTY
You begin play with an unusually valuable piece of equipment. Benets: It might be a family heirloom or maybe you looted it from a Spanish captain, but you have some unusual item unavailable to others. Typical examples include a pair of masterwork dueling pistols, medium or heavy metal armor, or a rie (for campaigns set after 1715).You must work with your GM to determine the exact nature of this item.

CAUSE
You have a fervent belief in a cause of some kind, whether that is the liberation of all the slaves, the overthrow of the English King, the establishment of the pirate kingdom of Libertalia, or another cause that would be similarly difcult to achieve. Everything else in your life takes second place to your cause. Benets: You benet from a +1 bonus to Fame so long as you pursue your cause. This bonus rises to +4 if you ever achieve your cause.

DEADEYE
You are uncommonly skilled with projectile weapons.

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Benets: You benet from a +1 luck bonus on attack rolls with projectile weapons at all ranges and under all circumstances. This bonus is cumulative with feats such as Point Blank Shot.

DEVILS OWN LUCK


You lead a seemingly charmed life. Fortune always smiles on you and your survival continually dees the odds. Benets: You begin play with 1d6+3 lives (instead of the normal 1d4+2), and may reroll a failed saving throw once per gaming session. Special: Only one character per campaign can take Devils Own Luck. If the players cannot agree, have them dice off and prove which one is the luckiest.

LETTER OF MARQUE
You possess an ofcial permit from the government of one country to prey on the ships of one or more other countries. Benets: A Letter of Marque is issued to a specic captain and covers any and all ships that they command. Any attacks on enemy ships count as legal acts of war, and a captain with a Letter of Marque may legitimately consider her ship a privateer, rather than a pirate. Inevitably such distinctions become blurredit is common for privateers to turn pirate, attacking a ship that is not a legitimate target if the prize is particularly tempting, or if they think they can get away with it. In addition, there are other risks associated with privateering. Enemy authorities treat privateering as an act of war, and a privateer crew may nd themselves imprisoned, or even hanged, if the authorities choose not to recognize the legitimacy of the Letter of Marque. In addition, the war that caused the letter to be issued may end at any time, and it may be weeks or months before the privateer happens to hear about it; weeks or months in which she may still be attacking formerly enemy ships, without realizing that to do so is now an act of piracy rather than of war! Usually only captains take this fortune, although any character could have a Letter of Marque with the expectation of some day captaining a ship.

LOA PATRON
One of the Loa has decided that you make an excellent servant. Benets: In exchange for fullling two or three requests per year, you gain the assistance and patronage of a powerful Loa. This Loa does not possess you under normal circumstances, but may intervene if your life is in danger. The exact benets and drawbacks of this fortune are up to the GM, and depend largely on the specic Loa that chooses you. Note that a belief in Voodoo is not required for you to take this fortune.

MAGIC
All characters (except those with the Enlightened fortune) typically have an assortment of such things as lucky charms, drogues, and fetishes they have acquired from various talisman hawkers and fellow sailors. You have one thats real. Benets: One of the trinkets in your possession, or inscribed upon you, is truly magicalthe lucky charm really does ward off bullets, the voodoo ute can whistle up a wind, or the dolphin tattoo will protect you from drowning. You should describe the various tattoos and other superstitious accoutrements your character has, and then pick which one of them is functional and describe what it does. You will need to negotiate with the GM as to its precise effects. Alternatively, you can describe the various things you have as above, but let the GM pick two of them to work. In this case, you start the game with no idea which of your items or tattoos is truly magical.

PARROT PERCH/MONKEY MAGNET


You have either a parrot or monkey (or other appropriate animal, by arrangement with the GM) as a pet. Benets: Your pet has no particular statistics or abilities other than as follows, but of course you are encouraged to roleplay your interaction with the beastie. The main game effect of your pet is as a plot device: although it will hide or ee at the rst sign of trouble, it always seems to have the knack of returning just in the nick of time and saving the day. This is represented by allowing you to gain a +1 on a Roll the Bones check (see Chapter VII: Combat) once per game session. This is a dramatic and potentially crucial intercession from the animal, usually from hiding. For example, your monkey stowed away beneath the cart carrying you to your own hanging, and is able to undo your bonds from hiding at the last moment; or your parrot appears as if from nowhere during your climactic ght with your arch-enemy and ies into his face, distracting him just long enough for your to run him through. A roll of 2 cannot be modied in any way, thoughit still counts as Snake Eyes, although if you choose you can apply it to the animal instead of you (killing the poor creature outrightif you do this, you lose the fortune forever).

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ILL FORTUNE DESCRIPTIONS


Ill fortunes have exclusively negative effects. You may take as many ill fortunes as you like (up to the four fortune maximum), and you do not need to take a good fortune for each ill fortune chosen.

ENEMY
A powerful and resourceful NPC wants you dead or brought to justice. Drawbacks: This enemy might be a pirate hunter, naval captain, governor, magistrate, plantation owner, rival pirate, or whoever else seems appropriate. You may take this fortune more than once. Do not take this fortune lightly; you will never be rid of it. Every time you remove your enemy, a new one will take their place.

KIN TO WHALES
Your girth is measured in tonnage. Drawbacks: You suffer a 2 circumstance penalty on all Dexterity-based skills and checks, and an additional 2 penalty on Escape Artist checks made to slip through tight spaces or out of manacles. This fortune has no effect on your AC, or on Reex saves.

LOOSE TONGUE
Loos lips sink ships. Whether you are outgoing, talkative, or simply absentminded, you cannot keep your mouth shut. While this is nothing more than an annoying trait in polite company, it is dangerous indeed when one travels with rough characters. Drawbacks: Whenever a situation arises when you are privy to a secret and happen to be in the company of those who should not be hearing it, you must attempt a Will save at DC 15 to keep your trap shut. Failure means that you let something slip that you shouldnt have. The exact nature of what was said, and the consequence, is up to the GM. The DC rises to 20 when you are in yer cups, exhausted, or fatigued.

OBLIGATION
Somebody has a major hold on you. Maybe you owe them a lot of money, or your life; or maybe they have you under a spell of some kind. Drawbacks: You can never be entirely free until this obligation is dealt with, one way or the other. You might be able to settle the score by paying off a delinquent debt, by doing a favor in return, or by ghting back, in which case you gain the Enemy fortune.

SEASICK
Almost everyone gets seasick for the rst three days or so of a sea voyage. But for you, seasickness is an ongoing afiction that never stops. Drawbacks: You lose 1d3 hp each week you spend aboard ship, and can only heal this damage by resting on dry land. You cannot drop below 1 hp as a result of this fortune.

TRUE THOMAS
You cannot tell a lie. Drawbacks: You suffer a 4 penalty on Bluff checks. This is clearly a dangerous fortune for anyone who lives outside the law, but is perfect for a character with the Code of Honor fortune.

- Legends of Piracy BENJAMIN HORNIGOLD


Time of Operation: 1713-1717 Operational Area: The Americas Hornigold [Sdg4/Sof8, hp 65] is presumed to have served during the War of the Spanish Succession, as the rst accounts of his piracy start in 1713. By 1716 he was well thought of by the pirate rabble of New Providence Island, and a number of other infamous piratesmost notably Blackbeardgot their start with Hornigold. In 1717 he plundered a number of rich prizes, including a French ship whose cargo included gold and jewels worth over 50,000 pieces of eight. In 1718, when Woodes Rogers came to the Bahamas, Hornigold was one of the captains that greeted him at Nassau and asked for the Kings pardon. Rogers thought highly of Hornigold and commissioned him to hunt down several of his old compatriots, including Stede Bonnet and Charles Vane. While Hornigold never managed to bring either of them in, he did capture a number of others and was, by all accounts, a faithful privateer for Rogers. In 1719, on a trading voyage to Mexico, Hornigolds ship struck a reef and all hands were lost.

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VICE
You have a weakness for a specic vice; usually gambling or women, but some characters might be hooked on snuff, gourmet food, or an exotic sexual deviancy. Drawbacks: When the object of your vice is available, you must attempt a Will save (DC 15 + days since you last indulged) or take part in an orgy of indulgence, ignoring all dangers and larger goals in your pursuit of pleasure. You suffer from a 4 circumstance penalty on all Sway checks involving your vice. You may take this ill fortune more than once, in which case you must specify a new vice each time. Special: See the A Pirates Life chapter for information on vices and Sway checks.

WANTED
At least one nation knows you are a pirate, and knows your name and description. Drawbacks: You are hunted as a pirate by the authorities of one major sea power. They may or may not have sent a naval force to bring you to justice, but you still risk being recognized by soldiers or naval ships of that nation, and will certainly be identied in a court of law. You may take this fortune more than once, each time picking a new major sea power.

WASTREL
You love the ner things in life, and believe that money is for spending. Drawbacks: Each week you spend in a town, you must attempt a Will save (DC 15 + the DC modier given on Table 4-1) or blow your money on wine, women, and song. The weekly cost of carousing (in doubloons) varies depending on the size of the town, as listed on Table 4-1 Note that if you lack the cash to cover your costs, you must sell your possessions (at half their listed price). Alternatively, you can go into debt with a local moneylender, or even acquire the Obligation fortune by borrowing from less-savory characters.

TABLE 4-1: WASTREL


Town Size Thorp Hamlet Village Small town Large town Small city Large city Metropolis DC 6 4 2 +0 +2 +4 +6 +8 Cost 4 10 20 80 300 1,500 3,000 6,000

WHISKEY JOHNNY
Drinking is a common pastime among sailors, but youve taken the love for liquor to a new level. Drawbacks: If drink is available, you must attempt a Will save (DC 15 + days since you last indulged) or drink yourself into a stupor. Every minute spent drinking as a result of a failed check applies a 2 penalty to all skills and checks that require ne control, discretion, or nesse. You suffer from a 4 circumstance penalty on all Sway checks involving liquor. Special: See the A Pirates Life chapter for information on vices and Sway checks.

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Chapter V: Prestige Classes


The Skull & Bones setting includes six new prestige classes. As always, you can only take levels in these classes with the GMs approval.

- Diestro he diestro (abbreviated Dst) is a master of La Destreza, the Spanish school of fencing. Based on geometry, philosophy and mathematics, La Destreza is an attempt to create a scientic approach to defense. Movements are based on circles, arcs, and tangents, with the entire combat taking place within an imaginary circle, each combatant at opposite ends of the diameter. La Destreza is perhaps the most cerebral form of fencing, and appeals to those with an interest in scientic or mystical matters. Hit Die: d10.

REQUIREMENTS
To become a diestro you must fulll all the following criteria. Base Attack Bonus: +5 Skills: Concentration 4 ranks, Knowledge (mathematics) 4 ranks. Feats: Expertise, Improved Disarm, Riposte, Weapon Focus (longsword or rapier). Special: You must nd a teacher and embark on a course of study lasting at least six months. There are few teachers of La Destreza in the New World, and their rarity makes their services very expensive. Alternatively, you can travel to Spain to seek out a diestro master, or to one of the schools that teach Spanish fencing elsewhere on the continent, though these latter schools practice a bastardized form of La Destreza.

CLASS SKILLS
The diestros class skills (and key ability for each) are Balance (Dex), Bluff (Cha), Concentration (Con), Knowledge (all skills, taken individually) (Int), Jump (Str), and Sense Motive (Wis). Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modier.

CLASS FEATURES
WEAPON AND ARMOR PROFICIENCY
The diestro is procient with all simple weapons (including simple rearms) and all martial melee weapons. Diestros are procient with light and medium armor, but not with shields.

AFIRMASE (EX)
The basic stance of La Destreza is armase, learned at 1st level. The feet are slightly apart, but the legs and back are straight, with the right arm extended full length and the sword pointed directly at the opponent at all times. Despite the aggressive appearance of this ghting style, it is actually a highly effective defensive stance, since the opponent cannot approach directly without being wounded. You must be in armase stance to use all other diestro special abilities. When you are in armase, you designate one opponent and receive a +2 dodge bonus to Armor Class against attacks from that opponent, but you lose your Dexterity bonus to AC against attacks from all other opponents. You can select a new opponent as a free action each round at the beginning of your action.

CURVO (EX)
Training on the curved steps around the diameter of the La Destreza circle allows a diestro of 2nd level or above to ght more effectively against a fellow Spanish fencer. When ghting another diestro who is in armase stance, your opponent cannot gain the +2 dodge bonus to AC against you. Additionally, any diestro with a base attack bonus lower than yours may not use desvio or estocadas against you. Any opponent (diestro or not) ghting a diestro trained in curvo gains no advantage for holding the higher ground.

TACTO (EX)

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When you make blade-to-blade contact with an opponent who is also wielding a melee weapon (by one of you executing a successful parry) you can attempt a Sense Motive check (DC 15) to determine either your opponents base attack bonus, Strength, or Dexterity. When both opponents have the tacto ability, this check is an opposed test pitting Bluff against Sense Motive.

TABLE 5-1: DIESTRO LEVEL PROGRESSION


Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Base Attack Bonus +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 +7 +8 +9 +10 Fort Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 Ref Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 Will Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 Special Armarse Curvo Tacto Desvio Atajo Estocadas Improved desvio Llave y gobierno Passos mas perfectos Filosoa de las armas

DESVIO (EX)
The technique of desvio, learned at 4th level, involves parrying the opponents weapon on the forte (the lower half of your blade) and stabbing with the point. The speed and directness of this attack is devastating, although it is a difcult technique to master. In effect, it is a simultaneous parry and riposte. In game terms, each of your parries functions as an opposed attack roll against your opponent. However, due to the complexity of the desvio technique, you suffer a 2 penalty on your roll. Your opponent cannot attempt to parry the desvio. If you beat your opponents roll, but do not roll higher than his AC, you have successfully parried his attack but failed to hit him. The desvio can not be used with a sneak attack, as the hasty riposte does not give sufcient opportunity to aim for the opponents vitals. Example: Maria de la Vega is dueling with an uncouth Englishman, Captain Hart. Captain Hart attacks with his sword, rolling a 17 plus his attack bonus of +6, for a total of 23. De la Vega gets a 14 on her desvio roll, plus her +15 attack bonus, minus 2 for using desvio, for a total of 27. Since her result of 27 easily beats Harts 23 (and is also higher than his AC of 18), she parries his attack and hits with her counterattack.

ATAJO (EX)
Beginning at 5th level, your tacto ability improves. Each time you succeed at a Sense Motive check as part of the tacto maneuver, you gain a +2 circumstance bonus on your next attack, parry, or desvio check against that opponent.

ESTOCADAS (EX)
Estocadas are quick, versatile, thrusting attacks that can be made from almost any position. Any time you are entitled to make an attack of opportunity, you can take a 2 penalty on your damage roll for this attack to add a +2 circumstance bonus to the attack roll.

IMPROVED DESVIO (EX)


Beginning at 7th level, the diestro has mastered the desvio technique and no longer suffers the 2 penalty on his desvio counterattack check. If the diestro is normally allowed a sneak attack against an opponent, he may now use this ability while performing a desvio.

LLAVE Y GOBIERNO (EX)


Translated literally as the key and the government, this technique is an extremely sophisticated feint, but does not involve anything so blatant as a feigned attack. Rather, the diestro fools his opponent by almost imperceptible subtleties of position and footwork, setting up a near-perfect attack. Using llave y gobierno is a full round action that grants the diestro the benets of total defense (+4 dodge bonus to AC for 1 round) and forces an opposed check (your Bluff vs. your opponents Sense Motive). If you win, you gain a +3 circumstance bonus on attack and damage rolls next round. If you lose, you suffer a 2 circumstance penalty to AC next round.

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PASSOS MAS PERFECTOS (EX)


The perfect steps are the result of an innate understanding of spatial relationships, coupled with superbly practiced athleticism. Beginning at 9th level, you may add your Intelligence bonus to one attack roll or one parry attempt each round.

FILOSOFIA DE LAS ARMAS (EX)


The diestros clinical study of swordsmanship as a form of mathematics allows him to ght calmly and carefully in any situation. When he reaches 10th level, the diestro can take a special full attack action. He must succeed at a Concentration check each round (DC 17, no Taking 10) to sustain this heightened level of concentration, but while it is active he may Take 10 on a single melee attack, parry, or desvio check during that round.

- Master of Fence asters of fence (abbreviated Mof ) are fencing experts trained in English-style swordsmanship. Most masters learn their craft with an eye to starting their own fencing academies, or to make money as stage gladiators in public prizeghts. Both armed and unarmed techniques are taught. The unarmed techniques are particularly prominent in this school, as the English fencing-masters happily borrowed from boxing and wrestling styles to add unexpected tricks to their fencing. Hit Die: d10.

REQUIREMENTS
To become a master of fence you must fulll all the following criteria. Feats: Riposte and Weapon Focus with any two of the following: longsword, greatsword, rapier, dagger, quarterstaff, bastard sword, longspear, or halberd. Special: The candidate must defeat at least one 1st-level master of fence in a prizeght (see the Combat chapter for rules on prizeghting and dueling). This prizeght must be repeated before taking your 5th level as a master of fence (at which point you must defeat a 5th-level master of fence), and again before taking your 10th level (at which point you must defeat a 10th-level master of fence). You may attempt this prizeght any number of times.

CLASS SKILLS
The master of fences class skills (and key ability for each) are Balance (Dex), Climb (Str), Heal (Wis), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), and Perform (Cha). Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modier.

CLASS FEATURES
WEAPON AND ARMOR PROFICIENCY
Masters of fence are procient with all simple weapons (including simple rearms), all martial melee weapons, and bastard swords. They are procient with light armor, but not with shields.

ARMOR RESTRICTION
Masters of fence cannot use any of their class abilities while wearing heavy armor, and while wearing medium armor they may only use the following class abilities: hanging gardant, true gardant, weapon judgment, and weapon measure.

PUMMEL (EX)
You gain the Improved Unarmed Strike feat as a free bonus feat, and your unarmed attacks deal damage as the next higher die type (Mediumsize humanoids deal 1d4). Additionally, you can make one extra attack of opportunity per round with an unarmed attack, if you have at least one hand free. You can still only make one attack of opportunity per enemy.

FLASHY FIGHTING (EX)


This is a technique devised for prizeghts by stage gladiators. By ghting with spectacular and showy movements, the combatants (all of whom must have this ability) extend the time taken up by the prizeght, thus enhancing their earnings. While using it, each combat round takes 12 seconds rather than 6, doubling the number of coins thrown each round for each combatant (see the prizeghting rules in the Combat chapter). This is one reason that professional stage gladiators prefer to ght each other, rather than any old ghter!

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TABLE 5-2: MASTER OF FENCE LEVEL PROGRESSION


Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Base Attack Bonus +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 +7 +8 +9 +10 Fort Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 Ref Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 Will Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 Special Pummel, ashy ghting Hanging gardant Enclosing Flirting and darting Commanding True gardant Commanding riposte Weapon judgment Weapon measure Pressing in and ying out

HANGING GARDANT (EX)


The hanging guard is the most versatile of defensive stances. The weapon is held point downward, diagonally across the body, providing protection from almost every angle. It is widely regarded as the best stance when ghting against a group of opponents. If you take the full attack action, you can use hanging gardant with any melee weapon with which you have Weapon Focus. While in this stance, you gain a +1 dodge bonus to AC for every opponent currently in melee combat with you, to a maximum of +5. You also suffer a 2 circumstance penalty to all attacks you make while in this stance.

ENCLOSING (EX)
Enclosing is the fencing term for grappling, usually performed with the off-hand so that you can attack with a sword in your main hand. If you win the grapple check, you can choose to deal normal grapple damage, or you can attack with a Medium-size weapon in hand, so long as it is one with which you have Weapon Focus. Note that this attack incurs an attack of opportunity, just like a normal grapple check. If you are holding anything in your off-hand (such as a weapon, shield, or torch), you cannot make an enclosing attack.

FLIRTING AND DARTING (EX)


This attack involves drawing your weapon back, then immediately attacking with it in the exact same line. Flirting and darting is intended to confuse your opponent, but is risky as it leaves you briey open to attack. It can be used with any weapon with which you have Weapon Focus. You can make a irting and darting attack as a standard attack action. If you are attacking from your opponents threatened area, you provoke an attack of opportunity from him before your attack is resolved. You gain a +2 attack bonus on your own attack.

COMMANDING (EX)
Commanding is an improvement on enclosing, and involves grabbing your opponents weapon hand or forearm, usually with your off-hand, to prevent him from striking you. Unlike enclosing you do not provoke an attack of opportunity when attempting to start the grapple. If you win the grapple check, your opponent cannot attack with a weapon (even a light weapon). You can attack with a Medium-size weapon with which you have Weapon Focus while grappling, and you benet from a +2 attack bonus with it. If you are holding anything in your off-hand (such as a weapon, shield, or torch), you cannot make a commanding attack.

TRUE GARDANT (EX)


One Mr. Johnson, an English stage gladiator, perfected the technique of attacking from the hanging gardant stance. This makes it possible for the fencer to wrench his weapon round from the gardant position to attack from almost any angle. However, due to its roots as a stage gladiator technique, it is only really useful in prizeghts or similar situations. When faced with a single opponent wielding an identical weapon or identical combination of weapons to yours, you may use hanging gardant without penalty, and receive a bonus of +2 on your attack.

COMMANDING RIPOSTE (EX)


Whenever you could make a normal riposte, you can choose to perform a commanding riposte instead. Instead of making a melee attack, you attempt to start a grapple. This attempt does not provoke an attack of opportunity, and you receive all the benets of your commanding class ability.

WEAPON JUDGMENT (EX)


Pick two weapons from following list: longsword, greatsword, rapier, dagger, quarterstaff, bastard sword, longspear, or halberd. While you are armed one of the chosen weapons, you can take the full attack action to make a single attack at your full attack bonus, and add your Intelligence bonus (if positive) as a modier to the attack and damage rolls.

WEAPON MEASURE (EX)


While you are armed with a weapon you picked for the weapon judgment ability, your opponent may not use the following feats and class abilities against you: combat reexes, dodge, mobility, spring attack, swordsmans gambit, false attack, and irting and darting.

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PRESSING IN AND FLYING OUT (EX)


While armed with a weapon you picked for the weapon judgment ability, you may move 10 ft. in a round in which you perform a full-round attack, either before or after your attacks, or 5 ft. before and 5 ft. after. Moving in this way never provokes attacks of opportunity.

- Master of Scrimia ll masters of continental fencing fall under this heading, since the greatest of all are the masters of Scrimia (abbreviated Mos), the Italian school. Masters of the French school (Escrime) and the German school (Schermize) use the same rules, but receive a different set of special moves. Because this class has a variable set of special moves, it is extremely exible. The GM can easily design variants to represent unique styles taught by a particular master. Schools based on this class can be found even in England and Spain, rivaling the national styles of those countries. The player is of course welcome to call himself Master of Escrime or Master of Schermize if that seems more appropriate to his background. Hit Die: d10.

REQUIREMENTS
To become a master of Scrimia you must fulll all the following criteria. Base Attack Bonus: +5. Feats: Riposte, Weapon Focus with longsword, rapier, or smallsword. Special: You must nd a continental fencing master to teach you. It is much easier to nd masters of this style (and its substyles) than the English or Spanish styles, though acquiring the services of a master is still an expensive proposition.

CLASS SKILLS
The class skills for this prestige class depend on the individual school it represents. When setting up a school prole, the GM should pick six class skills from the following list: Balance (Dex), Bluff (Cha), Climb (Str), Heal (Wis), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Perform (Cha), Ride (Dex), Sense Motive (Wis), and Tumble (Dex). Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modier.

CLASS FEATURES
WEAPON AND ARMOR PROFICIENCY
Masters of Scrimia are procient with all simple weapons (including simple rearms) and all martial melee weapons. They are procient with light armor, but not with shields. The special abilities of this class may only be used if you are wearing light armor or no armor, and are armed with a longsword, smallsword, or rapier in your main hand.

SPECIAL MOVES
Masters of Scrimia learn a new special move with each new level in the class. The exact special move they can learn depends on their school afliation, as listed in the Sample Schools section on page 44. Note that all special moves are extraordinary in nature.

BEAT
A beat is a strike at your opponents weapon, in an attempt to damage it or shut down his next attack. This ability grants Sunder as a free bonus feat, even if you lack the prerequisites. You cannot damage a weapon with a piercing weapon (such as a rapier), but if you succeed at your attack against the weapon, and so long as your opponent is armed with a longsword, rapier, or smallsword, you can cause him to lose one attack (your opponents choice, if he has more than one) from his next attack or full attack action. If your beat attempt is a critical, your opponent loses all attacks from his next attack (if he has more than one).

BIND
A bind is a counterattack on your opponents weapon, not to damage it but to lock your own weapon against it, keeping it out of action for a few seconds. You must be armed with a longsword, rapier, smallsword, or dagger to perform a bind. If you choose it to, a bind is occurs automatically when you successfully parry your opponents attack, and if your parry roll beats your opponents attack roll by 4 or more. Once you have bound your opponents weapon, he may not use it either to attack or to parry until he breaks free of the bind, or until you unbind it. Your own weapon is also bound up and cannot be used to parry or attack. While his weapon is bound, he may make an opposed bind check in place of an attack to attempt to free his weapon. He may declare that he is using either Strength or Dexterity to try to break free. In either case, you each have the following attack bonuses: Base attack bonus + Ability modier + special bind modiers If your opponent chooses Strength, you must also use your Strength on your roll to oppose his; if he chooses Dexterity, you must use Dexterity. Your opponents special bind modiers are as follows: 2 if he does not also possess the bind ability; +2 if he is wielding the weapon with both hands

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If your opponent succeeds, he breaks free of the bind: if not, his weapon is still bound. Of course, even if his weapon remains bound, he can drop it and ready another, or attack with an off-hand weapon.

- Legends of Piracy HENRY JENNINGS


Time of Operation: 1702-1717 Area of Operation: Caribbean-Atlantic Jennings [Sdg7/Sof8, hp 118] was a Welshman who served as a privateer during the War of the Spanish Succession {1702-1713}. Jennings, like so many others, turned pirate soon after peace was declared. The governor of Jamaica asked Jennings to leave, so he moved his base of operations to New Providence Island in the Bahamas. In 1714, a massive hurricane wrecked eleven Spanish treasure galleons off the tip of Florida, and by late 1715, the Spanish had a small eet attempting salvage operations. Jennings and 300 of his men surrounded the eet, seizing 300,000 pieces of eight for their efforts. As they sailed back to Nassau at New Providence, they came across another Spanish ship with a rich cargo and an additional 60,000 pieces of eight. Nassaus population had risen to well over a thousand pirates by 1717, and King George II decided to bring it back under his sway by sending Woodes Rogers as a governor with an amnesty for all past piratical activities. Jennings, who could see which way the wind was blowing, took the kings pardon and retired to Jamaica a very wealthy man.

BONETTIS DEFENSE
The famous Italian master Bonetti, one of the rst Europeans to open a school of Scrimia in England, made his pupils practice their footwork while wearing lead-lined shoes, so as to build up their agility and sure-footedness. Bonettis defense makes use of that agility to leap away from an opponents attack. Once per round, instead of parrying an attack, you can attempt a Jump check to evade an attack. Your Jump check opposes your opponents attack roll, with the attacker winning in the event of a tie. If you succeed, you move back 5 feet and your opponents attack misses. Note that this ability has no effect if your opponents weapon has reach that extends to 5 feet behind your current position. You cannot use Bonettis defense if anything occupies the 5 foot square behind you (allies, enemies, furniture, a wall, etc.).

BOTTA SEGRETE
The botta segrete is the fabled secret attack that each school claims to teach its highest initiates. In many cases, the botta segrete is only a fable, but occasionally a school will come upon a useful technique that they are able to keep secret. When you join a fencing school, your GM rolls d20 in secret on the following table:

TABLE 5-3: BOTTA SEGRETTE


d20 1-2 3-6 7-11 12-15 16-18 19-20 Secret Attack Result It is complicated and impractical. You would never attempt to use it in combat. If you succeed in a Bluff vs. Sense Motive test against your opponent, you gain a +2 attack bonus. It is quite deadly: you get a +2 to damage when you perform it. It cannot be parried. Once per combat you can unleash your secret move. This is an extra attack made at your full Base Attack Bonus, and you can take it at any point in the initiative order (possibly preempting enemy actions). It deals damage directly to your opponents Constitution.

You are sworn to secrecy never to teach the botta segrete to anyone but another 10th level master of your school. In addition, you must take care to ensure that no one sees you perform it more than once, or else they may be able to begin to work out how it is done.

CAVATIONE
A cavatione is a circular movement used to defeat a parry attempt. Once per round you can declare a cavatione against a single parry attempt. Your opponent suffers a 2 penalty on his parry check. Additionally, when you break free of a successful bind you can make an immediate attack of opportunity on the binding opponent. This attack of opportunity cannot be parried and counts against your attacks of opportunity for the round.

CLOAK DECEITS
This special move actually includes three separate combat maneuvers. You can only attempt a cloak deceit if you are equipped with a cloak or similar piece of cloth. You may choose each round whether to use the cloak defensively (in which case you gain an AC bonus from it as usual, and may parry with it), or offensively, in which case you can perform any one of the following maneuvers.

FLING
You throw your cloak over an opponents head to entangle him. Make a ranged touch attack against your opponent. The cloak has a maximum range of 10 feet, and you suffer no range penalties while throwing it. This attack provokes an attack

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TABLE 5-4: MASTER OF SCRIMIA LEVEL PROGRESSION


Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Base Attack Bonus +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 +7 +8 +9 +10 Fort Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 Ref Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 Will Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 Special Level 1 special move Level 2 special move Level 3 special move Level 4 special move Level 5 special move Level 6 special move Level 7 special move Level 8 special move Level 9 special move Botta segrete

of opportunity. If you hit, your opponent is entangled. He suffers a 2 penalty on attack rolls and a 4 penalty on effective Dexterity. He can only move at half speed and cannot charge or run. The entangled opponent can escape with an Escape Artist check (DC 10) as a standard action. If you score a critical hit with the cloak (it threatens a critical on a natural 20) your opponent is also blinded (suffers a 50% miss chance in combat, loses any Dexterity bonus to AC, grants a +2 bonus to attackers attack rolls, and suffers a 4 penalty on Search checks and most Strength- and Dexterity-based skill checks.) You can choose to throw your cloak with the tip of the weapon in your main hand, in which case you take a full-attack action but suffer no penalties for attacking with your off-hand. If you throw the cloak with your off-hand, you suffer the standard penalties for attacking with two weapons (note that a cloak is Medium-size).

FLING AND THRUST


You ing your cloak with the tip of your sword, and then make a quick attack with the sword. You must take a full-attack action to use this maneuver. If the cloak hits, you gain a +2 bonus on the subsequent sword attack. Even if the cloak misses, your opponent suffers a 2 penalty on attempts to parry your follow-up attack.

DESPERATE FLING
If you are wearing a cloak normally (as a cloak, rather than a weapon) and have both hands free, you may attempt to ing the cloak over your head and onto your opponent by grasping both edges near the collar. This works just like a standard ing attack, but you suffer a 2 penalty on your attack roll.

COLPO DI ARRESTO
Colpo di arresto is a counterattack, a stop hit that combines the esquive maneuver (a form of dodge) with a return strike. You can declare the use of this maneuver on your opponents turn, but it cannot be used in conjunction with a parry attempt. You gain the benets of the esquive (+2 dodge bonus to AC), and make a counterattack that ignores any dodge bonus to your opponents AC. On the round after you use the colpo di arresto maneuver, you can only take a partial action and suffer a 2 penalty on attack rolls.

CONTRATEMPO
This is the counter to the colpo di arresto maneuver. You do not lose your dodge bonus when attacked by a colpo di arresto, and you gain a free parry against the colpo di arresto. If your parry is successful, you may make an immediate attack of opportunity against the opponent who attempted the colpo di arresto against you. This ability is only taught by schools that also teach colpo di arresto.

COUP DE JARNAC
This special move is the creation of a frustrated French master who took part in a series of protracted and hardfought duels. The coup de Jarnac is a crippling cut with the tip of a rapier to the opponents hamstring, intended to put him out of action at a stroke. You can make a coup de Jarnac attack as a full-attack action. It can only be used against a bipedal opponent no larger than Medium-size, and you must be armed with a rapier. It always provokes an attack of opportunity which cannot be parried unless you have a weapon in your off-hand. Make a melee attack roll modied by your opponents stamina as listed on Table 5-5.

TABLE 5-5: COUPE DE JARNAC


Opponents Condition Endurance feat Fighting with a light weapon only In melee for fewer than ve rounds More than 50% of max hp remaining Fewer than 25% of max hp remaining Fighting with a two-handed weapon In melee for more than ve rounds Moderately encumbered Heavily encumbered Modier -4 -4 -4 -4 +2 +2 +2 +2 +4

Roll for damage normally. If you deal at least 5 points of damage, you cut your opponents hamstring. He immediately falls to the ground and is prone. He must take a full-round action to stand from prone, and cannot move more than 5 feet per round. He loses his Dex bonus to AC, and suffers a 4 penalty on all Dexterity-based skill checks. A successful Heal check (DC 17) removes the penalties, as does any magical cure spell.

DOUBLE FALSE

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The smallsword is light and fast enough to make multiple feints, each one capable of being turned into a real attack if not defended against. If you are armed with a smallsword (only), you may make a double false attack as a full-attack action.

Make an opposed Bluff check against your opponents Sense Motive. If your opponent wins, you lose all attacks and parries (including attacks of opportunity) for the round. If you win, you gain a +2 bonus to attack and parry rolls for one round.

DUO TEMPO
Literally double time, the duo tempo special move is a parry and riposte done quickly and efciently with the smallsword, taking full advantage of its lightness and handiness. When using a smallsword, you gain a +1 bonus on parry checks and deal +1 damage on a riposte.

ESQUIVE
An esquive is an attempt to dodge by moving only the part of the body that is threatened. You designate an opponent and receive a +2 dodge bonus to AC against one attack per round from that opponent. You cannot apply both this special move and the Dodge feat against the same opponent.

LUNGE
The lunge was for many years a secret attack known only to certain Italian schools. It was so lethally effective that it could not be kept secret forever, and by the era of Skull & Bones, it is offered as part of the curriculum of most European fencing schools. The lunge was created to offer many of the benets of the charge, but with less risk and more versatility. You may lunge with the rapier, the longsword, or the smallsword. The lunge may be used with either the attack action or the full attack action. In either case, you may move 5 feet further than you would usually be able, but all your movement must be taken before your attack, just as though you were charging. Again, like the charge, you must move at least 10. You gain a +1 attack bonus on your rst attack roll (the lunge itself ), but you take a 1 penalty to your AC for the entire round in which you lunge.

MEZZO TEMPO
An attack in the middle of the time is a quick stab at your opponent the moment they attack you, with the intention of landing your blow a moment before they land theirs. The idea is that your opponents thrust loses its force because of the injury you inict on him. Of course, this approach is fraught with dangereven if you do land your attack in time, your opponent may be able to strike you anyway if you dont take him down with one blow. You may use mezzo tempo when your opponent charges you, attempts a Power Attack on you, or attacks with a weapon at least twice as heavy as yours. You make a single attack as an attack of opportunity. If you deal damage with this attack, your opponent must make a Fortitude save (DC 10 + damage inicted) or lose his attack for the round. If you fail to deal damage, you suffer a 4 penalty to AC against the opponent for one round and cannot attempt to parry his attack this round.

SAVIOLOS WARD
Instead of parrying, you attempt to grab your opponents blade with your off-hand, just as she attacks you. The great fencing-master Saviolo explained this technique as follows: this weapon must bee used with a glove, and if a man should be without a glove, it were better to hazard a little hurt of the hand, thereby to become master of his enemys sword, than to breake with the swoord, and so give his enemy the advantage of him. Much as with a parry, you give up one attack from your next attack action or full attack action. You give up any dodge bonus to AC against your opponent for the rest of the round, and you make an attack roll opposed to your opponents attack roll. If you lose this opposed check, your opponent strikes you normally. If you win, you grab your opponents sword blade and he automatically misses with his attack. He cannot use a grabbed weapon until you release it, or he frees it by succeeding at an opposed grapple check with a +4 bonus. Unless you are wearing medium or heavy armor, you suffer half the base damage from the weapon (ignore any bonuses from Strength or feats) when you grab it, and each additional round you hold it.

- Legends of Piracy BARTHOLOMEW BLACK BART ROBERTS


Time of Operation: 1718-1722 Area of Operation: Caribbean-Atlantic The tale of the Great Pyrate Roberts [Rog3/Ftr7/Sof10, hp 142] begins with the death of Howell Davis, whom he succeeded as captain. After leveling the settlement where Davis was killed, Roberts sailed to Brazil, right into the midst of a Portuguese treasure eet at anchor. Roberts approach was so brazen that the Portuguese didnt realize what was happening till he had escaped with over 40,000 gold moidores, sugar, tobacco, furs, and a diamond-studded gold cross that Roberts wore from that day forth. Roberts took more than four hundred vessels, with a career highlight being eleven ships of varied nations that he seized in a single day off the African coast. He was a fearless dandy and a teetotaler who encouraged prayer, though he was utterly ruthless. He carried a pair of dueling pistols on a silk cord about his neck, and this brief account can barely hope to capture even a part of what a magnicent bastard he was. In February of 1722, a fty-gun Royal Navy warship caught Roberts off the Guinea coast, but instead of running, he attacked. The navys rst broadside killed Roberts. His loyal crew carried out his wishes to pitch his corpse overboard, nery and all.

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SAMPLE SCHOOLS
The following selection of ready-made schools can be used for PC or NPC fencing masters, and serves as starting points for new schools you design yourself.

FRENCH RAPIER SCHOOL


Class Skills: Balance (Dex), Heal (Wis), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Sense Motive (Wis), and Tumble (Dex). 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

SPECIAL MOVES
Level Special Move Stesso tempo Cavatione Esquive Lunge Bind Cloak deceits Bonettis defense Coup de Jarnac Mezzo tempo Botta segrete

5 6 7 8 9 10

Colpo di arresto Contratempo Saviolos ward Coup de Jarnac Mezzo tempo Botta segrete

SPECIAL MOVES
Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Special Move Bind Beat Esquive Lunge Colpo di arresto Coup de Jarnac Bonettis defense Cloak deceits Saviolos ward Botta segrete

ECLECTIC ITALIAN SCHOOL


Class Skills: Bluff (Cha), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Perform (Cha), Ride (Dex), and Tumble (Dex).

ITALIAN RAPIER SCHOOL


Class Skills: Balance (Dex), Climb (Str), Heal (Wis), Intimidate (Cha), Ride (Dex), and Sense Motive (Wis).

SPECIAL MOVES
Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Special Move Quart guard Lunge Esquive Beat Bind Coup de jarnac Bonettis defense Cloak deceits Saviolos ward Botta segrete

FRENCH SMALLSWORD SCHOOL


Class Skills: Balance (Dex), Bluff (Cha), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Ride (Dex), and Sense Motive (Wis).

SPECIAL MOVES
Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Special Move Bind Lunge Stesso tempo Beat Colpo di arresto Contratempo Saviolos ward Cloak deceits Mezzo tempo Botta segrete

SPECIAL MOVES
Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Special Move Quart guard Lunge Esquive Double false Duo tempo Cavatione Colpo di arresto Contratempo Mezzo tempo Botta segrete

STALWART GERMAN SCHOOL


Class Skills: Balance (Dex), Climb (Str), Heal (Wis), Intimidate (Cha), Ride (Dex), and Sense Motive (Wis).

ITALIAN LONGSWORD SCHOOL


Class Skills: Balance (Dex), Climb (Str), Heal (Wis), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), and Ride (Dex).

SPECIAL MOVES
Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Special Move Bind Beat Stesso tempo Lunge Colpo di arresto Cavatione Saviolos ward Contratempo Mezzo tempo Botta segrete

FLAMBOYANT FRENCH SCHOOL


Class Skills: Balance (Dex), Bluff (Cha), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Perform (Cha), and Ride (Dex).

SPECIAL MOVES
Level 1 2 3 4 Special Move Bind Beat Stesso tempo Lunge

STESSO TEMPO
Literally self time, the stesso tempo special move can only be used when you are wielding two weapons. You use one weapon to parry, and the other to make a simultaneous riposte. This uses up one attack with each weapon, but your opponent cant parry your riposte. He loses any dodge bonus to AC, and you gain a +2 to damage on your riposte. These bonuses only apply if your opponent does not also have an off-hand weapon. This ability may also be used offensively, so long as you have the beat or bind special moves. In this case, you use one weapon to either beat or bind the opponents weapon, and the other to attack (with the same benets to the attack as above, and again using up one attack with each weapon). Stesso tempo may be performed with either a buckler or cloak as an off-hand weapon, but only defensively.

QUART GUARD
With the development of the extraordinarily light and maneuverable smallsword, a new stance was devised, with the blade in quarte and the body turned more to the side than usual. The off-hand is held up behind the body for balance, and the rear foot is pointed diagonally backwards, allowing the fencer to quickly step back or retire from any attack. The narrow prole and ease of defense gives you a +2 Dodge bonus to AC as long as you are ghting only one opponent, but you may only use this stance when armed with a smallsword. In addition, your off-hand must be completely empty, and may not be used for anything other than balance (that is, you may not use it for enclosing, Saviolos ward, and so on.) If your opponents weapon has reach, you gain only a +1 dodge bonus to AC.

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- Mystic Navigator As a mystic navigator advances, he goes through what is called the sea change. His eyes take on the luster of pearls, his irises fading to a silvery or yellow white shade. He soon nds that he is driven to sail, forever restless for the next horizon. After ve levels in the class, the mystic navigator takes on an almost alien appearance: his skin acquires a bluish or greenish cast, and he exudes the smell of brine. By tenth level, the navigators skin color changes with the weather and the mood of the sea, and his hair is perpetually tossed, as if driven by ocean currents. Hit Die: d6. Full fathom ve thy father lies; Of his bones are coral made; Those are pearls that were his eyes; Nothing of him that doth fade But doth suffer a sea-change Into something rich and strange. -William Shakespeare, The Tempest

ariners of all descriptions practice navigation in its mundane form, but only the mystic navigator (abbreviated Mnv) sees the arcane relationships at the heart of the wind and tides, and only they can nd the secret shortcuts through physical space. These characters are a rarity even in large seaports, and they are worth their weight in bullion to the captain who has one on his side.

REQUIREMENTS
To become a mystic navigator you must fulll all the following criteria. Alignment: Any neutral. Knowledge (arcana): 6 ranks. Knowledge (navigation): 8 ranks. Knowledge (sea lore): 8 ranks. Profession (sailor): 4 ranks.

CLASS SKILLS
The mystic navigators class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Balance (Dex), Craft (Int), Knowledge (arcana) (Int), Knowledge (navigation) (Int), Knowledge (sea lore) (Int), Listen (Wis), Profession (sailor) (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), Speak Language (None), and Spot (Wis). Skill Points at Each Level: 6 + Int modier.

CLASS FEATURES
All the following are class features of the mystic navigator prestige class.

WEAPON AND ARMOR PROFICIENCY


Mystic navigators gain no prociency in any weapon or armor.

NAVIGATION (EX)
Beginning at 1st level, the mystic navigator gains a +1 competence bonus on all Knowledge (navigation) and Knowledge (sea lore) checks. This bonus improves by +1 at every other level thereafter (3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th).

MASTER OF WINDS (SU)


Once per day, you can attempt a Knowledge (sea lore) check and perform a special ceremony to change the winds. This ceremony takes one hour, and causes 1d4 temporary Wisdom damage. The base DC to raise a favorable wind when the prevailing winds are light or nonexistent is 15. Creating a favorable wind during stronger wind conditions is harder, as shown on the following table. Winds raised with this ability surround the ship to a radius of one mile, and follow the ship as it moves. The duration of this abilitys effects is one day.

TABLE 5-6: MASTER OF WINDS


Wind Strength Moderate Strong Severe Windstorm Hurricane Tornado DC Modier +2 +4 +6 +8 +10 +12

MASTER OF THE REEF (SU)


Once per day, you can attempt a Knowledge (sea lore) check and perform a special ceremony to reshape the sea oor within a half-mile of your position. This ceremony takes one minute, and causes 1d4 temporary Strength damage. The base DC to manipulate undersea materials is as follows.

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TABLE 5-7: MYSTIC NAVIGATOR LEVEL PROGRESSION


Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Base Attack Bonus +0 +1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 Fort Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 Ref Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 Will Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 Special Navigation +1 Master of winds Navigation +2 Master of the reef Navigation +3 Master of tides Navigation +4 Land ho! Navigation +5 Sculpt the sea

You can raise, lower, or reshape 100 square feet of material for every level you have in mystic navigator. You can move materials by stretching them, but cannot extend them more than 10 feet from their starting position for every two levels you have of mystic navigator. For example, at 4th level you could lower 400 square feet of sand by 20 feet to open a passage into a shallow bay, or raise a 400 square-foot stone block 20 feet from the sea oor to block your enemys passage. It takes one full minute for the material to respond to your entreaty, but the changes you make are less transitory. They are permanent.

TABLE 5-8: MASTER OF THE REEF


Material Sand Soft stone Coral Hard stone Base DC 15 20 25 30

MASTER OF TIDES (SU)


Once per day, you can attempt a Knowledge (navigation) check and perform a special ceremony to bring ocean tides into line with your will. This ceremony takes one hour, and causes 1d4 temporary Dexterity damage. The DC to speed up your own ship 20% is 15, and the DC to slow another ship by the same amount is 20 (choose one effect or the other). This ability has a range of sight when used to target another ship, but the effect follows the enemy ship even when it is out of sight. It lasts for one day.

LAND HO! (SU)


Once per week you can use attempt a Knowledge (navigation) check and perform a special ceremony to create a new island out of nothingness. You sketch the island in its desired location in your wagenaer (navigation journal), using your own blood as ink and concentrating on intricate arcane formulae. This ceremony takes one day, and causes 1d6 temporary Constitution damage. The base DC to create an island is 20, and is modied as follows.

TABLE 5-9: LAND HO!


Island Characteristics Island is less than 1 square mile Island is between 1 and 5 square miles Island is between 6 and 10 square miles Island has a source of fresh water Island has edible wild animals Island has a sheltered bay DC Modier -2 0 +2 +2 +2 +2

While the new island is being created, the area in which it is forming is shrouded by a thick fog. The new island is never inhabited by any sentient creatures, and is only occasionally haunted by sea spirits and hostile monsters. Once created, the island that Land Ho! calls into existance is permanent and may be found and charted by other mariners. It is not possible to create land within a half mile of other islands or the mainland.

SCULPT THE SEA (SU) TABLE 5-10: SCULPT THE SEA


Base Distance 1-100 miles 101-200 miles 201-500 miles 501-1,000 miles 1,001-3,000 miles 3,001+ miles DC Modier -4 -2 0 +2 +4 +8 This ability is dismissed as legend by almost everyone, including most mystic navigatorsbut as with so many things in Skull & Bones, the legends are true. Once per week you can attempt a Knowledge (navigation) check and perform a special ceremony to change the very nature of space as it relates to a single ship, adding and erasing leagues as you go. With this ability, you can sail from the Caribbean to the Ivory Coast in a single day. A ship with a navigator capable of this mighty feat could sail out of the Straights of Gibraltar one morning and arrive at Edo in Japan the next. This ceremony takes one day, and causes 2d6 temporary Wisdom damage. The base DC to sculpt the sea is 20, and is modied as follows.

If a natural 1 is rolled while making the skill check or if the DC is missed by 10 or more, the ship falls through a hole in space and is hopelessly lost. Its exact location is up to the GM, but he is encouraged to consider lakes, inland seas, rivers, and even fortress moats as possible destinations.

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- Legends of Piracy BARTHOLOMEW PORTUGUES


Time of Operation: 1666-? Operational Area: The Caribbean Bartholomew [Sdg1/Ftr3/Sof2, hp 38] was a ghter who operated from Jamaica. In 1666 he took a galley with a cargo consisting of tons of cacao-nuts and 70,000 pieces of eight. After acquiring his new prize, he was captured by three Spanish men-o-war and taken to the port of Campeche. Portuguese was well known there as a pirate and had previously escaped from their jail. Fearing another escape, his captors kept him on his ship and erected a gibbet to hang him in the morning. Portuguese slew his guard and oated to shore using two sealed wine jugs, as he could not swim. He endured a 40-league trek to the Cape Golfo Triste where he met up with comrades from Jamaica who were convinced to give him men and a ship. With these he slipped back to Campeche disguised as a trader, and retook his original prize! Fortune played one last trick on him as he passed the Island of Pinosa storm dashed his ship onto the rocks of the Jardines. Some claim Bartholomew went down with his hard-fought-for prize, and others that he survived, but if so, he never again achieved such success.

- Officer Prestige Classes -

aptains, lieutenants, gunners, carpenters, bosuns, quartermasters, sailing-masters, and surgeons are all ofcers of a ship. Two ofcer prestige classes are presented here, one for sea ofcers (all ofcers with a role in commanding the ship, that is, captains, lieutenants, gunners, bosuns and quartermasters), and one for warrant ofcers (surgeons and carpenters). Not all ships have all the ofcers listed; disorderly pirate ships and small merchantmen may have just a captain and one other ofcer, usually a quartermaster on a pirate ship or sailing-master on a merchant ship, who must between them fulll the roles of all other ofcers. Naval ships also have between one and six lieutenants; ranked as rst lieutenant, second lieutenant etc, all of whom are essentially captains-in-training. Only pirate ships have a quartermaster as an ofcer; he acts as the crews advocate to the captain, presenting their point of view at the table. He also supervises the division of the spoils, ensuring every pirate gets a fair share.

MAXIMUM OFFICER LEVEL (FOR ALL OFFICER PRESTIGE CLASSES)


Depending on your particular rank as ofcer, and the size of ship upon which you hold that rank, your maximum level in the ofcer class is as follows:

TABLE 5-11: MAXIMUM OFFICER LEVEL


Ship Size and Rank Maximum Ofcer Level 3rd 5th 8th 10th Any ofcer on a merchant ship, except the captain. Captain on a merchant ship; any ofcer on a pirate or naval ship except the captain. Captain on a pirate or naval ship. Admiral or pirate king (at least six ships Medium-size or bigger, at least one of which must be Large)

If you are given a rank on a larger vessel, your maximum level in the ofcer class may rise. The GM can make adjustments if he thinks that a larger ship requires a higher-level ofcer contingent.

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- SEA OFFICER The sea ofcer (abbreviated Sof ) lls the direct command position onboard a ship. Sea ofcers are responsible for the efciency of the crew, and its success in war or commerce (depending on its role).

REQUIREMENTS
To become a sea ofcer you must fulll all the following criteria. Base Attack Bonus: +4 Profession (sailor): 4 ranks. Special: Must be appointed to the rank of ofcer by the captain, the owner of the ship, or other legitimate authority. If the sea ofcer subsequently loses the appointment, they do not lose the benets of this prestige class. Hit Die: d10.

CLASS SKILLS
The sea ofcers class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Appraise (Int), Balance (Dex), Bluff (Cha), Climb (Str), Craft (any) (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Gather Information (Cha), Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge (navigation) (Int), Knowledge (sea lore) (Int), Listen (Wis), Perform (Cha), Profession (gunner) (Wis), Profession (sailor) (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), Speak Language (None), Spot (Wis), and Use Rope (Dex). Skill Points at Each Level: 4 + Int modier.

CLASS FEATURES
WEAPON AND ARMOR PROFICIENCY
Sea ofcers are procient with all simple and martial weapons (including rearms) and light and medium armor, but not with shields.

SKILL EXPERT (EX)


Beginning at 1st level, the sea ofcer you gain a +1 competence bonus on any single class skill you have ranks in (choose one). The bonus to this skill improves by +1 at every other level thereafter (3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th).

COMMAND (MORALE BONUS) (EX)


At 2nd level, your long experience with the exercise of authority grants you the ability to make inspiring commands. Your voice can be heard at great distance; a normal characters voice carries just 30 feet in combat conditions, yours is understandable at 60 feet. If you take a move-equivalent action to bark orders, all friendly crew within the sound of your voice gain a +2 morale bonus on saves and checks (including Sway checks). These effects last for one round. You can use this ability up to three times day. You gain other command abilities as you rise in level: readiness at 4th level, break enchantments at 6th level, and furious attack at 8th level. See the following sections for specics.

COMMAND (READINESS) (EX)


If you spend one minute barking orders, all friendly crew within the sound of your voice gain a +4 morale bonus on their next Initiative check if its taken within the ten minutes. You can use this ability up to three times per day.

COMMAND (BREAK ENCHANTMENTS) (EX)


If you take a move-equivalent action to bark orders (provoking an attack of opportunity), all friendly crew within the sound of your voice can attempt a new save against any mind-affecting spell or effect. You can use this ability up to three times per day.

- 48 -

TABLE 5-12: SEA OFFICER LEVEL PROGRESSION


Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Base Attack Bonus +0 +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6 +6 +7 Fort Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 Ref Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 Will Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 Special Skill expert +1 Command (morale bonus) Skill expert +2 Command (readiness) Skill expert +3 Command (break enchantment) Skill expert +4 Command (furious attack) Reputation, skill expert +5 Strategist

COMMAND (FURIOUS ATTACK) (EX)


If you take a full-round action to bark orders (provoking an attack of opportunity), all friendly crew within the sound of your voice enter a state of mindless rage for a number of minutes equal to your Charisma modier (minimum 1 minute). All affected crewmembers gain a +2 morale bonus to Strength and Constitution, a +1 morale bonus on Will saves, and a 1 penalty to AC. They also receive a +2 morale bonus on Sway checks. You can use this ability once per day.

REPUTATION (EX)
At 9th level, you pick up a serious reputation. If you are a pirate, you gain a permanent +2 bonus to Fame. If you are a naval ofcer, you may cancel another characters attempt to use Fame once per day, as a free action, so long as the other character is within your sight.

STRATEGIST (EX)
By 10th level you have become a master naval strategist. When engaged in a naval battle, you can make an opposed level check against the enemy captain at the beginning of the encounter. If you win, all ships under your command or sway gain a +4 bonus on their initiative rolls.

- WARRANT OFFICER Warrant ofcers (abbreviated Wof ) are either surgeons or ships carpenters, with slightly different special abilities and skills depending on their job.

REQUIREMENTS
To become a warrant ofcer you must fulll all the following criteria. Base Attack Bonus: +3 Craft (carpentry), Heal, or Profession (surgeon): 6 ranks. Special: Must be appointed to the rank of ofcer by the captain, the owner of the ship, or other legitimate authority. Hit Die: d8.

CLASS SKILLS
The sea ofcers class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Appraise (Int), Balance (Dex), Bluff (Cha), Craft (Int), Heal (Wis), Knowledge (all skills taken individually) (Int), Listen (Wis), Move Silently (Dex), Profession (sailor) (Wis), Profession (surgeon) (Wis), Search (Int), Sense Motive (Wis), Speak Language (None), Spot (Wis), and Use Rope (Dex). Skill Points at Each Level: 6 + Int modier.

CLASS FEATURES
WEAPON AND ARMOR PROFICIENCY
Warrant ofcers gain no prociency in any weapon or armor.

IMPROVISED TOOLS (EX)


Surgeons and craftsmen onboard ship do not have the luxury of unlimited supplies and well-appointed work areas. Often they are called upon to practice their craft in rolling seas, in dim light, or in the midst of pitched battle. Warrant ofcers quickly learn to improvise with materials at hand. Whenever you are onboard a ship where you are a recognized ofcer, you do not suffer the standard 2 circumstance penalty for working with improvised tools.

SKILL MASTER (EX)


Beginning at 2nd level, the warrant ofcer gains a +2 competence bonus on Craft (carpentry), Heal, or Profession (surgeon) checks (choose one). This bonus improves by +2 at 4th level.

- 49 -

TABLE 5-13: WARRANT OFFICER LEVEL PROGRESSION


Level 1 2 3 4 5 Base Attack Bonus +0 +1 +1 +2 +2 Fort Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 Ref Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 Will Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 Special Improvised Tools Skill master +2 Cure fever or cross-craft Skill master +4 Battle repairs or back from the brink

CURE FEVER (EX)


At 3rd level, a ships surgeon masters the complex techniques required to cure deadly tropical diseases that leave European doctors bafed, including Yellow Fever. Make a Heal check once per week for each infected patient under your care. The DC to cure the disease is 25, but any result of 15 or higher keeps the patient alive for another week.

CROSS-CRAFT (EX)
Ships carpenters are often the only craftsmen aboard a ship, and so regularly get asked to mend cutlasses, make iron nails, gild the gurehead, and so on. Beginning at 3rd level, you can use ranks in one Craft skill to attempt any Craft check, with a 4 circumstance penalty to the check.

BACK FROM THE BRINK (EX)


At 5th level, a ships surgeon devises various salves and elixirs to coax life back into a dying body. If one of your comrades has just Rolled the Bones and failed, and you get to her within two combat rounds of that failure, you may be able to bring her back from the brink of death. With a Heal roll (DC 30) you can revive her, if the life she lost was not her last. This means that shes back into the fray a little quicker than would usually be expectedeven within the same scene, at the GMs discretion. If she lost her last life, it is far more difcult to bring her back from the brink (DC 35). In this case she is living on borrowed timehopefully enough to achieve one last goal that may have been left unnished, or gasp out the location of her treasure depending on how well you made the roll: Although you make your skill roll as normal, the GM should roll to see precisely how much time the dying character has left, and keep it secret. Once this time is up, no medical care or spell can bring her back.

TABLE 5-14: BACK FROM THE BRINK


Heal Result 35 36 37 38 39 40 41+ Life Remaining 1 round 2d6 rounds 2d6 minutes 2d6 hours 1d4 days 1d4 weeks 1d4 months

BATTLE REPAIRS (EX)


At 5th level, a ships carpenters total familiarity with his ship and unparalleled knowledge of wood allow him to quickly repair damage to the ship, even when still under attack. See the Ship Repair section in Chapter X: Of Ships and the Sea for full details of this ability.

- Legends of Piracy GEORGE LOWTHER


Time of Operation: 1721-1722 Operational Area: Caribbean-Atlantic Lowther [Sdg5/Sof3, hp 52] was an Englishman who signed onto a slaver as rst mate in 1721. Lowthers captain, Charles Russell, was far more concerned with meeting his slave quota than with the rapidly deteriorating health of his men. The Royal African Company fort at Gambia was supposed to be their base of operations, but it was so diseased and ill kept that the garrison men and their Captain Massey actually retreated to the Gambia Castle, Russells ship. The slave trade was at such a standstill that they sat for months until Lowther and Massey staged a mutiny. Lowther proposed that they go on the account, which was accepted by all. Massey and his followers soon left relatively amicably in his own ship, a sloop theyd captured. Lowther swiftly acquired a reputation as a bloodthirsty, though successful, captain. In 1722, while careening his ship on a small cay north of Venezuela, an English captain, Walter Moore, caught him and his men. Lowther managed to escape, but little good it did him, as he was marooned. His body was found years later with a spent pistol in hand and a bullet in his skull.

- 50 -

Chapter VI: Equipment


This chapter contains a complete list of the weapons, armor, and equipment commonly available in the Skull & Bones setting. It also details a currency system more appropriate to the period, and lists the prices for goods and services.

- A Silver World he lure of wealth brought the Spanish to the New World, and the reality of it kept them there. The vast amounts of silver and gold that Spain acquired in South America and the West Indies owed over the Atlantic in everincreasing quantities from the early 1500s onwards. The actions of French corsairs and others caused the rest of Europe became aware of the sheer scale of the wealth that the Spanish were importing, and European countries swiftly took steps to get their own share of the wealth. Piracy and privateering were born. The treasures of the Inca and Aztec civilizations werent the only source of wealth the Spanish found. In La Peru, which corresponds to modern-day Bolivia, a mountain was discovered that was almost solid silver. A colony called Potos was established near the base of the silver mountain, and eventually a mint was built there as well. In order to swiftly import their wealth back to Spain, the colonies sped up the process of minting coinage by producing irregular coins called cobs. Instead of attempting to cut out silver planchets for minting, which is the normal procedure, the Spanish took rounded silver bars and sliced the ends off in appropriate weights for the coins they produced. The lopped-off silver pieces were then hammer struck with simple dies that held the appropriate coin faces. The size and shape of these cobs were completely irregular and they frequently had large cracks running through them, but their weight was correct. If they were too heavy, the minter would clip off the extra, further altering the shape of the coin. Silver is the common currency of all nations, followed by gold and copper. The face value of a given coin is directly proportional to the amount of wealth it is supposed to represent. The irregular nature of the Spanish cobs has led many rogues to practice clipping or shaving their coins and counterfeiting the scraps. As merchants have grown wise to this practice, they have begun to accept coins entirely on the basis of their metal type and weight, not their country of origin. The coins most associated with piracy are doubloons and pieces of eight: the Spanish escudos and reales. All escudos are gold and all reales are silver. Both types of coin have multiple denominations, but the two most famous are the eight-escudo coin, called a doubloon, and the eight-reale coin, known as a peso de ocho, or piece of eight. The piece of eight is the standard coin of the West Indies due more to the large amount available for circulation than any other factor. The following chart lists a number of the ABLE URRENCY most common coins circulating in the Caribbean and their values in relation SPANISH CURRENCY to one another, but it is by no means Doubloons Pieces of Eight Reales Maravedi exhaustive. 1 4 32 1,090 The most common coins and their

6-1: C

ENGLISH CURRENCY
Pound 1 Crown 4 Daalder 2 1/2 Shilling 20 Florins 5 Pence 240 Stuiver 100

DUTCH CURRENCY
Ducat 1

values are listed on Table 6-1. Each coin is listed along with how many make up the basic unit of each countrys currency. Four crowns makes a pound, ve orins makes a ducat, and so on. A piece of eight weighs about 1 oz., a single reale weighs 1/10 oz., and a doubloon weighs of an ounce. Typical exchange rates are listed on Table 6-2.

TABLE 6-2: CURRENCY CONVERSIONS


CONVERSION RATES
Doubloons 1 Pounds 1 Ducats 1
D20 CURRENCY

Pounds 3/4 Doubloons 1 1/3 Doubloons 1/2 Reales 1 Shillings 4/5

Ducats 2 Ducats 2 2/3 Pounds 3/8 Stuiver 1 1/2

All the prices for the various goods and treasures of Skull & Bones are listed in Spanish coin, but can be easily converted to d20 standard currency; each reale is equal to one silver piece. Doubloons, guineas, and ducats are made of gold. Reales, crowns, shillings, daalders, and orin are made of silver. Maravedi, pence, and stuivers are made of copper. The English pound is referred to by merchants and in banking, but there is no such thing as a pound coinit is a nancial tool, not a true piece of currency.

Silver Pieces 1

- 51 -

Silver prices uctuated wildly during the historical Golden Era of Piracy. The price of a single troy ounce of silver was seven shillings in 1700 but inated all the way to 20 shillings by 1730. There were many reasons for this instability. The various colonies of the Americas typically put out credit notes to buy goods that were eventually redeemed in silver. As long as there was cash available, this worked. However, oversea interests frequently demanded coin instead of credit. When there was a shortage of silver, the price would rise accordingly as the various merchants and noblemen bid up the price in their efforts to acquire hard cash. Pirates that traded their goods to merchants that dealt in stolen goods could expect far less in coin than the goods were worth, but if they were willing to take bank notes and promises of credit they had a better chance of getting the full value of their ill-gotten loot. Many of the banks and governments of the Caribbean happily dealt with those who were on the account. So how much does this matter to a Skull & Bones campaign? As much or as little as each GM wants it to. If market uctuations of silver prices work for your gaming group, then by all means include them.

- Reading the Equipment Lists -

nless otherwise noted, all rules for equipment and weapon use laid out in the core rules hold true for equipment and weapons in Skull & Bones. The format in which they are described is standardwith the exception of price. The monetary system in Skull & Bones is a bit different (as noted on the previous page). Prices for all equipment are abbreviated as follows.

Doubloon: dbl. Piece of Eight: poe. Reales: rl or rls (a piece of eight is an eight-reale coin; there are also four, two, one and one-half reale denominations). Maravedi: mar. If there is a particular item that is not listed in this chapter, you can probably nd it in the core rules. You can convert the prices found there by treating 1 silver piece = 1 reale.

- Weapons -

hat would a bloodthirsty pirate crew be without its cutlasses and boarding pikes? Food for sharks, thats what. A peaceful pirate is a contradiction in terms, and the tools of mayhem are alway close to hand for a corsair. This section details the weaponsblades, guns, cannons and the likeavailable in the Skull & Bones campaign setting.

MASTERWORK WEAPONS
Masterwork weapons are rare and prized in the Caribbean. They are often jeweled and ornamented, as much objects of art as weapons. Add a minimum of 100 doubloons to the price of any masterwork weapon, simply for the price of the raw materials and ne Toledo steel. Most of the masters capable of making such live in Europe or have a reputation to uphold. While this doesnt mean they wont work for a pirate (with coin in hand) it does mean that a lot of persuasion is required before you can commission a masterwork saber or cutlass, to say nothing of anything more exotic.

MELEE WEAPONS
Weapons in the Skull & Bones setting are lighter than their medieval equivalents, as can be seen from the weights given on page 54. For melee weapons not listed here, take the core rules weight and halve it, rounding up.

MELEE WEAPON DESCRIPTIONS


BELAYING PIN
These wooden rods are common on every sailing ship. They are used to secure rope, by dropping the belaying pin into a special hole and tying the rope to the pin (hence the phrase belay that, originally meaning tie it down). Various sizes of belaying pin, to t into various sizes of hole and to take various weights of rope, are available. If youre above decks, there is almost always a medium belaying pin available, either within reach or by taking a ve-foot step.

BOARDING AXE
A heavy axe used for boarding enemy ships, the boarding axe is used in one hand for ghting or to assist with climbing up the sides of a ship (+2 circumstance bonus to Climb rolls when climbing a wooden surface). Once onboard, it can be wielded with both hands to cut through the sail lifts, tumbling an enemy ships sails to the deck in a show of force.

BOARDING PIKE
Essentially a shortspear, the boarding pike is a handy shipboard weapon because dozens of them can be stored in racks around the mast. Other weapons such as cutlasses and muskets are stowed below decks to keep the sea air from them, but boarding pikes are so cheap that theyre left out to corrode. On a well-disciplined ship, sailors are assigned to clean, polish, sharpen, and oil the boarding pikes once a week, but pirates are rarely so careful (1 to damage if the boarding pike has not been properly maintained).

BROADSWORD

- 52 -

Heavy broadswords are common, particularly among English fencers (who tend to sneer at the rapier and smallsword as toy weapons, t only for effete continentals), cavalrymen, Scots, and some sea ofcers. They are practical for use at sea, so long as one does not attempt to wield them below decks.

BUCCANEER KNIFE
The buccaneer knife is a long and heavy knife with a slight curve. It can be used to chop kindling, deliver a coup-de-grace to an animal that has been shot, butcher the animal afterwards, and hack your enemies to pieces.

CUTLASS
This is a heavy, short sword with a curved blade, possibly derived from the buccaneers long hunting knife. It has been adopted by naval forces across the world, from naval marines to pirates to merchants. This is because the cutlass is almost as powerful as a broadsword, but does not get tangled in the rigging when ghting on deck or bashed into beams overhead when ghting below decks.

CAVALRY SABER
Heavier and longer than a cutlass or scimitar, the cavalry saber is used from horseback, where its weight is an advantage for slashing down at the heads of infantry. On foot, it is too heavy to be used effectively without long practice and training, but it is the choice of many experienced ghting-men for the cruel wounds it inicts. Like most other Medium-size weapons, it is too long for use below decks, but some pirate captains keep one to wield when raiding ports. Although the cavalry saber is an exotic weapon, it is treated as a martial weapon when used from horseback.

DIRK
A long dagger, carried as a weapon and tool by men and women of almost all backgrounds and professions.

- 53 -

TABLE 6-3: MELEE WEAPONS


SIMPLE MELEE WEAPONS
Weapon Belaying pin, Medium Boarding pike* Dirk Halfspear* Marlinespike Quarterstaff## Cost Damage Critical Range Increment Weight 10 ft. 20 ft. 10 ft. 20 ft. 10 ft. 3 lb. 3 lb. 1 lb. 3 lb. 1 lb. 4 lb. Type Bludgeoning Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Bludgeoning Size M L T M T L Free 1d6 x2 1 poe, 6 rl 1d8 x3 1 poe 1d4 19-20/x2 1 poe 1d6 x3 6 rl 1d4 19-20/x2 1 poe 1d6/1d6 x2

EXOTIC MELEE WEAPONS


Weapon Cavalry saber Cost 5 dbl Damage 1d8 Critical 18-20/x2 Range Increment Weight 4 lb. Type Slashing Size M

MARTIAL MELEE WEAPONS


Weapon Belaying pin, Small Belaying pin, Large Boarding axe Broadsword Buccaneer knife Cutlass Dueling rapier Greatsword Hatchet Longspear*# Rapier Sap Smallsword Tomahawk Cost Free Free 2 poe 1 dbl 1 poe, 7 rl 3 poe 15 dbl 5 dbl 6 rl 2 poe 5 dbl 1 poe 12 dbl 1 poe, 3 rl Damage 1d6** 1d10 1d8 1d8 1d6 1d6 1d6 2d6 1d6 1d8 1d6 1d6** 1d6 1d6 Critical x2 x2 x3 19-20/x2 19-20/x2 18-20/x2 18-20/x2 19-20/x2 x3 x3 18-20/x2 x2 18-20/x2 x2 Range Increment Weight 10 ft. 3 lb. 10 lb. 4 lb. 3 lb. 1 lb. 2 lb. 3 lb. 15 lb. 3 lb. 9 lb. 3 lb. 3 lb. 1 lb. 2 lb. Type Bludgeoning Bludgeoning Slashing Slashing Piercing Slashing Piercing Slashing Slashing Piercing Piercing Bludgeoning Piercing Slashing Size S L M M S M M L S L M S S S

* If you use a ready action to set this weapon against a charge, you deal double damage if you score a hit against a charging character. **The weapon deals nonlethal damage rather than regular damage # Reach weapon ##Double weapon Refer to the weapon description for special rules.

DUELING RAPIER
This is a version of the standard rapier a good foot longer than usual. It is almost useless at sea, where it will soon get tangled in rigging if you try to use it on a crowded deck. A dueling rapier can be highly effective on land, thoughno other weapon combines speed and deadliness to such a degree. Against anyone armed with an ordinary melee weapon (that is, anything but a weapon with reach or another dueling rapier), the wielder of the dueling rapier gains a +2 circumstance bonus to initiative at the cost of a 1 circumstance penalty to attack rolls. It is otherwise treated as a rapier. Anyone who can afford such an expensive weapon can probably afford the masterwork version, in which the masterwork +1 enhancement bonus neatly cancels out the 1 penalty to attack rolls.

HATCHET
A simple tool for chopping wood thats often pressed into service during desperate ghting.

MARLINESPIKE
A crucial shipboard tool for splitting ropes, the marlinespike is often used as an impromptu weapon due to its ready availability aboard any ship. Treat as a dagger, except that it cannot be used to parry.

SMALLSWORD
The smallsword is a light thrusting sword, designed for civilian use and dueling. It is fast and easy to use, but too light for parrying heavy weaponsthe styles of fencing that have been evolved to make use of it rely on dodging, or on the opponent also wielding a smallsword. It is treated in all respects like its larger, heavier cousin the rapier, except that the smallsword suffers penalties to parrying (see Chapter VII: Combat), and may be used with certain special abilities by members of the master of Scrimia prestige class. It weighs just 1lb.

TOMAHAWK
The name, shape, and design have been borrowed from the natives of the New World, but the tomahawk has a sturdy oak handle and sharp steel head. This is a common weapon for pirates, because it can be used to assist with climbing just like its larger cousin (+2 circumstance bonus on Climb checks when climbing wooden surfaces) and can be thrown or used to parry an attack while you draw your cutlass. Tomahawks are also popular off-hand weapons when ghting at close quarters (below decks).

- 54 -

GUNPOWDER WEAPONS
All gunpowder weapons have a maximum range equal to 15 times their range increment, except for the grenadoe, which as a thrown weapon has a maximum range equal to ve times its range increment. In melee combat all pistols double as saps, and all ries or blunderbusses can be used as clubs. Since they were not designed for such use, there is a chance melee combat will ruin them, however. When using a pistol, rie, or blunderbuss as a melee weapon, you may wreck your weapon if the attack roll is a natural 1. Make another attack roll with the same modiers as the attack you just made. If this roll would miss your opponent, the weapon breaks and becomes useless for melee and ranged attacks. If you rolled high enough to hit your opponent, you dont damage your opponent, but your weapon remains intact.

GUNPOWDER WEAPON DESCRIPTIONS


BLUNDERBUSS
Blunderbusses are commonly used at sea, where the short ranges found in close quarters combat make them sickeningly effective. At longer ranges, the spray of shot from a blunderbuss is much less damagingfor each range increment beyond the initial one, damage is reduced by 2 (although a shot that hits always does at least one point of damage). For example, at a range of 35 feet, the blunderbuss deals 2d10-2 damage, and suffers the usual 4 attack penalty for range. Blunderbusses are usually loaded with a dozen or so pistol balls, but in extremis can re any old mixture of rocks, nails, jacket buttons, and other junk. Doing this has a 50% chance of damaging the barrel, which must be replaced (at half the original cost of the gun) before it can be red again. Blunderbusses are crude, simple weapons, and cannot be masterworked.

BLUNDERBUSS PISTOL
Pirates and other thugs favor blunderbuss pistols, both for their deadliness at close range and their unmistakably threatening appearance. The ammunition used may be a number of small pistol balls, or it may be stones, nails, or whatever other bits of junk the owner can nd. In any case, the blunderbuss pistol is damaging, but only at close rangesfor each range increment beyond the initial one, damage is reduced by 2 (although a shot that hits always does at least one point of damage).

CANNON
A full-size cannon, found only on the largest ships and ring a roundshot weighing about 45 pounds. Also known as a French cannon.

CANNON, CULVERIN
Another medium-size cannon, standard armament on most ships, ring a roundshot that weighs about 18 pounds. Also known as an ordinary culverin.

CANNON, SMALL CULVERIN


A small cannon ring a roundshot weighing about 9 pounds. Used as the main armament on small ships, or as a secondary weapon on larger ships. Also known as a demi-culverin.

CANNON, DEMIA medium-sized cannon, a little larger than the culverin. Fires a roundshot weighing about 24 pounds.

GRENADOE
Grenadoes are primitive and unreliable weapons, usually ABLE RENADOE USES constructed by their user. The Roll Fuse cost given is for the materials (a 25+ Perfect: the grenadoe explodes as soon as it lands. ceramic pot full of gunpowder); 20 Good: the grenadoe explodes one round after landing. a Craft (gunsmithing) check 15 Adequate: the grenadoe explodes d3+1 rounds after (DC 10) must be made to landing. make one. The main use of Less than 15 Poor: the grenadoe explodes d6+4 rounds after landing. a grenadoe is to frighten and confuse the enemy (nothings says Move! like a zzing, smoking grenadoe). Anyone within 5 feet when it goes off takes 1d3 damage and must make a Fortitude save (DC 15) or be stunned and unable to act for one round. If they hit a target directly they deal 1d2 bludgeoning damage and then go off immediately. Due to the difculties in gauging how fast the fuse will burn in the humid air of the Tropics, a Craft (gunsmithing) check must be made to determine how well the user has cut the fuse.

6-4: G

HATCHET-PISTOL
An unusual weapon intended for hunting, but occasionally adopted for maritime use. It is a handaxe with a pistol mechanism built into the haft, allowing the user to re the pistol or swing the axe with equal ease. In effect, every one of these weapons is masterworked, as is reected in the price, but there is no attack bonus for either the sword or the pistol; rather, the masterworking allows each weapon to be used without the penalty that would be expected when two such inappropriate weapons are tted together. These are rare, and are almost always made as one-off pieces for European nobles.

- 55 -

TABLE 6-5: GUNPOWDER WEAPONS


SIMPLE GUNPOWDER WEAPONS
Weapon Musket, long* Musket, short Pistol Cost 5 db 3 db 8 db Damage Critical Range Increment Reload Time 2d6 2d6 2d4 x3 x3 x3 60 ft. 40 ft. 10 ft. 6 full rounds 6 full rounds 6 full rounds Weight 25 lb. 20 lb. 5 lb. Type Piercing Piercing Piercing Size L L S

MARTIAL GUNPOWDER WEAPONS


Weapon Cost Damage Critical Range Increment Reload Time x3 x3 x3 x3 x3 x3 x3 x3 x3 x3 5 ft. 15 ft. 150 ft. 150 ft. 150 ft. 150 ft. 5 ft. 80 ft. 100 ft. 40 ft. 10 full rounds 12 full rounds Varies Varies Varies Varies 7 full rounds 6 full rounds 6 full rounds 12 full rounds Weight 10 lb. 25 lb. n/a n/a n/a n/a 3 lb. 25 lb. n/a n/a n/a Weight 10 lb. 10 lb. 35 lb. Type Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Type Piercing Piercing Piercing M L n/a n/a n/a n/a T L n/a Blunderbuss pistol* 12 db d12* Blunderbuss* 3 db 2d10* Cannon 400 db 4d4 x 10 Culverin 150 db 2d4 x 10 Demi-cannon 200 db 3d4 x 10 Small culverin 90 db d4 x 10 Pocket pistol* 12 db 2d4 Rie* 35 db 2d6 Swivel-gun* 50 db loaded w/one ball 4d6 loaded w/ pistol balls d20

EXOTIC GUNPOWDER WEAPONS


Weapon Cost Damage Critical Range Increment Reload Time 5 ft. 10 ft. 30 ft. 40 ft. 10 ft. 5 ft. 5 ft. 5 ft. 6 full rounds 6 full rounds 6 full rounds 6 full rounds n/a 6 full rounds 6 full rounds 6 full rounds Size S S L Double-barrel pistol, side by side* 24 db 2d4/4d4 x3 Double-barrel pistol, over and under* 30 db 2d4 x3 Double-barrel musket, side by side* 20 db 2d6/4d6 x3 Double-barrel musket, over and under* 25 db 2d6 x3 Grenadoe* 5 rl 1d8/1d3 x3 Hatchet-pistol 350 db as hatchet 1d6 x3 as pistol 2d4 x3 Spear-pistol 350 db as spear 1d8 x2 as pistol 2d4 x3 Sword-pistol 450 db as sword 1d8 19-20/x2 as pistol 2d4 x3 *See weapon description for more details.

35 lb. Piercing L 4 lb. Bludgeoning S 7 lb. S Slashing Piercing 14 lb. M Piercing Piercing 9 lb. M Slashing Piercing

MUSKET, DOUBLE-BARRELED
Although the double-barreled musket is more of a curiosity or hunting gun than a serious martial weapon, there is something extremely intimidating about staring into both barrels of a large musket! Like the double-barreled pistol, it comes in two varieties, side-by-side and over-and-under. A side-by-side gun can be red twice in one round (2d6 damage per barrel), if a character has more than one attack. Both barrels may also be red simultaneously, in which case only one attack roll is made and the weapon deals 4d6 damage. An over-and-under guns barrels twist around a pivot, so that after ring the top barrel, the barrels are given a half-turn, bringing the unred barrel to the top. This takes a move-equivalent action to perform. All double-barreled muskets are short muskets, and the statistics given reect thata long double-barreled musket would be too heavy to use. As with other muskets, this gun can be used as a club in melee combat. However, if an over-and-under gun is used as a club, the twisting pivot will break or bendit will no longer be possible to re the second barrel. The reload time given is for loading one barrel only.

MUSKET, LONG
A common weapon used by hunters, the army, and buccaneers. It can be used as a club, but its weight and general unwieldiness means it must be used two-handed. A long musket is too long to be red against an adjacent opponent.

MUSKET, SHORT
The short musket is intended for cavalry or shipboard use. Its short size makes it much easier to use than a long musket. It can be used as a club, but its weight and general unwieldiness means it must be used two-handed. It is sometimes known as a musketoon, especially when used aboard ship.

PISTOL

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Most types of pistol have a skull-cracker metal butt, allowing them to be used as saps in hand-to-hand combat. The only ones that cant be used in this way are pocket pistols, which are too small.

Masterwork pistols almost always come as a pair of dueling pistols, at a cost of 150 db a pair. A pair of dueling pistols bought in this way is known as a case of pistols, and comes in a sturdy wooden case with powder, shot, ramrods, and so on. The best dueling pistols are noted particularly for their quality of coming up, that is to say, the ease and speed with which they can be red when raised from the side of the body to a ring position. At the GMs option, a good pair of masterwork dueling pistols may grant a +1 bonus to initiative instead of to attack roll, to reect the quality of coming up. Few gunsmiths in the New World are capable of creating masterwork pistols of any sort, and so ne dueling pistols are highly valued when found as bootyso much so, in fact, that it is standard practice on pirate vessels for the rst man aboard a prize to be given the best pair of pistols to be found aboard her, over and above his share of the loot.

PISTOL, DOUBLE-BARRELED
A fancy-looking, expensive gun, the double-barreled pistol is a useful weapon. It comes in two varieties, side-by-side and over-and-under. A side-by-side gun can be red twice in one round (2d4 damage per barrel), if a character has more than one attack. Both barrels may also be red simultaneously, in which case only one attack roll is made and the weapon deals 4d4 damage. An over-and-under guns barrels twist around a pivot, so that after ring the top barrel, the barrels are given a half-turn, bringing the unred barrel to the top. This takes a move-equivalent action to perform. Double-barreled pistols have a skull-cracker metal butt, so they can be reversed and used as a sap in melee combat, just like other pistols. However, if an over-and-under gun is used as a sap, the twisting pivot will break or bendit will no longer be possible to re the second barrel. In addition, a critical hit with a double-barreled pistol being used as a sap will break the weapon in two, making it useless for any purpose other than as scrap metal or rewood.The reload time given is for loading one barrel only.

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PISTOL, POCKET
A tiny pistol that is lightweight and easily concealed. Even the mechanism is smaller than that of a full-sized pistol, which makes reloading it more time-consuming. Its small size and handiness of use means that it may be red against an adjacent opponent without provoking an attack of opportunity.

RIFLE
This weapon is much like a long musket, but with spiral grooves running through the barrel for much-improved accuracy. It is only available after 1715. Even then, only a small number of gunsmiths are so much as aware of its existence, let alone capable of manufacturing it. The price listed is that for a rie bought direct from the inventor, a Dutch gunsmith in Pennsylvania. A rie is too long to be red against an adjacent opponent.

SWIVEL-GUN
Usually mounted on a deck or wall, the swivel-gun can be loaded either with a small cannonball (weighing one or two pounds), in which case it does the listed damage to a single target, or dozens of pistol balls, in which case it works much like a larger, more powerful blunderbuss. Loaded with pistol balls, it deals 2d12 damage (DC 15 Reex save for half damage) to all targets within a 10 ft. by 10 ft. area up to 100 feet away. The gures for reloading assume that the swivel-gun is operated by a two-person crew. The Firearms Drill feat can only reduce this time if both crewmembers have the feat. If the gun is operated alone, triple the loading time (but you may then apply Firearms Drill feat to reduce the time). Minor variants of the swivel-gun are known as falcons, falconets, and robinets.

SPEAR-PISTOL
Much like the hatchet-pistol, this is a spear and pistol combined for hunting purposes, and again invariably masterworked and rare.

SWORD-PISTOL
Much like the hatchet-pistol, this is a sword and pistol combined for hunting purposes, and again invariably masterworked and rare.

AMMUNITION AND ACCESSORIES DESCRIPTIONS


BAYONET
A bayonet is a dagger that has been adapted to t on the end of a musket or rie to enhance its effectiveness in melee combat. A bayonet mounted on a short musket is treated as a halfspear, and a bayonet mounted on a long musket or rie is treated as a shortspear. Bayonets are available in two types, plug and ring. It takes one full-round action to t and lock a bayonet into place. When a plug bayonet is mounted on a gun, the gun cannot be red until the bayonet is removed (this takes 1d3 rounds, as the bayonet often becomes stuck in the barrel). A ring bayonet has the advantage that the gun can still be red without penalty, so the bayonet may be tted well in advance of combat. Ring bayonets are only available after 1700 in the tropics, and then only occasionally (usually by stealing them from a marine or soldier).

POWDER AND SHOT


To keep bookkeeping easier, powder and shot are priced together, along with the wadding used to pack it into the gun barrel. This makes it much easier to keep track of the amount of ammunition you have left. If you need to price powder and shot separately for some reason, assume that powder and shot each weigh half and cost half the amount indicated for both together. The price given is for average quality powder, which misres on a natural 1 or 2 on an attack roll. Occasionally, much better quality powder, sometimes known as tower proof , is available (only misres on a natural 1), for at least double the normal cost. Worse quality powder is also sold, sometimes cheaply. You can attempt to gauge the condition of powder by making a Profession (gunner) check (DC 10). A gun that misres must be reloaded before it can be red again.

TABLE 6-6: GUNPOWDER WEAPON AMMUNITION AND ACCESSORIES


Item Dozen powder and shot, pistol* Dozen powder and shot, blunderbuss pistol Dozen powder and shot, blunderbuss Dozen powder and shot, musket** 1200 powder and shot, swivel-gun 200 powder and shot, demi-culverin 100 powder and shot, culverin 75 powder and shot, demi-cannon 40 powder and shot, cannon Prepared charges (musket or pistol) Bayonet, plug Bayonet, ring Cost 2 reales 4 reales 5 reales 2 reales, 10 maravedi 20 doubloons 20 doubloons 20 doubloons 20 doubloons 20 doubloons +1 reale per dozen 5 reales, 12 maravedi 1 Piece of Eight Weight 1 lb. 2 lb. 4 lb. 2 lb. 1 ton 1 ton 1 ton 1 ton 1 ton N/A 1 lb. 1 lb.

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*Also suitable for pocket pistols. **Suitable for short muskets, long muskets, and ries.

TABLE 6-7: POWDER DETERIORATION


Condition One year stowed perfectly in a ships hold One month stowed well in a ships hold One week stowed badly in a ships hold Two years stowed perfectly in an armory on shore Two months stowed well in an armory on shore Two weeks stowed badly in an armory on shore One month stowed perfectly about ones person One week stowed well about ones person One day stowed badly about ones person One day loaded in a gun Stowed well and exposed to sea air for one day Stowed well and exposed to light rain for one hour Stowed well and exposed to heavy rain for one hour Stowed badly (or loaded in a gun) and exposed to sea air for one hour Stowed badly (or loaded in a gun) and exposed to light rain for one minute Stowed well and exposed to tropical storm for one hour Stowed badly (or loaded in a gun) and exposed to heavy rain for one minute Stowed badly (or loaded in a gun) and exposed to tropical storm for one minute Dunked underwater Misre (on 1d20) 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-4 1-4 1-4 1-6 1-6 1-10 1-17

All powder deteriorates over time, depending on how well you look after it and what weather conditions it is exposed to. The table above lists the natural rolls that result in a misre for a number of storage conditions. To stow powder, make a Profession (gunner) check with a DC of 15. If you succeed, it is stowed well. If you make the roll by 10 or more, it is stowed perfectly. If you fail, it is stowed badly. The GM should make this check secretly for you; you always think you stowed it perfectly. If you are in sea air or rain, storing powder on your person or loading it in a gun exposes the powder unless it is stored perfectly. Powder and shot for cannon is given by the ton of cargo space, rather than by weight. It is assumed that each ton is a mix of roundshot, grapeshot and chainshot, so that all three are available if desired. Prepared charges: Paper containers, each containing a precisely measured quantity of powder and a single shot, are sometimes available. These are usually worn dangling from a baldric or belt for easy access. Their use saves a considerable amount of time on reloadingtake one round off the reload time (this is cumulative with the Firearms Drill feat).

- Armor rmor is far less common in Skull & Bones than it was in medieval times. A few specialist regiments still wear bits and pieces of plate, and most soldiers wear a thick leather jerkin or buff-coat, but pirates and other civilians wear little or no armor at all. None of the types of armor listed in the core rules are still available, at least not in their original form. Likewise, the only shield still found is called a buckler, a small metal shield with a single handle and no strap, although the use of a cloak partially wrapped round the left arm is not uncommon in duels. At the GMs discretion, some barbaric characters may use archaic armor and shields. For example, the Scottish Highlanders commonly use a shield called a targe (treat as a buckler from the core rules, but made of wood rather than metal), and Africans or other natives may use hide shields (treat as large wooden shields for most purposes).

ARMOR DESCRIPTIONS
BREAST AND BACK
This armor is a combination of breastplate and backplate that encases the torso in a rigid shell of steel. Most breastplates in Skull & Bones are angled to deect glancing shot. Despite its rarity in civilian markets, this type of armor is still being made for certain cavalry regiments.

BREASTPLATE
The breastplate protects only the front of the torso, and is held on by straps which cross over the back. Some cavalry regiments wear the breastplate only, boasting that good soldiers never turn their backs to the enemy.

BUCKLER
This is the only kind of shield still in use by civilized people. This is a different shield than the buckler described in the PH. It is a small round metal shield, held by a single handle in its center. Its light weight means that it does not need to be secured by a strap (although a small strap or loop may be provided for attaching it to the belt when not in use). Because it is held in your hand, you may not hold anything else in the same hand. However, it is small and handy, so that you may use it as an off-hand weapon without losing your AC bonus (it deals d3 damage and is treated as a simple small bludgeoning weapon).

BUFF COAT
The buff coat is a thick, padded leather coat that comes with a skullcap of either hard leather or light metal, and a pair of tough leather gauntlets. Buff coats are standard armor for light troops in the Skull & Bones setting.

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TABLE 6-8: ARMOR


Armor Armor Maximum Armor Bokor Spell Bonus Dex Bonus Check Penalty Failure Speed (30 ft.) Weight Cost

LIGHT ARMOR
Fencing jacket Buff coat +1 +2 +8 +7 0 0 5% 5% 30 ft. 30 ft. 2 lb. 5 lb. 6 dbl 2 dbl, 2 pieces of eight

MEDIUM ARMOR
Pitch jacket Breastplate Breast and back +3 +4 +5 +5 +5 +4 -2 -2 -3 20% 15% 20% 20 ft. 20 ft. 20 ft. 15 lb. 10 lb. 20 lb. 2 pieces of eight 1,200 doubloons 2,000 doubloons

HEAVY ARMOR
Munition armor +6 Three-quarter plate+8** Plate armor +9** +2 +1 +1 -5 -5 -6 30% 35% 35% 20 ft.* 20 ft.* 20 ft.* 30 lb. 40 lb. 50 lb. 1,500 doubloons 3,500 doubloons*** 5,000 doubloons***

SHIELDS
Buckler Cloak +1 +1 -1 0% 5% 2 lb. 1 lb. 1 piece of eight, 6 rl 6 dbl

*When in heavy armor, you may not move any faster than triple your base speed, even when running. **There is only a 10% chance that looted heavy armor will t properly; ill-tting armor suffers a -2 penalty to armor bonus. ***Starting characters cannot begin the game with these unless they have the Booty fortune and the Gentleman-Adventurer background.

- Legends of Piracy ROCHE ROCK BRASILIANO


Time of Operation: 1660s1668? Operational Area: The Caribbean Brasiliano [Sdg1/Ftr5/Sof1, hp 48] was a Dutchman who spent many years in Brazil under the auspices of the Amsterdam West India Company, until the Portuguese took their territory in 1654. Fleeing to Jamaica, he acquired a ship and soon took a massive prize in gold plate. He was a sociopath who supposedly ran through the streets of Port Royal hacking limbs off those he encountered. He loathed Spaniards and would spit them on stakes and roast them alive. Having once lost a ship to a storm, he lead a group of thirty poorly-armed pirates in an ambush on 100 Spanish cavalrymen and managed to kill them all, losing only two men in return. The Governor of Campeche captured Brasiliano, but he faked a letter to the Governor that indicated that if he werent careful with his prisoners, all Spaniards who fell into the hands of Brasilianos ctitious allies would be harshly dealt with. The governor, believing the ruse, sent Roche as a free man to Spain. Brasiliano soon returned to the Caribbean, where he redoubled his cruelties to Spaniards. He disappears from written history around 1668, his fate unknown.

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CLOAK
Besides its use as apparel, the cloak can also serve as a shield in a pinch. The wielder rolls part of the cloak around the forearm of the off-hand, leaving the bulk of the cloth trailing below. This loose section of cloth is swung to intercept an enemys strike. Preparing a cloak for use as a cloak takes a move-equivalent action. You can attempt to ready a worn cloak in one smooth motion as a free action, but must succeed at a Dexterity check (DC 15) or lose your action and provoke attacks of opportunity as you wind the cloth around your arms and head. Masters of Scrimia with the cloak deceits special move also learn to use cloaks as weaponsin this case, it is not wrapped around the arm but is held more loosely in the hand, much like a net. You may change between using the cloak as a weapon or as a shield at the start of each new round as a free action, if desired. The cloaks armor check penalty and bokor spell failure chance only apply if it is being used like a shieldif it is worn or used as a weapon, there is no armor check penalty or spell failure chance.

FENCING JACKET
A light leather jacket, intended to protect against glancing blows or for practice ghting. It is usually worn with light leather fencing gloves.

MUNITION ARMOR
Munition armor is a cheap, mass-produced version of plate armor, intended for infantry use. It consists of a breastplate and backplate, with paldrons, tassets, and gauntlets to protect the shoulders, hips, and hands, and comes with an open-face helmet. It is sometimes known as half-plate or almain rivet. It is worn by elite infantry units, and occasionally by naval marine regiments.

PITCH JACKET
This improvised armor is made by coating a thick linen or calico jacket with layers of pitch until it becomes stiff and hard. The pitch jacket is classic pirate armor, because it can be made at virtually no cost from materials available on every ship. Although it provides reasonable protection it is bulky and uncomfortable to wear.

PLATE ARMOR
Improved metalworking techniques, higher grades of steel, and a better understanding of armor manufacture give this Renaissance-period armor slightly better protection than its medieval equivalent. It is incredibly rare in the Skull & Bones setting, and most suits in circulation are family heirlooms.

THREE-QUARTER PLATE
This plate armor is designed for use on horseback. It covers almost all the body except for the lower legs, which are protected by sturdy leather boots. Like plate armor, it is supremely rare and almost unknown outside the Continent.

- Poisons -

or the most part, the poison rules in the core rules sufce for the Skull & Bones setting, and the prices given are appropriate (assume 1 silver piece = 1 reale). That said, a number of Caribbean natives as well as bokor use poison when dealing with troublesome foes. Many of the plants and creatures of the West Indies and South America are highly toxic. A pair of infamous poisons deserves special mention considering their frequency of use by unscrupulous bokor.

MOMGAZI POWDER
Momgazi powder is made up of various hallucinogenic plants and ltered snake venom. It is a vicious concoction meant to sap the will, not the body. Momgazi is seldom sold, as bokor often have to trade with unsavory Djab to learn the manner of its manufacture.

GHEDES WINE
This legendary poison has many names, but Ghedes wine is a good hint to its nature: death and trickery in one. The wine makes a human appear to die of a heart attack or respiratory ailment. The victim turns pale and acquires the symptoms of rigor mortis, when in fact they are alive in a suspended state. Their heart beats, but slowly, less than once a minute. Canny bokor use this and the shock that comes with being dug out of ones own grave to help inuence the impressionable into thinking that they are zombi. Ghedes wine is slow acting and takes several exposures for it to take effect. Initial and secondary damage from the rst and second doses is 1d2 Dexteritythe victim feels sluggish and perhaps like he is coming down with a bad cold. If it is administered to the same target for three consecutive days, and the victim fails all three of his saves, then initial and secondary damage from the third dose is 1d6 Dexterity. If this is sufcient to reduce the victims Dexterity to 0 or less, then he falls into a coma and appears to die in the night. Approximately two days later, their skin coloration returns and they regain consciousness, as well as 1 point of Dexterity. The secret of Ghedes wine is held by various malevolent entities, as well as Ghede himself, and none of them will give it up lightly.

TABLE 6-9: POISONS


Poison Type Initial Damage 1d6 Wisdom Special Secondary Damage 1d6 Wisdom Special Price 1,000 dbl 2,000 dbl Mongazi powder Ingested DC 15 Ghedes wine Ingested DC 13*

*If administered for up to three consecutive days, the DC rises by 3 each day (from 13 to 16 the second day, and from 16 to 19 the third day.)

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TABLE 6-10: GOOD AND SERVICES


TOOLS & PERSONAL EFFECTS
Item Book (fanciful tale) Buttons, gross Comb, horn Comb, ivory Iron nails, two dozen Logbook Medicinal leeches, one bottle Navigators instruments Navigators instruments, masterwork Needles, three dozen Pocketwatch Pox medicine Scissors Shipwrights tools Shoemakers knife Speaking trumpet Surgeons tools Telescope, paper and vellum Telescope, paper and vellum Thimble Thread, one pound Tobacco, eight ounces Cost 2 poe 2 dbl 1 poe 2 poe 2 rls 2 dbl 1 poe 18 dbl 45 dbl 1 poe 3 dbl 4 dbl 1 poe 8 dbl 1 poe, 4 rls 1 poe 20 dbl 45 dbl 20 dbl 2 rls 1 dbl 4 rls

VICTUALS AND QUARTERS (CONTINUED)


Item Meal, ne Meal, good Meal, poor Milk, gallon Mutton, joint Pig Turkey Cost 1 dbl 2 poe 1 rl 22 mar 1 rl, 12 mar 1 dbl, 3 poe 1 poe, 2 rls

DRINK
Item Ale, quart Claret, bottle Old rotgut, gallon Rum, gallon Wine, ne Wine, good Wine, poor Cost 7 mar 2 poe 15 mar 1 dbl 1 dbl, 1 poe 4 rls 12 mar Cost

TRADING GOODS
Item Brandy, barrel 45 poe Cattle, one head (two barrels of cargo) 32 poe Cocoa, cask 25 poe Cotton, bale (one barrel of cargo) 35 poe Flour, barrel 18 poe Fresh water, pipe 1 poe, 4 rls Fruit, barrel 30 poe Furniture, one piece 80 dbl Indigo, cask 100 dbl Italian shoes, fty pairs 100 dbl Ivory tusk 5,000 dbl Jesuits Bark (Cinchona), pound 20 dbl Molasses, barrel 24 poe Oil, pipe 12 dbl Paper, ream 29 poe Persian rug, one piece 25 dbl Pitch, barrel 20 poe Provisions, one months (ve tons of space) 500 poe Rice, barrel 16 poe Rum, barrel 30 dbl Salt beef, barrel 22 poe Salt, barrel 15 poe Sandalwood, pound 10 dbl Silk, bolt 1,000 dbl Spice, barrel 35 poe Standard ale, barrel 60 poe Sugar, bag 16 poe Sugar, barrel 30 dbl Vinegar, barrel 26 poe Wheat, bushel 3 poe Wine, barrel 60 poe Wine, pipe 100 dbl

CLOTHING
Item Belt, leather Boots, leather Cotton chemise Extravagant gentlemans hat Fancy plumed hat Gentlemans outt Gentlewomans outt Gentrys wig, fancy Gentrys wig, simple Paupers outt Poor womans outt Sailors cap Sailors outt Shoes, fancy Shoes, simple Shoes, womens pumps Silk chemise Silk frock coat, fancy Silk frock coat, simple Silk overcoat, fancy Silk overcoat, simple Tradesmans outt Tradeswomans outt Wool and linen frock coat Wool overcoat Cost 1 poe, 3 rls 2 dbl 3 rls 10 poe 1 poe 25 dbl 40 dbl 15 dbl 2 poe 3 rls 1 dbl, 6 rls 6 rls 1 dbl 3 poe, 2 rl 2 poe, 1 rl 2 poe 25 dbl 100 dbl 40 dbl 140 dbl 70 dbl 4 dbl 6 dbl 2 dbl, 2 poe 6 dbl Cost 1 poe, 4 rls 18 mar 25 mar 3 rls 3 rls 1 rl 3 dbl 1 rl 1 poe, 3 rls 3 rls 12 mar 3 rls

VICTUALS AND QUARTERS


Item Beef, pound Bread, loaf Butter, tub Cheese, wheel Chicken Eggs, one dozen Goat Lodging, common Lodging, ne Lodging, good Lodging, poor Meal, common

MISCELLANEOUS GOODS AND SERVICES


Item Dowry, common Dowry, ne Dowry, good Feminine company, common Feminine company, ne Feminine company, good Feminine company, poor Parakeets, one dozen Parrot, polite talking Parrot, talking Cost 75 dbl 4,500 dbl 1,500 dbl 20 rls/hour 1 dbl/hour 1 poe/hour 2 rls/hour 2 poe 8 dbl 5 dbl

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- Goods and Services -

lades, guns, armor and poison might be the most common tools of the corsairs trade, but life is made up of more than gunpowder and cold steel. The right tool for the right job is all importantand not every job calls for a cutlass slash and entrails steaming on the deck. The following section lists typical prices for clothing, meals, lodgings, and common everyday items that characters may wish to acquire.

TOOLS AND PERSONAL EFFECTS DESCRIPTIONS


Navigators instruments: Sextant, theodolite, paints, pencils, dividers, sundial and a loadstone. Navigators instruments, masterwork: As standard, but better quality and the addition of a compass, volvelle and wind vane. These instruments grant a +2 circumstance bonus to Knowledge (navigation) checks. Pox medicine: Possibly the most valuable thing on a ship if youre pox aficted. A victim of pirates in 1720 said, No part of the cargo was so much valued by the robbers as the doctors chest, for they were all poxed to a great degree. Shipwrights tools: Adze, caulking mallet, ramming iron, jerry iron, caulking iron, pitch ladle and short saw. Speaking trumpet: Used to call over distances, adding 30 to the range of your voice. Surgeons tools: Several saws, a scalpel, various other sharp objects and a horn spoon for digging shot out of wounds.

ONE IVORY TUSK


Yes, thats 5,000 doubloons. The only elephants capable of producing said item are wandering over the central grasslands of Africa. Indian elephants tusks are both smaller and softer than the African variety, to say nothing of the monopoly the East India Company has on trade. A hunting expedition on the Dark Continent sets you back at least 10,000 doubloons. If you survive the voyage, you have to trek several hundred miles into the heart of Africa, surrounded by natives who suspect youre there to enslave them. When you nally arrive at a village where you can hire guides to show you where the elephant roam, you nd out that elephants are sacred to most of the veldt tribes and your metal money is worthless. Hope you brought decent bartering goods. Also hope you thought to haul a cannon with you, because your muskets will merely irritate and enrage a bull elephant. If and when you bring down an elephant you get two tusks. Note that most stories from this era indicate that a typical bull elephant would kill 30 to 50 men before he went down. Now you have to get the tusks back out of Africa, watching out for, well, everybody, because everyone knows that its easier to steal from ivory hunters than take down elephants. Five thousand doubloons is probably a bargain.

CLOTHING DESCRIPTIONS
Gentlemans outt: Shirt, breeches, waistcoat, and cravat all made of the nest silk. Tradesmans outt: Shirt, breeches, waistcoat and cravat all made of linen or cotton. Gentlewomans outt: Skirt, bodice, overskirt, and stockings all made of the nest silk. Tradeswomans outt: Skirt, bodice, overskirt, and stockings made of linen or cotton. Paupers outt: Shirt and breeches made of wool or cotton. Sailors outt: Tough jacket and breeches made of treated cotton.

VICTUALS AND QUARTERS DESCRIPTIONS


Meal, ne: Fit for nobility. Multiple courses consisting of veal, suckling pig, and roast beef with fresh bread, exotic cheeses, hearty soup, and an excellent wine. For dessert: mints or sugar tarts. Meal, good: A hearty repast consisting of a single main course like a game hen, a sh, or a turtle (a pirate favorite). Fresh bread, greens, yams and respectable ale. Perhaps candied fruits. Meal, common: A decent stew with meat, potatoes, and some vegetables on the side. Day-old bread and adequate ale. Meal, poor: Thin vegetable broth and stale bread. Lodging, ne: An excellent private room in a respectable establishment. Lodging, good: A fair room with adequate bedding and clean sheets. Lodging, common: A room over a tavern. Youll be sharing with one or two other patrons, but there is bed material for all. Lodging, poor: The tavern oor. This after-hours dormitory is shared by anywhere from ve to 50 members of the cream of society. Hope youre a light sleeper.

TRADING GOODS
All goods are listed by the manner in which they are most commonly traded. Trading goods inevitably take up cargo space and there are a number of units of measurement that are common, but perhaps unfamiliar.

TRADING GOODS DESCRIPTIONS


FRUIT, BARREL
Limes, citron, yams, potatoes, etc.

PROVISIONS, ONE MONTHS


Food and water for 100 men for one month. Includes such staples as beer, salt beef, salt pork, suet, vinegar, our, oatmeal, peas, bread, butter, cheese, goats, hard tack, and portable soup. We know, whats portable soup? Its a giant solid block of marrow-derived bullion cube that you break bits off of and boil with water. No, we didnt make it up.

TABLE 6-11: CONTAINER SIZES


Container Barrel Bushel Cask Firkin Hogshead Kilderkin Pipe Capacity 32 gallons 8 gallons (dry) 16 gallons (dry or wet) 9 gallons 63 gallons 18 gallons 105 gallons

SPICES, BARREL
Nutmeg, ginger, basil, etc. Pirates are not fond of seizing spices and often pitch them overboard. There is little market for them in the Caribbean, and unless they are removed to Europe, there is no prot to be had by them.

1 ton of cargo = 6 barrels or 4 hogsheads or 2 pipes or 12 casks or 30 bushels.

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Chapter VII: Combat


To give the Skull & Bones setting the feel of swashbuckling high adventure, a number of changes have been made to the standard d20 rules for damage and character death. These changes are described in the following pages.

- Parrying he rst line of defense in Skull & Bones is the combatants ability to parry attacks; at least it is if you choose to use it. So long as your parry roll is higher than your opponents attack roll, you are able to deect his weapon with your own, getting you out of ABLE ARRYING ODIFIERS troublehopefully long enough for you to riposte. Situation Parry Modier Anyone armed with a melee weapon with which they Smallsword parrying a are procient may choose to give up one attack from Medium-size weapon their next attack action or full attack action to parry (other than another smallsword) 2 an opponents attack. This turns the opponents attack One-handed weapon into an opposed roll. The attacker must still beat the parrying a two-handed defenders AC, as well as beating the defenders parry slashing weapon 4 roll. In cases of a tie, the attacker wins. The modiers One-handed weapon parrying a at right apply to parry rolls. two-handed bludgeoning weapon 6 Note that if you have the Expertise or Power Attack feat and also wish to parry, things get a little complicated. When you parry, you are effectively borrowing a future attack. As soon as you borrow that attack to make your parry attempt you must decide whether or not you are going to use a feat on your following attack action and if you are using it, how much of a penalty you will take on your attack rolls, so that you can take the same penalty on your parry roll. The same applies any other feat you have that affects your attack roll.

7-1: P

Also note that parrying compels you to take the attack or full attack action on your next turn. You cannot parry, and then try to take a non-attack action (cast a spell, for example) on your next turn. If you are using miniatures and a tactical map, its a good idea to place a colored bead or token next to each character that parried to help you remember. Characters with only one attack should avoid parrying unless they are defending themselves against a greatly superior foe. The reason for this is straightforward: they end up doing nothing but parrying. Bokors and hougans also must be wary of the sensible desire to avoid being hit, because their ability to ever get off a spell is greatly compromised.

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Example: Dalzane is a 4th level bokor who is attacked by two rogues. Dalzane wins initiative and casts burning hands. Scorched but alive, the thieves attack him. If he parries one of their attacks, then he has used up his next attack action and on his turn in the following round he can do nothing other than take a move action. Note that Dalzene would draw attacks of opportunity if he chose to move 30 feet away from the two rogues on his turn in the following round, since he effectively spent that round parrying and moving instead of simply moving. After his turn, Dalzene will have to wait through another round of attacks, which he cannot parry if he wishes to cast another spell or make an attack in the 3rd round of the combat. . . providing he manages to live that long with two rogues anking and sneak attacking him. Dalzane is thus likely better served by using a spell every round until at least one of the rogues is down. It is up to the GM whether to allow the players to choose which attack to give up to gain a parry if they have multiples, or whether to just assume that the highest attack roll is used. It is recommended that the GM give them the free choice, but if players have difculty keeping track of which attack they have used, GMs may wish to institute a default of either the highest or the lowest attack roll for every parry attempt.

- Damage in Skull & Bones Cannon Fodder do not have hit points, instead they use their Constitution ability score. All damage a CF suffers goes directly to his Constitution. If his Con score is ever reduced to 0 or below, he is either dead or unconscious at his attackers (and the GMs) discretion. CFs can have as many effective levels as a PC or NPC, but these levels only grant improved attack bonuses, spells, saves, feats, and skill checksthey do not grant additional hit points. A 10th level CF ghter is likely to get in a couple of good swipes with his sword before a PC manages to run em through. These Cannon Fodder characters are designed to represent the faceless cutthroats of the swashbuckling genre. Skull & Bones encourages a style of play that can be described as cinematic. In the PH, hit points represent the ability to take physical punishment and keep going, and the ability to turn a serious blow into a less serious one. In Skull & Bones this remains true all the way down to 0 hp, but then things change. All damage a PC or NPC takes after running out of hit points goes directly to their Constitution. This can drop a character in his tracks, though he may valiantly struggle on. A PCs lowered Constitution will eventually recover through rest and time, though serious damage requires the attention of a surgeon. Regardless, a character that has gone below half their Constitution will suffer permanent after effects. On the bright side, hit points are regained swiftly in Skull & Bones. Every time a PC or NPC takes enough damage to result in Con damage they must make a Fortitude save to remain conscious. The DC of the check is equal to 10 + Con loss. If a character suffers Con damage that totals more than half his total original ability score, he automatically goes unconscious unless he is willing to Roll the Bones. If he wants to stave off unconsciousness, he must make a Fortitude save as above, modied by the result of the Roll the Bones check. You can learn more about Rolling the Bones later in this chapter (and even more in Chapter XI, but only if you are the GM!).

he Golden Age of Piracy is a time of adventure and exploration. It is also a time of suffering and quick death. Skull & Bones rewards the bold and acknowledges that heroes stand out from the pack of supporting characters. The Skull & Bones rules divides the masses of the world into three categories: Player Charcters (PCs), Non-Player Characters (NPCs), and Cannon Fodder (CF). Lets talk about those doomed to suffer and die rst.

NONLETHAL DAMAGE IN SKULL & BONES


As a rule, attacks that deal nonlethal damage cannot deal Con damage. Cannon Fodder are an exception to this (since they dont have hit points), but they heal nonlethal damage as normal (see Table 7-2). Thus, a good punch can knock a CF unconscious, but not automatically put him at deaths door.

VARIANT RULE: CUTTHROAT


Some GMs may want to run a more vicious version of Skull & Bones as bets some tales of the pirate genre. In such games, critical hits cause Con damage. A weapon with a critical multiplier of x2 deals its normal damage to Con on a critical. A multiplier of x3 deals twice normal damage to Con, and a multiplier of x4 deals triple its damage to Con. This variant makes the game far more deadly, but tends to hurt PCs more than NPCs and CFs in the long run.

RECOVERING HIT POINTS AND CON


Hit points recover from rest at a faster rate than that given in the PH. Determine this rate by consulting Table 7-2: Hit Point Recovery. Characters with multiple hit die types should base their recovery rate on the most numerous of their hit dice (in the case of a tie, use the more favorable hit die type). For example, a 4th level buccaneer/3rd level sea dog has 4d8 and 3d10 for hit dice. Since he has more d8s than d10s, he uses the d8 entry on Table 7-2. Nonlethal damage is recovered at the same rate. When a character has suffered both normal damage and nonlethal damage, the nonlethal damage is recovered rst. All characters recover a minimum of 1 hit points per minute, and a maximum of 20. There is no bleeding out in the Skull & Bones game. PCs automatically stabilize, without the need for any aid or checks. An unconscious character wakes up after his hit point total surpasses his (wound-modied) Constitution ability score.

TABLE 7-2: HIT POINT RECOVERY


Hit Die Type d10 or d12 d8 d6 d4 Healing per Minute (4 + Con modier) x Level (3 + Con modier) x Level (2 + Con modier) x Level (1 + Con modier) x Level

Constitution damage heals at the rate of 1 point per day of rest. If a characters Constitution ever falls below half his normal maximum, he requires the full attentions of a surgeon or healer (must have at least 5 ranks in Heal) until his Con reaches half its normal maximum. Once he is healed back to this point, he recovers Con normally at a rate of 1 point per day. Without expert care, a character wounded below half his normal maximum never recovers Con. Magical healing cures hit points, not Con damage, unless it is a 4th-level effect (a favor) or higher. Fourth-level or higher effects cures Con damage rst, and then hit points. Damage and Healing Example: Bald Jack, a 3rd level rogue with a 12 Constitution and 16 hp, is attacked by two Spanish guards after they see through his disguise. After several rounds of combat, Jack is reduced to 2 hp and has dispatched one guard. The remaining guard deals 5 points of damage with his cutlass. Jack loses his last hp and takes 3 points of Con damage, reducing his Constitution to 9. Jack must make a Fortitude Save with a DC of 13 to remain conscious. Even if he remains standing, he can take only 3 more points of Con damage before he is forced into unconsciousness or a Fortitude save accompanied by a Roll the Bones check. Lets say that Jack is nimble and runs the remaining guard through, then slips off to a dark alley to recover. Jacks Con is at 9, which gives him a 1 ability modier. His hit point recovery rate is 3 (2-1, x3), so he heals 3 hp per minute of rest. His reduced Con lowers his maximum hit point total to 13 so he is as recovered as he can be after six minutes of rest. It will take him three days to recover the damage to his Constitution.

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- Lives and Death in Skull & Bones


emember this line from the damage section: Regardless, a character that has gone below half their constitution will suffer permanent after-effects? Well, one of those permanent after-effects is death. In Skull & Bones campaigns, PCs are extremely hard to kill. As mentioned in the section on character creation, they get to die several times. Every PC and NPC has a number of lives which they expend over the course of their adventuring career, till they at last run out of tales. Each PC in Skull & Bones begins the game with 1d4 + 2 lives, with a few exceptions. The GM should roll for every character and secretly keep track of how many lives they have left. We cannot stress strongly enough how important it is that this particular piece of knowledge is kept from the players. No one should ever know their fate before it claims them. The exceptions to the rule for starting lives are characters that begin the game with the Old Salt and The Devils Own Luck fortunes. Old salts are grizzled veterans who have already died once, so their starting total is reduced by one. Characters with the luck of the devil begin the game with 1d6 +3 lives. Swashbuckling pirates get into a lot of trouble, and it is our sincerest hope that your PCs are no exception. The lives system for Skull & Bones characters represents the incredible escapes that protagonists of high adventure must make if they are to live to ght another day. Since the setting lacks the raise dead and resurrection spells, we reckoned PCs could use at least one break. When a PCs Constitution is reduced to below half its maximum total, he must Roll the Bones to remain conscious. Since this tends to occur in the midst of life and death situations, players will frequently choose to do so. They can always choose not to, in which case they will not lose a life, but they are effectively removed from the action. Example: The ery Spanish duelist who nally got to confront his fathers murderer would have collapsed from his many puncture wounds if he hadnt successfully Rolled the Bones and fought on. Characters whose Con is reduced to 0 or below must Roll the Bones and regardless of the outcome, they acquire an afiction from Table 7-3: Afictions. If they fall below half their Con and fail their Fortitude save to remain conscious they also acquire an afiction. Lifes like that sometimes. For the various scars, Charisma bonuses and penalties are cumulative only if they come from different kinds of scars. If you get three scar results from this table, one of which is an impressive scar and the other two are both disguring scars, your net Charisma penalty is 1 (+1 from the impressive scar, 2 from the rst disguring scar, and no extra game effect from the second disguring scar).

- Rolling the Bones Players must Roll the Bones if they wish their character to remain conscious when theyve lost more than half of their normal Constitution. There is no guarantee that they will succeed, and they miss the rest of the ght if they fail. Players must Roll the Bones when their characters are subject to a fatal event. Fatal events are the kinds of situations that seem to happen to swashbuckling types, such as being caught in an exploding powder room, dropped into a krakens maw,

he life of a pirate is one of chance and adventure. As bets such an existence, characters in Skull & Bones can tempt fate. Indeed, sometimes they have no choice. This mechanic is called Rolling the Bones, and it is applied in several different ways.

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TABLE 7-3: AFFLICTIONS


Result 1-3 4-6 7-8 9 10 11-13 14-16 Afiction Impressive scar Battle scar Hideous scar Disguring scar Throat wound Lose one eye Lose one hand Bonuses/Penalties +1 Charisma +1 Fame -2 Diplomacy, +2 Intimidate -2 Charisma Voice carries half normal distance -2 to initiative checks, Dex-based skill checks, and Reex saves -2 to attack rolls with two-handed weapons, and to Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Forgery, Open Lock, Sleight of Hand, and Use Rope checks -10 ft. to movement, -2 on Climb, Swim, Jump, Ride, Tumble, Balance, and Move Silently checks, and Reex saves -4 to attack rolls with two-handed weapons, and to Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Forgery, Open Lock, Sleight of Hand, and Use Rope checks -1 Strength, -1 Dexterity, and -2 Constitution -2 Strength, -2 Dexterity, and -4 Constitution

17-19 20

Lose one leg Lose one arm

21-23 24+

Weathered Worn

AFFLICTION MODIFIERS
Circumstance Each life previously lost The Devils Own Luck fortune Strange Luck fortune Modier +2 -2 Adjust the rolled result by one slot up or down

or thrown into the sea with an anchor tied to ones neck. In short, any situation in which all present think there is no way he could have survived. Losing all your Con also counts as a fatal event. Players may also Roll the Bones if their characters are in the midst of a dramatic event, such as when their life is on the line at a climatic moment. A high roll can allow a character to succeed at an impossible task, hurt a seemingly indestructible foe, or make an impossible saving throw. A low roll . . . well, best not to think about that. Rolling the Bones is easy: you simply throw 2d6 and hope Lady Luck is with you. Thats all there is to it. The GM has the chart and knows the rest. Try to avoid rolling Snake Eyes. So what happens if you fail the roll for a dramatic or fatal event? Does that mean your character dies? Possibly. Death in the Skull & Bones setting is not necessarily the end of a character. Although there are no raise dead spells, heroes dont die easilyhowever unheroic they may be. If you were watching a swashbuckling movie and the protagonist died at the hands of his enemy, youd expect that at the end of the scene, the guy you were rooting for would stagger to his feet in a daze, or be rescued by a native healer who binds his wounds; or, after being knocked overboard into a stormy sea, wash up on a desert island days later, clutching a piece of otsam. The point is that without some mechanism like this, you just cant play swashbuckling stories. Characters have to suffer terrible defeats so they can swear revenge and dedicate their lives to tracking down the foes that beat them.

DRAMATIC EVENTS
These are key turning points in adventures, such as when a PC is squaring off against the enemy he has spent the last several years tracking down, or when a PC is in the right position to minimize damage to the ship in a severe stormif he can avoid being washed overboard by the monumental waves. If the player wants to give his character an advantage during a dramatic event, he can Roll the Bones and hope that fate is on the characters side. If fate isnt shining on the character that day, well, then the dramatic event may take a turn toward the fatal.

FATAL EVENTS
Normal people cant survive fatal events. They occur most commonly when you lose all your Con, but death traps, natural disasters, and supernatural happenings are all classed as fatal events as well. Whenever a PC participates in a fatal event, willingly or not, he must Roll the Bones. If he gets a neutral or positive result (a 6 or better on the chart) he doesnt lose a life and the GM decides how the character managed to stay out of Davy Jones Locker. If he gets a negative result (2-5), he loses a life. If it is his last life, he dies permanently. Examples: The daring bosun was thrown clear of the exploding ship and washed up with the tide, waterlogged but alive. The bokor had to cut a dark deal with a Djab, but managed to survive being burned at the stake, etc. Fatal events usually remove a character from the scene. You need to use what is sometimes referred to as the Obscure Death Rule; theres no body, so the nal fate of the character remains a mystery. A player shouldnt be immediately told if his character lost his last life. If a character didnt lose his last life he will usually turn up again after the battle, in the next scene, or at some later point (in some suitably dramatic fashion, of course!).

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Chapter VIII: A Pirates Life


This chapter features a number of mechanical systems and source items to help bring the tone and avor of the Golden Age of Piracy more to the fore in Skull & Bones campaigns, as well as offering some tidbits of setting information for both GMs and players.

- Wages he table at right is a list of the typical annual incomes of various occupations in Skull & Bones. It can be used to gauge what nancial assistance a contact might be able to offer a needy character, or what payment they should expect if characters actually decide to make an honest living. (Honest is used in the loosest possible sense in this instance). All values are in doubloons.

TABLE 8-1: WAGES


Occupation Artist, famous Artist, regional Artist, well-known Clergy, Bishop Clergy, Cardinal or Archbishop Clergy, priest Crafstman, expert Crafstman, journeyman Crafstman, skilled Craftsman, apprentice Farmer, plantation owner Farmer, subsistence farmer Gentry Governor, successful colony Governor, unsuccessful colony Healer, apothecary Healer, surgeon Judge Laborer, skilled Laborer, unskilled Merchant, successful Merchant, unsuccessful Naval midshipman Naval ofcer, captain Naval ofcer, sea ofcer Naval ofcer, warrant ofcer Naval seaman Nobility, Baron or Baronet Nobility, Duke or Marquis Nobility, Earl or Viscount Ofcial, high-ranking Ofcial, low-ranking Soldier, militia Soldier, standing army Annual Salary (dbl) 500 30 100 1,000 10,000 20 400 250 80 10 500 8 3,500 6,000* 2,000* 50*** 200 100* 20 10 2,000 500 60 500** 300** 200** 30 8,000 40,000 20,000 1,200* 300* 25 40

- Vices and Pleasures


ost characters in the Skull & Bones setting like to drink, gamble, and carouse now and then, but pirates do it on a scale that is unheard of in polite society. They bring so much wealth with them that the economies of entire ports are based around keeping them entertained. Well-dressed and well-spoken pirates may even be invited to the governors ball, if they provide a good deal on those trade goods they acquired from a Spanish pinnace.

DRINKING
Drinking is best handled by the Sway rules, in its effect on general crew morale. Most pirates are such hard drinkers that they have learnt to function more or less normally despite consuming Herculean quantities of liquor. Only if they are exceptionally drunk (as characters with the Whiskey Johnny fortune often are) should the GM consider applying across-the-board penaltiesusually a 2 on all attack rolls, skill checks, and saving throws.

Pirates will drink almost anything, from cheap rum intended to make foul water safe to drink, to the nest brandies and wines. Some drinks have become forever associated with them. Note that grog, a mixture of rum, water, sugar, and lime often thought of as a pirate drink, was not invented until 1740 and so is beyond the era of Skull & Bones. Its creator, Vice-Admiral Edward Vernon, ordered its use to cut down on the drunkenness of sailors (who previously drank rum straight up).

*Governors, ofcials, and judges make more money if they take bribes. Multiply their Charisma bonus by 10% of base salary to determine how much they make in bribes. **Naval ofcers are entitled to 1% of any salvage recovered by the ship. Captains are entitled to 2%. ***Apothecaries willing to deal in poisons earn an extra 100 per year.

KILL DEVIL
This potent rum punch is a favorite of pirate crews.

RUMFUSTIAN
This vicious combination of spices, beer, gin, and sherry is guaranteed to produce a staggering hangover. A true rumfustian is rarely seen. This legendary drink is made from unspiced rum and gunpowder, and is set ablaze before drinking. You must make a Will save (DC 20) to successfully drink one. On a successful save, you suffer only 1 damage from the explosive mixture, but on a failed save you suffer 1d3 damage, lose most of your hair, and fail to drink it.

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DUTCH GIN
Some pirates have come to enjoy this sharp-tasting liquor. It is notable for the oddly shaped square bottles it comes in.

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GAMBLING
Playing out games of chance during a roleplaying session can be dull, though some players enjoy the game within a game aspect of it. You can use the Bluff, Sense Motive, Knowledge (mathematics) and Profession (gambler) skills to simulate such games more quickly. Each gambler pays a stake into the pot and makes a Knowledge (mathematics) or Profession (gambler) check, in secret, and records the result as his hand. The higher this number, the better their hand of cards. Then, the person who rst made the check may choose to stay in the game by raising the stake, or folding (dropping out of the game). Each player, going clockwise around the gambling table, may either stay in by matching (or raising) the current stake, or folding. Anyone who stays in must make a Bluff check, opposed by the Sense Motive checks of the other players (usually the GM will make all these rolls in secret). Any player whose Sense Motive beats the active players Bluff will have an idea as to how good that persons hand is, as follows: Won check: You can tell if the active players hand is good (hand of 15+) or indifferent (hand of 1 to 14). Won check by 10 or more: You can tell if the active players hand is excellent (hand of 20+), good (hand of 15 to 19), indifferent (hand of 7 to 14), or bad (hand of 1 to 6). Won check by 20 or more: You can read the active player like a book. She must reveal her precise numerical hand score to you. If the active player beats the opposing player, his hand is a mystery. At any time a player may pay the current stake to see all other players, in which case all hands are revealed and the player with the highest hand score wins the pot. Most NPCs fold if they fail a Sense Motive check and have a hand of 14 or less.

WHORING AND SEDUCTION


Any pirate in port with a purse full of silver and gold will have no trouble nding a willing lass (or lad) for a nights sport, but may nd his purse a great deal lighter in the morning. Seducing a particular person can be a lot more difcult, particularly if shes the governors daughteryoud need her weight in doubloons to impress her with your wealth. Essentially, the stages of any seduction or courtship can be played out using the Bluff, Sense Motive, and Diplomacy skills. Bluff is more common for seduction, and Diplomacy for courtship, but which skill is used in any particular case will depend on the intentions of the characters and the tactics used. Is Bald Jake attempting to seduce the governors daughter because he cant afford a whore, or because hes looking for a wife? He would probably lie about his intentions in the former case (Bluff ), but he could try Diplomacy even therecharm her despite his wayward nature, and convince her that she might like this as much as he does. The results of failed rolls will also be different in each case. A failed Bluff is far more likely to lead to you being thrown out of the ball in social disgrace, whereas a failed Diplomacy roll will get you a disdainful look or a polite refusal. A particularly successful Diplomacy roll can have unforeseen consequences, too, thoughthe governors daughter is so in love that she demands that you marry her, or stows away secretly on your ship. A particularly successful Bluff roll may be setting you up for future trouble, since the target of the Bluff is likely to bear a grudge when she realizes she was lied to.

- Fame During the course of a Skull & Bones campaign, characters acquire a trait called Fame that represents the legends which form around their exploits. The chart on page 71 shows various ways characters can acquire points in Fame. GMs may choose to not tell their players exactly what their score is, though. Why? Once per game session a player can try to add points up to their Fame rating to a die roll for an attack roll, skill check, or saving throw after the check has already been rolled. They do this by describing how they succeed despite the odds. The better and more appropriate the story, especially if it is in line with their growing legend, the more points the GM should allow them toward the roll.

any who aspire to greatness achieve nothing more than an ignominious death. The rare few who risk everything and survive nd that the stories about them take on a life of their own.

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TABLE 8-2: FAME


Circumstances Accepting a pirate name Base attack bonus of 15 or higher Choosing a pirate name Defeating a British ship of the line Defeating a ship of the line Each ability score you have at 22 or higher First time you drink a true rumfaustian in front of 25+ witnesses First time you perform an impossible stunt in front of 25+ witnesses First time you slaughter a crew that surrendered First time you spare an enemy crew First time you survive a direct hit from a cannonball First time you use magic in an obvious way in front of 25+ witnesses Living through a fatal event Regularly using an obviously magical weapon Sailing under a unique ag Slaying a beast of the deep with 20+ HD Still breathing after six deaths Still breathing after three deaths Taking a haul of 5,000 or more pieces of eight Ten or more enemy crews spared Ten or more surrendered crews slaughtered Upgrading your vessel to a ship/galleon You commit an act of colossal stupidity and survive Fame Bonus Captain 3 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 3 2 2 4 1 1 Fame Bonus Others 3 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 3 1 1 2 1 1

The Fame rating erodes with time, as the legends about a character slowly fade. Sharp shocks to ones legend also have a detrimental effect. Once a year, in the winter, all characters lose 1 Fame point. If a player attempts to draw on their characters story for any reason and they fail, 1d6 points of Fame are immediately lost. There is, of course, a downside to being famous: Notoriety. For those on the account, this will lead almost inevitably to a violent demise unless they are fast, clever, or lucky. Potential enemies add half of a characters Fame rating to any Knowledge (local) checks they may make when attempting to gure out who the character is. The effects of different levels of Fame are as follows: 5 Points: Tales of the characters exploits are circulated in taverns, though details vary wildly. No description is accurate enough to allow those who havent met the character before to recognize him on sight. 10 Points: The characters name is well known. He is cursed by merchants and praised by fellow buccaneers. If the character is loyal to a specic country, he is well regarded at that countrys ports and is dealt with fairly. Stories about the character are accurate and his image may have been circulated by vengeful foes. 15 Points: The characters name is known throughout the Caribbean and whispered with either fear or awe (or both) depending on how the character has reached this level of fame. If the character has managed to stay loyal to a country, he is regarded as a national hero. However, other countries will no longer honor his Letter of Marque if he is captured, and he will be tried as a pirate, not a soldier. Stories about the character have started to take on the tenor of legend, and he is recognized on sight wherever he goes. 20 Points: The character has made a great noise in the world. Warships are dispatched from whichever nations he has robbed from to bring him to justice. Worse, at this level of notoriety even blood enemies may put aside their differences in their quest to destroy the character. If he is loyal to one country, he is asked to give up the privateers life and take an active part in government, or simply retire as an acclaimed hero. There is nowhere the character can go where he wont be recognized on sight, and there is no one who will not, at the very least, have heard of him. People in the characters company regularly expect the impossible to happen and they are seldom disappointed.

- Sway Such a Day, rum all out Our Company somewhat sober A damnd Confusion amongst us! Rogues a-plotting great Talk of Separation. So I lookd sharp for a Prize such a Day took one, with a great deal of Liquor on board, so kept the Company hot, damnd hot, then all Things went well again. - from the journal of Edward Blackbeard Teach of Bristol, as recounted by DeFoe irate crews are in a constant state of tension between the pressure to obey their captains instructions, and their own tendency towards wild, anarchic, amorality. The rules for Sway allow the referee to determine the mood of a ships crew. A captains base Sway is calculated as follows: Fame/2 + Charisma modier. Base Sway is subject to various circumstance modiers as follows: It is quite possible for a captains Sway to be negative, if it has been many weeks since he took a prize.

TABLE 8-3: SWAY MODIFIERS


Circumstance Sway Modier Company sober 4 Each week at sea without a prize 1 High share value +1 per 1,000 dbl per share Crew is hungry 2 More than 1/3 of crew injured 2 More than 1/3 of crew diseased 2

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Pirate Captain Edward Teach has a Fame score of 15 and a +3 Charisma Bonus. His base Sway is 10 (15/2 + 3). He has been at sea four weeks without a prize (4), and his crew is sober (4), the stores of rum having run out the previous day. His current Sway is equal to his base Sway, minus 8, for a total of 2. He is having trouble keeping his ships company under control; if he does not take a prize soon, they are likely to depose him and choose another captain. Fortunately, he spies a fat merchant ship that same day, and though his crew are more unruly than ever in ravaging it, by the end of the day they are no longer sober and he has a prize, so he is back to his base Sway of 14, fully in control of his men. Each other crewmember also has a Sway score (usually 0 for ordinary crewmembers). Their base Sway is calculated in the same way as the captains. If a crewman is known for his loyalty to the captain, his fortune is tied to the captains: calculate his current Sway as the average of his base Sway and the captains current Sway score. If the crewmember is a rogue aplotting, siding with those members of the crew who are always spreading dissent against the Captain, his current Sway is the same as his Base sway. Pirate crews are ckle, and expect to see their shipmates shift loyalties, but a mate who changes allegiance more than once in a week suffers a 2 penalty on their Sway for the next week. Example: Israel Hands has a Fame of 4 and a Charisma penalty 1. His base Sway is 3. He is loyal to Captain Teach, and so his current Sway after taking their most recent prize is (3+10)/2 = 6. If he speaks out against the captain, his Sway drops to 3 again. If he changes his mind a couple of days later and is once again supportive of the captain, his Sway goes to 4, that is, 6 less the 2 penalty for ckleness. If the crew does not know a particular character, his Sway begins at ten less than his base Sway (minimum of 0). Each week he works with the rest of the crew, his Sway rises by 1, until it reaches his base Sway. The quartermaster is a special case, since his job on a pirate ship is to present the crews viewpoint and grievances to the captain. His Sway is equal to his base Sway, plus one for each point the captains own Sway is currently below the captains base Sway. This makes the quartermaster the ofcer most likely to win a leadership challenge (see page 73) with the captain at any time.

SWAY CHECKS
A crewmember must make a Sway check each time temptation is placed in his way. This is a Will save, though the crewman receives a circumstance bonus equal to the captains current Sway on the roll. Temptations are almost always animal urges, and the GM must determine the DC. Some examples follow.

TABLE 8-4: SWAY CHECKS


Situation Assigned to guard a cargo of ne brandy Find a cask of brandy while taking a prize ship More than half ships company dead Ordered to guard prisoners Outnumbered by enemy Outnumbered by enemy navy Wounded in combat Sway DC 15 20 20 15 15 25 15 Consequences of Failed Check Open it and drink it Open it and drink it Flee or surrender Torment them Flee or surrender Flee or surrender Flee or surrender

Raise these DCs by 5 if the situation arises while taking a prize, since the crews blood is up and they are even more savage than usual. DC is also raised by 5 if the temptation directly relates to something which already caused a penalty to the captains Sway; so if the crew has had no liquor for several days and you order them not to drink anything found on the prize ship, the DC is 25 not to open a cask of brandy. Crewmembers suffer a 2 circumstance penalty on Sway checks for each other crewmember they observe breaching discipline and getting away with it in the past week, and a 4 circumstance penalty for each time they have personally breached discipline and gotten away with it in the past week.

THE KNOCK-ON EFFECT


If several members of the crew are together and one of them breaches discipline in some way, the others must make knockon Sway checks, usually at the same DC. Any crew who fail the check will join in with the breach of discipline. Any who succeed will continue to obey orders but take no action against the offender, except maybe to argue with them. However, if they beat the DC by 10 or more, they will immediately attempt to punish the wrongdoer themselves. If the initial breach of discipline was blatant, so that at least half the crew saw it, knock-on checks are made at a +4 circumstance bonus (open rebellion is rarely contagious, unless left unchecked.) Unless punishment follows immediately from one quarter or another, another knock-on check must be made each round that the breach of discipline continues, with no bonus this time. This could soon lead to most or all of the crew rebelling openly, at which point the captain has lost all authority.

PUNISHMENT, DISCIPLINE, AND REWARD


The way that a captain disciplines, punishes, and rewards his crew can have a dramatic effect on his Sway over them. The GM must judge these on a case-by-case basis. Example: Captain Browne keelhauls Harold Pew for stealing more than his share of rum. His Sway is currently 12; he has taken a prize recently, and the crew is happy enough with him. He gains a +2 to his Sway for punishing Pew, because the crew feels that Pew was stealing from all of them, and that the keelhauling was justied. Some months later, with stores low after a run of bad luck, Brownes Sway has ebbed to 3, and his crew is muttering about him beneath the focsle. Lucky Ned, an expert but hard-drinking gunner, has stolen a bottle of brandy from the Captains own stash, and Browne attempts to make an example of him in front of the crew. This time, the crew feels that the Captain is in

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the wrong; they think Ned may have been right to take the Captains victuals, since the Captain should have provided more by now. The Captain pulls out his pistol and tells the sailing-master Keelhaul the whoreson, Mr. Swanwick! and the GM rules that his Sway is reduced by 4 (to a total of 1) because the crew think hes being a tyrant. Ned is an old man, probably tough enough to survive such a punishment, although its no sure thing. Any punishment of a genuine wrongdoer will increase a captains Sway, but any hint that the punishment is unjust will decrease it signicantly. Most pirates escaped the navy or merchant service because they felt that discipline was too harsh and too arbitrary, so they dont want to see the same sort of discipline on a ship that they regard as their own. Some captains, in the navy style, have a bosun to keep discipline. This is rare, given the freedomloving nature of pirates, but when it is practiced the most common effect is to distance the captain in the crews eyes from the punishments meted out by the bosun. This usually means that so long as the bosun is not obviously far too harsh or far too lax, the captain escapes both losing and gaining Sway as a result of discipline and punishment. Any ofcer, or indeed any crewman, can attempt to regain control of a crewmember who has previously failed a Sway check. In this case, he simply makes an opposed Sway check against the offenderhis Sway against theirsas a move-equivalent action. This is called a discipline challenge. If he wins, the offender recognizes that he has done wrong, and accepts that he must be punished for it. If the offender wins, he no longer recognizes the ofcers authority and is likely to attack him; unless they win by 5 or more, in which case they convince him to join their rebellion, and mutiny is one step closer. If the captain himself attempts to sway riotous crewmembers back into the ships company, he wont join the rebellion on a failed roll, but he will immediately lose 2 points from his Sway if he lost by 5 or more. Of course, a condent captain or loyal crewmember can simply attack the offender rather than making a discipline challenge. Likewise, he may use Diplomacy and Intimidate to get the offender to back down. Rewards increase a captains Sway. Holding an enormous party in which you provide good liquor, ne food, and encourage the crew to re off plenty of guns into the air to let off some steam is usually good for at least a +1 to Sway. If you get them used to it, and then cant keep throwing parties because you run out of victuals, youll nish up with an angry crew. Most pirate crews are, at least in theory, a democracy, with the captains power being absolute only during a battle. The Sway rules are intended to reect this. A captain who is too harsh and arbitrary will soon be deposed. Most captains rule by acclaim, not by force. Occasionally a captain will have the force of personality, good luck, and sheer terrifying physical power to cow an entire crew of hardened pirates, but most who try it nd themselves thrown overboard. Often a captain can better retain his Sway by putting major decisions to a vote, rather than attempting to control the crew in an authoritarian manner.

LEADERSHIP CHALLENGES
Any character on a ship may attempt a leadership challenge at any time as a full-round action. This action is obvious to all concerned, although how obvious is up to the challengerit could be anything from a whispered threat of violence to a bellowed demand that the captain step down. The captain and challenger make an opposed Sway check, with a bonus of +1 for each inuential crewman (Sway of 4 or higher) who publicly supports him. The winner is loudly acclaimed as captain by a clear majority of the crew. In the case of a tie, the crew will demand that the two of them ght it out in a duel at once. If the loser accepts the crews decision, it is up to the captain what happens nextdoes he punish the loser in some way, or accept him back, perhaps attempting to appease him with a position as an ofcer? Disgraced captains are often welcomed back into the crew, who may recognize that he makes a much better sailor than he does an ofcer. Just as often, grim torture or a quick death for the loser and any who supported him is the result of a challenge. If the former captain won, he is more likely to be merciful to a loser who made a more subtle challenge, but again it is up to him. A loser who does not accept the result always has the option of making a physical challenge, demanding a duel for the captains rank. The winner need not accept, although he suffers a 1 penalty to Sway if he does not. Example: Lucky Ned tries to reason with Browne, but suggests that had Browne taken a prize by now there would have been no need for Ned to borrow his liquor. This is a subtle leadership challenge, so he and Captain Browne make opposed Sway checks. Captain Browne rolls a 17, plus his Sway of 1, plus +1 for the support of Mr. Swanwick, the Sailing-Master, for a total of 17. Ned, not so lucky for once, gets a 12 plus his Sway of +3, for a 15. The crew is with Brownebut only just. Ned cries You wouldnt be so cocky if we each had a cutlass ready, lad, instead of you havin the drop on me with yer pistol, demanding a duel to settle the matter once and for all. There are cheers at this, and Browne takes another 1 penalty to Sway (now at 2) by refusing, Twouldnt be fair to ght an old man like you. Ned, you know the rules as well as any of us, and youre old enough to know what I have to do to them as breaks the rules. Throw down your weapons and stand fast while Mr. Swanwick ropes yer, Ned. This is a discipline

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check. Browne rolls a 6, plus his Sway of 2 for a total of 4. Ned gets a 10, plus his Sway of +3 for a total of 13. This is at least ve more than the captain, so Brownes Sway is reduced by a further 2. Ned exhorts his crewmates to rise up with him and throw off the tyranny of Captain Browne, a blatant Leadership Challenge. Swanwick calls out his agreement this time. Ned gets a 14, +3 for his Sway, +1 for support from the Sailing-Master (18 total). Browne rolls a 9, plus 4 for his pitifully low Sway for a total of just 5. He doesnt even get a chance to cock his pistol as the crew rush him, knives in their hands and murder in their eyes. He should have just shot Ned when he had the chance!

- Code Duello -

ueling is an essential part of the life of all honorable folk, and this section deals with duels and their commercial cousins, prizeghts, and the pure entertainment of stage gladiator matches. Its forms are many and varied; one of the most important reasons for the opponents seconds to meet up beforehand is to agree on precisely which rules the duel will follow, since there are variations by region, culture, and simple inclination. To add to the confusion, English fencing masters practice a tradition of prizeghting, whereby they publicly ght one another as a demonstration of prowess rather than to settle scoresyet even these supposedly non-lethal ghts can get out of hand, and nish up as duels to the death. Some fencing masters make prizeghting a way of life, earning a fair living from their art, in which case they are known as stage gladiators. Stage gladiators are not as hotheaded as other prizeghters, but there are notable exceptions, and they still use live weapons, so serious injuries or fatalities are possible.

DUELS
Most duels are far less formal affairs than is usually imagined. Although truly honorable combatants abide by the rules of dueling, most are less than completely honorable when their lives are on the lineand it is easy to simply forget a formal rule in the heat of the moment. It is not uncommon for duels to descend into bloodbaths, with the seconds and even innocent bystanders taking part in the slaughter as one or other combatant is accused of cheating. Some duels have virtually no rules anywaypirates settling their differences on some lonely beach are unlikely to pay much regard to formality and tradition. What follows is one of many sets of contemporary dueling rules, the code duello, but the GM should always bear in mind that regional and cultural variations, as well as agreement between the seconds, can mean that quite different rules are used in any particular duel. For example, the standard code duello states that though the challenger usually chooses the distance and the challenged chooses the weapon and the ground, some duelists prefer the reverse.

THE CODE DUELLO


Rule 1: The rst offense requires the rst apology, even when the second offense was more severe than the rst. For example: A tells B he is impertinent; B retorts that A lies; yet A must make the rst apology because he gave the rst offense, and then (after one shot) B may explain away the retort by a subsequent apology. Rule 2: But if the parties would rather ght on, then after two shots each (but in no case before), B may explain rst, and A apologize afterward. Note: The above rules apply to all cases of offenses in retort not of stronger class than the example. Rule 3: If a doubt exists as to who gave the rst offense, the decision rests with the seconds; if they wont decide, or cant agree, the matter must proceed to two shots, or to a hit, if the challenger requires it.

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Rule 4: When a direct lie is the rst offense, the aggressor must either beg pardon in express terms; exchange two shots previous to apology; or three shots followed up by explanation; or re on till a severe hit be received by one party or the other. Rule 5: As a blow is strictly prohibited under any circumstances among gentlemen, no verbal apology can be received for such an insult. The alternatives, therefore, are as follows: the offender handing a cane to the injured party, to be used on his own back, at the same time begging pardon; ring on until one or both are disabled; or exchanging three shots, and then asking pardon without proffer of the cane. Note: If swords are used, the parties engage until one is well blooded, disabled, or disarmed; or until, after receiving a wound, and blood being drawn, the aggressor begs pardon. Note: A disarm is considered the same as a disable. The disarmer may (strictly) break his adversarys sword; but if it is the challenger who is disarmed, it is considered ungenerous to do so. In the case that the challenged is disarmed and refuses to ask pardon or atone, he must not be killed, as in former times; but the challenger may lay his own sword on the aggressors shoulder, then break the aggressors sword and say, I spare your life! The challenged can never revive the quarrel, but the challenger may. Rule 6: If A gives B the lie, and B retorts by a blow (being the two greatest offenses), no reconciliation can take place till after two discharges each, or a severe hit; after which B may beg As pardon humbly for the blow and then A may explain simply for the lie; because a blow is never allowable, and the offense of the lie, therefore, merges in it. Challenges for undivulged causes may be reconciled on the ground, after one shot. An explanation or the slightest hit should be sufcient in such cases, because no personal offense transpired. Rule 7: But no apology can be received, in any case, after the parties have actually taken ground, without exchange of res. Rule 8: In the above case, no challenger is obliged to divulge his cause of challenge (if private) unless required by the challenged so to do before their meeting. Rule 9: All imputations of cheating at play, races, etc., to be considered equivalent to a blow; but may be reconciled after one shot, on admitting their falsehood and begging pardon publicly. Rule 10: Any insult to a lady under a gentlemans care or protection to be considered as, by one degree, a greater offense than if given to the gentleman personally, and to be regulated accordingly. Rule 11: Offenses originating or accruing from the support of ladies reputations, to be considered as less unjustiable than any others of the same class, and as admitting of slighter apologies by the aggressor: this to be determined by the circumstances of the case, but always favorable to the lady. Rule 13: No dumb shooting or ring in the air is admissible in any case. The challenger ought not to have challenged without receiving offense; and the challenged ought, if he gave offense, to have made an apology before he came on the ground; therefore, childrens play must be dishonorable on one side or the other, and is accordingly prohibited. Rule 14: Seconds to be of equal rank in society with the principals they attend, inasmuch as a second may either choose or chance to become a principal, and equality is indispensable. Rule 15: Challenges are never to be delivered at night, unless the party to be challenged intend leaving the place of offense before morning; for it is desirable to avoid all hotheaded proceedings. Rule 16: The challenged has the right to choose his own weapon, unless the challenger gives his honor he is no swordsman; after which, however, the challenger may not decline any second species of weapon proposed by the challenged. Rule 17: The challenged chooses his ground; the challenger chooses his distance; the seconds x the time and terms of ring. Rule 18: The seconds load in the presence of each other, unless they give their mutual honors they have charged smooth and single, which should be held sufcient. Rule 19: Firing may be regulated rstly by signal, secondly, by word of command; or thirdly, at pleasureas may be agreeable to the parties. In the latter case, the parties may re at their reasonable leisure, but second presents and rests are strictly prohibited. Rule 20: In all cases a misre is equivalent to a shot, and a snap or non-cock is to be considered as a misre. Rule 21: Seconds are bound to attempt a reconciliation before the meeting takes place, or after sufcient ring or hits, as specied. Rule 22: Any wound sufcient to agitate the nerves and necessarily make the hand shake, must end the business for that day. Rule 23: If the cause of the meeting be of such a nature that no apology or explanation can or will be received, the challenged takes his ground, and calls on the challenger to proceed as he chooses; in such cases, ring at pleasure is the usual practice, but may be varied by agreement. Rule 24: In slight cases, the second hands his principal but one pistol; but in gross cases, two, holding another case ready charged in reserve. Rule 25: Where seconds disagree, and resolve to exchange shots themselves, it must be at the same time and at right angles with their principals. If they resolve to ght with swords, then seconds and principals must duel side by side, with ve paces interval.

OPTIONAL RULES:
Rule 26: No party can be allowed to bend his knee or cover his side with his left hand, but may present at any level from the hip to the eye. Rule 27: No party can either advance or retreat if the ground is measured. If no ground be measured, either party may advance at his pleasure, even to the touch of muzzles, but neither can advance on his adversary after the re, unless the adversary steps forward on him. Note: The seconds on both sides stand responsible for this last rule being strictly observed, bad cases having occurred from neglecting it. Rule 28: In simple, unpremeditated encounters with the small sword or saber, the rule is rst draw, rst sheath, unless blood is drawn; then both sheath, and proceed to investigation.

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PIRATE DUELS
Pirate duels are almost always desperately informal affairs in comparison to gentlemanly duels, although of course most pirates would regard their own duels as the height of formalitythey have more rules than a simple brawl, after alland in fact the sense of fair play that a crew often have may mean that a pirate duel is more honorable than some. Of course, more cutthroat crews take an anything-goes attitude, and may even applaud a particularly clever bit of cheating! Pirate duels almost always take place ashore. The close connes of a ship are simply not the right place to ght a duel. Likewise, the commonest weapons used in a pirate duel are simply whatever melee weapons the combatants preferand if that means rapier versus boarding axe, then so be it! Pistols are not considered vicious or lethal enough for a serious grudge matchhacking at your foe with a cutlass is so much more personal, and lets you save your ammunition for boarding actions, when it will be more useful. Any attempt to equalize matters by pulling out a pocket pistol and shooting an opponent who is beating you in melee combat is viewed with disgust and extreme violence by onlookers. Its a great way to get shot in the back with a musket by one of your enemys mates, or by another pirate with a sense of fair play. An additional method of dueling is typically performed as a spectator sport, with two prisoners or disfavored pirates dueling for the amusement of the crew. This sport is usually named the Dead Mans Chest for the small sandbar it typically takes place on. A rapier is rmly swathed to each combatants right hand, their left hand is rmly tied behind their back, and a tarred hood is drawn over their head and tied in place. Then a hawking bell is tied on them, and the two are let loose to track each other by the sound of the bells. In game terms, each combatant is blind (50% miss chance) and has a -2 penalty to Listen checks due to the hood. The bells penalize move silently rolls by -10. Each combatant must make a Listen check to determine what square their opponent is in. The pirate crew typically watches and cheers from a longboat as the two duelists stumble back and forth across the sandbar, each trying to hear and kill their opponent rst.

PRIZEFIGHTS
In the Skull & Bones setting, sword duels are a popular form of entertainment for wealthy Englishmen and even a fair portion of the lower classes. These duels are fought to win a purse rather than settle a grievance. English masters of fencing can make comfortable living performing these exhibition matches, which are fought until one combatant is disarmed, or until rst blood. In some cases, judges break ties based on the form and grace displayed by the ghters. The code duello is applied strictly to prizeghts, and any breaching of it means an automatic loss for the offender. Although large sums of money are often at stake, both men ghting in these duels are professional swordsmen who approach the ght calmly and practice hard to show off their craft. In rare cases, one of the duelers may lose his temper and turn the ght into something more serious; judges often step in to stop the duel at this point, but just as often they do not. Prizeghts are conducted as normal melee combats in Skull & Bones. A purse is worth 1d4x5 doubloons. A duelist can line up between one and four duels a week, but most do not keep such a rigorous schedule. For every ten critical hits a duelist scores on opponents during prizeghts, he gains a Fame point. For every ve duels won, he also gains a Fame point.

STAGE GLADIATOR MATCHES

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These entertainments are akin to modern-day professional wrestling. They involve two or more highly trained swordsmen going through carefully practiced routines for the entertainment of an audience at a tavern, festival, or marketplace. At the start of each bout, a storyline is establisheda ction describing why the ghters are locked in combatand then the performance starts. The amount of money made by the ghters is based on their level of showmanship and the entertainment they provide. Payment is provided directly by audience members, who toss coins into the arena.

Less-skilled stage gladiators may ght with wooden weapons, although the ones who want to make decent money use real blades. In these matches, the code duello is more part of the script than something that is actually followed to the letter. Stage gladiator matches are more show than combat, and those who engage in them must have ranks in Perform or a base attack bonus of +3 or better. Unless a player specically states that he is attacking his fellow performers with the intent of doing harm (or if the GM knows an NPC has similar designs), it is assumed that none of those involved in stage gladiator matches intends harm to other performers. In these matches, a successful attack roll or Perform check means the attacker is able to swing his weapon at his foe but draw just short enough so the audience doesnt notice that he is checking his swing. If an attack roll is made, the DC is 10 + opponents Dex - attackers Perform ranks. Defenders must usually make successful Perform checks (DC 12) to make the attack look particularly believable, but if the attack roll is a critical, the attacker has put on such a good show that a Perform check from the defender is not needed. If the attacker misses an attack roll by 2 or more, damage is rolled as normal, as the attacker has accidentally wounded the defender. Injuries do happen in these matches, and they often result in even more money being tossed upon the stage. An average performance can earn participants a total of 2d20 rls, with an additional 2 rls for each real injury or Critical scored during the ght. An additional 1d20 rls are earned for every 5 Fame points possessed by one or more of those taking part in the stage gladiator bout.

- Slavery lavery is common in the New World, mainly because of the rise of the plantation system. Plantation owners need one worker for every two acres of arable land if they wish to efciently bring in their sugar and tobacco. Since plantation owners want cheap, abundant labor they swiftly turned from paid workers to slaves. While some pirates regard slaves as just one more commodity to steal, others set slaves free and even offer them a place in their crew. What PCs choose to do in a Skull & Bones campaign is up to them and the GM. Native Americans were susceptible to the ravages of tropical diseases like yellow fever and malaria, as well as the ones Europeans brought with them, like smallpox and measles, making them unsuitable for slavery. While the natives of the Caribbean were not as likely to catch a fatal disease, they were on their home ground and swift to escape. Most white men, such as criminals sentenced to indentured servitude, can easily escape and blend into the surrounding colonists, and are not considered hard workers. By the time of the Golden Age of Piracy, white indentured labor is falling out of favor except when wars or other circumstances interfere with the supply of African slaves. Africans are now the slaves of choice. They are less prone to disease, they cannot easily escape their new environs, and there is a slave trade already ourishing in Africa that dates back over a thousand years. Europeans are mainly relegated to the role of shippers in the slave trade across the Atlantic. Their early forays into Africa were disastrous, and it is far easier to deal with the existent African slave channels. The larger African countries, such as Ashanti, Dahomey, and Oyo, sell slaves they have acquired from their tributary states. Some tribes have turned mercenary and raid weaker tribes for victims. The great bulk of slaves shipped to the New World are adult men. The Africans keep their female slaves, both as breeding stock and because they are worth less on the open market. Slaves are taken to points along the African coast where established markets allow Europeans to inspect the wares and haggle. During the Golden Age of Piracy, a slave can be acquired for 7 doubloons worth of trade goods and sold in the New World for 20 doubloons. The voyage across the Atlantic is called the Middle Passage. The Middle Passage is universally considered one of the most brutal, horrifying experiences in human history. An average of 20 percent of the individuals on every voyage die in transit. This includes both slaves and crew. Crossing the Atlantic takes anywhere from 25 to 60 days, depending on wind, weather, debarkation point, and the skill of the crew. Hygiene is primitive to non-existent. Dysentery is the largest cause of death. Despite the fact that the Middle Passage pays out almost three times what comparative voyages yielded, the turnover rate for surviving crew is close to 99%. At every stage of their journey from Africa to their new masters in the Caribbean, slaves are deliberately separated from their friends, families, and other members of the same tribe. This policy is designed to ensure that the slaves cannot trust one another or work together, since many tribes do not speak the same language. Their cultural backgrounds, religions, and forms of society are also highly disparate. This is of course part of the reason that the new religion, Voodoo, was born; it is a synthesis of the beliefs of many different African regions, with a dash of Carib and Arawak ideas thrown in too. Slightly different forms of Voodoo are found throughout the New World, sometimes known as Obeah or Myalism in the English West Indies, and Candomble, Xango, or Maucmba in the Spanish and Portuguese colonies on the mainland. The various colonial powers have different attitudes towards slaves. The Spanish were the rst to bring African slaves to the New World, as far back as the 16th century, to work in the mines and on the farms of what is now South America. For some reason, the Catholic nations (France and Spain) are a little less harsh to their slaves than the Protestants (English and Dutch). Slaves in French and Spanish colonies are permitted to marry, and even to buy their own freedom if they can raise the money to do so. There are even theoretical limits to the cruelty of the punishments that can be inicted on them, but in practice many Spanish and French slave-owners are as cruel as any Protestant. The possibility of slaves buying their freedom means that Spanish and French colonies have a far higher proportion of freed slaves than the English and Dutch ones. Even in the Catholic colonies, freed slaves and their families are in an awkward social position: the white elite and middle classes reject their company, and the former slaves feel socially superior to those who are still slaves. In contrast, English and Dutch masters are notorious for their cruelty, regularly working their slaves to death within a few short years, treating them as simple commodities that can easily be replaced. Punishments for escaped slaves are harsh in the extremecutting off the ears on the rst attempt, cutting off the buttocks on the second, and death on the third. European cruelty often leads to slave revolts and escapes. Some escaped slaves are able to get off their masters island entirely, perhaps stealing a boat and nding friendly natives on another island to join, or signing articles on a pirate ship. Most join or form autonomous outlaw gangs. Sometimes these gangs band together with the surviving Natives on an island. Each colonial power has a specic name for outlaw African slaves: Maroons (English and Dutch), Marrons (French), and Cimarrones (Spanish). More organized outlaws, who build fortied towns of their own, are called Palenqueros or Apalencados, and their forts are known as Palenques. Slave hunters known as ranchers are often employed by slave owners whose property has escaped.

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Chapter IX: Spells and Magic


The city-leveling magic of legend is long gone from the Skull & Bones campaign setting. The power of magic, and even the power of the gods themselves, has been on the decline for many centuries. However, supernatural beings remain in the world, and magic can still be wielded by those willing to make deals with these entities, or by those whose faith or emotional state is so strong that they attract the attention of supernatural patrons.

VOODOO LEXICON
Many of the terms used in this chapter may be unfamiliar to you. Here is a quick guide to the essential terms of voodoo. Asson: A ceremonial rattle, usually comprised of a dried calabash (a large gourd), lled with snake vertebrae and wrapped in a net of beads. To take the asson is to formally become a hougan (priest) or mambo (priestess) of the Loa. Baka: An evil spirit animal or demon. Djab: Spirits capable of physically manifesting themselves on Earth. Djab are dangerous and only bokor deal with them with any regularity. Govi: A red clay jar that acts as the throat of the Loa, allowing them to speak to the material world without possessing a host. A govi can also be inhabited by a grosbon-ange. Gros-bon-ange: The soul of an individual. Horse: When a Loa possesses a person, forcing out their gros-bon-ange, they are said to ride their head thus making the ridden one a horse. Hounfour: The innermost room of a site where Voodoo is practiced. More commonly, it refers to the entire site, including the sanctuary, peristyle and surrounding landmarks.

In the Skull & Bones setting, magic comes mostly from spiritual activities. Hougans, bokors, and even the occasional Catholic priest wield the powers of the ancients at great personal costs and risks. The practitioners of Voodoo are denitely the most visible spellcasters in the setting, but they are by no means alone. This chapter deals with the various forms of magic that characters may encounter if their adventures draw them into the darker shadows of the Golden Age of Piracy, or if they belong to the bokor or hougan classes. It also contains information on holy relics of Christianity, and the spellcasting abilities they grant to those classes in the core rules that cast divine spells.

- Real Religions in Skull & Bones his product, as a supplement to a fantasy roleplaying game, adds magic to a historical setting. This magic was kept within what was considered appropriate for the geographical area presented, and so Voodoo and Christian miracles were used. None of the material should be taken as an indictment or belittlement of any religious faiths or beliefs. This is particularly true when it comes to the use of Voodoo. The material presented here is based on popular perceptions of the more sensational aspects of the actual religious practice known as Voudoun, which, in fact, did not become an organized religious practice until well after the historical period covered by this supplement.

- Voodoo -

oodoo is a study of the spirit, both within the esh, and without it. Like many primal faiths, Voodoo seeks to explain the origins of the soul. Though the African, Arawak and Carib foundations of Voodoo are ancient, they have only recently begun to blend, and Voodoo is not acknowledged as a formal religion in the Skull & Bones campaign setting. Many of the priests of the old African gods have been chained and sold as slaves in the New World. Their various tribal beliefs have meshed with the spiritual teachings of the native Arawaks who have all but died, leaving only their gods to mark their passage. The beliefs of the Caribs, who gave their name to the islands and archipelagos that were once theirs, also strongly inuence Voodoo, for they still live and teach their lore to those they deem worthy. Voodoo practitioners worship the Loa and revere the dead. The Loa are powerful spiritual beings, gods, and archetypes of human experiences that have enough connection to the material world to still understand and sympathize with humanity. The followers of the Loa also believe in a greater god that created the universe, who is known by many names: Olorun, Onyama, Mau-Lisa and Khardun to name a few, but they also believe that god has more important matters to attend to than providing rain for a farmers crops. The Loa are seen as divine servants of the creator god, and it is they who handle the problems of worshippers. Voodoo holds that all humans have two different energies within them that, along with the esh, sum up their being: the gros-bon-ange or soul and the ti-bon-ange or spirit. The gros-bon-ange is a perfect spiritual copy of the individual from which it comes. It is the totality of ones experiences, abilities and intelligence, but it has no concept of morality. That belongs to the ti-bon-ange, which is the seat of conscience. The ti-bon-ange is universal and cannot lie. When a person dies, it is their ti-bon-ange that watches over the body for nine days while the gros-bon-ange, if properly tended, moves on. Gros-bon-anges make up the ranks of the dead. They dwell in the spirit world, waiting the day that their descendants will have them called up to take their place in a sacred govi. If a person is greatly revered, the ceremony for this typically takes place a year and a day after their death. Many of the dead have descendants who either dont care about them, or who cannot afford the proper ceremonies. Most untended gros-bon-anges fade away, but the strongest-willed may ght their way back to the world and interact with the living, particularly their descendants. An ancestor in a govi is consulted for many things, since the dead have a great deal of wisdom. As time passes, those who knew a given ancestor pass on themselves, and the memories of life slowly fade from the dead ones being. Eventually, they either become tired and rest forever, or grow in authority and power until they shatter the frail govi that holds them and they take their place amidst the Loa. Thus, Voodoo can be viewed as a lifelong perfecting of ones gros-bon-ange for ascension to the ranks of the Loa. All servants of the Loa believe that if they live their life as best they may, serve well, and help their people, then they will one day join with the gods. It is never so simple however. Not every soul burns bright enough to become a deity. Many simply become part of the Loa that are already in existence. As an example, lets say there was once a great warrior named Iyasus, who was beloved by his people and feared by his enemies. When Iyasus fell, he was properly interred, his gros-bon-ange well tended and he was sent into the spirit world for a year and a day. When the time was right, Iyasus will take his place in a govi and advise his descendants for several generations. Eventually, Iyasus will no longer remember walking the earth as a man, though memories of the battleeld will remain with him. If he remains strong, the day will come when Iyasus will break his govi, and ritual celebrations will raise him to the ranks of the Loa. Clearly, Iyasus life marks him as one who belongs to the family of Ogun. If Iyasus was truly strong willed, and distinct from attributes that are ascribed to Ogun, then he may join the Loa as Ogun Iyasus. However, if he were a great man, but didnt bring anything original or new about battle or power with him, than what he was would simply become a part of the archetype known as Ogun.

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Voodoo practitioners have a practical relationship with their gods. They expect favors and assistance from the Loa in both the material and spiritual worlds, and in exchange they will help sustain the Loa with belief, service, and sacrice. Despite their spiritual nature, the Loa grow hungry and need sustenance. To determine what is needful, Voodoo practitioners and the Loa themselves turn to those who have chosen (or have been chosen) to act as emissaries between the two worlds: hougans and mambos. Hougans are male priests, and mambos female. Despite their gender distinctive titles, they serve the Loa in the same capacity. All Voodoo practitioners are said to serve the Loa, but hougans and mambos have taken the asson. They arrange the regular ceremonies at their peristyle in which they celebrate the Loa and make offerings to them. These offerings are frequently grain and other foods, but on special occasions chickens, goats, and bulls may be sacriced. There are dark sects that sacrice human beings, but most followers of the Loa would never consider such a vile act. On occasion, the Loa like to stretch their limbs and walk around in a physical body. One of the more infamous aspects of Voodoo is the possession that occurs when a Loa displaces the gros-bon-ange of a follower (or ceremony bystander) and rides them. The Loa often refer to their servants as horses though this isnt meant as an insult. It comes more from the common understanding that a Loa rides the head of an individual theyve possessed. A person ridden by a Loa becomes capable of remarkable, even impossible, feats. No one ridden by the Loa remembers what occurred while they were possessed. Their gros-bonange is completely displaced during the period of possession; they are effectively missing. While hougans can talk to Loa that theyve called into a govi, they frequently take the time when Loa are in the esh to discuss problems with them and barter for future favors. Note that the Loa seldom have set preferences for the horses they choose to ride, and gender is meaningless to them. Ogun may ride an old woman as readily as a powerful young warrior. If the Loa have any reason for why they choose particular horses, they dont make it known. Sometimes, a Loa will favor a specic individual. When this occurs, the Loa is the master of their head. The Loa take great interest in their favored horses, frequently coming to their assistance but also making their life difcult. The Loa are said to live in guinea when they are not roaming the world, guinea being the spiritual reection of the continent of Africa. The many families of Loa reect their origins. They are frequently named for the region from which they came, or the tribe that worshipped them originally, before they were brought to the New World. There are literally countless Loa, and their numbers change constantly. A selection of the most powerful and inuential Loa is detailed in the next section. For the purposes of the Skull & Bones setting, there are four major groupings of Loa: Old World, New World, Djab, and the exceptions. The Golden Age of Piracy is a dark and wondrous time for the Servants of the Loa. They frequently have to meet in secret, concealing their beliefs from the civilized people around them. Slaves, escaped and otherwise, the natives of the Caribbean and the rare white followers of the Mysteries are all working together to form a new religion. It is time in which many voices are crying out for vengeance and for justice, but most of all, for freedom. It is a time of great deeds and bitter sacrices. It is a time of mighty horses.

VOODOO LEXICON (CONTINUED)


Mystere: One of the many names for the Loa. Olorun: One of the many names for the being who created the universe. All the Loa are, in theory, its servants. Peristyle: A roofed, opensided court in which most ceremonies and dances celebrating the Loa take place. Poteau-mitan: The brightly colored center post of a peristyle. It is supposedly the road through which the Loa enter a hounfour. Considered sacred to Legba. Ti-bon-ange: The spirit of an individual. It is the seat of morality and consciousness, and cannot lie. Verver: A sacred design formed by carefully pouring wheat or corn meal onto the oor of a peristyle before a ceremony. The design is a symbolic representation of the Loa it is meant to invoke, and every Loa has a unique verver associated with it. Multiple ververs may be created for a single ceremony. Wanga: A magic spell. Zombi: An individual whose gros-bon-ange has been stolen or destroyed, turning him into an undead servitor.

BOKOR ARCANE WANGA


The wanga available to bokor in the Skull & Bones setting are listed on the Table 9-2 on the next page. The effects of these wanga are identical to the spells of the same name.

HOUGAN DIVINE SPELLS


The spells available to hougans in the Skull & Bones setting are listed on Table 9-3 on page 80. The effects of these spells are identical to those listed in the core rules. Whenever a divine spell calls for a holy symbol, a hougan uses his asson. When a material component is required, substitute the following components instead, based on the spells school.

TABLE 9-1: HOUGAN MATERIAL COMPONENTS


Spell School Abjuration Conjuration Divination Enchantment Evocation Illusion Necromancy Transmutation Appropriate Material Components Mineral salts, quicksilver, whale oil, sandalwood ash Tobacco, gold dust, rum Eggs from a speckled hen, lodestones Bat nut, buckeye nuts, cinnamon, sage, mint Angelica root, ve nger grass, whale penis bone Powdered glass, fools gold, parrot feathers Blood from a black-furred animal, graveyard dust Rattlesnake skin and rattles, insect cocoons

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TABLE 9-2: BOKOR ARCANE WANGA


0-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA
arcane mark bokor (mage) hand dancing lights daze detect poison disrupt undead are ghost sound light mending open/close prestidigitation ray of frost resistance ghoul touch glitterdust hypnotic pattern knock levitate locate object magic mouth minor image mirror image misdirection obscure object owls cunning pyrotechnics resist energy scare shatter spectral hand summon swarm touch of idiocy web whispering wind re shield re trap ame arrow y hallucinatory terrain haste illusory wall lesser geas locate creature minor creation minor globe of invulnerability phantasmal killer protection from arrows rainbow pattern remove curse shout solid fog stoneskin wall of re greater dispelling guards and wards ice storm legend lore mass suggestion mislead move earth overland ight owls wisdom, mass permanent image repulsion symbol of fear symbol of persuasion Tazs transformation true seeing veil

1ST-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA


alarm animate rope cause fear charm person chill touch detect undead disguise self endure elements erase expeditious retreat feather fall hold portal hypnotism identify jump mage armor magic weapon message mount obscuring mist protection from good/evil/ chaos/law ray of enfeeblement shield shocking grasp silent image sleep spider climb true strike unseen servant ventriloquism

7TH-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA


banishment baleful polymorph control undead delayed blast reball disintegrate Draxs instant summons nger of death forcecage hold person, mass insanity invisibility, mass limited wish mords sword phase door power word, stun prismatic spray sequester shadow walk simulacrum spell turning symbol of stunning symbol of weakness teleport, greater teleport object vision waves of exhaustion

blink cone of cold clairaudience/clairvoyance dismissal color spray dominate person detect thoughts dream dispel magic fabricate displacement false vision gaseous form feeblemind gentle repose reball greater magic weapon lightning bolt gust of wind magic jar halt undead major creation hold person mind fog illusory script mirage arcana invisibility nightmare keen edge passwall magic circle against good/ persistent image prying eyes evil/law/chaos magic missile seeming major image sending nondetection stone shape phantom steed symbol of pain protection from energy symbol of sleep ray of exhaustion telekinesis sleet storm teleport slow transmute mud to rock stinking cloud transmute rock to mud wall of force 2ND-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA suggestion Tazs hideous laughter wall of iron alter self tongues wall of stone arcane lock vampiric touch waves of fatigue bears endurance water breathing 6TH-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA blindness / deafness wind wall blur acid fog 4TH-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA analyze dweomer bulls strength burning hands antimagic eld arcane eye cats grace bestow curse bears endurance, mass command undead confusion bulls strength, mass darkness contagion cats grace, mass darkvision chain lightning crushing despair daylight circle of death dimension door eagles splendor dimensional anchor control water false life emotion control weather foxs cunning enervation eagles splendor, mass aming sphere eyebite Evans black tentacles fog cloud explosive runes foxs cunning, mass

5TH-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA 3RD-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA cloudkill

8TH-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA


antipathy charm monster, mass clone demand discern location horrid wilting incendiary cloud iron body maze moment of prescience Ozs irresistible dance polar ray polymorph any object power word, blind prismatic wall protection from spells prying eyes, greater screen sunburst symbol of death symbol of insanity sympathy

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fear

geas / quest

0-LEVEL
create water cure minor wounds detect poison guidance inict minor wounds light mending purify food and drink resistance virtue

TABLE 9-3: HOUGAN DIVINE SPELLS


detect snares and pits divine favor doom endure elements entropic shield inict light wounds magic weapon obscuring mist pass without trace protection from evil remove fear sanctuary shield of faith consecrate cure moderate wounds darkness delay poison eagles splendor endurance enthrall gentle repose hold person inict moderate wounds lesser restoration make whole owls wisdom resist energy shatter shield other silence sound burst spiritual weapon warp wood zone of truth

3RD-LEVEL
bestow curse create food and water cure serious wounds daylight deeper darkness dispel magic inict serious wounds locate object magic circle against evil magic vestment negative energy protection prayer remove curse remove disease searing light speak with corpse {dead} stone shape water walk wind wall

1ST-LEVEL
bane baton legba {shillelagh} bless bless water cause fear command cure light wounds detect animals or plants

2ND-LEVEL
aid augury barkskin bears endurance bulls strength calm emotions

- The Loa -

oa descriptions are given in the following format. Titles: Common honorics that are applied to the Loa. Description and Aspects: An outline of the Loas personality, history, and nature. Many Loa have alternate aspects that may or may not be entirely different beings.

Favors: See the hougan class description and the Voodoo Rituals section for details. Behavior while riding: An individual ridden by the Loa is always referred to as the Loa, and Voodoo practitioners refer to anything a particular individual does while ridden without acknowledging the person being ridden at the time. Example: Ogun rides a young girl named Margritte, who makes an impassioned speech and then kills a man while being ridden. No one will ever say, Margritte killed that man. They would refer to the incident as Ogun killed a man after he gave a speech. Most civilized authorities would obviously view the above example in a different way. Note that the Loa are aware of the trouble they can get a horse into and usually temper their activities while in the esh. Usually. Favored sacrices: These are gifts calculated to get a specic favor or an immediate response from a given Loa. See the Voodoo Rituals section for more details.

THE OLD WORLD LOA


Consisting mainly of the spirits of ancient Africa, whove changed a great deal in the last few decades, the Old World Loa are dignied and somber. Many of the African tribes have been so decimated by the slave trade that they no longer remember the proper forms of worship for what were once their cherished tribal deities. Those who survive the dark journey across the Atlantic have gathered together with the faithful remains of other tribes in an ongoing attempt to remember their old ways. The tribes whose beliefs have remained most intact are the Dahomey, Nago, Dantor, Ibo, and Congo. Their rites are mainly referred to as Rada, which is a reference to the Dahomey coast of Africa. Where their worshipers go, so too go the Loa. Their servants now reside in the Caribbean, far from the sacred waters beneath guinea, and their needs are greater than ever before. The Old World Loa are determined to not fail their charges, no matter how strange their environs may be or how distorted their ceremonies have become.

AGWE

Titles: Lord of the Sea, Master of the Tides Description and Aspects: Patron of all seafarers, Agws verver is carved into many a hull that plies the Caribbean. His mighty ship, the Immamou, sails on the great winds that his conch shell horn summons. Agw is not capricious, as many beings associated with the sea are. Strong and eternal as the tides, he is the steady friend that can be relied upon when great storms threaten. Agw neither judges his followers nor demands much of them. He is married to La Sirne, the watery aspect of Erzulie, and is widely regarded as the model of what a good husband should be, especially considering he continually forgives her eternal affair with Ogun. Favors: Air and Water. Agw can change the tides at will. Massive storms and limitless calms upon the sea are easily within his power. Behavior while riding: Agw speaks with an echoing voice, his words seemingly conjured up from the deepest trenches. He immediately douses himself in water and seeks a shady space to sit in. He loves singing and will go out of his way to talk with skilled musicians. Cloths of blue and white please him, especially if theyre adorned with seashells. Favored sacrices: A massive feast of exotic foods prepared by the petitioner and submerged beneath the waves in a ceremonial barque. An oar covered with intricate engravings by the petitioner and tossed into the sea at sunset.

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DAMBALLAH AND AYIDA WEDO


Titles: The World Serpent and the Rainbow Description and Aspects: Damballah Wdo, the Great Sky Serpent, is as ancient as the vault of the heavens. He is the primordial father, benevolent and wise, innocent as no other can be, for he is so removed from the worlds daily concerns that he cannot comprehend the troubles of his human followers. He is the greatest good, without evil or malice. His wife, Ayida, is the rainbow born the rst time Damballah shed rain onto the world. She is patron of the waters from the sky, a dancer formed of light who brings joy and wonder into dark hearts. Their eternal coupling represents sexual and cosmic totality, represented best by the world serpent egg with is their symbol. They, along with Badessy the Wind, and the brothers Sobo and Agarou Tonerre, are all that remains of an ancient pantheon, from a time when the world was a simpler, more elemental, place. To invoke any of them is to reach into the distant past and touch the original myths of humanity. Favors: Damballah grants no favors, instead he grants his blessings on worthy petitioners. While they take up a standard favor slot, the GM determines when they occur, if ever, for Damballah can never be called upon lightly. They will usually come from the Good, Healing, or Protection domains. Ayida grants favors from the Air and Water domains, as well as favors that invoke light or bright colors. Behavior while riding: Damballah is a snake. He will immediately immerse himself in a basin provided for that purpose and then will either writhe upon the ground, or climb the nearest high tree, which he will do without using hands. His speech is an inarticulate hissing, and exact meanings are impossible to determine. He must always be clothed in white and covered with a sheet if he wishes to eat. Invariably, he will only accept eggs. Ayidas speech is accented with hisses, but easy to understand, she loves bright colors and fast dancing. The pair will almost always arrive together. Favored sacrices: A rare egg painted all the colors of the rainbow, then served raw amidst a light rain. A crystal carved by the petitioner into a snake-like shape then tossed into the sea.

ERZULIE
Titles: The Tragic Mistress, the Queen of Beauty, Lady of Luxury Description and Aspects: Erzulie is the Loa of love and beauty, specically perfect love and unattainable beauty. She is an innocent living in a perfect world that her servants create for her, but inevitably, she realizes that the perfection she seeks doesnt exist and bursts into tears. Erzulie is a representation of the unattainable. Knowing that they are unlikely to have wealth and luxury in life, her followers raise their dreams of something better to Erzulie as she dwells in guinea. Erzulie has been romantically associated with many of the Loa at one time or another. Her watery aspect, La Sirne, is married to Agw, who dotes upon her. Favors: Erzulie favors are usually illusions and charms. She can bring about love and acceptance in anyone, though she will never do so if she thinks it will cause harm to anyone. Behavior while riding: Erzulies followers always try to maintain a luxurious room, with attached bathroom, for her. She will immediately walk into her room, making herself over till she is satised, before she immerges. Erzulie seeks to be surrounded by mirrors and nery. She favors handsome men and skilled dancers. She cannot stand rudeness or impropriety, though her forward behavior towards her beloved followers, including stroking them suggestively and lavishing kisses upon them, can unsettle some. She loves desserts and sweet drinks, though she hates hard liquor and drunkenness. After she has enjoyed herself for a time, Erzulie will inevitably burst into tears, proclaiming that she isnt loved enough. No amount of protestations to the contrary will convince her otherwise. Eventually she will forgive, sigh, and depart. Favored sacrices: A rare and expensive perfume from across the sea, scattered about a site of great natural beauty. A mirror created by the petitioner, with a beautiful and unique shape.

LEGBA
Titles: Lord of the Crossroads, the Wandering Sun Description and Aspects: The signicance of the crossroads is universal in Voodoo. Legba, as Lord of the Crossroads, is the being through which all prayers to the Loa pass. He is the guard of the border between spirit and esh. The center poles at every peristyle are dedicated to Papa Legba, and while he can open the doors to the Loa, he can also close them. He is also the sun deity of the Old World Loa. The daily course of the sun from East to West is reected in Legbas frame, which is old and crippled from symbolically walking over the world for so long. He is spoken of in many tales, most of which hold useful truths about the world, usually buried amidst fanciful myths. He walks with a cane as gnarled and twisted as himself.

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Favors: Legba grants favors from the Knowledge, Sun, and Travel domains, as well as spells and prayers that exorcise evil spirits or protect the faithful from their power. Legba knows many roads that mortals have long forgotten, and a clever petitioner may win useful knowledge about lost routes and hidden places from him. Behavior while riding: Legba speaks like the old man he is, occasionally halting or forgetting what he was saying. His back is always bent, and the rst object hell reach for is a cane. He likes to sit in the sunlight and drink warm rum while chatting. Hell happily accept good tobacco. Favored sacrices: Bury the bones of either a hero or a villain the petitioner knew and fought with, at the crossroads. Three silver coins, each acquired in a different way and presented at the crossroads with a different story.

OGUN
Titles: The Master of Iron, Lord of Fire, The Wounded Hero Description and Aspects: Ogun is the great articer, forger of mighty weapons. Ogun is the slaughterer, the embodiment of the raw joy of battle. His legend started in ancient times on the plains of Africa, where even as a mortal man he was believed to be a God. His works and deeds associated him with strength and re. When he joined the ranks of the Loa, he inevitably became the patron of warriors and blacksmiths. Ogun is involved in a love triangle with Agw and Erzulie, made all the more bitter since Agw is a being of watery aspect. Ogun is invoked to protect those setting out on long journeys. He detests liars and thieves, and is not overly fond of pirates. Still, Ogun is just and he judges individuals on their merits and circumstances. Ogun has always been associated with power, no matter from what it stems, and as the years roll on political aspects of Ogun have begun to make themselves known. In the early 1700s Ogun is still a warriors Loa. There are a number of different Loa that are associated with Ogun or aspects of him. Ogun-Shang, for example, is the patron of thunder and a dangerous being to deal with. Favors: Ogun grants favors from the Earth, Fire, Strength, and War domains, and gives excellent tactical advice. He knows where the last remaining magical weapons are, and the secret properties of metals. Ogun-Shang can call thunder and lightning from clear blue skies. Behavior while riding: Ogun always stands straight, but he has a wound in his side and it occasionally pains him. He always takes note of his surroundings before speaking; making certain that he wont be ambushed or surprised. His voice is strong and demanding, but his laughter is long and loud. He will immediately arm himself, preferably with a sword, though he is beginning to like guns. It is impossible to lie directly to Ogun. He delights in beautiful women and will goodnaturedly irt with them. He loves rum and favors the color red. Favored sacrices: A masterwork iron weapon that was forged by the petitioner. The charred bones of an enemy slain by the petitioners own hands.

THE NEW WORLD LOA


The New World Loa were born from the pain of the lash, the rage of the enslaved, and the courage of men and women who sought freedom at any cost. Born too, from the manipulations of one legendary man, whom tales say lives even now somewhere in the Caribbean: Dom Petro, the Indian hougan. Many of the practitioners of Voodoo believe that Dom Petro formed the Loa of the New World from the gros-bon-anges of the countless dead whove died under the yoke of slavery. As a gardener seeks a single perfect rose amidst his owers, so Dom Petro supposedly culled the ranks of the dead. He searched for the most powerful souls, ones that he could tend and shape until they were ready to take up the tasks he set them. Others whisper that this is blasphemy no man would dare to give birth to gods. However they came to be, the New World Loa are called the Petro nation and they are dangerous beings to deal with.

ASHADEH BOCO
Titles: The Hidden Fire Description and Aspects: During the Golden Age of Piracy, there are many res in the West Indies. Fires of rebellion, res of passion, res lighting secret peristyles late at night, and res in the hearts of those who would be free. Ashadeh Bc fans the heat of these myriad ames. She is the burning need that drives the artist to create, and the slave to escape. She is the Loa of ery inspiration, the mystery who whispers of what may be to those who are shackled and despairing. She is greatly loved by her petitioners, but always treated with caution, for the same re that comforts on a cold night can scorch the careless.

, ,

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Favors: Ashadeh Bc grants favors from the Fire and Knowledge domains. She gladly grants favors that inuence or inspire great passions. Behavior while riding: Ashadeh Bc loves writers, artists, and leaders. She loves to dance about large res and favors loose clothing that twirls close, often dangerously close, to the ames. Recently, shes been introduced to intlocks and cannons, which she adores. Favored sacrices: A work of art by the petitioner that inspires others to action. A great conagration, as big as a galleon or better, that will serve no purpose other than to create heat.

BARON SAMEDHI
Titles: The Zombi Lord Description and Aspects: If darkness has a name, it is Samedhi. While most of the Petro Loa are dangerous, Samedhi is downright evil, delighting in terror and misery. He directs most of his wrath against the enemies of his people, but he has no problem scaring the occasional petitioner to death. The faithful simply note that it is dangerous to waste the Barons time. He is connected to Ghede in many ways, though no one truly knows the nature of their relationship. Samedhi created the rst zombi by destroying the gros-bon-ange of a man he was asked to kill, and ever since he has been associated with them. He is one of the three bokor patrons, and those who actively follow him are vile beyond redemption. Favors: Baron Samhedi grants favors from the Evil and Necromancy domains, but is notoriously stingy with his favors. It takes a truly foul act to gain a high-level favor out of him. Behavior while riding: Baron Samedhi is intensely but disturbingly charismatic. His eyes are deep, lightless wells that give off no reections. He has a macabre sense of humor and is nearly impossible to offend. He believes that subtlety is a greater virtue than power, and delights in sharp verbal entendres. He also deeply respects passion, even if it is turned against him. Samedhi favors meats that have been charred to cinders and he always wears black. Sometimes he paints his face white and he frequently wears a pale top hat, though whether he does so to honor or mock Ghede is unknown. Favored sacrices: A smoldering re made from rare woods and kept burning for weeks at a time. Death and lots of it.

CARREFOUR
Titles: Lord of the Midnight Crossroads Description and Aspects: Keeper of the gates through which the foulest denizens of the spirit world pass, Matre Carrefour is the Petro counterpart of Legba. Carrefours lot is to stand watch over spirits who deal in bad luck, terrible violence, and senseless destruction. He is one of the three patrons of the bokor and it is he who allows them to trafc with demons. Yet, it is also Carrefour who protects the faithful from the very beings that he lets into the world. Carrefours existence is a constant reminder to his followers that they must live each day as it comes, for the future is never certain. He is not evil, but he is cynical and bitter. Some hougans believe that Carrefour was once the Rada deity Kalfu, and that Dom Pedro offered him great power at the price of twisting his nature forever. Considering Matre Carrefours personality, it seems possible. Favors: Carrefour grants favors from the Destruction, Good, Protection, and Summoning domains. He knows the name and nature of many Djab and will broker deals with them if properly asked. Carrefour is willing to make deals at the crossroads with just about anybody. Behavior while riding: Carrefour always stands tall with his arms outstretched as if to form a cross. His whole frame shivers with barely suppressed power. It is impossible to smile in his presence, and those who try to whisper end up shouting instead. He loves the color black, and rum mixed with goats blood. He has no discernable sense of humor. Favored sacrices: Inict a particularly gruesome death that leads to a greater good. Trace Carrefours verver out at a crossroads in the blood of at least two different outsiders that the petitioner killed.

CONGO ZANDOR
Titles: Lord of the Scarlet Fields Description and Aspects: Pain is a constant companion to many of the followers of the Loa, and whether it comes from the kiss of a whip or sharp pangs of hunger, it reminds them that they are alive. Congo Zandor is the lord of pain and sacrice. Because of the hard work involved in tilling the elds of the Caribbean, he is also a patron of agriculture. Those who regularly give thanks to Congo Zandor believe that life is suffering, but also demand that their suffering lead to something more. To those who toil and ask for nothing, he gives the strength to endure. Favors: Congo Zandor grants favors from the Earth, Plant, and Strength domains. Favors that help crops as well as those that cause pain are within his power. Behavior while riding: Congo Zandor favors a

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pipe lled with strong tobacco and a peristyle with lots of dancing room, so he can leap about kicking up dust. Most prefer to let him dance as his conversations always dwell on gruesome subjects and he is inclined to masochism. Hougans always watch him carefully, lest he hurt his horse. He can be surprisingly sympathetic at times, especially with petitioners who have suffered great losses. Favored sacrices: Scatter the blood of an enemy the petitioner has crushed to death over an empty eld. Make a sacrice that greatly wounds the petitioner, either physically or emotionally.

DAN PETRO
Titles: None: he is himself, the world be damned. Description and Aspects: So favored by his father (Dom Petro) that he bears the family name, Dan Petro is the Loa of freedom. This freedom can take many forms: freedom from slavery, freedom from the shackles of the world, and freedom from the self. Dan neither judges nor preaches, he simply accepts what is, while forever striving for what could be. If a deity can be described as a dreamer, then Dan Petro surely is one. He encourages his followers to travel the world seeking their own answers instead of looking to the Loa for them. Favors: Dan Petro grants favors from the Luck and Travel domains. It is nearly impossible to imprison or enslave those who call on Dan Petro. Behavior while riding: Dan is so unassuming that he seldom announces his arrival till the party is in full swing. He is usually genial and delights in getting drunk on good rum while talking with widely traveled individuals. He is always full of questions, eager to know what people think and what theyve seen. He often wears a red kerchief around his neck. Favored sacrices: Destroy a pair of shackles that held a slave the petitioner helped free. Tell a poem or story that Dan has never heard before (at the GMs discretion) at the crossroads.

THE DJAB
While the spirits known as the Djab do have Loa in their ranks, there are also a number of them that would be better dened as outsiders and elementals. The Djab that arent Loa are clearly identiable in that, unlike Loa, they can frequently manifest themselves in the physical world without a horse. Those Djab that come from proper Loa stock (those that were once gros-bon-anges), need to speak through a horse or govi to deal with the world, and they may still grant favors though most hougans refuse to deal with them. Bokors tend to deal with Djab on a quid-pro-quo basis: a service for a service. Longer deals are occasionally entered into, but they typically have a high price (see the Voodoo Rituals section for details). The following are just two examples of the nearly countless Djab that bokors may encounter. Many moreand highly dangerous Djabare featured in the Friends and Foes chapter in the GMs section. Bokors usually meet more Djab as they gain experience, so players shouldnt ruin a GMs campaign by taking a look at his secrets.

ADJINAKOU
Titles: The Elephant Mystery Description and Aspects: Adjinakou comes from Africa, where he was a powerful patron elephant spirit to many tribes. Though there are no elephants in the New World, he still chose to come to help his faithful followers. A lonely and noble being, he is called upon for his vast strength and his prodigious memory. Favors: Adjunakou grants favors from the Destruction, Knowledge, and Strength domains. He remembers many ancient truths and lost pieces of knowledge. His most powerful favors can lay waste to an area, as though an entire herd of elephants stampeded through it. Behavior while riding: Adjinakou is slow of speech and movement. He is often sad and likes to watch children play. He favors strongly spiced vegetables and gray clothing. Favored sacrices: Bury an ivory tusk with appropriate ritual. Carve a life-sized statue of an elephant.

CINQ JOUR MALHEUREUX


Titles: The Lord of Lost Days Description and Aspects: This strange, sad being once held a position in an ancient Mayan pantheon not unlike Legbas. He was patron of the missing days on the Mayan calendar, charged with ensuring that each new season came at the appropriate time. Now, his people are dead and he is all but forgotten, kept alive by a few myths and the regard of knowledgeable bokors. Favors: Cinq Jour Malheureux grants favors from the Time domain. His favors can allow one to see up to ve days into the past. His most powerful favors can alter events up to ve minutes into the past. Behavior while riding: Cinq Jour Malheureux can only speak through a govi. His voice is old and sad, frequently speaking of all that he has lost. Favored sacrices: Bring a piece of ancient Mayan knowledge to widespread attention. Prevent a Mayan site from being desecrated.

THE EXCEPTIONS
Eventually, the separate branches of Voodoo, often called the left and right hands, will come together and a single hougan will be able to pay homage to Legba one night and Dan Petro the next. As discussed in the section on hougans, there is still a distinct separation between the Old World and New World Loa. However, there are some Loa who make themselves available to both hands and others who just dont care for mortal distinctions. Both Old World and New World hougans and mambos can call all of the Loa in this section.

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GHEDE
Titles: The Laughter of the Grave, The Lord of the Dead Description and Aspects: Perhaps the most famous of all the Loa, Ghede is the Loa of death and sexuality, obscene and serene at the same time. He is the trickster without equal, laughing at any and all regardless of how important they think they are. The only thing that makes Ghede serious for any length of time is a threat to children, and then he is terrible to behold. If he is properly convinced, Ghede can refuse to dig a grave and thus, prevent death. Because he embraces life in the midst of death, Ghede is called upon when powerful healing is required. Despite many personal faults, Ghede has the wisdom of all those who have ever died, and his council is sound. He has many aspects, and the family of Ghede is large, including Baron Samedhi as well as a number of others. One of his easier aspects to deal with is Brav Ghede, a more overthe-top heroic version of the Loa, given to great exploits and less vulgarity, but little to no wisdom. Favors: Ghede grants favors from the Death, Healing, Knowledge, and Trickery domains. Not even Ghede can resurrect the dead, but he knows a way or two around death. Behavior while riding: Ghede is vulgar and coarse, frequently telling dirty jokes at his servants expense. If he decides someone makes a good target, hell pick on him endlessly until they pay him to go away. He frequently shows up at ceremonies for the other Loa, sometimes to disrupt them, sometimes just to watch. He is forever ravenous, as Death is always hungry. When he dances, he grinds his hips and pelvis, occasionally pausing to hump the ceremonial drums. Ghede wears dark coats, white gloves, and black top hats. He always carries a cane, and frequently smokes a cigar or pipe. He speaks in a high-pitched nasal voice and is forever laughing at his own jokes. Ghede expects to be stuffed with food. He favors hot peppers that have been soaked in rum, as well as the rum they were soaked in. Favored sacrices: Save the lives of many children. Play an epic and original trick on those who oppose the practitioners of Voodoo.

LOCO AND AYIZAN


Titles: The Great Patrons Description and Aspects: Loco and Ayizan are the companions of Papa Legba. They assist him in his duties, for he grows old and sometimes forgetful. While they are mostly associated with the Old World Loa, they are acknowledged in the new as well, for Loco is the rst hougan and Ayizan is the rst mambo. Loco is a great healer and a master of the asson. He controls the poteau-mitan, which is the center-post of a peristyle and is the spot by which Loa enter. Thus, he regulates which Loa can come and go. Ayizan is the protector of sacred places and the guardian of the rites. She insures that all goes smoothly and bestows harmony on all around her. She empowers women and ensures that mambos are given their due respect. Favors: The Great Patrons grant favors from the Good, Healing, and Knowledge domains. Loco and Ayizan are often called upon for their advice on how to get a powerful favor out of another Loa. Behavior while riding: Loco and Ayizan always arrive together. Hougans must be at their best when Loco is around, for he is an exacting taskmaster and will punish laziness or improper etiquette. He likes butteries and sweet wine. Ayizan is far more relaxed than her husband. She is swift to laugh and will take a shot or two of rum if offered. She gives advice to pregnant women and talks with mambos about their concerns. Favored sacrices: Widely distribute a new technique for healing. Discover a useful medicinal herb and share it with other hougans and mambos.

THE MARASSA
Titles: The Divine Twins Description and Aspects: The Marassa are the rst born of Olorun and thus, the rst dead. They are acknowledged at every Voodoo ceremony, regardless of whether the hougan serves the Old or New World Loa. They represent the split between the physical and the spiritual, and the bridge between humanity and the divine. The Twins are innocent and new, regardless of how ancient they truly are. As the eldest dead, the Marassa are considered even stronger than the other Loa, though their power is tempered by their nature. The offerings at Ghedes death rituals are made to the twins before any others, even before Legba. Favors: The Twins do not grant favors, per se. However, kind hougans who acknowledge them regularly and are good to children may nd that the Marassa will help them on occasion without being asked. This help only occurs when the hougan is in a situation that can be perceived as a game, such as escaping a lynch mob by playing hide-and-go-seek. Behavior while riding: Those few who are ridden by the Marassa speak in singsong voices and play childrens games. They occasionally make prophetic or insightful phrases couched as poetry. Favored sacrices: Candy, candy, and more candy! Save many children from death or slavery.

SIMBI
Titles: The Great Serpent, He-Who-Straddles-the-Waters Description and Aspects: Simbi the magician stands at the exact center point of the crossroads, balanced between light and darkness, between the sea and the sky, and between heaven and earth. He is the quicksilver messenger who makes the impossible real. Simbi is one of three bokor patrons. His dominions overlap many others, but always with subtle differences. Like Ayida he is a patron of rain, but his rains are always a precursor to the storm. Like Agw he is associated with the sea, but unlike Immamous captain, he swims under the waves, exploring the mysteries of their depths. Standing as he does at the center of all things, he perceives many truths clearly, but this has made him wary and reticent of speech for he has found many times that those who seek knowledge, misuse it.

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Favors: Simbi grants favors from the Knowledge, Magic, and Water domains. Simbis favors are always wrapped in riddles and wordplay.

Behavior while riding: Simbi is shy and chooses his words carefully. He looks for a cool spot out of the sun and favors cold water. He likes games that require strategy and will happily play for hours if introduced to one. He frequently answers questions with questions, and occasionally utters phrases that seem like non-sequitors at the time, but often become relevant days, or even weeks, later. Favored sacrices: An ancient turtle shell, carved with a powerful mystic secret the petitioner has learned, then ung into the sea. Create a riddle that holds great insight when solved.

- Possession nquestionably the most famous aspect of Voodoo, possession is what occurs when a Loa displaces the gros-bon-ange of a human being. This can be a frightful experience, even for the faithful, but it is an honor. The following chart shows the Will save DC to avoid possession, both at a ceremony and at all other times. Faithful practitioners can forego their saving throw if they wish. If it is dramatically appropriate, GMs are encouraged to have their PCs roll, but then apply a sufcient circumstance modier to the die roll that allows the Loa possess the character regardless of the outcome on the die. The Loa are gods, after all.

TABLE 9-4: POSSESSION


AT A CEREMONY
Status Favored Horse fortune Hougan Hougan, ofciating Nonbeliever Petitioner Base DC 20* 25 15 15 20

*The DC rises to 30 if your Loa attempts to possess you.

Bokors are never possessed. The Loa are capable of possessing ANY OTHER TIME multiple people at once, and no two individuals possessed by a given Status Base DC Loa act exactly the same. Voodoo practitioners believe that this is Favored Horse fortune 20 due to the fragmented nature of the Loa. They dont ride a horse Hougan 5 with their whole being, just a single aspect of it. Possessions can last Nonbeliever 10 anywhere from a minute to multiple hours depending on the needs Petitioner 15 of both the horse and the Loa. When the Loa move on, it takes a minute or so for the former horse to come back to his senses and orient himself. Voodoo faithful quickly realize what has happened, but nonbelievers are often at a loss to explain what theyve been doing, or how they arrived wherever they nd themselves.

- Voodoo Rituals Rituals are held for many reasons. Some celebrate particularly lucky or great events, or honor a Loa on a sacred day. Like many faiths, Voodoo has ceremonies for birth and marriage as well as coming of age ceremonies. Unsurprisingly, voodoo also has a great number of rituals associated with death and the dead. The great feasts of the dead always occur in late October. The ritual celebration of the Marassa always occurs in either late harvest or during the winter solstice. The timing of many ceremonies is directly connected to the needs and resources of the hougan holding them. Ceremonies usually occur within the hounfour, led by a hougan or mambo. Most hounfour have an elaborately decorated altar at their center, though in areas where Voodooists must meet in secret, the altar may be portable. Almost all rituals are held at night, mainly because it is easier for the Voodoos faithful to gather secretly in darkness. Most rituals have a number of similar elements and occurrences. A feast before the main ceremony is typical, though if Ghede in particular is being called, the feast is held until he arrives. There is always drum beating at a Voodoo ceremony. The position of drummers is both sacred and unique. Most members of a Voodoo community stay with it their entire lives, but drummers actually move from one hounfour to another without being looked down upon. While they are playing the drums a Loa never possesses them. Ververs are always drawn on the oor of the hounfour in our or cornmeal. The verver of the Loa that is being celebrated will always be drawn rst. They are typically put on the dance oor and stepped on and slowly erased during rituals. Those present engage in frenzied dancing that builds in intensity until one or more participants are possessed. There will always be some food present as a sacrice to the Loa who are believed to eat its essence. A Loa who is present in the esh will always eat something to signify their acceptance of the sacrice. More important ceremonies merit the sacrice of an animal, such as a chicken, goat, sheep, or dog. The greatest and most powerful ceremonies require the sacrice of a bull.

he many rituals of the Voodoo faith celebrate both the Loa themselves and their relationship to their petitioners. The purpose of these rituals is to gain favor with the Loa and the dead by making appropriate sacrices and giving gifts. Faithful petitioners expect, in exchange, that they are watched over when they are sick, protected from evil, and have good fortune.

VOODOO RITUAL LISTINGS


The Voodoo rituals in this section include all of the elements listed above, but they also have another trait: power. All of the following rituals call upon the Other World and channel far more energy than typical Voodoo ceremonies. All Voodoo rituals are given in the following format. Description: What the ritual is like and what its for. Effect: The game mechanics effect of the ritual. Length: How long the ritual takes to perform. Sacrice: What must be offered to ensure a successful ritual. Level: This entry tells you either what level you must be or how many ranks of the Vodoo Rituals skill you must have to learn the ritual. Many rituals involve going on a quest before they can be learned.

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TABLE 9-5A: OLD WORLD LOA VOODOO BURDENS


The Old World Loa expect hougans to serve the faithful. A hougan who frequently goes on adventures without tending to the needs of his hounfour will eventually draw their wrath, and though it is slow in coming the hougan will know that they arent pleased when it arrives. Agw: It takes a lot of effort to anger the Tides Master, but taking part in the destruction of a sea going vessel or slaughtering marine life will enrage him. Burdens: Agw only has one burden that he ever places on hougans, but in the West Indies, its a hard one: the hougan is landlocked. They may not go into the sea or upon it. Ayida Wdo: Like her mate, Ayida is removed from humans. However, she knows cruelty when she sees it and a hougan that has been particularly violent may draw her wrath. Burdens: As a patron of rain and sky, Avida nds it entertaining to demand that an offensive hougan go naked in public. She sometimes insists that a hougan protect a favored chicken all week, taking it with him everywhere he goes and collecting any eggs for Damballah. Damballah Wdo: The World Serpent doesnt understand humanity enough to be offended by anything humans do. Erzulie: Tragedys Mistress hates violence and ugliness. A hougan who resorts to violence without rst trying peaceful solutions will anger Erzulie, as will one who destroys beautiful things, places, or people. Burdens: Erzulie often insists that a hougan who has upset her take no part in any kind of violence. She also favors forcing hougans to assume womens clothing (or male clothing, in the case of mambos). Legba: Papa Legba has no patience for hougans who disrespect the elderly or are too fond of newfound technology. A hougan who uses rearms may draw Legbas ire. Burdens: Legba may decide that the hougan needs to experience the trials of old age. The hougan cant move above a slow walking speed and suffers a 4 penalty on initiative checks. If Legba is really put out, he may decide he cant stand to look upon the offender; the hougan cant go out during the day. Ogun: Ogun detests cowards and thieves more than anything. Associating with pirates can anger Ogun, as can running from a fair ght. Burdens: The Master of Iron may decide that metal is too good for the hougan, and he is prohibited from touching metal of any kind. Conversely, he may insist that the hougan carry the largest sword he can nd for a week, regardless of where he goes or what he does.

TABLE 9-5B: NEW WORLD LOA VOODOO BURDENS


The Petro family expects action from their followers, always favoring deeds over words. If they are swift to anger, they are also swift to forgive. They are creatures of passion, often given to melancholy. They are stern in their expectations but in some ways, more forgiving than the Old World Loa. Ashadeh Bc: It is all too easy to anger Ashadeh: putting out res for any reason incenses her, as does destroying works of art or literature. Burdens: It amuses Ashadeh to force hougans to speak in rhyming poetry. She might decide that, since the hougan found re offensive, he cant use re of any sort. Baron Samedhi: Placating Samedhi is usually high on a wise hougans list, and most go out of their way not to offend him. Helping the enemies of Voodoo will always enrage him. Attempting to alleviate a persons fear of the unknown can provoke him as well. Burdens: Samedhi likes giving a hougan an actual burden to carry, such as a length of anchor chain or a cloth sack full of body parts. Samedhi also enjoys the pain of others, and may forbid the hougan from healing anyone or lessening their misfortune. Carrefour: It is difcult to upset Carrefour, as he is cynical and usually expects the worst of people. A hougan who abuses his powers might stir Carrefour into punitive action. Burdens: Since misuse of power is what spurns Carrefour into action in the rst place, he gives burdens that a hougan will eventually fail, thus teaching a lesson he wants to get across. Sometimes hell decide that the hougan doesnt get to sleep that week. At other times he may decide that the hougan must embrace darkness, and go blindfolded at all times. Congo Zandor: While Congo Zandor is inclined to raging anger, the actions that bother him are seldom committed by hougans. Anyone who burns or destroys elds angers him, as does anyone who prevents others from doing honest labor. Burdens: Congo Zandor often insists that a hougan work in the elds for a few hours every day. Hes also fond of making a hougan carry a sack full of sharp rocks all week. Dan Petro: Dan is easygoing, but can be stirred to terrible anger. He detests imprisonment and torture. No matter the reason, he wont stand for a hougan who takes part in either. Burdens: Dans burden is always the same. He insists that the hougan try to free every slave he meets. Obviously, this leads to a lot of hougans staying at home all week, which, to a great traveler like Dan Petro, is exactly the punishment he wants to inict. If the hougan does go out and free slaves, so much the better.

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TABLE 9-5C: THE EXCEPTIONS VOODOO BURDENS


Hougans of both faiths are capable of setting off the various Loa in this category. Since they are the exceptions, they have few traits in common. The Marassa: The Twins arent actively worshiped, just acknowledged. While they never lay actual burdens on a hougan, hurting children will denitely draw their vengeance (as well as Ghedes). Simbi: Obscuring knowledge is acceptable, but lies anger Simbi greatly. Like Carrefour, he hates the abuse of magical power. Burdens: Simbi is likely to forbid the offender from using his favorite spell or spells, or to insist that he not speak above a whisper. Loco: Loco is famous among hougans as the Loa easiest to rile. Because he is such a stickler for protocol and procedure, there is a lot that he can potentially be angry about. Burdens: Locos favored burden is simple: the hougan must announce himself every time he casts a divine spell. He must yell out his name, his status as a hougan, and what hes about to do before casting a spell. Every single time. Ayizan: Always the forgiving mother to Locos stern father, Ayizan is lenient. Hurting pregnant women though, will immediately set her off. Burdens: Ayizan almost always forbids a hougan from using spells that cause harm to others. She may insist that he safeguard a woman or child of her choice. Ghede: Ghede gets angry all the time. Then again, Ghede is impossible to anger. Rage is mercurial and eeting for the Lord of the Dead, though harming a child can provoke his wrath for a long, long time. Burdens: Ghede never gives burdens unless an innocent has been harmed. This is thankful, since Ghedes burdens always involve public humilation and appeasing his twisted sense of humor. A bit of necrophilia in a crowded town square is his idea of an appropriate punishment for such behavior. .

THE GREAT CAILLE CEREMONY


Description: This ceremony is the ritual feasting of the Loa that invigorates them and allows them to aid their followers. Knowledge of the caille rite is what makes a hougan a hougan and a mambo a mambo. Whether this ritual is performed in front of a hundred faithful witnesses at the center of a hougans peristyle or alone in the hold of a pirate ship makes no difference to the Loa, but they still insist upon it. The hougan gathers food of some kind and prepares it meticulously. If he is talented he may spend hours drawing ververs. In a large gathering, he will start up a song or a chant and begin to call up the Loa for praise. If he is only conducting a small ceremony, it will often be only the hougan and his govi, which he will slowly and rhythmically step about as he sings. If the hougan is putting on a large version of this ceremony, he will allow the intensity to build until one of the celebrants is possessed. If this ritual is performed privately, hougans typically expect some muttering from their govi, but little else. Variations of this ritual occur weekly for hougans, and once every two years they must put on a massive feast to appease the Loa. Effect: This is the ritual by which hougans accumulate divine spells from the Loa. Once every seven days, they must put on a ceremony to the best of their means. The Loa understand that their servants have hardships, nevertheless sometimes they ask a great deal from their servants; in fact, the stronger their servant, the more the Loa expect from him. When a hougan has prepared this ceremony, he makes a Voodoo Rituals check with a DC of 10 + hougan levels. If this check is successful, he may call upon the Loa to replenish his store of divine spells. If the hougan should fail the check by three or more, he has angered a Loa. A Loa that has been offended by a hougan will place a burden on him that he is supposed to follow for the next seven days. Burdens (see Table 9-5) are tests of a hougans faith. Unless the hougan fullls this burden to the letter, he cannot cast spells until his next caille ritual. The tables at left and above list the various Loa, reasons why they may be angered, and typical burdens that they choose to inict on their faithful. Which Loa is angered is strictly up to the tender mercies of the GM. Length: A caille ritual typically lasts two hours. The Great Feasting of the Loa that occurs every two years typically lasts three or four days. Sacrice: The hougan must put on the best feast he can, with the supplies available to him. A mange sec or dry offering is common, and typically consists of fruit and grains. Rum is always welcome. Taking the time to trace ververs and give simple gifts is also noteworthy. If the GM feels that a hougan is giving more than could reasonably be expected, the Loa know it and may help by, as an example, granting useful but unasked for advice on a problem. The Loa also know when the hougan is being selsh, and react accordingly. Level: Hougans learn this ritual when they rst take up the asson. Bokors dont salute the Loa in this fashion and never learn the caille ritual.

THE ENGAGEMENT RITUAL


Description: A Loas power is derived from many sources, but belief is one of the most prevalent. Hougans are, among many other things, directors of the Loas might. The Loa cannot afford, however, to help every hougan who calls for their aid. Their might, while vast, is limited in the physical world and they must carefully judge where and when they will apply it. The Loa believe the best way to handle this is to trust their favored hougans wisdom on the matter. To keep hougans from complacency, the Loa require continual re-afrmations of faith. This both strengthens them and strengthens their faith in their hougans. But in perilous times, hougans have found that they must ask for more than simple prayers and small displays of power. The most trusted hougans have learned the powerful engagement ritual, whereby they enter into pacts with specic Loa by offering sacrices in exchange for favors. If the Loa is pleased and agrees, the hougan can call the favor in at any time in the future. The engagement ritual is simple and always personal. The hougan enacting it draws the verver

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TABLE 9-6: VOODOO RITUALS CHECK MODIFIERS


OLD WORLD LOA
Loa Legba Ogun Agw Erzulie Damballah Wdo Ayida Wdo Ability Score Intelligence Constitution Strength Charisma Wisdom Dexterity

of the Loa they wish to call and begins to sing of the Loas good deeds (or bad deeds, depending on the individual). They then present their sacrice to the cardinal directions and prepare for the Loas coming. Effect: This ritual allows a hougan to gain 4th-level and higher favors. See the following section for the full ramications of what that means. The maximum number of outstanding favors a hougan can accumulate is given on the hougan level advancement table. The hougan must make a Voodoo Rituals skill check with a DC of 15 + favor level. He can bargain for more than one favor at once by adding each favors level to the DC, but the appearance of greed could spoil the whole effort. If the check fails the Loa will probably still come, but he will NOT be pleased, and it will take all the hougan can muster to calm them. The sacrice in question will never be acceptable and the hougan has to wait a week before attempting to engage that Loa again. If the roll is successful, the Loa is pleased with the sacrice. The hougans player should write down what level of favors he has acquired and which Loa they are from. At any time thereafter, the hougan can call out to the Loa to help him. The call for aid is a Voodoo Rituals check with a DC of 30 favor level (the more important the favor, the more quickly they act). The hougans Voodoo Rituals check is modied by the relevant ability score, as given on the chart at left. If this check is successful, the Loa responds on the same round the call was made. If the roll was unsuccessful, it takes one round for every point below what was needed for the Loa to respond. The Loa will, eventually, respond on anything but a 1. A 1 indicates that the Loa is tied up elsewhere or that the call was somehow lost.

NEW WORLD LOA


Loa Carrefour Baron Samedhi Dan Petro Congo Zandor Ashadeh Bc Ability Score Intelligence Charisma Wisdom Constitution Dexterity

THE EXCEPTIONS
Loa Simbi Loco Ayizan Ghede Ability Score Intelligence Intelligence Wisdom Charisma

Once the Loa is aware of the hougan, the GM can decide what happens based on the level of the favor and the Loa in question, or simply ask the player to pick an appropriate spell that falls within the Loas domains. Example: Irukwoo is a Hgn13 of the Old World faith who can prepare three 4th, two 5th, and one 6th-level favors beyond the simple favors which he sacrices for weekly. Irukwoo has happened upon a cache of rare perfumes from France he thinks Erzulie will nd irresistible. He has 14 ranks in Voodoo Rituals and a Charisma of 16. He decides that he is never going to get his hands on anything like this again, so he will ask for one 6th-level and one 4th-level favor at once. The DC of his check is 25 (15 + 6 + 4). He adds a +3 bonus to his Voodoo Ritual check for his Charisma modier, and needs to roll just 8 or better on the skill check. Failure means Erzulie never shows up; the perfume is unacceptable. Success means that she does grace Irukwoo with her presence and graciously allows him the favors he asked for. A few weeks later, Irukwoo is in combat with a half-dozen opponents. He calls on Erzulie for aid and calls in the 6th-level favor. The DC of the call is 24 (30 favor level). He needs to roll 7 or better on his skill check to get her immediate attention. If he rolls a 5 (for a total skill check of 22) Erzulie responds two rounds later. She could grant the player a 6thlevel spell, or the GM could dictate what happens based on the Loas personality and the situation. Length: This ritual requires that the Loa is present in the esh, so a hougan must have a volunteer to help make arrangements with the Loa. Summoning the Loa and the subsequent bargaining typically take one hour. Sacrice: Coming up with an appropriate sacrice is difcult for even greatly experienced hougans. Favors from levels 4 to 6 require a full ceremony with a bull as the sacrice, or one of the favored sacrices listed under the Loas descriptions. Favors from levels 7 to 9 require not only a favored sacrice, but typically a quest on behalf of the Loa as well. Ultimately, it is the GMs call. If the hougan has been a faithful follower, continually going out of his way to help the faithful, the Loa look far more favorably upon him. Correspondingly, the Loa are aware of which hougans are strictly practical in their faith, giving only what is needed and no more. Loa take special delight in tormenting those who have never called them before and only now call them when they need something. Level: Hougans may go on a quest to learn the engagement ritual at 8th level. The quest always advances the interests of the servants of the Loa, and typically takes no more than a week. During their quest, the hougan may use no divine spells whatsoever. The Loa believe that those who prove themselves competent without great power are the only ones trustworthy enough to receive it. Bokors never learn the engagement ritual.

WHAT FAVORS ARE AND WHAT THEY CAN DO


A favor is a direct manifestation of a Loas power called down by and channeled through a faithful hougan. In game terms, a favor works as a divine spell, an arcane spell, or a GM-adjudicated effect that a hougan acquires from an engagement ritual. Favors mimic the effects of the spell chosen. In some rare cases, a Loa may even grant a favor to a faithful servant who is in desperate trouble, even if he has not recently performed an engagement ritual. Spells granted as favors are cast normally after the Loa arrives, but they never require material components. GMs may choose a spell, or ask the player to pick an appropriate spell from one of the Loas domains. Alternatively, the GM can use the following guidelines to create a unique effect. You must create the effect by selecting priorities for ve elements: range, target or area, duration, damage, and saving throw. The maximum level you can select (for your highest-priority item) is equal to the level of the favor. Each subsequent priority takes its effects from one lower favor level, to a minimum of level 4.

TABLE 9-7: ENGAGEMENT RITUAL SUMMARY


Favor request: DC 15 + sum of requested favor levels. Skill check: Voodoo Rituals + relevant ability modier. Calling in a favor: DC 30 - favor level. Skill check: Voodoo Rituals + relevant ability modier. Success means the Loa arrives instantaneously. For every point the DC was missed, the Loa arrives a round later.

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TABLE 9-8: UNIQUE FAVORS


Favor Damage Level Range 4 5 6 7 8 9 Touch 50 ft. 200 ft. 800 ft. Sight Unlimited Damage Target or Area Single creature Two creatures or 5-ft.-radius sphere Ten creatures or 10-ft.-radius sphere 50-ft.-radius sphere 100-ft.-radius sphere or a small town 1,000-ft.-radius sphere or a small island Duration Instantaneous or 2d6 rounds Instantaneous or 2d6 minutes Instantaneous or 2d6 hours Instantaneous or 2d6 days Instantaneous or 2d6 weeks Instantaneous or permanent Targets Single Target Multiple Targets Saving Throw 10d6 15d6 15d6 20d6 20d6 25d6 10d6 10d6 15d6 15d6 20d6 20d6 Will negates Will half Will half None None None

For example, a hougan calls in an 8th-level favor owed him by Baron Samedhi. He asks the Baron to punish a town for stoning his hougan companion to death, and the Baron agrees to inict a plague on all the residents. The player selects the following priorities for his favor.

SAMPLE PRIORITIES
Priority 1 2 3 4 5 Choice Target or area Damage multiple targets Duration Saving throw Range Level 8th 7th 6th 5th 4th Result Small town 15d6 Instantaneous Will half Touch

Thus, when the hougan touches a person in the town, an instantaneous plague will strike everyone from the entire village. Doing an average of 52 points of damage (or half with a will save), the hougan had better expect a more traditional plague when all of those dead bodies start to rot and some bitter, bitter vengeance from any survivors. When following the guidelines for favors, GMs should always err on the side of plot development. If it sounds fun or appropriate for the Loa in question, go for it.

WHAT A FAVOR CANNOT DO


In the Skull & Bones setting, humans are incapable of physically leaving the human world. Physically shifting a mortal to another plane of existence is beyond the scope of any Loas power. The Loa cannot resurrect the dead, at least not in a way that most would want. It is possible to have ones gros-bon-ange stolen, which turns a human into a zombi, basically killing them, then have it recovered by valiant friends and restored, thus resurrecting the individual, but thats about as close as it gets.

WISDOM FROM THE PAST


Description: This ritual allows a hougan or a bokor to call upon the dead to pass their wisdom and advice to succeeding generations. The leader of this rite must prepare a quiet grove or empty cemetery. Under a full moon, a trench is dug which is then lled with rum, candy, and blood. The Loa are called upon to witness the exchange and make certain that unruly or unwelcome spirits are kept out. The ritual caller then asks the Loa to bring a specic spirit. Effect: This ritual summons a spirit to answers questions. It calls a member of the dead into a govi and allows participants to ask it for advice. The spirit is the gros-bon-ange of a deceased individual with a connection to either the hougan or bokor or the petitioner who requested the ritual. This ritual requires a Voodoo Rituals check with a DC of 10 + spirits relevant skill modier. For example, summoning the spirit of a sailor to locate a nearby cove would have a DC of 10 + the spirits total Knowledge (local) modier, in this case 12, for a total of DC 22. The ritual master can call a spirit with a skill modier in any given skill equal to his ranks in Voodoo Rituals. Spirits are summoned for a few minutes, but they tend to ramble. Houngans must succeed at an opposed Diplomacy check to keep the spirit on track, and bokors must attempt an opposed Intimidate check.

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Length: Preparation for this ritual can take several days. It takes two or three hours for the dead to arrive, but once they do, they can remain manifest for only a few minutes. The ritual is trying and cannot be attempted more than once a month. Sacrice: The dead always require blood. The sacrice of a goat is usually sufcient, but older ancestors might require a bull. Bokors must sacrice a human being. Level: Hougans need 10+ ranks of the Voodoo Rituals skill to learn this ritual. They then go on a quest for Ghede and if he nds the results of the quest acceptable, he teaches them. Bokor need 12+ ranks of Voodoo Rituals before they can learn this ritual from any of the three patrons, regardless of whether they follow them or not. Whichever Loa teaches the bokor will expect a great service in exchange.

DJABS CALL
Description: This is the rst of three powerful rituals that allow bokor to summon Djab. The call is the most basic ritual and its power is limited, but even a lesser supernatural creature can be extremely dangerous. While there are a few races of outsiders that bokor know how to call, they mostly deal with unique Djab whose names theyve learned from ancient texts, other bokor, and the Loa Carrefour. Bokors disdain the trappings of the European occult tradition. They draw no pentagrams when they make their call, and protective spells are seen as admissions of weakness, or insulting to the Djab. The Loa Carrefour set the rules for interaction between bokor and Djab, though even the wisest and oldest bokor dont know everything about dealing with the other side. They prefer an isolated spot, especially if a living sacrice is involved, to make their summons. The name of the Djab being called is then whispered over and over with gradually increasing volume until the bokor is yelling the name. Effect: The Djabs call ritual functions like the 4th-level divine spell lesser planar ally, with a few exceptions. The bokor must summon either a specic entity or a specic race of entities. I want help wont do. The bokor must request a task that can be completed in an hour, or a piece of knowledge that the outsider or elemental is privy too. They then engage in a contest of wits with the Djab. This works best as a roleplaying interaction, instead of a simple opposed test. If the bokor is unwilling or unable to give up the price required, the Djab shrugs and leaves. Djabs call brings up to 8 HD of outsiders or elementals. Length: The call takes 10 to 20 minutes, and bargaining lasts a few minutes more. It is extremely taxing to call entities from the other side, and bokors cannot attempt this ritual more than once per week. Sacrice: Outsiders typically want all kinds of unusual things when dealing with bokor. They may ask for anything from a pretty ower to the gros-bon-anges of a dozen children. Many Djab have specic requirements that must be produced when they are called. Failure to do so in some cases breaks the basic no-harm clause that Carrefour forces the more malevolent entities to follow. Level: Bokors learn the Djabs call ritual when they reach 7th level.

DJABS PACT
Description: The second of the Djab rituals, the pact calls stronger entities or makes permanent arrangements with lesser entities. Effect: The Djabs pact works like the 6th-level divine spell planar ally and in most other ways, is identical to the Djabs call ritual. The Djabs pact summons a being of up to 16 Hit Dice. Bokor can ask for tasks that take up to a day to perform. If the bokor uses the pact to call a creature of 8 HD or less, they can engage in a long-term pact with it. If the bokor and the outsider reach a satisfactory agreement, the bokor can call the entity to help them once at any time in the future. Calling in the Djab requires a Voodoo Rituals skill check with a DC of 15 + the Djabs HD. If the skill check succeeds, the Djab arrives instantly. If it fails, the Djabs arrival is pushed off a round for every point of failure. Note that if the Djab shows up too late to help, it has still fullled the letter of its agreement, and must be contacted again to negotiate a new one. Bokors can have a number of pacts equal to their Intelligence or Charisma modier at any one time. Length: The summoning process takes half an hour, and bargaining for a pact takes at least an hour, but frequently longer. Bokors can only summon one Djab per week, but calling on established pacts doesnt count against this limit. Sacrice: See Djabs call. In addition, entering into a long-term pact denitely requires a worthwhile sacrice on the part of the bokor. It is up to the GMs discretion as to what a given outsider or elemental wants. Level: Bokors learn the Djabs pact ritual when they reach 11th level.

DJABS TRUST
Description: The third and most powerful of the Djab rituals, the Djabs trust allows the bokor to summon extremely powerful beings. Dealing with such powerful entities tends to change a mortal in odd ways. Bokors who frequently deal with dark entities begin to take on a dark aspect after they learn this ritual, while those who deal with nobler entities tend to take on a more holy mien. Effect: Djabs trust works like the 8th-level divine spell greater planar ally. The Djabs trust ritual calls up an outsider or elemental of up to 24 Hit Dice. It also allows bokors to enter into pacts with entities of up to 16 HD per Djabs pact. Finally, bokors can summon Djab with this ritual that are more properly classied as Loa. When they do, they can bargain for favors not unlike a hougan. Cinq Jour Malheureux and Adjinakou are detailed in the section on Loa and serve as an example of the types of Loa Djab that a bokor may summon. Length: The summoning process takes an hour, and bargaining for a pact takes at least two hours. Bokors at this level can summon two Djab per week. Calling on established pacts doesnt count against this limit. Sacrice: At this level of power it is dangerous to not have an appropriate sacrice waiting when the Djab arrives. Even if the negotiations dont go well it is a good idea to offer something to the Djab. Carrefour may have forbidden them to do immediate violence to an uncouth summoner, but that doesnt mean they wont remember an insulting bokor.

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Level: Bokors learn the Djabs trust ritual when they reach 15th level.

THE BAKA RITUAL


Description: The rst time a bokor uses this ritual it is to send their spirit roaming to the other side on a quest to nd their heart beast. The ritual involves a week of fasting, followed by the ingestion of powerful drugs. Eventually, the bokor will either nd his beast or the ritual will kill him. Once a bokor has found his beast, he can use this ritual to take its shape. Referred to as a baka by practitioners of Voodoo, such creatures are thought to be evil spirits in animal form. In the case of some bokor, they are not far wrong. Effect: This ritual works like the 4th-level arcane spell polymorph, with several changes. The duration of the change lasts for up to ten minutes per class level (with an exception noted below). The baka is always a dire animal, and the mind of a bokor in baka form is constantly assailed by a need for violence and bloodshed. Whenever an opportunity to kill without being caught presents itself, the bokor must attempt a Will save with a DC of 20. The bokor can return to human form as a full-round action, but if he fails to control his bloodthirsty impulses during his time in the baka form, he is trapped in this form until just before the sunrise. Length: It takes an hour to perform the baka ritual, and it must be performed at night. If the rst rays of dawn should fall upon a bokor who is still in baka form, he must attempt a Fortitude save with a DC of 20 or immediately revert to human form and suffer 3d10 damage. Sacrice: Not every ceremony requires an offering to the Loa. The baka ritual is a matter of knowledge and will, and no sacrice is required. Level: Bokors with at least 13 ranks in Voodoo Rituals can learn the baka ritual. Most bokors learn it from a Djab or a Loa. The Loa Simbi forbids the practice of this ritual by any bokors under his patronage.

OLD BONES
It is known to certain hougans that the bones of the dead, especially those that had a great deal of mystic power in life, carry some of that power even after death. Properly enchanted, such bones can be used for rituals. In game terms, the bones of a hougan or bokor of 15th or higher level can potentially be enchanted to grant from a +1 to a +3 circumstance bonus to Voodoo Ritual skill checks. Such enchantments require the preparing of the bones by boiling them clean in a special mixture, the placation of the gros-bon-ange of the former owner of the bones, the blessings of the Loa, and a year of burial in sacred soil. The circumstance bonus is determined randomly by rolling 1d3.

THE ZOMBI RITUAL


Description: The darkest rite in a bokors arsenal, this terrible ceremony strips the gros-bon-ange from a living being and turns his still-living body into a zombi, a member of the living dead. The ritual involves, among other things, convincing the target that they are dead. Bokor typically employ various illusions and suggestions to bring this about. They often drug their target with hallucinogens and hold great dances with the victim strapped to a crossroads symbol at the center of the dance ring. Effect: This ritual is a modied version of the 8th-level arcane spell trap the soul. If the ritual is successful and the gros-bonange of the victim is pulled forth, the bokor places it into a specially prepared skull that has Baron Samedhis verver carved into it. The zombi template (see Chapter XIII: Friends and Foes) is immediately applied to the target. The new zombi is obedient to the bokor who enacted the ritual, as long as he possesses the skull that houses the zombis gros-bon-ange. If a target manages to resist the bokor, he can never again be affected by that bokors zombi ritual and he gains a permanent +2 luck bonus on all saving throws against that bokors wanga. Length: Priming the victim is the only time consuming part of this ritual. The slow weakening of a victims defenses takes weeks, but the ceremony proper only lasts an hour. Sacrice: It takes a prepared skull and a willingness to commit the most horrifying crime a voodoo practitioner knows. A trapped gros-bon-ange is one that will never join with other ancestors or become a Loa. Level: The dark Samedhi teaches his bokors the zombi ritual when they have 18 ranks in Voodoo Rituals. Neutral bokors must learn this ritual from evil Djab, since both Simbi and Carrefour expressly forbid their bokors from ever learning this ritual. Note: You dont need to carry a skull to have possession of it. Many bokors have a special place where they store the collected skulls of their victims. If the skull holding a zombis gros-bon-ange is returned to the right zombi before theyve succumbed to their state, shattering the skull will restore the zombi to life.

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- Christianity The power of the Christian God has faded in the world as much as any other magic, and His miracles are fading as well. However, a select few of His faithful may draw upon His grace and if they possess a holy relic.

HOLY RELICS
Relics are few and far between in the Skull & Bones campaign setting. Most of those that do remain are under the zealous guard of the Church in Rome. There, relics are treated as great burdens as well as objects of might, those who wield them called bearers, and every power that they exhibit is carefully recorded. Even so it is the rare man or woman who can actually wield one, for like most properties of the church, each seems to work only when the bearer uses it with unwavering faith. It is extremely rare for any relic to escape the grasp of Rome, but a few are rumored to have done so, slipping unnoticed through the centuries, guarded by secret sects or individuals, and some of these are even said to have made their way across the wide sea to rest in the Caribbean. These relics have shaped the fate of kings and nations, and even the world, and though their powers are great they are also terrible to behold. When carried by a faithful servant who has levels in the cleric or paladin class, the character can cast 0- to 3rd-level spells normally, assuming that they are high enough level to cast these spells. Spells of 4th level and above are never gained, regardless of character level. Each relic also grants its faithful bearer with additional gifts, which are given regardless of character class. If the relic is too large to be carried, such as Clements Anvil, the bearer must be in physical contact with the relic to gain its benets, unless otherwise noted in the relics description.

CHRISTOPHERS STAFF
Saint Christopher has long been a patron of travelers. His legend says that he carried the Christ child across a ooded ford, helping him to bear all the troubles of the world for that short time, and that in thanks, Christ caused his staff to bloom into a owering fruit tree when he struck it into the earth. When the emperor Decius condemned Christopher to be through-shotten with arrows by forty archers, the arrows hung in the air all round him and did not touch him, so he was beheaded instead. The Staff appears to be a plain walking stick about six feet long, gnarled and slightly knobby at the head. When cast into the water or laid upon the ground, the foot of the Staff will always point to true north. If struck into the ground and left overnight, it will blossom into a tree full of fruit, no matter how barren the soil. Additionally, the staff grants the bearer permanent protection from arrows and the ability to cast control winds as a 15th level caster once per week.

- Legends of Piracy SIR HENRY MORGAN


Time of Operation: 1662-1671 Operational Area: The Caribbean Morgan [Sdg6/Sof10, hp 128] was an English privateer. How he came to the Caribbean is uncertain, but for years he led protable raids against the Spanish from Port Royal in Jamaica. In 1666 he was made Colonel of the Port Royal Militia and named Admiral of the Brethren of the Coast. Soon after, Morgan attacked Cuba and Panama, acquiring well over 300,000 pieces of eight. In May of 1669, he was part of a legendary battle against three Spanish men-owar. One was destroyed with a black-powder-rigged ship, the second was seized, and the third ship retreated. Morgan led a force of thirty-six captains and 1,800 men to sack Panama in 1670. Unfortunately, a peace treaty had been signed between England and Spain that Morgan was unaware of. He was arrested and deported to England in 1671. While Morgan was incarcerated, war between England and Holland caused the King to ask him what could be done to preserve Jamaicas lucrative sugar trade. Morgans reply so pleased the King that he was knighted and returned to Jamaica as lieutenant governor in 1676. He settled down to a life of politics and drinking, passing away in 1688.

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CLEMENTS ANVIL
Saint Clement was a blacksmith who was martyred sometime in the rst century after Christ, cast into the sea with an anchor tied about his neck. He eventually became the patron saint of anchorsmiths and blacksmiths alike. The Anvil is rumored to be made from the remains of the anchor that drowned St. Clement, and to be both blessed and cursed. It imbues any item worked upon it with magical power; forging blades that are sharper and stronger than normal, and charms that ward against drowning, among others. Weapons forged by truly faithful and devout Christians on Clements Anvil gain a +1 enhancement bonus to attack and damage. The Anvil itself seems to have a strange desire to return to the bottom of the sea, making shipboard transport a chancy proposition. As if to make up for this tendency, it bestows water breathing as the spell to any creature touching it, for the duration of the contact. Rumors that it has somehow made its way to the Caribbean are simply counted as further proof of its miraculous powers. Perhaps it is intended for a higher purpose that can only be fullled in these waters.

THE DOVE
When the great oods began to recede, a dove bearing an olive branch led Noah and his people to the peaks of Mount Ararat, from which they were able to make landfall and begin the repopulation of the world. After the ood, some stories say that Noah carved simple gureheads for shing vessels from the prow of the Ark to guide his people on the waters. Only one is believed to have survived. The Dove is a crude wooden carving that has been polished smooth by centuries of handling. It is roughly the size of a balled st, and is carved in the shape of a dove carrying an olive branch. It is one of the most powerful relics to have crossed the seas, granting its rightful bearer a +8 sacred bonus on Knowledge (navigation) and Knowledge (sea lore) checks. If this bearer also has levels in the mystic navigator prestige class, he can use his class abilities without suffering ability damage. True bearers must come by the Dove honestly, as determined by the GM, and use it without harmful intent toward others. The Doves whereabouts are currently unknown.

THE FISH
The bones of Simon Peter, prince of the apostles, sherman and sher of men, are said to have any number of awesome powers, among them healing and raising the dead. The Fish is a relic supposed to contain one of the nger bones of the apostle encased in a gold sheath about three inches long, shaped like a sh and studded with precious stones. From the time of the building of St. Peters Basilica until the late 1480s it was listed among Church possessions in various inventories of the treasury of the Vatican. At some point in the early 1500s it disappeared from the records. Church records claim that the relic caused its bearer to become more personable, easily able to sway large crowds with his words. It also seemed to cause an intense desire to sh in those who carried it. The records strongly advise against use of the Fish over an extended period of time, although they do not say why. Perhaps if a single person were to wear it for too long, he would stand in danger of meeting a fate similar to St. Peters. Accounts describing Cristoforo Colombo wearing a similar ornament in the years before his rst voyage have never been veried. The Fish grants a +4 sacred bonus on Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Profession (sherman), and Sense Motive checks. It also bestows a +2 enhancement bonus to Charisma, and the benets of a permanent tongues spell with a caster level of 20. If the bearer can cast divine spells, he casts all healing spells as if affected by the Empower Spell metamagic feat, all spells from the abjuration school as if affected by the Extend Spell metamagic feat, and all other spells as if affected by the Silent Spell metamagic feat. Note that he casts these spells at their normal spell level, unlike spells normally cast in conjunction with metamagic feats.

SPLINTER OF THE TRUE CROSS


Who carried it away from the hill and how it came to be placed within the gem are tales long lost in time, but however it came to be, the Splinter is an actual piece of the cross on which Jesus was crucied, solidly embedded in a diamond cabochon approximately two inches across. It has since been mounted as the centerpiece of almost every form of jewelry imaginable, most recently as mounted on a gold-ligree cross, studded with smaller diamonds, pearls, and rubies and suspended from a golden chain. The last rumor of the Spinters whereabouts placed it in the keeping of an unnamed Spanish priest headed for missionary work in the New World in the early 1500s, a man who was capable of great miracles. The Splinter grants the benet of a permanent protection from evil effect with a caster level of 20 to anyone who carries it. When carried by a true bearer of good and noble intent (as determined by the GM), it also grants the following spells at the 20th caster level: At willcure light wounds, remove blindness/deafness, remove disease, remove fear, and remove paralysis; 3/daybless, cure moderate wounds, and remove curse; 1/daymass cure moderate wounds; once per bearertrue resurrection. There may yet be other miracles to discover, but the Splinter must be found rst. Of course, nding a pure soul capable of self-sacrice in the world of Skull & Bones may prove even more of a challenge.

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Chapter X: Of Ships and the Sea


At the heart of a pirates life is his ship. The ship is his home, his place of business, and the tool of his trade. The ship is the lifeblood of those living in the Colonies, whether on the mainland or on the myriad islands that dot the Caribbean. Sailing vessels bring news, wealth, food, trade goods and more between the Colonies and the nations of Europe. Where there is shipping, there are pirates. This section describes the crews and vessels of Skull & Bones, and provides rules for ship-to-ship combat.

- Ships Crew any pirates are ex-navy crewmen or ofcers. Navy discipline is harsher than that aboard merchant ships, which makes a certain kind of sailor more likely to rebel. The pay is less certain too: sometimes men wait months for their wages due to sloppy administration, supply problems, or a simple lack of funds. In addition, ex-navy sailors are more suited to piracy than former merchant seaman, having more appropriate skills. Pirate ships are usually much less structured and disciplined than navy vessels, but even pirates recognize that some of their number are better seamen than others, and that those with specialized skills should get a bigger share than ordinary freebooters. This section describes the shipboard jobs in the navy, so that characters aboard those pirate ships that are run with almost naval structure can more easily work out what positions they qualify for. It is useful for purposes of comparison even in the more lax and anarchic pirate ships, since many aboard will mentally assign their crewmates to specic jobs even if nothing is agreed verbally. It also provides extra background detail useful for those playing former navy sailors, GMs designing naval NPCs, and pirates who want to know which crew to press and which to set ashore if they take a navy ship. Finally, it is useful as a starting point when deciding how the PCs pirate ship operates, as much of the same work must be done as on a naval ship. For each job, a typical range of character levels is given; for example, navy gunners are typically Sdg7/Sof1. However, in times of necessity the navy will rapidly commission or warrant new ofcers, even ones who barely qualify, because it is reckoned better to ll a position with an inexperienced sailor than to not to ll it at all.

CAPTAIN
The ofcer in command of a ship is called a captain, though in many cases his actual naval rank is only lieutenant. Full captains are found only on ships of the line (that is, fourth rate and better). Ideally, the captain of a navy ship should be at least a Sdg8/Sof3, but in practice many are less experienced, particularly in wartime. Pirate ships of all sizes are commanded by captains, but a pirate captain with only a sloop for a command might be insultingly addressed as lieutenant by an ex-navy pirate captain in command of a bigger ship. In most cases pirate captains are elected, usually by discussion and consensus more than a vote. It is rare that the desires of a crew are so split that they decide to put the matter to a vote, and if the vote is close they are as likely to break up the company as to elect a captain who can only be sure of the support of a little more than half of his crew. Aboard most pirate ships, a captain is no more nor less than a war leader; his authority begins at the moment prey is sighted over the horizon, and ends once all resistance is crushed. All other affairs are put to a simple vote of the entire ships company, often after heated argument. Some pirate captains aim to control their crews at all times, but this can lead to disaster if they show any weakness or make any mistakes. In Skull & Bones, the Sway mechanic is used to simulate this. Most pirate crews are happy to have their captain paid slightly more than them, usually half a share to a share extra.

LIEUTENANTS AND MASTERS


Every navy ship has at least one lieutenant to assist the captain. The largest warshipsknown as rst rate shipshave as many as six. Their job is to be the captains deputy, to discuss tactics with him if he asks them for their advice, to assist him with navigation, and to learn from him so that perhaps one day they will have a command of their own. Sailing-masters have an almost identical role, although they are ranked lower than lieutenants and do not necessarily have to be gentlemen. Masters often do much of the day-to-day work of navigation, but this largely depends on the preferences of the captain and lieutenants. Ideally, a lieutenant or master is at least a Sdg6/Sof1. Sometimes a local pilot is taken aboard to assist with navigation through treacherous reefs and shoals. Although he works closely with the master, mates, and captain, he has no particular rank aboard ship, even if employed for several months or more. Pirate captains may appoint one or two lieutenants, ofcially or unofcially, but such appointments are usually based on the lieutenants loyalty and raw ghting prowess rather than any supposed gentle birth or navigational skills. Most pirates also have someone aboard who is an expert navigator, but they may be referred to as pilot, navigator, sea artist, or sailing-master, depending on the whim of captain and crew. These navigators dont usually have any particular rank or subordinates. They may be allotted an extra quarter to half share of prizes, though, on account of their specialized knowledge. Any local pilot brought aboard to assist with navigation around a particular post is more likely to be a captive than an employee.

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OTHER SEA OFFICERS


In the navy, the bosun and gunner are also sea ofcers. Their roles are quite specialized. The bosun is in charge of the dayto-day work of sailing the ship, keeping her ship-shape, and disciplining the crew. In most cases he is simply an experienced seaman, a Sdg8 or higher, with no more than one level as a sea ofcer. The gunner, likewise, is usually an experienced seaman, but with ultimate responsibility for all the arms on a ship including cannon, powder and shot, muskets, and even boarding pikes. As well as maintaining the arms, he supervises the operation of the cannon and issues small arms and cutlasses to the crew as necessary. Like the master, the gunner and bosun are ranked signicantly lower than the captain and lieutenants; they are usually not gentlemen, and have little chance of promotion. Pirates rarely have a bosun, given their general dislike of discipline. As a result of this and the general laziness of pirate crews, their sails and rigging are frequently in poor repair, but this can easily enough be dealt with by stealing the next prizes gear. One rank that is found on almost every pirate ship is the quartermaster. His responsibilities are to act as the crews spokesman to the captain and to supervise fair division of the loot. Clearly this is a powerful position, more powerful than the captains in some situations; a persuasive quartermaster can convince a crew to depose an unpopular captain and appoint the quartermaster to that position, or he may prefer to act as kingmaker to a series of captains, swaying the crew to get rid of any captain who outlives his usefulness. Ideally, the quartermaster and captain act to check the power of the other. Navy ships also have a quartermaster, but his role and rank are entirely different: he is named for his position at the wheel on the quarterdeck, and he is only ranked as a petty ofcer. Many pirate ships have a gunner, and the one thing most pirates are scrupulous about is maintaining and cleaning weaponry, because their lives depend on sharp cutlasses and reliable pistols. A pirate gunner usually receives a quarter to half share more than the rest of the crew.

WARRANT OFFICERS
The carpenter, surgeon, and purser are all warrant ofcers, specialists in their own elds but with a place largely outside the formal command structure. Technically they rank above inferior ofcers and petty ofcers, but their precise position in the complex web of shipboard hierarchy is hard to pin down. In most cases they are not gentlemen, and so will not mix much with the captain and lieutenants. Because they sleep at night and work during the day rather than standing watches with the rest of the ships company, they are technically classed as idlers and do not mix with the crew either. The purser, although of similar rank to the surgeon and carpenter, does not really need a prestige class of his own and should be treated simply as an expert. His role is crucial in the navy, where he acts as the ships accountant and the crews supplier of clothes and other goods (at a price). Pirate ships have no need of a purser (the quartermaster fulls all the needs of that role). Surgeons and carpenters are certainly highly prized, and will often be pressed from captured ships. Perhaps surprisingly, carpenters are reckoned even more crucial than surgeons. An incompetent surgeon may botch an amputation that leads to a gangrenous death for one man, but a carpenter who botches a repair and sinks the ship kills the entire crew. For this reason, surgeons are often expected to be full members of the crew, ghting alongside their comrades, whereas carpenters must remain aboard ship and avoid the ghting. Ships that cosset their carpenters like this may pay them a lower share (perhaps only three quarters of the normal share). Fighting carpenters and most surgeons receive a higher share than ordinary pirates, usually a quarter to half as much again.

INFERIOR OFFICERS
Navy ships have a whole host of inferior ofcers, including a chaplain, cook, schoolmaster, sailmaker, armorer, masterat-arms, and several surgeons mates. Most of these are self-explanatory. The schoolmaster is on board to instruct the midshipmen and other boys, particularly in navigation. The armorer and master-at-arms are subordinate to the gunner, and are responsible respectively for the ships armament and for instructing the seamen in musket drill. The surgeons mates are largely stretcher-bearers (known as loblolly boys), but pick up a little knowledge of surgery along the way. Most inferior ofcers are idlers (see sidebar). They will typically be 4th to 6th level experts, sea dogs, or ghters, depending on their job.

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Pirate ships may have any or all of the above, even the occasional chaplain and schoolmaster. Some replace the chaplain with a hougan or bokor, or the captain or quartermaster will lead the crew in a parody of Christian service. Most make no concession to any religion but gold, though a few truly religious captains may press or even recruit a Christian chaplain.

Occasionally a preacher of unusual piety may attach himself to a crew whether they like it or not, considering himself to be almost a missionary and believing that not all the souls aboard are irrevocably damned. Some pirates even let these madmen live. Sometimes a defrocked or otherwise disgraced priest may join up voluntarily with pirates, taking prizes and tormenting captives with gusto; such men hardly count as chaplains, except for the rare radical priest who may sign articles because he believes in the pirate ideals of liberty and anarchy. Almost all pirate ships value crew with specialist skills like sailmaking or gunsmithing, but rarely give the specialist an ofcial rank or any extra shares.

PETTY OFFICERS
Petty ofcers are appointed by the captain and do not have an ofcial rank or draw any extra pay above that of an able seaman. Midshipmen and masters mates are the petty ofcers held in the highest regard, as most are in training to become lieutenants or sailing-masters. Many are teenagers, and some are as young as ten or eleven. These are young gentlemen who have been sent to sea with the hope that they will one day be captains. Some midshipmen and masters mates are much older and are experienced and capable sea dogs. Midshipmen and masters mates are typically 1st to 5th level sea dogs. The quartermaster on a navy ship is the helmsman, pure and simple; there are two or more on most ships, assisted by one or more quartermasters mates, who are also petty ofcers. The bosuns mates are bosuns in training, helping supervise the general sailing work and carrying out oggings under the auspices of the bosun. Likewise, the gunner, sailmaker, and carpenter all have mates, rated as petty ofcers. Most of these petty ofcers are 4th to 6th level sea dogs. There are several other petty ofcers within the organization of a navy ship, including the captains steward (a combined waiter, butler, and manservant), captains clerk (secretary), coxswain (who pilots the captains boat when going ashore), corporal (assistant to the master-at-arms) and even a trumpeter. These men are experts, sea dogs, or ghters of 3rd to 5th level. As might be expected, pirates rarely bother with any of the above as ofcial ranks or job titles. They have little need for ofcers-in-training, although ofcers mates are always usefulwith no extra share, of course, since they are no more skilled than any other pirate. The quartermasters mates handle the wheel, perhaps with some supervision from the quartermaster, although the latter is occupied with more important work on a pirate ship.

IDLERS
The crew of any navy ship is strongly divided by the distinction between idlers and seamen. Idlers are those whose roles do not relate directly to sailing the ship, allowing them the perceived luxury of working only in daylight hours and sleeping through the night instead of standing watch with the seamen. These idlers include the surgeon, carpenter, chaplain, purser, sailmaker, clerk, cook, and schoolmaster, along with anyone subordinate to the above ofcers such as the carpenters crew. On rated ships and on some frigates and cruisers, the bosun and gunner and their subordinates are often idlers too, since there are enough sailors on watch to handle the work of sailing. Idlers are set apart from the rest of the company; an able seaman may well consider himself inherently superior to a mere idler like the sailmaker, although he is unlikely to make too big an issue of it, since the sailmaker can probably sell him good cloth with which to stitch a ne pair of trousers. Even idlers are subject to a call of All hands, and may be roused in an emergency. The captain of a navy ship is not precisely an idler, but neither does he stand watch with the seamen. He must be ready to deal with any emergency at any time of the day or night. Although he might get a chance to sleep through the night in calm waters, much of the time he is awake from dawn to deep into the night, and in particularly hazardous or troublesome situations he may need to keep going for days on end with only the occasional cat-nap.

- Other Shipboard Jobs -

number of unofcial and semi-ofcial positions are recognized on most ships, including quarter gunners and gun captains (in command of four guns and one gun respectively) to assist the gunners mates, and a captain of the tops, captain of the focsle, captain of the waist, and captain of the afterguard, each taking charge of the group of men working that part of the ship. These jobs have evolved out of practical necessity, and are usually held by experienced and able sea dogs (4th level and up). Pirates often retain the captains of the parts of the ship, but just like the actual captain, their authority is limited. Usually they do little more than organize the work in their section of the ship. When attacking a prize, they are unlikely to be needed in their ofcial capacity, since most of the ships company is either standing by ready to board or operating the guns, with only a minimal crew sailing the ship.

SEAMEN AND IDLERS


Even among the remainder of the crew, there are signicant distinctions of both status and role. Men rated as able seamen (typically 2nd to 4th level sea dogs) are paid more and given trickier work than ordinary seamen (1st to 2nd level sea dogs). Some members of the crew have little or no experience as sailors (ghters, rogues, and other character classes). These are

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known as landmen until they have been at sea a year, by which time they are usually rated as ordinary seamen (and should have gained a level of sea dog). On most ships, the landmen and some ordinary seamen work in the waist of the ship (and so are sometimes know as waisters) and the quarter deck (where they are known as the afterguard). These parts of the ship do not require skilled labor, just brute force. Most of the landmen are young and strong, so this is a good use of them while they are still learning the ropes. Much of their work involves hoisting and controlling the sails, but is easily grasped even by newcomers, and the main sails need so many arms hauling on them that one mans inexperience is unlikely to hinder the group. They also work on the more menial tasks such as swabbing the decks, splicing and joining rope, coiling up rigging, slushing the mainmast, and lling the scuttlebutt and re buckets. The afterguard is also a good place to send troublemakers, since ofcers can easily supervise them. The youngest seamen work the tops: reeng, furling, and loosing the sails. This would be tricky enough work on at ground, but they must do it while hanging from the rigging or perched on a spar. These sailors are some of the most agile on the ship, and are often teenage boys. Despite their age, many have years of shipboard experience and are rated as ordinary or even able seamen. Older and less agile sailors work the focsle, manning the headsails and handling the anchor. Idlers who are not petty ofcers, such as the sailmakers crew, carpenters crew, and stewards mate, are either 1st to 4th level sea dogs or experts. They handle all the humdrum tasks of their particular area of expertise, so the carpenters crew spends much of their time mixing tar or pitch and caulking the planks with oakum, all under the watchful eye of the carpenters mate. Pirate crews fall naturally into much the same divisions of work as naval ones, since those divisions have evolved from simple practicality. However, pirate crews are often much larger than is strictly necessary for the size of their ship, so there is less work to go around. Pirates can afford to be lazy. Their tendency to simply steal a new ship or a new set of rigging rather than bothering with any of the tedious work required to keep their own vessel ship-shape means that there is even less to do. It is quite possible for a pirate to shirk much of the shipboard work, but probably only if he is useful in other waysa sharpshooter who spends all his time cleaning his musket, for example, will get away with it so long as he continues to prove his worth when taking a prize. The same lack of discipline that allows the lazy to avoid work also means that troublemakers cannot be forced to work in the afterguard, and so will likely be off sowing dissent out of sightrogues a-plotting indeed!

SERVANTS
Ranked below even the landmen, servants are really more like apprentices than traditional servants, and are tasked with learning all the jobs on the ship. Typically in their early to mid teens, some are as young as six or eight. This is the best path to a career at sea, and many a captain has started his navy work as a servant to one ships ofcer or other. Pirate ships may have some boys, particularly if there are women aboard too, but unless they are old enough to ght they will get no share of the loot. Some ships articles ban both women and boys, in case they lead to jealousy and ghting among the men. The captain and other ofcers may have an adult servant each, but he will not have any particular rank. This servant usually serves out of simple loyalty and ghts like anyone else when taking a prizemore of a henchman than a steward.

MARINES
The addition of marines to navy ships is a relatively recent one, but they can be vital in action, providing musket re from the tops and lining the rail ready to board or repel boarders. They are also useful to make up shore parties and guard prisoners. During day-to-day sailing, marines are required to assist the waisters or afterguard with their work. All marines are drawn from the army, rather than the navy itself. Common marines have 1 or 2 levels in the warrior class, and are led by corporals of 3rd to 5th level. Pirate ships rarely have such well-organized divisions of labor, although they may well have a number of warriors, barbarians, and ghters aboard who do little sailing work but are rst to board a prize. Some of these may even be former marines or other soldiers, since the army pays notoriously low wages.

- The Crew Roster -

o ship can cast off from harbor without a crew. A good and experienced crew can make all the difference between life and death in combat or when pitted against a storm. These may be men who have served their entire life on board a ship in one way or another. However, there are also many green crews comprised of men setting sail for the rst time. Often hired or press-ganged by merchants seeking to spend as little as possible to safeguard their prots or by navies eager to bolster their ranks, such crews can be as much a menace to themselves as anyone else sailing in the high seas. Incompetence and mutiny soon become rife on HE USSEX long voyagesthe wise captain will always make sure he has Class: Sea dog crewmen on his ship that can readily match his own abilities. Level: 1 The crew roster is used to judge the effectiveness of any ships Crew Size: 80 crew at a glance, and greatly aids combat resolution during Crew Wounds: 88 ship-to-ship combat and boarding actions. Attacks: Short sword +1 Short musket +0

A typical crew roster sheet, this one showing the newly pressganged crew of the British frigate Sussex, is shown at right. As can be readily seen, the crew roster has much in common with the monster entries of the MM, and you will notice the rules for crew combat later in this chapter are similar in many respects to the normal combat rules in the d20 System.

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Damage: Short sword 1d6+1 Short musket 3d4 AC: 10 (unarmored) Saves: Fort: +3; Ref: +0; Will: +0 Seamanship: +0 Feats: None Crew Quality: Rabble

CLASS AND LEVEL


Crew class is determined by simple majorityif a ship has three shantymen and 27 sea dogs in its crew, then the crew are sea dogs. The level of any crew is formed by the average of every member of that crew, rounded down.

CREW SIZE
This is simply a record of how many members are in a ships crew.

CREW WOUNDS
Crew wounds are used to measure the damage a crew may sustain in combat before being wiped out. This is determined by combining the hit points (or Constitution in the case of Cannon Fodder) of every crewmember, and then dividing the total by 10. Note that the majority of the crew are Cannon Fodder, who have no hit points and only use their Constitution score. Player characters in a crew do not add to this totaland only those NPCs who take actions as part of the mass of crew should be included.

ATTACKS, DAMAGE, AND AC


These values are determined by simple majority. The weapons and armor that the majority of the crew carry are assumed to be carried by all for the purposes of the crew roster. The majority is also used to determine base attack bonus and any modiers to attack, damage, and AC.

SAVES
Once again, the saving throw of the majority of the crew are noted down on the crew roster.

SEAMANSHIP
This is the average Profession (sailor) skill modier of the crew. Total the skill modier of every crewmember, and then divide it by crew size and round down. This method allows those with greater knowledge of the sea to impart their wisdom to other members far less experienced, even when in the grip of a storm or the heat of battle.

FEATS
Feats are only ever listed on the crew roster when a majority of the crew possesses the same feat or feats. The use of feats in crew combat is detailed later in this chapter.

TABLE 10-1: CREW QUALITY


Circumstances Captain has a Fame of 5-15 Captain has a Fame of 16+ Lax discipline Firm discipline Brutal discipline Adjusted Seamanship 0-2 3-4 5-9 9-12 13+ Modier +1 +2 1 +1 1 Crew Quality Rabble Poor Average Superior Expert

CREW QUALITY
This is an overall rating the crew as a whole, used for morale determination, among other things. The quality of the crew is determined by its seamanship rating (see above), modied by the abilities of the captain and command, as follows: The crew roster is used as a matter of convenience throughout these rules, from handling a ship in the middle of a vicious gale to recording casualties in combat. There are many circumstances where the GM may prefer to use standard rules from the PHB to resolve combat and skill checksthe crew roster is used when large numbers of crew members perform the same task at the same time.

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- Ships and the Sea SCHOONER


Medium-size Merchantman Draft: 1.5 fathoms Structure Dice: 4d8 (18 sp) Hardness: 5 Maneuverability: -2 (-2 Merchantman) Speed: 120 ft./12 knots Turn Rate: 4 AC: 8 (-2 Merchantman) Weapons Fore: Demi-culverin x 2 Weapons Aft: Demi-culverin x 2 Weapons Broadside: Culverin x10 Damage: Demi-culverin 1d4, Culverin 2d4 Special Qualities: None Crew: 50 Passengers: 20 Cargo: 100 tons

ailing vessels dominated the worlds oceans from the Age of Exploration in the 15th century through the earliest days of the 20th. During those ve centuries, a huge variety of vessels were invented, each taking a different approach to the combination of masts, sail area, and hull shape in an attempt to reach the perfect combination of speed, defense, and cargo capacity. At left is the entry of a typical and commonplace vessel, a schooner. The meaning of each listing is given in the following section.

SHIP NAME
This is the name by which the ship is commonly known, whether it is the actual name of the vessel, or simply a class of ship.

SIZE AND TYPE


This entry gives a simple denition of how large the ship is and how it actually functions within the game. Ship sizes use the same categories as creatures, but it is important to note the difference of scale. Most ships, as dened by the standard creature size scale, are Gargantuan or Colossal. To dene ships relative to one another, however, we need a new scaleship size. Below is a table of ship sizes, together with their creature size equivalents.

TABLE 10-2: SHIP SIZE


Ship Size Tiny Small Medium-size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal Equivalent Creature Size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal Colossal Colossal Colossal AC/Maneuverability/ Ramming Modier +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -4 -8 Hit Dice 1 2-3 4-5 6-8 9-10 11-12 13+ Example Rowing Boat Fishing Boat Frigate Pinnace West Indiaman Galleon First Rate

The ship type further denes the characteristics of a vesselits relative durability, seaworthiness, and agility in the water.

AUXILIARY
This is a catchall term covering many of the smaller vessels found on rivers and in harbors. They are also commonly found on board much larger vessels, used as lifeboats, pilots, and captains transports. Structure Dice: d4.

COASTAL
These ships are designed only for shallow and relatively safe waters near the coastline. They are cheap compared to ocean-going vessels but lack the strength and durability to resist rough seas and bad weather. Structure Dice: d6. Maneuverability: -1. AC: -1.

MERCHANTMAN
By far the most common type of ocean-going vessel, these are the ships that ply the sea-lanes, forming the vital lifeblood of trade. While stronger than coastal vessels, they are ungainly in the water and easily outmaneuvered by lighter ship. Structure Dice: d8. Maneuverability: -2. AC: -1.

WARSHIP
Vessels of this type are among the most famed of all ships upon the ocean. They are the fastest, strongest, and most powerful vessels ever to set sail. Structure Dice: d10.

DRAFT:
This is the minimum depth, in fathoms, in which the vessel can travel without running aground. One fathom is equal to six feet.

STRUCTURE DICE
This characteristic gives the number and type of Structure Dice the ship has, together with any bonus structure points. The number in parentheses gives the ships average structure points. Structure points are the nautical equivalent of hp and are used to track the damage a ship has taken. Under normal circumstances, ten full hp worth of damage must be dealt to the ship in order to deduct one structure point from its total. However, some weapons are capable of causing structural damage directly.

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HARDNESS
Ships have a hardness score, as described in the PHB. This is used only for attacks causing hp of damage, rather than those dealing structural damage. The hardness of most ships is 5, though unusually strong or weak ships may differ.

MANEUVERABILITY
This gives a base score of how agile the ship is at speed and the ease with which a crew may steer it. Modied by size and the helmsmans own skill, maneuverability is used in combat in exactly the same way as initiative is for creatures. This is also used to modify the skill checks made during piloting.

SPEED
This lists the maximum speed a ship may reach under normal conditions. Speed is given in feet per round, and in knots (nautical miles per hour).

TURN RATE
Ships are often large and can be incredibly difcult to maneuver. This rate is the number of 11.25-degree turns the ship can make in 10 rounds.

AC
This line gives the ships AC for combat and includes notes in parentheses of any modiers from size or vessel type.

WEAPONS
This set of entries list all the ships attacks, divided into facingsfore, aft and broadsides. The listing for broadside weapons describes the weapons that are available on each side. For example, the schooner shown above lists 10 20-pound cannon on a broadside. This means that the schooner actually has 20 cannons10 on the larboard (port, or left side of the ship) and 10 on the starboard (right side of the ship).

DAMAGE
The damage each attack causes is listed here, in structural damage only.

SPECIAL QUALITIES
A small number of ships exhibit extraordinary or supernatural capabilities. Such ships are highly unusual but not unknown. The full details of any special qualities are included in the ships description. This is also where any feats garnered due to advancement are listed. ABLE KELETON REW

10-3: S

CREW
A simple gure, listing how many crewmembers are required to operate the ship in optimum conditions. Any ship may set sail with a skeleton crew numbering no less than 25% of this gure (rounding up), but any actions taken by a skeleton crew are taken at a penalty to the roll, and taking additional time, as shown at right.

Skeleton Crew Less than 25% 25-40% 41-60% 61-80% 81-99%

Action Penalty No action allowed -4 -3 -2 -1

Time Penalty N/A Quadrupled (x4) Tripled (x3) Doubled (x2) None

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Additionally, ships can be over-crewed by as much as 20%. Doing so gives bonuses to all rollsup to 10% will give you +1, and 1120% will give you +2but no signicant reduction of time. Larger numbers of crew mean that you have the option of putting only the best people on a job, but there is a physical limit to how many people can t into a work area.

PASSENGERS
This is how many passengers (including troops) a ship may carry in relative comfort in addition to its crew. For every passenger space not taken up, an additional ton of cargo may be carried.

CARGO
This entry lists how much cargo may normally be carried by the ship in tons, without interfering with any other aspect of operating the ship. For every ton of cargo space not taken up, an additional passenger may be carried in relative comfort.

- Ships of the Sea Following are game listings for ships and other watercraft commonly encountered in the Skull & Bones campaign setting.

ROWBOAT
Tiny Auxiliary Draft: fathom Structure Dice: 1d4 (2 sp) Hardness: 5 Maneuverability: +2 (+2 size) Speed: 15 ft./2 knots Turn Rate: 32 AC: 12 (+2 size) Weapons Fore: None Weapons Aft: None Weapons Broadside: None Damage: None Special Qualities: None Crew: 1 Passengers: 3 Cargo: 0 tons A small, non-descript rowboat, found the world over. These boats are propelled by a single set of oars.

Maneuverability: +1 (+1 size) Speed: 100 ft./10 knots Turn Rate: 4 AC: 11 (+1 size) Weapons Fore: None Weapons Aft: None Weapons Broadside: None Damage: None Special Qualities: None Crew: 8 Passengers: 7 Cargo: 25 tons The standard template for several types of sailed shing vessels. These vessels can occasionally be used as coastal trading vessels or cargo haulers as well. They are not normally armed.

BARGE
Small Auxiliary Draft: 1.5 fathoms Structure Dice: 2d4 (14 sp) Hardness: 5 Maneuverability: +1 (+1 size) Speed: 100 ft./10 knots Turn Rate: 4 AC: 11 (+1 size) Weapons Fore: None Weapons Aft: None Weapons Broadside: None Damage: None Special Qualities: None Crew: 2 Passengers: 5 Cargo: 10 tons This is a small, at-bottomed cargo boat used for various port duties and for hauling goods.

SHIPS BOAT
Tiny Auxiliary Draft: fathom Structure Dice: 1d4 (2 sp) Hardness: 5 Maneuverability: +2 (+2 size) Speed: 15 ft./2 knots Turn Rate: 32 AC: 12 (+2 size) Weapons Fore: None (although can mount a swivel gun) Weapons Aft: None (although can mount a swivel gun) Weapons Broadside: None Damage: None (although if mounted with a swivel gun, see damage on page XX) Special Qualities: None Crew: 5 (minimum 1) Passengers: 7 Cargo: 1 ton This is the generic type of boat kept as an auxiliary vessel on larger sailing ships. They are used for boarding parties and landings. There is room in the vessel for up to a dozen individuals and a ton of cargo, although for each person left off, an additional ton of cargo can be carried. The ships boat can be operated by a single person, but normally features four oarsmen operating two sets of oars, and a single pilot at the rudder.

SLOOP
Medium-size Warship Draft: 2 fathoms Structure Dice: 4d10 (22 sp) Hardness: 5 Maneuverability: 0 Speed: 130 ft./13 knots Turn Rate: 4 AC: 10 Weapons Fore: None Weapons Aft: Culverin x 2 Weapons Broadside: Culverin x 8 Damage: Culverin 2d4 Special Qualities: None Crew: 50 Passengers: 10 Cargo: 80 tons

FISHING BOAT (YAWL, DHOW, LUGGER, ETC.)


Small Coastal

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Draft: 2 fathoms Structure Dice: 2d6 (7 sp) Hardness: 5

These vessels are primarily merchant vessels, though they are so famous for their speed and toughness that they have the warship type in Skull & Bones. Sloops are a common sight in the Caribbean, ferrying sugar and rum to the colonies of the Atlantic coast or operating as smugglers in and among the islands themselves.

Special Qualities: None Crew: 50 Passengers: 20 Cargo: 100 tons Schooners are a common site in the Caribbean, built with a shallow draft to make them more useful closer in to the islands. Their speed and ability to enter shallow coves where larger vessels founder make schooners an ideal choice for smugglers, pirates, and blockade-runners.

SCHOONER
Medium-size Merchantman Draft: 1.5 fathoms Structure Dice: 4d8 (18 sp) Hardness: 5 Maneuverability: -2 (-2 Merchantman) Speed: 120ft./12 knots Turn Rate: 4 AC: 8 (-2 Merchantman) Weapons Fore: Demi-culverin x 2 Weapons Aft: Demi-culverin x 2 Weapons Broadside: Culverin x10 Damage: Demi-culverin 1d4, Culverin 2d4

BRIGANTINE
Large Merchantman Draft: 2.5 fathoms Structure Dice: 6d8 (27 sp) Hardness: 5 Maneuverability: -3 (-2 Merchantman,1 size) Speed: 120 ft./12 knots Turn Rate: 3 AC: 7 (-2 Merchantman, -1 size)

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AC: 6 (-2 Merchantman, -2 size) Weapons Fore: Demi-culverin x 4 Weapons Aft: Demi-culverin x 6 Weapons Broadside: Culverin x 24 Damage: Demi-culverin 1d4, Culverin 2d4 Special Qualities: None Crew: 200 Passengers: 60 Cargo: 160 tons These immense cargo vessels are used to ferry wealth and trade back and forth between the West Indies and Europe, and are among the most sought-after prizes in the Caribbean. This is an amazingly well armed merchant vessel, with two gun decks sporting 12 cannons on each side.

GALLEON
Gargantuan Merchantman Draft: 4.5 fathoms Structure Dice: 12d8 (27 sp) Hardness: 5 Maneuverability: -3 (-2 Merchantman, -4 size) Speed: 120 ft./12 knots Turn Rate: 2 AC: 4 (-2 Merchantman, -4 size) Weapons Fore: Culverin x 4 Weapons Aft: Culverin x10 Weapons Broadside: Culverin x 16, Demi-cannon x 16 Damage: Culverin 2d4, Demi-cannon 3d4 Special Qualities: None Crew: 200 Passengers: 60 Cargo: 400 tons The legendary prize-ships of the Spanish eet, used to cart gold and silver from their mines in Central and South America to the crown back in Spain. These vessels represent the ultimate goal of any pirate, although by the late 17th and early 18th century they are rarely encountered. The galleon is also viciously armed with massive cannons on two gun decks, making taking one as a prize even rarer.

Weapons Fore: None Weapons Aft: Culverin x4 Weapons Broadside: Culverin x 10 Damage: Culverin 2d4 Special Qualities: None Crew: 120 Passengers: 50 Cargo: 100 tons A good-sized merchant vessel, and the most common variety used by pirates in the Caribbean. This class of vessel is so commonly used by criminals that the name of the class comes from the word brigand.

PINNACE
Large Merchantman Draft: 3 fathoms Structure Dice: 8d8 (35 sp) Hardness: 5 Maneuverability: -4 (-2 Merchantman, -1 size, -1 circumstance (see description)) Speed: 110 ft./11 knots Turn Rate: 3 AC: 7 (-2 Merchantman, -1 size) Weapons Fore: None Weapons Aft: Demi-culverin x 6 Weapons Broadside: Demi-cannon x 12 Damage: Demi-culverin 1d4, Culverin 2d4 Special Qualities: None Crew: 180 Passengers: 50 Cargo: 120 tons A large, three-masted merchant vessel. Often used to ferry cargo across the Atlantic due to their sturdy construction. Unfortunately, they are not maneuverable when compared to brigantines, sloops, or schooners, and are not valued for their combat ability despite being tough and well armed.

CORVETTE
Medium-size Warship Draft: 3 fathoms Structure Dice: 4d10 (22 sp) Hardness: 5 Maneuverability: 0 Speed: 130 ft./13 knots Turn Rate: 3 AC: 10 Weapons Fore: None Weapons Aft: Demi-culverin x 2 Weapons Broadside: Culverin x 12 Damage: Demi-culverin 1d4, Culverin 2d4 Special Qualities: None Crew: 70 Passengers: 20 Cargo: 80 tons Corvettes are the smallest military vessels, and are used to escort larger vessels, scout regions, and chase down smugglers and pirates. Squadrons of corvettes are often sent out as pirate hunters.

WEST INDIAMAN
Huge Merchantman Draft: 4 fathoms Structure Dice: 9d8 (40 sp) Hardness: 5 Maneuverability: -4 (-2 Merchantman, -2 size) Speed: 120 ft./12 knots Turn Rate: 2

FRIGATE
Medium-size Warship Draft: 3 fathoms Structure Dice: 5d10 (30 sp) Hardness: 5 Maneuverability: 0 Speed: 130 ft./13 knots

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Turn Rate: 3 AC: 10 Weapons Fore: None Weapons Aft: Demi-culverin x 4 Weapons Broadside: Culverin x 16 Damage: Demi-culverin 1d4, Culverin 2d4 Special Qualities: None Crew: 100 Passengers: 20 Cargo: 80 tons Ranking just below the ships of the line, a frigate is sometimes referred to as a fth rate. They are often sent on the same duties as corvettes, serving as the command vessel for a squadron of the smaller ships. Single frigates are found on patrol duty on the shipping lanes, making this the most common variety of military vessel encountered by pirate crews.

Special Qualities: None Crew: 250 Passengers: 50 Cargo: 120 tons Third rate warships are the most commonly encountered vessel found in the navies of England, France, and Spain. With their massive repower and hardened wood siding, these vessels spell a quick death for any pirate crew reckless enough to engage one in combat.

SECOND RATE
Gargantuan Warship Draft: 5 fathoms Structure Dice: 12d10 (66 sp) Hardness: 6 Maneuverability: -4 (-4 size) Speed: 130 ft./13 knots Turn Rate: 1 AC: 6 (-4 size) Weapons Fore: Culverin x 6 Weapons Aft: Culverin x10 Weapons Broadside: Cannon x18, Demi-cannon x 18 Damage: Culverin 2d4, Demi-cannon 3d4, Cannon 4d4 Special Qualities: None Crew: 350 Passengers: 75 Cargo: 175 tons These vessels ll the role of capital ships: they serve as command ships, regional agships, and symbols of naval might. Most of these military vessels are engaged in defense in the Old World, and they are exceedingly rare in the Caribbean.

FOURTH RATE
Large Warship Draft: 3 fathoms Structure Dice: 7d10 (42 sp) Hardness: 5 Maneuverability: -1 (-1 size) Speed: 110 ft./11 knots Turn Rate: 2 AC: 9 (-1 size) Weapons Fore: Demi-culverin x4 Weapons Aft: Demi-culverin x4 Weapons Broadside: Culverin x28 Damage: Demi-culverin 1d4, Culverin 2d4 Special Qualities: None Crew: 200 Passengers: 50 Cargo: 100 tons Fourth rate vessels are the smallest ships of line. Their duties roughly correspond to those of a modern-day destroyerprimarily patrol, border defense, and the escort of larger warships. They are almost as well armed as their larger sisters, but are more maneuverable and able to operate in shallower waters. This is the most common type of vessel used by the Dutch navy.

FIRST RATE
Colossal Warship Draft: 5 fathoms Structure Dice: 14d10 (77 sp) Hardness: 7 Maneuverability: -8 (-8 size) Speed: 130 ft./13 knots Turn Rate: 1 AC: 2 (-8 size) Weapons Fore: Culverin x 10 Weapons Aft: Culverin x12 Weapons Broadside: Cannon x22, Demi-cannon x22 Damage: Culverin 2d4, Demi-cannon 3d4, Cannon 4d4 Special Qualities: None Crew: 450 Passengers: 100 Cargo: 200 tons Run away. Very quickly. These are the most massive sailing vessels ever builtoating fortresses capable of obliterating nearly any opponent with massive barrages of re. They possess three gun decks and hardened timbers, which more than make up for their near-total lack of maneuverability.

THIRD RATE
Huge Warship Draft: 4 fathoms Structure Dice: 9d10 (50 sp) Hardness: 6 Maneuverability: -2 (-2 size) Speed: 130 ft./13 knots Turn Rate: 2 AC: 8 (-2 size) Weapons Fore: Demi-culverin x4 Weapons Aft: Demi-culverin x6 Weapons Broadside: Demi-cannon x 16, Culverin x 16 Damage: Demi-culverin 1d4, Culverin 2d4, Demicannon 3d4

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- SAILING -

hile sailing, a ships speed at sea is determined by many factors, including: Wind (including both the power of the wind and the ships bearing), sails, and the design of a vessel. In Skull & Bones, we also modify this by the quality of the crew. Before we begin, here are a couple of quick denitions for landlubbers that will help you understand the rules:

A nautical mile is based on the circumference of the earth. If you were to cut the earth in half at the equator, you could pick up one of the halves and look at the equator as a circle. You could divide that circle into 360 degrees. You could then divide a degree into 60 minutes. A minute of arc on the planet is one nautical mileequivalent to 1.1508 miles, or 6,076 feet, in the English measurement system (or 1,852 meters). A knot is a unit of measure for speed, equal to one nautical mile per hour.

TABLE 10-4: WIND SPEED


Wind Speed (Knots) 0 1-12 13-23 24-35 36-58 59-85 86+ 0 1-3 4-6 7-10 1-15 16-20 21+

Wind Force Calm Light Moderate Strong Severe Windstorm Hurricane

Speed Limit (Knots)

WIND SPEED
Wind speed falls into one of the following categories, corresponding to those described in the core rules. Speed limit represents the speed that a ship can attain in these conditions. This is roughly equal to 1/4 of the wind speed, for those GMs who want to gure exact translations.

BEARING
A ships speed is modied by its bearing to the wind. These are determined by using a compass with 32 pointswith each point corresponding to 11.25 degrees of the circle (8 points for every 90 degrees). Place the ship in the center of the compass, pointed straight upward. The wind direction can then be determined, and the speed modier found. Note that the best result is to ride with the wind quartering, which allows all of the sails to be lled without blocking any other sail (which is the case when the wind is directly aft).

NW

NE

TABLE 10-5: BEARING


Wind Bearing 0-2 points off the bow 3-4 points off the bow 5-6 points off the bow Larboard or starboard +1/-1 3-6 points off the aft 0-2 points off the aft Description Dead Hauling Beating Reaching Quartering Running Modier no movement possible -0.9 -0.5 -0.25 None -0.1

W
SW

E S
Se

SAILS
Speed is also modied by how much canvas is on the masts.

TABLE 10-6: SAILS


Sail No sail Minimum sail Fighting sail Plain sail Full sail Extra sail Speed Modier No movement -50% -20% No modier +20% +50% Description Ship will drift unless anchored. Headsails and driver only . . . enough to give the ship headway. Topsails, which are running reefed (half deployed) All mainsails and topsails. All mainsails, topsails, topgallants, and royals. Fast and hard to maneuver. (-2 to maneuver checks) As full, but with every extra piece of canvas strapped on to any surface that will take itstudding sails, courses, gaff sails, staysails, etc. Hard to handle, but blindingly fast. (-5 to maneuver checks)

SPEED

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Each ship has a speed rating indicating the best speed possible, expressed in knots. Speed is based on the shape of the hull, the number of the sails, the strength of the masts, and the relation between the weight of the ship to the area of her sails. If this speed is exceeded, the ship must reduce speed (either through changing direction or lowering sails) or start to take 1 structure point every 3 rounds in stress damage to the masts

CREW MODIFIERS TO SPEED


A ships speed is modied by the experience of her crew as follows. Note that this modies the ships speed rating, not its current speed. A good crew knows how to push a vessel beyond its designed specications.

TABLE 10-7: CREW MODIFIERS TO SPEED


Crew Quality Rabble Poor Average Superior Expert Speed Modier 3 knots 2 knots No modier +2 knots +3 knots

DAILY MOVEMENT RATES


This table gives daily movement rates in nautical miles per day, based on the speed in knots:

RUNNING AGROUND
If a ship enters waters that are shallower than its draft, it runs aground. The ship takes structural damage equal to 20% of its speed in knots, rounded down. For example, running aground at 8 knots deals 2 points of structural damage. The ships speed immediately drops to 0. To move again, the ship needs to either wait for the tide to shift and re-oat the vessel (up to 6 hours), or try to drag the ship into deeper waters by either towing with ships boats, or by boating the anchor out to its full length and pulling the ship along by reeling in the anchor. Either of these methods requires a Profession (sailor) check at DC 15. The base time for such an attempt is 4 hours, minus 30 minutes for every point by which the roll is made, to a minimum of 30 minutes

TABLE 10-8: DAILY MOVEMENT RATES


Knots 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Daily Movement 24 48 72 96 120 144 168 192 216 240 264 288 312 336 360

- Winds and Tides -

he tides and weather are a major element of pirate tales: awesome tropical storms tearing violently through the rigging, hurling men overboard; great waves that threaten to capsize even the mightiest galleon; fears of being becalmed for weeks in the doldrums.

As in any game, natural forces are the provenance of the GM. A Skull & Bones GM should get into the habit of describing weather and tide conditions as a matter of course, just as she would describe the lighting conditions in a dungeon-delving game. Extra care should be taken in describing environmental factors to characters with the Knowledge (sea lore) skill. The following descriptions of typical winds and currents in the Caribbean are intended as a game aid for the GM, not as part of the rules. If an easterly wind is essential to her plans for the scenario, there is an easterly wind, even if the map says it should be a westerly. After all, there are many more factors that could inuence the wind direction, including other environmental effects and the interference of bokors or Loa. Information in the winds section is designed to enable a PC with the Knowledge (navigation) skill to plot the best course to a destination. The tides section is designed to help the GM determine which direction a ship travels when the characters have no control over its motion; for example, when a hurricane blows them off-course, or their sails are burned and useless. Finally, the GM can refer to the weather section to select a weather-based challenge for the adventure.

WINDS
Winds are named for the direction that they come from, not the direction in which they blow. Therefore, a westerly wind is blowing from the west to the east. The most important winds in the Caribbean are the aptly named trade winds. The trades blow all year round as north easterlies. They are vital to ships wishing to sail to the New World. Importantly, they blow almost directly from Europe to the Caribbean, so that virtually every ship bound for the New World must pass through the Caribbean. This is one of the major reasons for both the strategic importance of the area and its popularity with pirates. The trades are among the most reliable winds in the world, but even they vary considerably in strength

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and directionabout two-thirds of the time, they can be relied on to be within 45 degrees of their usual direction for that season, and the rest of the time anything could happen. Although rather less reliable than the trades, westerly winds for the voyage back to Europe can be found by sailing either just to the north or just to the south of the trade winds. To get to them one must risk being becalmed in the low-pressure areas known as the horse latitudes (to the North of the Caribbean area) and the doldrums (to the South of the Caribbean). The doldrums and horse latitudes can cause ships to be bereft of wind, drifting at the mercy of the tides for months on end. The horse latitudes are named for the frequent deaths of ships animals whenever ships are becalmed for long periods. Local wind systems are many and varied throughout the Caribbean islands, but a sea breeze always blows from sea to land during the day, and is replaced by a land breeze at night. The sea breeze is at its strongest during the afternoon, which can be a dangerous time for landings. The land breeze can be used to assist with early morning sailings. These two common types of breeze become much stronger near to mountainous islands, since they are strengthened by breezes owing upslope in the day and downslope at night. In addition, local breezes can interact with the prevailing wind system (usually the trades) with unpredictable and dangerous results.

TIDES
Tidal currents are rarely of importance in Skull & Bones, as they have little effect on the motion of a ship under sail. In any case, they ow in the same direction as the prevailing winds. Occasionally, however, a group of characters will nd themselves adriftperhaps through being becalmed, or losing a mast, or even through losing the entire ship. In such a case, the GM is free to fudge the issue, simply deciding where the party ends up and how long it takes them to get there. Note that even major currents are unlikely to move particularly fastperhaps four knots. Smaller local currents vary enormously in strength and speed; some of them can be dangerously fast and strong within a small area as a result of eddies. These may prove to be a hazard even to a sailing-ship, since they dont necessarily ow in the same direction as the wind. A good pilot can guess where the worst currents are, and steer his ship to avoid them (Knowledge (navigation) check of DC 15, but you may Take 10 if desired), but if a ship does get caught in such a current a Profession (sailor) check must be made by the sailing-master, modied by crew quality: 2 for rabble, 1 for poor, +1 for good, +2 for superior, and +4 for expert. The DC depends on the strength of the current, usually 15 to 25, and a failed check means that the ship goes off course, or into a rock or a reef if a fumble is rolled.

WEATHER
Tropical hurricanes are frightening and devastating occurrences. They are also relatively frequentcertainly, a ship that spends most of its time in Caribbean waters would not be especially unlucky if it encountered one or more each year, usually between June and November. Fortunately, the Caribbean is blessed with such clear skies and ne weather that an approaching storm is easy to anticipatethe clouds are visible on the horizon and the sea grows choppy and rough. Even once a storm is sighted and identied, though, there may be little enough one can do about avoiding it other than running for the harbor of a protected cove. The effects of a full-scale hurricane, though strongest just outside the eye, may extend to dangerously strong winds and subsidiary thunderstorms several hundred miles from the center. For the most part, storms occur when the GM wants them to. To be fair to the players, he should ensure that those who make their Knowledge (sea lore) checks get plenty of warning about an approaching storm. At this point, its time for more Knowledge (sea lore) checks to predict the storms path; Profession (sailor) checks to batten down hatches, reef all sail, and lash down or get below anything that might move about dangerously in a storm; and Knowledge (navigation) checks to take the ship in the desired new direction without tearing her bottom open on a reef. At this point the GM should have an idea how big and dangerous the storm is: is it a storm or a fullblown hurricane? How easy is it to avoid? How much damage will it do to the ship, in a best-case scenario? How about worst-case? As a general guideline, a ship caught in a tropical storm suffers 1d6 structure points of damage each day, modied by crew quality: +2 for rabble, +1 for poor, 1 for good, 2 for superior, and 4 for expert. A bad storm inicts 2d6 structural points a day, and a hurricane 3d6 or even more, with the same modiershowever good your crew are, a hurricane will still send you to Davy Jones Locker eventually. Each natural roll of 5 or 6 on any one of the damage dice results in critical damage, unless the crew quality is superior or expert, in which case only a natural 6 causes critical damage. Of course, the ships carpenter is in his element in a storm, desperately making repairs to the ship to prevent her from sinking. A storm may well last up to a week or more if a vessel cannot break away from it, since the storm will propel the ship along with it. The damage done each day may be a gradual process, but inevitably there are one or two moments of heavy damage each day, when a mast or yard is torn away or the ship is holed. The GM should consider rolling storm damage in secret, and only describing the more obvious effects of the damage.

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Once a ship is caught in a storm, no sail can be used (it would be torn away, along with yards and possibly masts). At this point any steering will have little effect on the ships course, but an attempt to steer for clearer weather may be made, with two or more strong sailors wrenching at the wheel under the direction of a sea ofcer, who must attempt a Knowledge (sea lore) check (DC 20) once a day to order the best route to be steered. One day is sufcient to steer away from a storm, or two days in a row from a bad storm, or three days from a hurricane. Alternatively, the captain may elect to drop anchors and wait out the storm. This reduces the damage taken each day while the ship is caught in the storm, but it is always tricky to guess precisely how long the storm will last, so it may take more damage in the long run. Of course, in this case there is more time for the carpenters crew to repair damage, too. A ship that drops anchors during a storm reduces the daily damage by 2.The chance of critical damage is unaffected, but if critical damage does occur there is a +5 modier to the critical damage table. Other hazards abound during a storm. The deck and rigging are slick and dangerous. Objects that are not properly tied down may swing or y out, knocking crew members unconscious or overboard. A particularly savage gust of wind may blow people off their feet or snap a mast in two. All sorts of skill checks are commonplace, as are Reex saves to avoid hazards and Fortitude saves to endure the harsh conditions. Guidelines for typical hazards are given in the following section, but the GM is always free to discard whichever of them she chooses, including critical damage, and handle storms in a more free-form or narrative way. The GM should always have an idea of the purpose of a storm before she incorporates it into her adventureis it going to scare the players and keep them aware of the dangers of the sea, or be a tough challenge for them, or does it need to sink their ship so she can strand them on a desert island for the next phase of the adventure? Is it a plot device to blow them off course, forcing them to land to do repairs on the nearest island, which happens to be home to the cannibalistic Caribs that the next scenario is built around? Of course, it is important that the players actions have an inuence on the outcome of the event, but against such an implacable force as a tropical hurricane, it is not unreasonable for their greatest victory to be saving vital stores from the ship before it sinks!

HAZARDS AND CONSEQUENCES OF A STORM OR HURRICANE


The following situations are often faced by passengers and crew onboard sailing ships in a storm. They are particularly threatening to those who are attempting to keep the ship steady, or who may be engaged in battle.

SLIPPERY DECKS
If youre a sensible sort of tar, and go about barefoot, this shouldnt be too much of a problem. If youre some kind of dandy in bucket-topped boots, youll be tossed all over the deck. After two minutes of a typical rainstorm, the decks are slick as ice. Each hour that you spend on deck, you must make a Balance check (DC 15) or fall over. If youre wearing footwear of any kind, you suffer a 4 circumstance penalty on this check. If you fall over, you take only 1d3 points of damage (you dont fall as far as if you got blown over). You may make another balance check the following round to get up again. It is possible to Take 10 on any or all of these balance checks.

STRONG GUSTS OF WIND DURING A STORM


First attempt a Knowledge (sea lore) check (DC 20) to see if you are aware of subtle clues that indicate the already strong wind is about to become dangerous. If you succeed, you gain a +5 bonus to your Reex save in the following process. If you succeed by 10 or more, you have time for a single standard or move action a moment before the gust occurstime to shout a warning, granting anyone within earshot (halved during a storm) the chance to get a +5 bonus too, or time to hold on to the nearest handhold yourself without need for a Reex save. For a typical strong gust, if you havent already stated that youre lashing yourself to your post or holding on to something solid, make a Reex save (DC 15) to grab the nearest handhold until the gust passes. If you fail, you fall over and take 1d6 damage from whatever breaks your fall. If you fall from the rigging you take standard falling damage for the distance fallen. Even if you are holding on to something (either through already deciding to, or through grabbing it by making your save), you need to make a Strength check (DC 10) or lose your grip and fall anyway.

STRONG GUSTS OF WIND DURING A HURRICANE


As above, except that the DC of the Reex save and the Strength check are both raised by 5 or even 10. In addition, anyone who fails the Reex save must make a second Reex save at the same DC to grab another handhold wherever they end up, in order to avoid being blown overboard entirely.

FLYING OBJECTS
Almost every ship has objects on deck that need to be made fast (tied down) during a stormlivestock, if nothing else! Even navy ships often have an untethered goat or two wandering the deck. Pirate ships, particularly undisciplined ones, may have cows, badly built lean-tos, piles of old rope, boarding axes, swivel guns, boxes of tobacco, bottles of rum, barrels of nails, and all sorts of other junk lying around. In most cases, even the most extreme mess can be cleared between the time a storm is sighted and the time it hits the ship, so long as the crew reacts quickly and efciently. A crew of only rabble quality always has 1d20 objects scattered about the ship, and are able to clear up no more than half of them (round down) before the storm hits. A poor crew will have only d12 objects, and clear up three quarters of them (round down) before the storm. An average or better crew always clears the decks entirely before a storm unless they are somehow prevented, in which case it should be assumed that there are 1d4 loose objects on deck. Any loose objects are picked up and hurled about by the wind within the rst few hours of a storm: each will strike one random member of the crew for d6 damage (Reex save, DC 15, +4 circumstance bonus if only a skeleton crew is on the deck). The real problems with ying objects start to occur if the ship comes apart. Falling yards and snapped masts are particularly dangerous. Although masts are massive, solid pieces of hardwood, they frequently snap even in moderate storms. Storm damage often breaks something on deck, since the yards, rigging, bulwarks, and masts are much more exposed than the body of the ship. For more information about this, see the critical damage section on the next page.

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CRITICAL DAMAGE
Any damage to a ship in a storm has a chance to cause serious problems, from snapped masts to a hole below decks that threatens to sink the ship. Each time a natural 5 or 6 is rolled on one of the storm damage dice, the GM should roll 1d20 on the following table to determine critical damage, with a +5 circumstance modier if the ship is anchored. A ship that has already lost a mast in a particular area, or that never had that mast in the rst place, can ignore any roll that would affect that mast, or the rigging or yards attached to it. This means that two-masted ships like sloops are less vulnerable to critical damage than warshipsbut they are still likely to sink far quicker, given their lower structure points. In a severe storm, the captain may decide that the safest option is to cut the masts loose and hurl them overboard. If this can be done, results 9 to 17 on the above table can be ignored, since masts, rigging and yards alike are gone. Cutting a mast down takes one man an hours work with a boarding axe, or twenty minutes with a greataxe. Up to four men with boarding axes, or two with greataxes, can cut at a mast at any one time.

TABLE 10-9: SHIP CRITICAL DAMAGE


d20 Roll 1 2-8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21+ Effect Major leak Minor leak Rigging torn loose (mainmast) Rigging torn loose (foremast) Rigging torn loose (aftermast) Yard breaks off, threatening focsle Yard breaks off, threatening waists Yard breaks off, threatening quarterdeck Mainmast snaps, threatening waists Foremast snaps, threatening focsle Aftermast snaps, threatening quarterdeck Bulwark breaks off, threatening focsle Bulwark breaks off, threatening waists Bulwark breaks off, threatening quarterdeck Anchor cable breaks

EFFECTS OF CRITICAL DAMAGE


MAJOR LEAK
At this point, the ship is taking on large amounts of water. Its effective SP total is immediately at 1, and it begins suffering all the effects of that state, including losing one additional structural point per round (although it doesnt suffer the effects of being at 0 SPs, such as loss of weaponry). If the leak can be plugged, the ships pumps will gradually return it to its usual SP (less any reduction for storm damage, of course) at a rate of one SP per minute. Only a ships carpenter with the Battle Repairs class ability can repair an ongoing major leak.

MINOR LEAK
The ship is taking on water. This, in itself, is not really a problemall wooden ships leak a little, thats why they have pumps. Its still worth xing, though. A Craft (carpentry) or Craft (shipmaking) check at DC 10 can be used to repair a minor leak in 20 minutes, less 1 minute for each three points the Craft check is made. A Tiny or Small ship has no pumpseven a single minor leak on a vessel this small becomes a major leak within a number of minutes equal to the ships current SPs. A Medium-size ship has enough pumps to cope with two minor leaks (four if a warship); a Large ship can handle four minor leaks (six if a warship); a Huge ships eight minor leaks (10 if warship); a Gargantuan ship 16 minor leaks (18 if a warship); and a colossal ship 32 minor leaks (34 if a warship). Any additional minor leak above this number becomes a major leak within a number of minutes equal to the ships current SPs.

RIGGING TORN LOOSE


One random character in the rigging or on the yards of the appropriate mast must immediately make a Reex save, as though affected by a strong gust of wind, and with the same consequences of failure (including the risk of being blown overboard in a hurricane).

YARD BREAKS OFF


As rigging torn loose, above. In addition, the yard counts as a ying object (see above) threatening that section of deck.

MAST SNAPS
All characters in the rigging or on yards of the appropriate mast must make a Reex save (DC 20). Success means you can either hang on, or drop to the deck (taking standard falling damage), as you wish. Failure means that you fall into the sea, almost certainly to drownalthough as ever, you could try Rolling the Bones on the way down, in hopes of being saved by sheer chance, or you could take your chances with some difcult Swim checks. In addition, all characters on that section of deck (waist for mainmast, focsle for foremast, quarterdeck for aftermast) must make Reex saves (DC 15) or be crushed by the falling mast (1d6 damage per size category of ship, i.e. 3d6 for a Frigate or 7d6 for a First Rate). This includes characters in the rigging and those who choose to fall to the deckanyone who remains in the rigging suffers a 4 circumstance penalty on their Reex save to avoid being crushed.

BULWARK BREAKS OFF


Counts as a ying object (see above) threatening that section of deck.

ANCHOR CABLE BREAKS

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Scratch one anchor. A ship carries one anchor for each SP, plus an additional two if its a warship.

- Battles on the High Seas -

ombat involving ships follows many of the standard combat rules. Unless otherwise stated in the following section, all the combat rules detailed in the PH apply equally to ships.

MINIATURES

Miniatures are rarely required in ship-to-ship combat so long as a GM is present to adjudicate the relative positions of vessels. However, naval actions comprising entire eets may necessitate the use of miniatures, as may the simple wishes of the playersafter all, such models look good on the tabletop! We suggest using a scale of 1 inch = 100 feet for ship-toship combat, though you are free to use a different scale to better suit the size of the models you own. So long as all players are aware of what scale is being used and it remains the same throughout each combat, almost any scale may be used.

SIGHTING
The rst step in a sea battle is spotting your enemy. Locating and identifying ships and landforms are crucial for the security of the ship and crew. On most vessels, lookouts are posted at the highest point on the ships tallest mast, called the crows nest. The crows nest is often just a simple platform, although the stereotypical basket-shape is often found on merchant ABLE vessels (where getting in and out of the nest quickly is not as important). ISTANCE TO THE ORIZON

10-10: H

DISTANCE TO THE HORIZON


Sighting distance depends upon the range to the horizon. A simple formula is used to determine this, based upon the height of the viewing position: 1.17 x the square root of your altitude in feet = Distance to the horizon in nautical miles (6,076 feet, or 1.15 statute miles).

Altitude Rowboat (6 feet) Deck of a ship (12 feet) Poop deck of a ship (24 feet) Crows nest of a ship (48 feet) 100-foot fortress on a cliff

Horizon Distance 3 miles 4 miles 6 miles 8 miles 12 miles

SIGHTING DISTANCE
If you want to gure the distance at which your target becomes visible, you must know your altitude (as above) and the height of the object. You then do the same calculation for your distance to the horizon and the objects distance to the horizon and add the distances together. So, from a fortress (horizon 12 miles), you can see the top of a ships masts (horizon 8 miles) from 12+8=20 miles away. Use the formula to determine the maximum sighting distance between two objects at sea, and then modify the sighting distance by the modiers at left (any result totaling

TABLE 10-11: SIGHTING DISTANCE


Sighting Altitude 6 12 24 48 100 6 6 7 9 11 15 12 7 8 10 12 16 Object Height 24 48 9 10 12 14 18 11 12 14 16 20 100 15 16 18 20 24

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TABLE 10-12: SIGHTING MODIFIERS


Size of Target Tiny Small Medium-size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal Small Island Island Coastline Other Lookouts have Telescopes Target silhouetted in sun Target is lit with lanterns Time of Day Dawn/Dusk Day, Cloudy Day, Bright Night, New Moon Night, Cloudy Night, Moon Night, Full Moon Weather Haze Light Rain Steady Rain Downpour Fog Modier -60% -50% -30% -20% -10% +0% +10% +20% +40% +80% Modier +20% +20% +40% Modier -20% -20% 0% -80% -60% -50% -40% Max Distance 1d6 +6 miles 1d4+4 miles 1d4+1 miles 1d4 miles 1d20 x 10 yards

more than 100% equals 100%it is not possible to exceed that gure). Weather also affects sighting, although it doesnt simply reduce the percentages. Weather gives a maximum limit to sighting distance, as at left. The resulting number gives the maximum distance at which the target can be sighted. Making the sighting is a Profession (sailor) skill check (use the crews Seamanship rating for NPC lookouts), with the following DC.

PROFESSION (SAILOR) SKILL CHECK


% of Max Distance 100-75% 74-50% 49-25% Less than 25% DC 25 20 15 10

TO QUARTERS!
Naval captains issue a set of standing orders (a quarter bill) to allot each crewmember a specic station (quarter) that he must man whenever the ship is in combat. Each captains quarter bill is slightly different, because although all undergo much the same training in tactics, each will have a different idea as to how best to apply those tactics, depending on the size of his ship, the nature of his mission, the kind of opposition he anticipates, and his own particular preferences. Each player character onboard a naval ship has a specic duty post assigned to which he must report during battle preparations, and possibly stay for the entire combat.

If the sighting is missed, make additional checks any time the target changes range increments on the above table, or every 30 minutes if the target maintains its distance. If the check exceeds the DC by 5, the lookout can tell the size of the vessel, and whether shes a military ship or merchantman. If the check exceeds the DC by 10, the lookout can also tell her country of origin and style of manufacturea Spanish galleon, or a Dutch west indiaman, for example. Note that this indicates only the original source of manufacture, not the current ownership or allegiance, which can only be determined by the ag own. If the check exceeds the DC by 15, the lookout can also see what ag shes ying. For this reason, lookouts often continue to roll as the target gets closer, even after a successful Spot checkto amass more information about the target as it draws near. After all, it would be a nasty surprise to change course to intercept potential prey, only to discover upon engagement that they are, in fact, a rst rate ship of the Royal Navy.

INITIATIVE
Before the rst round of ship-to-ship combat begins, each ship makes an initiative check. An initiative check is made with 1d20 + the ships maneuverability score. Important individuals (captains, other high-level NPCs, and of course PCs) also make initiative checks at this time, as per the normal rules.

ROUNDS
Ship-to-ship combat is broken up into standard six-second rounds. Each combat round is broken down into the following phases. 1. Initiative 2. Movement (including altering sail) 3. Attack

MOVEMENT
Ships move in reverse order of initiative, so that the winner gets to react to the movements of his opponent. Every ship has a speed measured in feet. The ship may move this distance each round. During this phase of the round, a captain may also order the sails altered, adding or subtracting canvas to adjust speed. As described previously, the six levels of sail are as follows: no sail, minimum sail, ghting sail, plain sail, full sail and extra sail. Moving from one level of sail to another takes time based on the quality of the crew. See the chart at right.

TABLE 10-13: CREW MOVEMENT EFFECT


Crew Quality Rabble Poor Average Superior Expert Base Sail Change 20 rounds 15 rounds 10 rounds 6 rounds 3 rounds

TURN RATE
Compared to creatures, ships are ungainly and sluggish in their movement. The turn rate for each ship lists how many 11.25 degree (one point on the 32-point compass) turns the ship may make in 10 rounds.

ATTACK
When ships are engaged, the battle is resolved according the following rules.

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Attack Roll: 1d20 + base attack bonus + range penalty against the target vessels AC.

DAMAGE
The majority of attacks in the d20 System deal damage in hit points. However, ships suffer damage in terms of structure points. These two types of damage mesh together with one simple rule: an attack must cause ten full hit points worth of damage to deal one structure point of damage to a ship. Any lesser amount is ignored and disregarded, the attack simply bouncing off the hull of the ship. All ships also have a hardness score, so it will quickly become apparent that a lot of damage needs to be inicted upon a ship to have any discernible effect. However, this does mean incredibly strong creatures and potent spells have a chance of damaging a vessel. Cannons and re deal damage directly to a ships structure points. Hardness is never applied to structural damage, as such attacks are simply too powerful.

RELOADING CANNONS
After ring, a cannon takes between 12 and 30 rounds (2 to 5 minutes) to reload and aim. This reload time is based on crew quality and various modiers, as shown on Table 10-14.

TABLE 10-14: CREW RELOAD MODIFIERS


Crew Quality Rabble Poor Average Superior Expert Circumstances Minimum crew Half crew Expert Gunner feat Base Reload Time 30 rounds 24 rounds 20 rounds 16 rounds 12 rounds Reload Modier As a crew two steps worse As a crew one step worse -2 rounds

ARMOR CLASS
A ships AC is the result needed for an enemy to successfully make an attack roll. AC: 10 + maneuverability + size modier

STRUCTURE POINTS
Structure points represent how much damage a ship can take before it begins to sink.

ATTACK OPTIONS
When attacking, a ship has several basic options: attack, ram, or attempt to board.

ATTACK
A ship may move and attack, or attack and move.

RAM
The ramming ship moves in a straight line up to its base speed, and then makes a ram attack with a +2 ram bonus on the attack roll. The ship suffers a 2 penalty to its AC for one round.

BOARD
A ship may move up to its base speed and launch a boarding action upon any enemy it comes into contact with. Boarding actions are described later in this chapter.

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CREW
Any crewmember not actively engaged in a function of the ship (steering, rigging, weapons, and so on) may ght normally. He can make attacks, cast spells, run and hide, or take any other permissible action.

ATTACKS OF OPPORTUNITY
A ship provokes an attack of opportunity only when attempting to ram or board another ship. An attack of opportunity made by a ship may use every weapon at its disposal. A ship may only make one attack of opportunity per round.

SINKING
A ships structure points represent how much damage it can withstand before sinking beneath the waves. 0 structure points: If a ships structure points drop to 0, the ship is crippled. Its speed is immediately halved. In addition, half of each type of weapon carried becomes unusable for the duration of the combat. This represents gun decks taking on water. -1 to -9 structure points: If a ships structure points drop to between 1 to 9, it is beginning to sink. The ship now automatically loses 1 structure point per round as it takes on water. -10 structure points: If a ships structure points fall to 10 or below, the ship is destroyed. It breaks into pieces and sinks to the bottom.

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
The rules for at-footed combatants are not used in ship-to-ship combat. Surprise is incredibly difcult to achieve at sea and is only applied at the discretion of the GMsuch situations may include attacks at night, assaults on ships in harbor, or battles in heavy fog.

RAMMING
Ramming is a special standard action that allows a ship to directly attack another. A great deal of damage may be caused by a successful ram, but they are difcult to perform and a quick-witted defender may be able to severely damage the ramming ship before it strikes.

TABLE 10-15: RAMMING DAMAGE


Enemy Ship Size Tiny Small Medium-size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal Structural Damage 1 1d6 2d6 3d6 4d6 5d6 6d6

MOVEMENT DURING A RAM


A ship must move at least 50 feet before making a ram. All movement must be in a straight line, stopping when the target has been reached.

ATTACKING
After moving, the ship makes a single ram attack, with a +2 bonus on the attack roll. The movement for ramming ships is easy for enemies to predict, so the rammer suffers a 2 penalty to its AC for one round. In addition, the target may make an attack of opportunity before the ramming ship strikes.

TABLE 10-16: CREATURE RAMMING DAMAGE


Ship Size Tiny Small Medium-size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal Damage Caused 1 1d10 2d10 3d10 4d10 5d10 6d10

DAMAGE
If a ram is successful, damage is rolled. Both ships take damage based upon the size of the opposing vessel. The attacker (the engaging vessel, assumed to be striking with its bow) takes 1/3 of listed damage.

TABLE 10-17: LOCKED SHIP MODIFIERS


Circumstance Enemy ship is Colossal Enemy ship is Gargantuan Enemy ship is Huge Enemy ship is Large Enemy ship is Medium-size Enemy ship is Small Enemy ship is Tiny Ramming ship has no ram Your ship is Colossal Your ship is Gargantuan Your ship is Huge Your ship is Large Your ship is Medium-size Your ship is Small Your ship is Tiny Modier -8 -4 -2 -1 +0 +1 +2 +5 -8 -4 -2 -1 +0 +1 +2

LOCKED SHIPS
If the target survives the ram attack, both ships are locked together. While in this position, either ship may launch a boarding action without provoking an attack of opportunity. To break free, a ship must make a Seamanship check (DC 15), with the modiers listed on the following page. Attempting to break free from this lock is a standard action.

RAMMING CREATURES
Creatures of Huge size or larger may be rammed, so long as they are on or just below the surface of the water. The damage caused by a ram on such creatures is listed on Table 10-16. Ships automatically suffer 1d6 structure points when they ram a creature. The damage dealt to the creature is based on ship size and is listed on the previous page.

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MORALE
Whether engaged in a ferocious harbor battle or ghting off pirates on the high seas, few men are willing to keep ghting when engaged by a superior enemy. A sustained attack on a ship may cause its crew to strike the colors and surrender. Morale checks are made whenever the circumstances listed on the table at right are met. The DC for each circumstance is also given, along with modiers for morale checks. If a morale check is failed, the crew surrenders. Player characters are under no obligation to surrender but from this point, they are ghting on their own!

TABLE 10-18: MORALE CHECKS


Circumstances Ships structure points reduced by 50% Ships structure points reduced by 75% Attacked by warship at least two size classes larger Attacked by multiple ships of same size or larger DC 15 10 15 10 +2 per ship

MORALE CHECK MODIFIERS


Circumstances Captain present Captain present with Leadership feat Modier + Captains Cha modier + Captains character level

BOARDING THE ENEMY


Boarding is a special standard action that allows a ship to draw up alongside an enemy vessel and launch a devastating melee attack with its crew. A successful boarding attempt allows one ship to capture another, perhaps without even damaging it, but ferocious defenders may well be able to turn the tables with a counterattack.

TABLE 10-19: BOARDING ATTACK MODIFIERS


Circumstances Vessels two size classes apart Vessels one size class apart Attackers crew size larger than defenders Attackers vessel is a warship Defenders vessel is not a warship Every additional ship attempting to board defender Modier -4 -2 +2 +2 +4 +4

MOVEMENT DURING BOARDING

A ship may move up to its base rate of movement but may not launch any attacks. The ship stops when the target is reached. The target vessel may immediately make an attack of opportunity. The target vessel must be within two size classes of the ship attempting to board or else the action is an automatic failure.

THE CRASH OF TIMBERS


To successfully launch a boarding action, two ships need to be brought alongside each other and secured. If the defender is willing to accept a boarding attempt, this may be considered automatic as the attacker closes range. However, few crew are willing to accept an attempted boarding action. As the attacker draws close, grappling hooks are thrown, all attempting to snare the defenders ship and draw it close enough for the attackers men to cross over and begin to board. The defenders meanwhile re weapons as they try to keep the attackers heads down, all the while severing the ropes and chains that are bringing the two ships together. If the defender wishes to resist the attempt, both they and the attacker make opposing Seamanship checks. The attackers check is modied as on the boarding attack modiers table, above. If the defender wins the opposing Seamanship check, the boarding action has been successfully defeated before it beganthe ships are not bound together and both may move freely in their next action. If the attacker wins the check, he has ensnared the enemy ship and may now immediately launch a boarding action.

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RESOLVING A BOARDING ACTION


The crew roster sheet is used for each ship engaged in a boarding action, since the whole crew is involved in the combat.

INITIATIVE
Just as in melee combat, both sides must make initiative checks to determine which acts rst. This is an opposed Seamanship check, using the skill of the crew or their captain (whichever is higher), but the attacker gains a +2 boarding bonus. If either captain has the Leadership feat, a further bonus of +2 may be added to this roll. The crew that rolls highest for initiative acts rst in every combat round.

COMBAT
Combat is resolved between crews in much the same manner as combat between individuals. The attacker makes an attack roll against the defending crews AC. If successful, damage is dealt against the defending crews hit points. Attack and damage rolls between crews are greatly affected if one crew outnumbers the other, as shown on the following table.

TABLE 10-20: BOARDING ACTION CREW COMBAT


Crew Wounds are. . . Twice enemys Three times enemys Five times enemys Ten times or more enemys 50% of enemys 33% of enemys 20% of enemys 10% or less of enemys Attack Roll Modier +1 +2 +3 +5 -1 -2 -3 -5 Damage Roll Modier x2 x3 x5 x10 x1 x1 x1 x Morale Modier +1 +2 +3 +5 -1 -2 -3 -5

MORALE
Few crews are willing to ght to the death. As the enemy swarms over the railings of the ship, slaying crew mates with abandon, many sea dogs may choose to throw down their weapons rather than risk a cruel death in defense. Morale checks are made in boarding actions whenever the circumstances listed on Table 10-21 are met. The DC for each circumstance is also given. The following modiers apply to morale checks. If a Morale check is failed, the crew surrenders.

TABLE 10-21: BOARDING ACTION MORALE CHECK DC


Circumstances Crew wounds reduced by 50% Crew wounds reduced by 75% Crew wounds reduced to one third of current score in a single round Crew suffers more damage in a round than enemy Crew is struck by enemy with three times or greater crew wounds DC 15 20 10 15 15

MULTIPLE BOARDINGS

BOARDING ACTION MORALE MODIFIERS

It is possible for a ship to face two or more Circumstances Modier boarding actions in a single turn, particularly if Captain present + Captains Cha modier being attacked by smaller vessels. In such cases, Captain present with the defenders crew must be split into two or more Leadership feat + Captains character level (though this need not be an equal division) with each section defending against one attempted boarding action. In some circumstances, this may have an effect on crew roster sheets in terms of attacks and damage, but only crew wounds will alter, as most crews are formed of sea dogs of similar skills and strengths.

CANNON FIRE
The four basic types of cannon featured in the Skull & Bones campaign setting are the cannon, demi-cannon, culverin, and demi-culverin. Historically, there were many more varieties of these basic four types, but these represent the average statistics for those cannon type near to the poundage listed. Demi-culverin: The smallest of the anti-ship cannon, ring a 9-pound shot. Sometimes called a 9-pounder. Culverin: The most common ships weapon during this time period, ring an 18-pound shot. Demi-cannon: A large-bore weapon ring a 24-pound shot.

TABLE 10-22: CANNON TYPE


Type Demi-culverin Culverin Demi-cannon Cannon Structural Damage Range Increment 1d4 2d4 3d4 4d4 100 ft 100ft 150ft 150ft

Cannon: The largest of the ship-mounted weaponsa massive gun that res a 45-pound shot.

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STRUCTURAL DAMAGE
The amount of damage rolled on a successful hit. Note that this damage is rolled per cannon. Now you see why a rst rate is something to fear with its 22 demi-cannon and 22 cannons per broadside. A full broadside from a rst rate has the potential to deal 154d4 points of structural damage, enough to sink any ship on the seas at a stroke.

RANGE INCREMENT
Any attack at less than this distance is not penalized for range. However, each full range increment causes a cumulative 2 penalty to the attack roll. Cannon can re out to 20 range increments (for a total 40 on the attack). Although cannon are deadly, they are also slow to reload and highly inaccurate at long range.

TYPES OF SHOT
Cannonballs are not the only ordinance that can be red from a cannon. It is assumed that any armed vessel has the ability to re these weapons, although deciding to use them will increase loading times as indicated below.

GRAPE SHOT OR CANISTER SHOT


Metal scrap and musket balls wadded with canvas or loaded into a sheet-metal canister. Acts like a giant shotgun, targeting the crew (-2 to attack), and deals no structural damage. Instead, convert structural damage to hit points (multiply by 10), and apply the damage directly to the crew roster. No more than 50% of Crew can be lost in this fashion (the rest are below decks, safe from this form of re). Double the standard loading time.

CHAIN SHOT OR BAR SHOT


Solid shot cut in two and joined by a length of chain or a jointed bar. Spins wildly when red. Deals no structural damage. Can be targeted at either crew or rigging (both at a 4 attack penalty). Against sails, roll half damage, and take damage as a penalty to speed (as chain rips through rigging). Against crew, use the method described in grape shot, above. Double the standard loading time.

HEATED IRONS
This is a cannonball heated until red-hot. It causes re damage as described below. Triple the standard loading time. In addition, this procedure is extremely dangerous. Make a Seamanship check with a DC of 15. Failure indicates that one or more of the heated irons accidentally touches off its powder, causing an explosion on the gun deck. One gun explodes per point of failure on the check. For each cannon destroyed, roll damage to your ship as if it had been attacked by a cannon of that type. In addition, the ship is now on re.

FIRE
Fire is the terror of ship crews, for it can spell the destruction of a vessel in mere minutes, condemning all on board to burning or drowning. However, many crews willingly employ re as a weapon of destruction, heedless of the suffering it causes, cheering as they see a proud enemy reduced to a smoldering wreck. Firing heated irons is a relatively common tactic on the high seas, used when the objective is to ruthlessly destroy an enemy rather than risk a boarding action to capture an enemy vessel intact.

FIRE DAMAGE
A re-based attack dealing one or more structure points of damage to a ship sets it on re. This re then begins to spread. This re deals damage equal to the initial damage each round, plus one for every consecutive round of burning, until the ship is destroyed or the crew controls the ames. Additional re-based attacks made on a burning ship add to the cumulative re damage dealt every round. Example: The galleon Santa Pietra has 27 structure points and is struck by a hot iron causing 2 structure points of damage. This is a re-based attack and so a re is automatically started. At the end of the following round of combat, the re spreads and causes an additional 2 structure points of re damage. At the end of the next round, it spreads further, causing an additional 3 structure points of re damage.

FIRE FIGHTING
Crews attempt to control and put out res as soon as they spring up on board their vesselthe best crews are well trained for such trials and may quickly quench the largest inferno, even in the heat of battle. Any crew may attempt to ght a re that has started on their shipthis is assumed to be a free action for the ship. A Seamanship check is made at DC 10, with a bonus of +2 given to warships, which carry elm-tree pumps specically designed to pump water for ghting res. The amount of re damage put out by the crew in that round is equal to the crews margin of success on the Seamanship check. Example: We left the Santa Pietra burning merrily away in our last example but the crew is now attempting to ght the spreading ames. They have a Seamanship score of 8 and there are currently 3 points of re damage to ght. Their Seamanship check results in a 12 (Seamanship 8 added to a 1d20 roll of 4), causing two points of re damage to be quenched. One point still remains, however, and this spreads as normal to cause an additional 2 structure points of damage. In the next round, the crew of the Santa Pietra manages to nally extinguish the ames for good.

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Grass & Sea

By T.S. Luikart

n his dream, Endeley stood atop Ogundes Hill, his face warmed by the morning sun. Kabos wind caressed his hair and the long grass as far as he could see was his to hunt in. His spear was heavy in his hand both in weight and responsibility, for the marks of ve generations were carved down its length. Today the weight was mighty indeed, for one of Simbas tribe had run through his peoples camp the night before, the life-blood of Otoos rstborn bright red on his lips and teeth. Endeleys line bore the sacred cuts of the Long Hunters and it was to him that the terrible honor of destroying the lion fell. Endeley ran through yellow grass his spear at the ready. The tracks of his prey led him on and he deftly slipped between the tall blades till he came upon a small clearing. There, at the center, the Tawny Hunter awaited him. Before it lay the carcass of a half eaten young buck. What do you want of me, Man? It whispered or it thought; Endeley didnt know which. Youve slain a child of my tribe. And? Your life is forfeit. It said nothing for a time, his eyes roaming over the grass, his tail icking slowly. Finally, it looked straight into Endeleys face and its golden eyes were not golden but the darkest blood red. This is how it would have been, Son of Aprakuru, if you had found the lion that day. You would have come upon him and you wouldve killed him or he wouldve killed you. But that isnt what happened, is it? Endeley sobbed. No. No, it isnt. The lions face smiled, in his dream. Change is coming, Long Hunter. Prepare yourself. Endeley heard a noise behind him and spun to face ve tribesmen he didnt recognize. Each one bore a stout club and a heavy net. He didnt even have time to scream before the rst club fell. What think, ye, Willy? Be it a worthy prize or a handsome folly? yelled Morgan Kilgore up to the high cross trees where Slim Will sat watching the horizon. Men shifted about on deck, some craning to see and others sharpening their blades in hopeful preparation. Maybe, Captain. Shes not runnin deep though. Looks a slaver, she does. Morgan stood lost in thought, one hand roaming through his infamous bright-red beard. The men about him knew better than to interrupt the Captain when he was thinking deep. After a minute or so, Morgan called out, A slaver, ye say? Aye. But shallown? Looks like. Morgan grinned and some of the fainter hearted men aboard shuddered at his countenance. Knock the Cooper spoke up rst. Well, Captain, whats it to be then? Morgan looked around the decks as the Fiery Roses crew regarded him, their anticipation evident. Well lads, eres what I fancy. Slim Will reckons her a slaver, but not loaded. In these waters, he gestured out at the Caribbean Sea surrounding them, and not with a haul? Ha! The hauls already in, Im thinkn. Which means the trips prot is likely close to hand. Which makes it close to our hands, eh Morgan? yelled Amos Cullins, the quartermaster. The crew roared their approval. Even so, Cully. Bring her about, lads, time to look lively. Willy! Give em a wink of our jolly mate! Endeley jolted awake, the taste of blood heavy in his mouth. It was almost welcome, certainly far better than the wretched gruel he was forced to consume to stay alive. He slowly, unwillingly, opened his eyes and took in the crowded dark hold he and the others had been chained into. The only light slipped down through the cracks in the boards above. His chafed wrists stung from the salt. If his people had ever had a conception of Hell, he wouldve thought he was in it. Sobhuza and Umbragwe are dead. whispered Ngothen, as carefully as he could. You could be beat to death if you were caught talking in this place. Endeley regarded his friend from the Heartland and as always, marveled at the intricacy of the inked markings and designs that had been carved into his esh. Better for them, then. May Olorun choose a better life for them. The Menge are afraid of something. Endeley raised his eyebrows in surprise. How do you know? There was a great pounding as they all ran and words swiftly spoken. I wanted you to hear it, but I woke you not for it ended too quickly. It is not over, though, the guard is away from the door. Endeley held up the chains that shackled him to the wall. It matters little. Ngothen shrugged. Change comes when least expected. Endeley looked at his friend, his eyes widening.

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What did you say? I said Change

A cannonball interrupted him as it blew through the side of the hold and out the other, shattering their wooden prison and slaying most within. Hit em again! shouted Morgan over the cannons roars. It makes no sense, Morgan, shouted Amos, why are they ghting? Ye can ask when were in residence, Cully. Amos laughed. I just may, Captain. Prepare to board, lads! Captain Gilberto Salaveria was cursing when Acedo found him. Cursing his men, cursing his king, cursing his god, but mostly cursing his luck and the damn pirates. Gilberto looked up as his First Mate entered the room. Well? Shes a frigate, Captain. Shell take us for sure... Sir, youve been wounded! Dark blood welled past Salaverias ngers and dripped onto the deck beside his chair. One glance at the scarlet ow told Acedo that his Captain was not long for the world. It doesnt matter, boy. Prepare to repel boarders. Sir, I realized weve trained men aboard, but He stopped under his Captains glare. They are not to have what this ship contains. Hold them as long as you can. Scuttle her if you must. Aye, Sir. Go. The surgeon? No time. The young man turned to leave and was almost out the door when the Captain said, Acedo? Sir? Youve been a ne ofcer. Thank you, Captain. Die like a man, Acedo. Dont let them take you alive. He nodded and left. Captain Salaveria pulled an intricately crafted pistol from his desk and placed it at the ready. Come on then, he whispered, well go together you bastards. Endeley shook his head to clear it. He lifted a hand to wipe blood out of his eyes and stopped in shock. His hands were still shackled, but the chains holding him to the wall had been ripped to pieces. He stood up for the rst time in two months, but fell back to the deck again as his knees were unready for and had grown unaccustomed to his weight. He forced himself upright again, bracing against a wooden bulkhead. Ngothen had been killed by shards of the broken hull. Endeley unsteadily moved across the room, over many twisted corpses, and up the stairs to the decks above. He felt the ship shudder and twist under his feet as he groped up the stairs. The sound of many warriors crying as one reached his ears and he knew a battle must be near. As he reached the deck, he saw that it was swarming with erce looking men and Menge in the clothing he had come to loathe. The cruel butcher called Acedo was standing at the rear of the ship directing his men against the erce ones. Endeley looked around at the seemingly endless sea that surrounded him, then back into the center of the battle. He held up his wrists. The butcher had the keys. Endeley smiled grimly, for his were a dangerous people. Morgan ran his cutlass through a man, drawing a pistol from the fresh-made corpse as he did so. He booted the body from his blade and shot another with the dead mans intlock. A voice reached him, clear even in the midst of battle. Morgan Red Beard. Face me. He turned and smiled up at the gure on the aft deck. He took in his uniform and the deft precision with which he twirled his rapier. Cristobal Acedo, Im thinking? Even so. To the death then? Acedo raised his rapier in a traditional salute. Absolutely. Morgan grinned, tossed away his spent pistol and wiped his cutlass on a nearby crewman. I knew twere gonna be a ne day. Endeley slipped forward, as cautious as he could be in the midst of the struggle. Several times, men with short sharp blades confronted him, but each time the men would give him a quick glance up and down before moving past and ignoring him. After the second time it happened, Endeley decided they didnt nd him a threat because he was chained and there was nowhere to go. How will I get home? he wondered to himself. He laughed at himself. Kill one lion, not the pride, he quoted silently. Ill deal with

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that if it ever comes. As he turned and looked up at his destination his eyes widened in surprise. A giant was ghting the butcher. Endeley regarded the two struggling men, rst with trepidation, but slowly, with awe. The tribesman knew nothing of swordplay, but he knew master warriors when he saw them. Endeley moved forward across the deck, his eyes focused on the struggle before him. The re-haired giant and the cruel Menge fought across the high deck, their blades ashing so quickly that the eye couldnt follow. It was soon obvious that the big man was tiring, though, for with every passing minute more cuts appeared in his long coat and his blood was owing freely from many wounds. The butchers imminent victory seemed obvious. A vicious smile was on his face as he began slowly but steadily backing the giant towards the ocean. Even amidst the sounds of the ghting, a stern quiet voice caught Endeleys attention. Change, Long Hunter. Endeley knew that voice. He turned and looked about him. On the deck a few feet to his right, a man in bright blue cloth lay in a pool of what Endeley knew must be his lifes blood, but his eyes were clear. Ogunde, he whispered. The man smiled and pointed, then collapsed. Looking about the deck, Endeley swiftly found what the man had been gesturing at. A long spear had been tossed into a pile of ropes. Endeley picked up the spear, took aim despite his chained wrists and let it y. I admit, gasped Morgan, ye are better than I gave ye credit for. Acedo smiled as he swiftly parried Morgans blows. I was trained by Caravaca himself. My family spent a fortune. Really? A rum puncher named Lathan taught me. It cost me two doubloons and a set night with a pretty he fancied. Acedo knocked Morgans cutlass away and dealt him a erce wound across his shoulder. Its comforting to see that one still gets what one pays for. He drew back and prepared a lunge that would end Morgans life. The game is over, Red Beard. The head of a boarding pike suddenly thrust out of Acedos chest. Both men looked at it in surprise. Acedo slowly slumped to his knees, then fell hard onto the deck. Aye, lad. I suppose tis. Endeley stood as straight as he could in the face of the giants approach. He was, unquestionably, the largest man Endeley had ever seen. His strange eyes above his beard of re were like carved bright chips of Damballah Wdos realm. He stopped before Endeley, regarded him from his great height. He swung his blade into the air high above Endeleys head, and the Long Hunter closed his eyes, thinking, At least Ill die on my feet. The blade whistled as it descended. There was a ringing sound followed by thumps that shook the deck as the man withdrew. Endeley opened his eyes and looked at the giants retreating back, then down at his hands. His manacles fell away and clattered to the deck, amidst the pieces of broken chain. Ye think then, that they carried secrets for ole Phil then, do ye? So it would seem. Morgan nodded. Aye, twould explain why they fought so ard. I fancy those papers in the hold maybe worth far more than pieces of eight and doubloons, eh? Amos nodded. Morgan turned away from the quartermaster and faced his crew. A ne prize, lads. Take the holds booty and stow it with the rest. Well split it soon enough. Morgan looked about as he could hear grumbling among the men. What is it, then? Well, Sir, Evans was speaking, never one to agree readily with Morgan, what about him? He gestured towards the black man standing behind Morgan. Well, what ye swab? Morgan stabbed a nger at Endeley; He saved me life. Hes a free man insofar as Is concerned. Thats all well and good, Captain. But hes worth twenty pound at Trinidad. A number of men nodded. Morgan turned and looked at the one that saved him. Whats your name, boyo? Endeley was silent for a moment, struggling through Morgans odd accent. At last he slowly spoke, En-del-hay. Well, what will ye? Endeley looked up at Morgan for a time, then he regarded the sea around them. When he nally spoke his voice was clear as he said, Where you go, I will follow. Morgans teeth showed yellow-white amidst the red and he turned back to his crew. Hes joined our crew, lads. Hows this, then, Morgan will buy drinks next time were to port to the sum of twenty pound. What say, John Evans? Evans looked about, gauging the mood and slowly nodded. Sounds fair, Captain. The crew of the Fiery Rose roared their approval and set about preparing their prize. Amos. Morgan? Set em to learnn what he must. Aye, Morgan. What is he doing, do you think? Morgan turned and looked at the African, who stood at the stern with his arms outstretched, face to the sun. The captain smiled at the quartermaster. Hes being a free man, Cully. Arent we all?

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Game Masters

Section

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Chapter XI: Running a Skull & Bones Campaign


This chapter contains some GM Eyes Only rules, along with an overview of play-styles and approaches that can make for a successful campaign. Even more, the chapter offers nine campaign foundations to help launch the GM and the players into the blood-tainted waters of the Golden Age of Piracy. Finally, a list of ships names are provided for the times when the players ask, So, whats the name of that ship in the harbor?

- Rules for Rolling the Bones There are three different times characters can be called on, or choose to, Roll the Bones. They must roll when they experience a fatal event (which includes losing all their Con to wounds). They may roll if they fall below half their Constitution in wounds and they wish to remain conscious to ght on. They may also roll if theyre in the midst of a dramatic event. Dramatic events are more or less what they sound like; ghting an old foe along the top of the narrow roof of a burning chapel would qualify. So too would swimming away from a ships wreckage in the midst of a typhoon. Dramatic events shouldnt occur more than once a game session, perhaps twice if your group runs marathon sessions. Rolling the Bones is always a matter of rolling 2d6, adding them together, and consulting Table 11-1. Thats it. 2d6, live or die. When rolling because of a fatal event, the roll is a simple one: 2-5 the character loses a life and if it is his last life then he dies. When rolling due to wound loss, add the outcome per Table 11-1 to the Fortitude Save result, which can cause a character to succeed and ght on, or expire on the spot. Dramatic events require more adjudication on the part of the GM. The result from Rolling the Bones can be added to, or subtracted from, a combat roll, a skill check or saving throw, depending on what the PC was trying to do.

s mentioned in Chapter VII, Rolling the Bones provides a mechanic to help heighten the swashbuckling feel of this d20 System campaign setting. Under certain circumstances, the GM should ask players to Roll the Bones. Doing so may help their characters survive against impossible odds, or it may speed them to an early grave.

TABLE 11-1: ROLLING THE BONES


Roll 2 3 4 5 6-8# 9* Result Snake Eyes; an utter and disastrous failure. The character promptly loses a life regardless of any other circumstances. If the character was in a ght and this result came in the midst of a dramatic event, their opponent runs them through and leaves them for dead. 20 to skill check. 15 to attack roll or saving throw. In addition, something odd occurs, and in this case odd means bad. The characters weapon breaks, a pistol explodes in their hand, they slip and fall ending up in the rigging, or similar bad circumstances. 15 to skill check. 10 to attack roll or saving throw. 10 to skill check. 5 to attack roll or saving throw. Fickle Fate ignores you. No result. +10 to skill check. +5 to attack roll or saving throw. If this causes a successful hit, +2d6 to damage. Succeed or fail, something odd will occur. In this case odd means, well, anything. All kind of unusual things occur with this result. A ying sh leaps from the depths and knocks your foe over the side, yourcharacter slips and falls only to have a cannonball impact where they hadjust been standing, etc. +15 to skill check. +10 to attack roll or saving throw. If this causes a successful hit, +2d8 to damage. +20 to skill check. +15 to attack roll or saving throw. If this causes a successful hit, +2d10 to damage. Wind in your sails. An impossible success is possible with this result, e.g. a high level bokors reball doesnt even singe the character, the character rides an explosion across a bay, and so on. If this result came with an attack roll, dont bother to roll damage, your character kills their opponent with this blow.

10* 11* 12*

*All positive results gained by Rolling the Bones (ie a roll of 9-12) have an additional effect if the character is making an attack. Driven by fate luck or what-have-you, the attack ignores damage reduction, spell resistance, incorporeality, and the like. Complete immunity, however, is not overcome.

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#A character with the Strange Luck fortune has the description under 9 (other than the bonus to roll) occur to them on any roll of a 6 through 9.

A character with the good fortune Parrot Perch/Monkey Magnet may modify one Roll of the Bones in any given play session by +1. The +1 modier can be added after the bones have been thrown and the player must describe how their animal intercedes to get the new result. Note that only a natural 12 gives a Wind in Your Sails result. A 2 cannot be modied, although as noted under the fortune the noble beast can give its life for its master.

- Skull & Bones Campaigns In troupe-style play, each player runs more than one character, but usually only with one character per player at any time. Long Skull & Bones campaigns, in common with other nautical campaigns, are well suited to troupestyle play. For example, one player might play the Captain (7th level), the Carpenters Mate (4th level), and an Ordinary Seaman (1st level). Another might play the Surgeon (7th level), the Captain o the Tops (4th level), and a Marine (1st level). A third might play the Quartermaster (7th level), an Able Seaman (4th level), and a Landman (1st level). One game session might involve the Captain, Surgeon, and Quartermaster conferring over a planned alliance with other pirates that could allow the assembly of a eet to take on the entire Spanish treasure otilla. The next might be the battle with the Spanish, which divides the players into several groups and individuals, alternating the action between each group: the three rstlevel characters in the rst boarding party, the Captain and Quartermaster directing the battle from the quarterdeck, then joining the boarding and the Surgeon and Carpenters Mate rushing around below decks patching up sailors and hull after suffering broadsides, while the Captain o the Tops and the Able Seaman work aloft on the rigging. The next might concern the adventure the Carpenters Mate, Marine, and Landman have when sent ashore to look for and cut down a suitable tree to replace the mizzenmast lost in the ghting. And so on. In this example, the 7th level characters are known as ofcer-level characters. The players should agree or vote for a player to play the Captain. Next, the remaining players should dice to determine who gets rst choice of the other ofcer-level roles, who gets second choice and so on. The other roles are quartermaster, surgeon, gunner, navigator (or master, or pilotsee the Shipboard Jobs section in Chapter X) and carpenter. If there are more than six players, additional players should play lieutenants. Ofcer-level characters are 2d6 years older than standard starting characters. The mate-level characters, at 4th level, can be a gunners mate, surgeons mate, masters mate, steward, cook, carpenters mate, captains of the tops/waist/focsle/afterguard, able seamen or similar characters. Players should choose their roles in the reverse order that they chose their ofcer-level roles, so that the captain gets last choice. See the Shipboard Jobs section and note that on most pirate ships the mate-level characters will not have ofcial job titles, just roles that they have been accepted into. Mate-level characters are 1d6 years older than standard starting characters. The various rst-level characters, called swab-level, are ordinary seamen (1st level sea-dogs, shantymen, or buccaneers), landmen (any other classes at 1st level), or marines (1st level warriors, ghters, buccaneers, or barbarians). There is no particular need to choose these characters in any order, since there can be any number of each, although it is recommended that at least two swab-level characters are ordinary seamen. Character generation is handled as usual, except that in troupe-style campaigns, starting as a higher-level character means that you get less lives than normal: 1st level character: d4+2 lives 4th level character: d4+1 lives; roll one Afiction 7th level character: d2+1 lives; roll two Afictions Fortunes are handled more or less as usual. The GM may wish to allow higher-level characters to start with a free Booty or two in addition to their standard fortunes. This is entirely optional, since even high-level characters at the start of most campaigns will not be particularly well off. Old Salt is not really suitable for any characters above 1st level, since most of them are older anyway and have more skills than 1st level characters. If it is taken, its negative effects (1 life, extra afiction) are cumulative with those for starting at higher than 1st level. As always, only one character in the entire campaign can have the Devils Own Luck. If a mate-level or higher character takes The Devils Own Luck, the GM may rule that they gain no extra lives for the fortune, or a reduced number as follows: 1st level character: d6+3 lives 4th level character: d4+2 lives roll; one Afiction 7th level character: d4+1 lives roll; two Afictions

TT

here are several different ways to put the material in this volume to entertaining use in seafaring pirate campaigns.

ROUPE-STYLE PLAY

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If you and your players have never tried a troupe-style game before, it may be best to start them off gently, with only two characters each: usually this means no ofcer-level characters. In this case, the mate-level characters will probably be the actual ofcers of the ship. Around the time that the original Swab-level characters hit 4th level and the original matelevel characters hit 7th level, you may decide to let the players generate a new lot of 1st level characters and thus have three characters each. Most of the action should focus on the higher-level characters. As a result they will probably advance the fastest. As the higher-level characters age and lose Lives, the focus should gradually shift to the younger and tter characters, with the oldsters slowing down and eventually coasting to retirement. Character death should not be a huge problem, mainly because of the swashbuckling nature of the Skull & Bones campaign setting and the lives system. By the time the rst character nally truly dies the other characters of that level should be decrepit, probably with several Afictions apiece and almost ready to retire from pirating anyway. It is rare for character in a Skull & Bones game to make it to 20th level and remain a pirate. There are rarely good in-character reasons to do so, as individual pirates are motivated either by wealth, or by some quest they must resolve. Whenever theyve accomplished such goals, they typically retire to a quieter, healthier lives. After that, they make good contacts or other NPCs, since they will typically stay in the Caribbeanand might occasionally come out of retirement for that one last job . . . Over a long troupe-style campaign, the rst batch of ofcer-level and mate-level characters will eventually die or retire and the Swabs gradually progress up to the level of Captains and Ofcers themselves, maybe even eventually retiring, too. At this point, it is often only the Ship that creates any real long-term continuity in the campaign, although no doubt even the newest Swabs will soon learn the legendary deeds of the original high-level characters. The focus and style of the campaign will no doubt have changed gradually but signicantly over the years. Some adventures focus entirely on characters of ofcer-level. This is quite common, since such characters inevitably cluster around the Captain as advisors. Swab-level adventures are also frequent, since its often the Swabs who get selected for unpleasant or dangerous work. Their inexperience and unfamiliarity with the way the ship runs will cause them to form close bonds with one another. Mate-level adventures are rarer, since the various characters at that level tend to have their own specialties and jobs to do, but characters of this level berth together and know each other well, so they may carouse together in port and the like. More common are missions led by a Mate, bringing along a number of Swabs as cannon fodder. Some adventures may mix characters of all three power levels, although these may be difcult for the GM to balance. Then again, a high attrition rate is in keeping with most pirate tales.

PIRATE HERO CAMPAIGNS


Where a troupe-style game might be said to give a good feel for life throughout an 18th century pirate ship, perhaps with a mythic feel, a Pirate Hero campaign concentrates on the legend, attempting to recreate the feel of the classic swashbuckler movies. The crew are irrelevant, an undifferentiated mass of bodies whose functions are simply to control the ship, die spectacularly and give gruff but rousing cheers at the triumphs of the hero. Just the one hero? Yes, probablythis kind of game works best with just one player (possibly two) and one GM. That way, its clear that the character is the center of his own movie, with the only other fully realized characters being an arch-enemy, a love interest (usually kidnapped by the arch-enemy at least once) and one or two sidekicks. The Pirate Hero should be generated or otherwise created with the close supervision of both GM and player. They can be of almost any character level and background, depending on the needs of the campaign. Motivation is key and the character should almost certainly have the Cause prestige fortune. The wronged Pirate Hero will doubtless have a Code of Honor, while the ruthless Pirate Protagonist is likely out for a gruesome payback and may have Heart o Flint. Swashbuckling should be to the maxthe GM should be happy to let the PC get away with far more wildly cinematic behavior than would normally be appropriate even in Skull & Bones adventures!

- Nine Ways to Run a Skull & Bones Campaign


he following campaign outlines are designed to allow you to begin a Skull & Bones campaign with a choice of several different campaign models. The theme of pirates as essentially good, but forced into going on the account by the actions of their enemies and then choosing to remain pirates to have revenge on those enemies, is a common one in pirate literature. Several of the campaigns that follow are designed to allow you and your players to play out such pirates as wronged heroes themes, if you wish. Former petty criminals exiled from home more to provide a cheap labor source than for any real crimes, ghting for the ideal of liberty. Slaves in the same position, perhaps with the added desire to free all the slaves of the Caribbean. Jacobites supporting the man they believe to be the true King. A group of mutineers with a particular grudge against the cruelty of captains and shipmasters, surely a common motivation. Even the buccaneers are often motivated as much by a rough desire for freedom and a hatred for authority as any lust for gold, although if any have been wronged by their enemies, this will usually be on an individual level, since they come from such disparate backgrounds. Most of the campaigns described can be used to help the characters identify a Cause of some sort. Most are written from the point of view of either troupe-style play or typical adventuring party style play, but most of them can easily be adapted to provide motivation for a Pirate Hero game.

POACHERS AND VAGABONDS

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The campaign begins in England, with all the party as petty thieves, thugs, poachers and the like. They are restricted as to character class. Most should start as rogues or ghters. Former poachers may well be rangers. The occasional barbarian may be aboard, a rebellious Scottish Jacobite, for instance. You may allow one or two characters to begin as sea dogs or shantymenthese are either deserters or pirates reckoned to be entirely incorrigible. The game proper begins with the group sentenced to deportation to the Barbadoes as indentured servants for the sugar plantations. If it is practical to do so, you may wish to run prologues for each player (or for pairs of players in the case of, say, a burglar and her look-out)

in which they play out part of their criminal career, eventual capture and sentencing. If you want to run a Wronged Heroes forced to turn to Piracy to Clear their Names style of campaign, you can also run such a prologue, except of course that the crime has to be one they did not commit but get accused of anyway. Once they have all been sentenced to deportation to the Barbadoes, they are sent to prison to await deportation. At this point they could each be visited by one or two of their contacts and may be able to hatch a plot of some kind. The easiest way for a contact to assist may be to wait till they are sent to the docks and either pass them a small object such as a le or skeleton key in the confusion of the port city or nd out which ship they are to be sent to and bribe one of the crew to help them in some way. Have them chained together at the prison and taken to the docks together. This gives them some opportunity to get to know one another. Marched aboard and below decks under the steely gaze of a detachment of marines, they board a prison ship bound for the Caribbean. This is most likely to be an old warship, past her days of active service. She will have few cannon, since the gundeck is taken up with hundreds of prisoners chained up. Discipline and conditions are harsh, but the PCs may be able to make contact with some of the other prisoners and sound them out for revolt; they may also, with great difculty, have a chance to establish friendly contact with one or other of the marines or sea dogs. They may formulate some plan to escape, or take the ship. Let them learn the routines (monotonous days for thempoor food, little chance to even move, possibly small groups allowed to exercise on deck for brief periods) and gauge the number of crew aboard. There will typically be 20 to 40 crew and a similar number of marines, guarding a couple of hundred prisoners. If they make their break, great, they have a ship and a crew full of men with no better prospect than a life on the account. If they dont try, or fail, you can have the ship captured by pirates thinking shes a slaver. They are disappointed to nd the prisoners are whitethey are unable to sell indentured servants, since they have none of the right paperwork. A few are allowed to join, probably including the PCs, unless you want to be really tough on them as the rest are dropped off at the next habitable island.

BUCCANEERS
This is the approach taken with the introductory scenario Welcome to the Account (toward the end of this book). It is one of the easiest ways to start a Skull & Bones campaign, because you dont need to restrict your players character generation choices in any way. Whatever their background, for some reason or another all the characters are on a small buccaneer island, perhaps Tortuga or one of the Bahamas, Canaries or Grenadines. Unable to return to civilized society, they must join the buccaneers (easy enough to do, since buccaneers came from all sorts of backgrounds too) and make their living as pirates. The buccaneers may or may not already have a ship; if not, they will have dugout canoes with which to attack passing ships. The characters are invited along on such raids and will eventually capture a serviceable vessel for use as a pirate ship. They may persuade the other buccaneers to let them keep it as their share of the prize, or they may simply be acclaimed as leaders of a large crew of buccaneers, if the ship is a little bigger.

SLAVE REVOLT
This works in a similar manner to Poachers and Vagabonds, although inevitably the tone is even grimmer. The characters should be barbarians, ghters, hougans, rangers or rogues. They will not be members of the same tribe, as the slave-takers take pains to separate slaves from those they know at every stage. So, if you wish to run a series of prologues, they should probably each feature just one character, although their experiences will probably be similar. Some will have been captured by European slavers directly, others will have been sold by African kings or chiefs, having been taken in battle with rival tribes or kingdoms, or even sold into slavery by their own king or chief for whatever reason. In any case, they face a harsh regime on the slave ship, treated not even as animals, but simply as cargo. Their captors will have been chosen for their utter indifference to suffering and are some of the cruelest crews to ever set sail. If only a third of the slaves die en route to the New World, the voyage is reckoned a success. As with Poachers and Vagabonds, the group may decide that it is possible for them to somehow overpower the crew; although the latter are far outnumbered by

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the slaves, they have the advantages of weapons and unchained bodies. Yet a slave from one of the more civilized African kingdoms may be able to pick the locks on the manacles, if he can improvise thieves picks from stolen nails or tools; or a cunning ghter may overpower a guard with her chains or bare hands. A hougan may be an even greater asset to a group of slaves, although he will nd it difcult to gather enough food for a decent Caille feast. The slaves will need to choose their moment carefully for few, if any of them, will have any idea how to sail a ship. They need to plan to either keep some of the crew alive long enough to learn, or stage their rebellion when land is in sight, sink the ship and swim to shore. You may wish to make life a little easier for them by having a pirate ship attack the slaver, in which case the characters may win their freedom by assisting the pirates (as in the Grass and Sea story) or may be fortunate enough to be captured by pirates who despise slavery and are looking for recruits rather than prots. Of course, they may decide to try to simply escape, rather than start off a full-blown slave revolt. This is perhaps less heroic, but certainly entirely understandable. Many of the original Maroons will have done just that and have no particular political aim, just a desire to live free. The other way to run a slave revolt is to wait till the slaves are brought ashore and sold. In this case, you may wish to engineer it so that the characters are all sold to the same plantation-owner. You may prefer to separate them onto two or more plantations, so that any revolt they do start has a better chance of spreading throughout the island, so long as they can devise some method of keeping in contact with one another. This can be an extremely dramatic way to start a campaign, with plantations aame in the Caribbean night, cruel overseers dispatched in desperate hand-to-hand ghting, perhaps an attack on the militias armory and an eventual escape for hundreds or even thousands of slaves into the hills to be Maroons. Some (including the PCs) may steal a ship there and then, or pirates may recruit them at a later date. The desire of individual characters to either return to Africa or make a new life in the Caribbean for themselves will certainly be one of the core themes of a Slave Revolt campaign.

JACOBITES
In Britain and Ireland, the end of the 17th century and rst half of the 18th century are troubled almost continually by battles, rebellion and something close to civil war. Traditionalists, Catholics, and Scottish Highlanders support James IIs claim to the throne, and capitalists, Protestants, and Scottish Lowlanders support the claim of William of Orange. At the start of the Skull & Bones era, 1690, William has just been crowned but his grasp of power is still weak. Scotland in particular will break out into open rebellion in 1715 and 1719. The supporters of James (and later his son, Bonnie Prince Charlie) known as Jacobites, are constantly plotting to bring down William, often with the assistance of the French and Spanish governments. Suspected rebels are often exiled to the Caribbean, but even Irish and Scottish Catholics who settled peaceably in the New World are often hounded out of their colonies and farms by government forces. This kind of campaign is best triggered by news of an event back in Europe. For example, Williams coronation will no doubt cause something of a purge in the New World, with the characters beginning the game as settled colonists whose political or business rivals take advantage of the PCs Catholic faith or rebellious past to smear their good names, usually in the hope of seizing their assets. The characters are forced to turn to piracy to avenge themselves on their enemies, perhaps with the assistance of one or two Captains that the merchant PCs had business dealings with. The characters may wish to rationalize their actions by insisting on putting part of all their prizes aside to help James efforts, in effect, acting as though they had a Letter of Marque from a not-presantly-existant monarchy. In this case, they may nd allies amidst the Spanish.

MUTINY

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A mutiny can occur on any ship, whether she be merchant, pirate or naval, but the cause is almost always a tyrannical or incompetent captain. Few sailors sign up to a ship expecting harsh discipline. Even in the navy, most captains prefer to overlook minor transgressions, or just give out a warning. Although seamen are inherently impulsive creatures, they will rarely risk starting a mutiny unless the situation truly warrants it, since the likely consequence of even a successful rebellion is outlawry.

Character classes suggested are buccaneer, ghter, sea dog, and shantyman if the group is starting at swab-level, along with the various Skull & Bones prestige classes for those starting at higher-levels. The mutiny, along with its causes and slow buildup, should be played out in whatever amount of detail you prefer. Ideally the PCs should gradually become more and more dissatised with the captain, perhaps becoming targets of his vicious and arbitrary discipline, or victims of his incompetence. Eventually they reach breaking point; they may plan their mutiny in detail and gather the support of many of the crew, or spontaneously decide theyve had enough and simply attack the captain and any loyal ofcers. The battle will likely be a bloody one, because all but the most atrocious of captains somehow retain the support of a few loyal crew and there is little room for neutrality or mercy in a mutiny. Sooner or later, the PCs will prevail, leaving them with a ship, a diminished crew, and the status of outlaws... there is little choice other than to go on the account, even if that had not been their initial intention.

ERE BE MONSTERS
In this campaign the various creatures of sea legend are far more common than even a typical Skull & Bones campaign. So common, in fact, that their existence is widely accepted and colonies frequently hire able crews to wipe out local menaces. Characters are not, of necessity, pirates in a Ere be Monsters game, though they may wish to supplement their income on occasion. Characters are hired onto ships in a manner reminiscent of whalers, but the danger pay is a lot higher, so all varieties of seamen and ghter types would be welcome. The more unusual character types could also be used in such a campaign, as they would be brought on to a ship for their greater knowledge of the unknown and the utility of their powers. GMs are encouraged to come up with wildly spectacular menaces, not all of which can be dealt with simply by killing them. While this campaign seems like a straightforward hack and slash game, it doesnt need to be. Imagine the characters slowly discovering that there is intelligence behind where and when certain monsters attack. Eventually, they nd a diabolical kraken is plotting the systematical downfall of the colonies of Europe, because they dont sacrice live victims to it like the Caribs and the Arawaks used to, or maybe a powerful bokor has decided to order the Caribbean to her liking.

THE OTHER SIDE


This style of campaign dwells heavily on the more supernatural aspects of the Skull & Bones world. The spirits of the Caribbean have been deeply disturbed by the arrival of the Europeans. It is up to the characters to either make peace or wage war, depending on the kind of campaign youre looking for. The Loa are extremely powerful in such a campaign and their inuence is felt everywhere. Even when hougans and mambos are not present, they regularly possess people to enact their will and schemes. The Inquisition will certainly be a force in such a game, as either powerful allies or terrible foes. GMs that are up for some seriously epic tales can have the nine Aztec Lords of the Night return to the earthly plane, determined to once again bring their old empire under their sway. Magic would, obviously, be more common in such a campaign but it should always remain eerie and dangerous to employ regularly for the use of powerful spells and items draws the attention of spirit world denizens.

A SALT-CAKED HELL
This campaign is not for everyone. Abandon all thoughts of heroism or good cause. A number of pirate tales involve the slow but steady erosion of sanity as a ship gets caught in irons or hopelessly lost. The characters and crew will slowly succumb to scurvy and madness aboard their doomed ship. Cannibalism will soon become an unsavory but possible option as stores run out. There is little to no swashbuckling in such a game. This campaign is tailor made for tales of morality and redemption, but it isnt for the squeamish. Variants of this tale could involve a terrible Djab systematically possessing members of a crew and using them to work its foul schemes, until they banish or destroy it.

THE LAST TALE


This can make for a fun one shot adventure or shortterm campaign. The characters are all dead men, literally. They crew a ghost ship, seeking revenge for their unjust demise or seeking to prey on the living. Players and GMs work together to make differing level characters as normal, but then overlay them with the various undead templates. Obviously, the reason for an entire crew joining the ranks of the restless dead should be a powerful one. Perhaps the characters of a normal Skull & Bones campaign are tricked by merchants and destroyed by the navy? This might give them posthumous shot at revenge.

BLENDING CAMPAIGNS
There is no reason why a GM couldnt blend several of the campaign styles listed above. If you are running Skull & Bones as a troupe-style game, you may wish to use two or three of the campaign outlines above, with the ofcer-level, mate-level and Swab-level characters thus having different backgrounds and motivations.

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For example, you may run a couple of game sessions in which the ofcers begin at 4th level as Mutineers, but lose many of their crew while seizing control of the ship from the former captain and those loyal to him. Next, you run a few sessions of the Slave Revolt campaign with a different set of 1st level characters, culminating with them joining the Jamaican Maroons under Cudjoe. When the ofcers are recruiting in Port Royal, some of them make contact with Cudjoe (possibly when he attempts to rob them with the assistance of some of the Maroon PCs and the ofcers make it clear that they would prefer to negotiate rather than ght). Eventually they make a mutually satisfactory deal involving some Maroons signing up as new crew. After a couple of years, the Maroons are mate-level and the ofcers nally ofcer-level: it is time to think of recruiting a new set of swab-level characters, possibly former indentured criminals, possibly Jacobite settlers. Its possible to draw together two or more separate campaigns (even ones previously run by different GMs) quite easily with this kind of technique. It is common for one set of PCs to lose their ship in a storm or hostile engagement and be picked up by another ship. Perhaps even by a slave or prison ship or one about to be gripped by mutiny, allowing you to bring established characters into a new campaign, rather than the other way around. These extended or combined campaigns are an excellent way to combine the advantages of troupe-style play with the benets of more traditional single-character gaming. The players will feel a good strong attachment to all three groups of characters, since you will run each campaign setting individually for a few sessions before merging them together. This avoids what can be a drawback of troupe-style play, which is that the lower-level characters are not well differentiated from one another and lack motivation. The players should end up with strong attachments to all three characters they each play, but the loss of any one character should prove to be less troublesome and easier to handle than if it are the player is only character. Ere be Monsters, The Other Side and A Salt Caked Hell are styles of play as well as campaigns in and of themselves and they can easily be paired with the other ideas. Imagine a group of poachers that nd out there are whole new breeds of creature to hunt down and that it isnt illegal in the Caribbean. Or some staunchly Catholic Jacobites having to deal with the Loa on a regular basis. In such a game world, perhaps it was the PCs that introduced Catholicism to Voodoo!

- Name that Ship! -

ne of the trickier things about being a GM involves providing an endless stream of details to make the setting come alive. Heres a list of ship names that you can consult when some player whose character is paying a visit to a port suddenly gets interested in the vessels anchored there. (The list can also be used for you to check against in regards to ship names that you may or may not have used in your campaign; simply place a check next the name whenever you use it for a particular ship.

- Legends of Piracy PIERRE LE GRAND


Time of Operation: 1620 Operational Area: The Caribbean Pierre [Buc6/Sof2, hp 45] holds the dubious honor of being the rst documented buccaneer to turn to a life of piracy. Pierre and his men had been hunting cows on Tortuga, when the Spaniards decided the numbers of buccaneers in the Caribbean was getting too large for their comfort. Driven to sea unprepared, Pierre and his twenty-eight companions soon ran out of both provisions and water. When they spied a Spanish ota that had fallen away from the rest of its eet, they swore a desperate oath to take it or die trying. To ensure that there would be no turning back, and to spur his men on, Pierre ordered holes drilled in their own ships hull to scuttle it. Pierre and his crew waited till nightfall to slip over the galleons sides. They swiftly took the captain and his ofcers while they were playing cards, and also captured the gunroom, thus seizing the ota with minimal ghting. Pierre ordered their Spanish captives set ashore and, proving himself far more intelligent than many captains who were soon to follow in his wake, ordered his men to sail back to France with their prize. His eventual fate is unknown.

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Achilles Active Adventure Advice Albemarle Alexander Amazon Amity Amy Antamasia Antelope Aquilon Arundel Assistance Augusta Aureng Zeb Bareur Basilisk Bachelors Adventure Beaver Bedford Bell Belle Isle Bentworth Berkley Blandford Blessed William Blessing Bombay Merchant Boneta Boreas Borneo Boston Bristol Buck Buffalo Burford Cadogan Carteret Cassandra Chandois Charles Charlottle Charlton Charming Mary Christopher Colchester Content Cornwall Coward Crean Crown Deal Castle Deance Degrave Delicia Delight Delivery Diamond Diana Dijoux Diligence Dolphin Dove Dragon Drake Duchess Duke Duke of York Duchess Eagle Edgar

TABLE 11-2: SHIP NAMES


Elizabeth Emperor Endeavour Essex Eurydice Expectation Experiment Fame Fancy Fateh Muhammad Favourite Flushing Flushingham Flying Dragon Forgiveness Fortuna Fortune Frances French Ranger Fury Gambia Castle George Gertruycht Glory Golden Hind Golden Vanity Good Fortune Grace of God Great Allen Great Mahomet Greenwich Greyhound Guernsey Gunjsawai Hannah Happy Happy Return Hardey Hastings Hazard Hector Henry Herman Hind Hispaniola Hopewell Hornet Indian Emperor Indian Queen Invincible Irwin Jacob Jamaica James Jason Joceline John Jolliff Kent King James King Solomon King William Kingston La Victoire Lancaster Lanceston Lark Laurel Liberty Liched Lime Little Ranger Little York Liverpool Lass Lizard Lloyd London Love Loyal Merchant Ludlow Castle Lynn Lyon Mad Dog Magnanime Maid of Liverpool Malabar Maremaid Margaret Martha Mary Mary Anne Marygold Mary-Woodly Matthew May Flower Mediterranean Mercury Mercy Mermaid Merry Christmas Milford Minerva Mocha Monmouth Morning Star Morrice Mumvil Trader Nantucket Neptune New Soldado Newark Nieuwstadt Norman Northumberland Nostre Dame, Mere de Dieu Nostre Senhora de Cabo Nostre Signiora de Victoria Onslow Otter Panther Paradox Passion Pearl Pelican Pembroke Peterborough Phoenix Pomechatraine Pompey Porcupine Port Royal Portland Portugal Princess Prosperous Protestant Caesar Prudent Hannah Queda Merchant Queen Anns Revenge Ranger Raper Rebecca

Recovery Redemption Reserve Resolution Restraint Revenge Richard Rising Eagle Robinson Rook Rosalyn Rose Rover Royal Fortune Royal James Ruby Sadbury Sally Samuel Sarah Scarborough Scoarer Sea Lion Sea Nymph Seaford Severn Shark Sheerness Shoreham Sir Edward Hawke Soldado Solebay Southampton Speaker Speedwell Speedy Return Spence Squirrel St. Joseph Stafford Stanhope Stanwich Success Suffolk Swallow Swan Swift Tarlton Temperance Temple Thomas Torbay Triumph Triumvirate Tryal Turbet Ulster Ulysses Valiant Victoire Victory Walrus Weymouth Whidaw Whydah Willing Mind Winchelsea Woolfe Worcester Wright York Young

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Chapter XII: Plunder


This chapter is to help GMs sort out just what that plunder may be. Most standard games presume that effort equals reward. In other words, if a party ghts a dangerous foe, a suitable reward is gained in the end. Sadly, our world, the world which Skull & Bones is draped about, doesnt share such a fair viewpoint. Many pirates have acquired wealth beyond avarice simply by taking a rich prize, some times with little to no effort. Others have dashed themselves to pieces only to acquire a bare stful of copper for their efforts. Remember too, that a prize worth tens of thousands of doubloons is swiftly reduced to a modest sum, once split into repairs, the common store, damages and a hundred and thirty or so other pockets. Pirates also have to contend with the fact that their stolen goods often have little intrinsic value until they have been fenced through friendly merchants who, of course, take their own cut of the prots. Fear not, we wont set you GMs adrift without a compass. While there is no direct correlation between an EL and the Plunder that would come from it in a Skull & Bones adventure, this section should give a good idea as to what constitutes a proper haul. The following listings are both descriptions of typical plunder that a pirate may need or acquire during the Golden Era of Piracy and a number of potential plot hooks.

- Typical Plunder A small prize, taken in 1715, consisted of the following: A small cargo of Rum, Molasses, Sugar, Cotton, Indigo and 25 pounds in specie (coins). Total value: 650 doubloons. A ship that was transporting goods for Spain in 1704 was taken by pirates and deemed an excellent prize. It had the following coinage on it: 40,000 Pesos {pieces of eight} in Silver Coin, 4,000 Pesos in Gold Coin, 7500 Pesos worth of Silver plates and 27 bars of Silver, each worth 200 pieces of eight. Total value: 14,300 doubloons. A massive haul was taken in 1712 off the coast of Brazil. Pirates seized a Portuguese trading vessel carrying 90,000 Moidores {a Portuguese coin worth 27 shillings} and a hold full of Sugar, Tobacco, Chains, Animal Skins and a variety of Jewelry Pieces. Total value: 182,000 doubloons.

he following descriptions are culled and paraphrased from various historical sources. The smallest prizes are seldom listed, as they yielded up no more than stores and equipment, which, while occasionally needed, are never deemed a fair prize.

- Plunder in Detail Here are a wide range of cargo and plunder-types that may fall into the hands of pirates.

TRADE GOODS
Most of the Trade Goods are listed in the Equipment chapter. Animal skins, especially for animals exotic to Europe, can fetch a high price on the right market. A typical skin, such as from a common small mammal, is valued around 1 or 2 reales. The skin of a snake, poisonous or otherwise, may bring in the 4 or 6 reales. The skin of a jaguar, on the other hand, is worth a 100 pieces of eight.

EQUIPMENT AND STORES


Not the most glamorous, but certainly the goods most commonly stolen by pirates. More than a few had trouble nding friendly ports, which forced them to make due. Pirates are notorious for taking planking, tools and any other material they deemed useful. New Cable was especially favored. Seamen frequently have to cut and splice ropes, often many times. Gradually, the rope becomes more and more difcult to deal with as it becomes covered with knots. Pirates happily took new rope from freshly outtted ships and often gave their thrashed ropes in exchange.

INDIVIDUALS
Most people, if they are traveling abroad, carry 15% to 20% of the wealth they make in a year. GMs can use the sample wages provided in A Pirates Life to determine how much passengers on a ship may be carrying. Nobles often travel with a few objects that show off their wealth as well as multiple pairs of clothing. Pirates, if they are lacking crew, are notorious for pressing coopers and surgeons into service. Never forget the possibilities inherent in a good ransom.

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COINS AND METALS


The most commonly used coins of the Caribbean are listed in the Equipment chapter.

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Silver from South America is usually turned into Cobs for transport, but was, on occasion, shipped in the form of six foot long silver bars. Each bar weighs about 60 pounds, worth around 960 pieces of eight. A more typical bar of silver weighs around 12 pounds and is worth about 200 pieces of eight. Gold Dust was a common means of exchange for several reasons, but mainly because its value never had to be debated: gold is worth what gold is worth. Those that could afford to often carried some of their wealth as gold dust. A pouch is easily concealable and doesnt give itself away with the clinking sounds that coins will typically make on a rocking vessel. 1 ounce of gold dust is worth 1 doubloon. Gold and silver money chains are often used to transport wealth. They are designed to be broken down link by link for use as currency. Chains varied from a 2foot long bracelet to a massive 15foot long necklace. Links value depended on the width of the chain. A gold link would be worth at least 1 and at the most, 3 doubloons. Silver links are worth between 2 and 6 reales.

GEMS
Pearls are a valued commodity both for their appearance and the difculties inherent in collecting them. A small pearl is worth around 4 reales. Large or exceptional pearls, some as big as a childs clenched st, are worth upwards of 30 doubloons apiece. A huge black pearl could bring 400 doubloons or more. Uncut emeralds from South America as well as a number of other stones travel frequently in Spanish Galleons. Even the most awed emerald is valued at 5 doubloons. A particularly large or wellformed piece may be worth hundreds of doubloons. A large expert cut emerald is worth 1,000s of doubloons. There are a number of skilled gem cutters in the New World, but they arent common. Securing the services of a master to cut ones illicit acquired raw emeralds could be fun. Diamonds, whether they hail from Africa or elsewhere, are always valued. Many diamonds are cut almost immediately after leaving the mines; so far fewer uncut diamonds ever nd their way into pirate hands. A small diamond, say the size of a ngertip, is worth 20+ doubloons. Large or unusual diamonds can be worth 10s of thousands of doubloons. Obviously, such prizes are heavily guarded.

JEWELRY
Crosses of all shapes and sizes are common jewelry. A simple silver cross is worth around 2 pieces of eight. A complex crucix made of gold and lined with diamonds may be worth 1,000 doubloons or more. Some crosses have far more signicance to the right people, though. A simple cross is little missed, but a gold cross from the Order of the Knights of Santiago, set all around with sapphires, is worth 500 doubloons and/or an active holy order hunt. Rings and earrings are both popular and common. Materials and maker determine their value. A sailors silver hoop earring will typically be worth a single pieces of eight, but the same earring set with a fair sized emerald is worth around 50 doubloons. Pirates believe that taking a mans earrings, unless he is dead, is bad luck. If you take a dead mans earrings, you must given him a proper burial. The consequences of not doing so are both legendary and dire, though they vary depending on who is telling the story. Signet rings are still common in this era. They are typically emblazoned with a reversed symbol that represents a government, a business or a noble family. When applied to wax, the ring leaves the ofcial imprint of whatever group it is for. Signet rings are almost always made of gold and are typically worth 5 or 6 doubloons, materially speaking, but far more if they can assist in making forgeries of various legal documents. Native gold lip plugs are worth around 2 doubloons each. A busk is a panel which is inserted into the front of a ladys bodice to hold it straight and at. They are typically made of wood or whalebone. However, certain noblewomen insisted busks made of carved ivory. Such a busk would go for 100 doubloons or more.

DINNERWARE
Sets of Celadon Porcelain which change colors when most popular poisons are introduced to them are extremely valuable. A complete dining set for eight can go for 1,000 doubloons or more. Spoons, forks, knives, cups, candlesticks and pitchers might all be made of silver. A given piece is worth anywhere from 1 piece of eight for a spoon to 10 pieces of eight for a pitcher.

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Gold plates and cups are highly valued by the Spanish. A gold plate is worth

around 15 doubloons and a gold cup is worth around 8. Kang Hsi China pieces are commonly white with blue designs, white with gold rim tracing or black enameled with gold overlays. Each piece was worth from 25 to 50 doubloons, depending on its size. Complete sets are worth even more. Glasses that are really made of glass, typically engraved with patterns or pictures, are valuable in the Caribbean. A single glass will typically go for 5 doubloons or more if it is by a famous glass blower. They are extremely fragile. Indeed, a vast fortune could be lost if a gunner wasnt careful in taking a prize with such aboard.

WAGGONERS
Waggoners or in the original Dutch, wagenaers, are never sold on the open market. In 1681, the pirate Bartholomew Sharp seized one showing the South American coast from a Spanish galley: I took a Spanish manuscript of prodigious valueit describes all the ports, roads, harbors, bays, sands, rocks and rising of the land, and instructions how to work a ship into any port or harbor. Many waggoners are written in code, making them almost worthless without a proper rudder to understand them. A waggoner grants a +3 bonus to Knowledge (navigation) skills for an area that it covers. If a character already has the Knowledge (navigation) skill for a specic area, the bonus is only +1. The waggoner must be available to be referred to for the navigator to get the bonus.

ART
Art from the various indigenous people is always valued, but the value increases sharply with the materials used. A Feathered Headdress from an Incan sun ceremony may be worth 5 pieces of eight when it is made of wood and the feathers of exotic birds. The same headdress, when it is inlaid with pearl and gold, is worth 100 or more doubloons. Mosaic Masks are common to many cultures of the West Indies. They are usually made of wood, though they may be inlaid with pearl, turtle shell, semiprecious stones, etc. A simple mask is worth 3 or 4 pieces of eight. A complex one inlaid with more valuable materials could be worth 30 or more doubloons. Common everyday items are frequently improved upon for the nobility in both materials and ornamentation. Coats of arms and complex designs are ever popular. As an example, a tradesman may content himself with a well-carved wooden snuffbox worth 3 pieces of eight. A nobleman, however, would want a silver snuffbox with enamel inlay worth 5 doubloons. Some other examples follow: Jade jewelry box with complete set of decorative hair combs300 doubloons. Gold ligree girdle set with emeralds, pearls and coral500 doubloons. Silver broach with painted miniature portrait in oils120 doubloons. Garnet fan holder30 doubloons. Bloodstone reliquary15 doubloons. A Silver Inkwell3 doubloons. An intricately engraved saddle and bridle set with rubies1500 doubloons. A dragon clasp with a toothpick tongue and an earwax spoon in its tail, hung upon a thin gold chain50 doubloons. A gold pin in the shape of a scarab beetle enameled with lapis lazuli20 doubloons. A silver perfume vial shaped like a sword5 doubloons.

CLOTHING
Clothing prices are listed on page 62. Remember that the Golden Age of Piracy doesnt yet dream of the mass production of clothing. Just about everything is handmade and costs vary wildly, but they are never low. Pirates occasionally stripped their victims naked, depending on how good their apparel seemed to be.

PAPER
The value of a book is directly proportional to the knowledge it contains. A book of ction is worth little. A centuries old waggoner, a collection of secret notes from other navigators, is literally priceless if the code can be deciphered. Stock certicates are worth as little or as much as the stock they represented. Some of the larger trading companies had stock valued at close to 270 doubloons per share. Grants typically entitled their bearer to receive whatever was on the grant. Grants vary from 10 Pesos in silver from the bank of Cartagena to The Island of St. Thomas and the sea around it for a radius of three miles. Treasure maps. Almost inevitably worthless or fake, but people still buy lottery tickets, do they not? Letters whether from lovers or governments can provide valuable information in the form of secrets, inuence and blackmail. Logbooks can hold many a tale amidst their pages.

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SAMPLE UNUSUAL ITEMS


Jade Statuettes from far CathayDepending on what the statue depicts, worth anywhere from 100 doubloons at the minimum, to 1,000s. Live animals from Jaguars to Tropical Birds. Valued more as curiosities than anything else. European zoos will pay hefty amounts of gold for live specimens. Certain clandestine groups may be willing to pay fair amounts for dead specimens as well. Obsidian Aztec daggers are valued for their inherent history and the thrill they send down proper ladies backsides when they are brought forth. They are worth around 5 doubloons each. A silver gunpowder ask with a coat of arms worked onto the side in gold. 2 doubloons A statue of the Madonna and child made of solid gold. Obviously depends on the size. A typically sized one would stand about two feet tall and be worth 1500 doubloons.

UNIQUE AND/OR MAGIC ITEMS


An ancient Olmec jaguar-embossed greenstone axe. A golden salamander pin studded with rubies that protects the wearer from re. A symbol covered puzzle box that, at times, moves of its own accord. An old yet unrusted broadsword covered with what appear to be Viking runes. A carved crystal skull, engraved with the initials K.H. and imbued with mysterious powers. Drakes Drum, which famed explorer Sir Francis Drake took with him on every voyage including, legend says, his last. It is believed that the drum beats in a low and eerie manner if its owner is ever threatened. Pirate legend suggests that deliberately beating it terries (+5 bonus to vaporing) Spanish ships. In fact, in 1595 Drake was supposedly buried at sea in a lead cofn off the Isthmus of Panama at Portobello, but who is to say whether that was his nal resting place? Indeed, some say he never died at all. The bokor or hougan who could raise this dead mans bones would be sure to have a guide to some of the more fantastic treasures pulled from South American and/or taken from the Spanish. An ornate compass in scrimshaw covered ivory case. An Eye of Horus worked in gold, jade and obsidian. A pearl the size of a mans head that seems to have a heartbeat. A cargo of preshaped sandstone blocks carved with runes that assemble into an ornate arched doorway. Oval shaped gold ligree box containing a stoppered diamond ask said to contain water from the fountain of youth. One of the legendary light brass cannons from the Revenge. Carved with the Tudor Rose, the cannon is one of the 39 guns with which Sir Richard Grenville decimated a Spanish eet in 1591 before his eventual capture. The Revenges cannons are said to never miss their target and they deal double the damage of an ordinary culverin. A banquet table carved from a single emerald. A bag of ancient coins made of an untarnished golden metal that is not gold and covered with writing that no sage knows.

- Sample Magical Items -

agic items in the Skull & Bones setting are rare and precious things. The art required to consciously create most such devices is long lost, even to those races in the world that still practice other magical arts. There are a few groups and some scattered individuals that have these relics of a more magical time in their possession, but no new enchanted items are being created. However, the same tides of belief that shift the islands of the Caribbean can, on occasion, imbue objects with more than natural properties, some of which are powerful.

GMs and players should then be aware that the rules for creating magical items including in the Game Masters Guide do not apply to this setting, so mechanical elements such as the minimum caster level and required spells to create an item are not included in the following write-ups. In Skull & Bones magical items come about not by mortal design but instead by the accidental convergence of supernatural energiesbe they constructive or destructiveor perhaps the hidden hands of gods.

LOLONNOIS HANGER
One of the bloodiest cutthroats to ever sail the Spanish Main, Francois LOlonnois was a Frenchman by birth. Brought to the West Indies as an indentured servant, he escaped to become a pirate captain of the Brethren of the Coast. His erce temper and legendary cruelty are known and reviled throughout the Caribbean. In one particularly infamous incident, he cut a mans heart out of his chest and took a bite out of it before the mans still living eyes. LOlonnois was eventually hunted down in the early 1650s by an unlikely alliance of the Coree, an Arawak Indian tribe that are sworn enemies of the Spanish, and several Spanish governors who joined forces to capture him and his murderous crew. When he was nally brought to ground, he was cut to pieces, which are then ung into a roaring bonre, ending his cruelties forever.

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The Hanger is the cutlass that LOlonnois bore for several decades. It has a simple, unadorned blade and a swept basket hilt shaped as a series of overlapping rose leaves. The Hanger gives a +3 bonus to combat rolls and damage. Anyone wounded by the Hanger must make a Fortitude Save against a DC of 15 or be stunned for 1d4 rounds from the massive pain that the

wound causes. Multiple cuts are not cumulative; the ability only works the rst time an individual is cut by the Hanger. Every month that someone owns the Hanger, they must make a Will Save against a DC of 15+1 for every time theyve used it in battle that month (one engagement, no matter how many foes they fought counts as a single battle). If they succeed, nothing happens. When they fail, note how many they failed by. For every point that they missed the check by, they will commit a bloodthirsty act at the GMs discretion. It will usually come at an inappropriate time, e.g. a merchants vessel surrenders without a struggle, expecting to be looted and sent on their way. The bearer of the Hanger cuts down the whole crew in cold blood. The owner of the Hanger will not usually attribute his new found blood lust to their ne cutlass.

ETTEKOVANS PENS
The nal masterworks of the Danish craftsman Riaan Ettekovan, this series of ve fountain pens supposedly greatly aid in navigation. A nobleman from the New World, who would not reveal his name, originally commissioned them from Ettekovan. Pirates ransacked the vessel bearing the nished pens and soon after Ettekovan was killed in a re. The whereabouts of the pens are now unknown. Each pen was made of different materials and supposedly granted unique abilities. Only the appearance and name of two of the pens are known: The Alabaster Lady, a pen made entirely of carved ivory, and the Rook, which was made of bluishgray marble and covered with runes. What the pens could actually do is quietly discussed in certain circles but ultimately, unknown. Each of the pens grants a +3 circumstance bonus to Knowledge (navigation) skill checks, but whatever other properties they might hold went with their creator to his grave.

OCHOAS PLATE
The name Corts and the man who bore it are well known, but one of his most notable commanders slipped unsung through the sheaves of history. Ruben Ochoa was an honest soldier who only wished to serve his king and country with honor. The horrors that he witnessed in the taking of the Aztec Empire, both by some of the natives and his own countrymen, might have broken a lesser man. Ochoa nevertheless found strength in his faith that he had never known he possessed. He prevented the men under his command from needless killing and constantly reminded them that, though God may be with them, the Creator was also constantly judging their actions. His nobility and mercy are so well known that when he died, stricken by a disease, prayers are offered to many Gods for the safety of his soul. Some of Ochoas pure spirit lives on in the armor that he wore through out his time in the Americas. Ochoas Plate acts as standard munition armor for most wearers. For a wearer who is both honorable and merciful, as adjudicated by the GM, the armor has no Armor Check Penalty, grants a +4 luck bonus to AC, and has the Heavy Fortication special quality (the wearer is completely immune to critical hits and sneak attacks).

- The Spanish Treasure Fleets The following information can only be bought dearly, in coin or life. Characters could literally spend years acquiring the following information and many a canny spy of the Spanish crown will be on the look out for individuals inquiring after such information.

or a Soldier of Fortune, the most important thing to know about the Spanish colonies of the New World is simple enough to answer: When does the Treasure Fleet sail and what is its route? How well is it guarded? How much treasure does it have aboard, and of what composition? How much plate, how much silver, how many jolly dollars, what kind of gems?

FLEET OVERVIEW
Two supply eets leave Spain each year and return as treasure eets a year later. One eet, known as the ota sets off each spring and a second, the galeones each August. They leave from either Seville or Cadiz, depending on which port is in favor with the Spanish crown at the time. The ota supplies Spains colonies in the Caribbean and Honduras before eventually making for Vera Cruz in Mexico. It enters the Caribbean between the Virgin Islands and Porto Rico with the bulk of the eet making straight for Mexico. After loading up with silver at Vera Cruz, the ota makes for Havana, where it will stay the winter, setting sail back for Spain early in the spring. Several subsidiary merchantmen and pinnacles leave the eet to supply the Spanish islands and collect goods for the return journey. Two are assigned to Havana, two to Santo Domingo, two to San Juan, one to Trinidad and one to Santiago.

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These subsidiary ships are considered the easiest prey for pirates. Once they have left the protection of the eet, a canny libuster may board a single ship twice; once when she is laden with supplies for the colonies and again when she leaves port bearing their produce for return to Spain. This will require either good luck, or excellent intelligence of the ships planned route. Of course, if enough pirates can be persuaded to work together they may be able to take on the entire eet, but it is an extremely risky venture and not quite so rewarding as it was in Drakes day, before Spains power and wealth in the New World began to wane. The supply ships often travel half-empty now, since the colonies are growing more selfsufcient in meat and grain. Traders from other European states regularly sell them slaves, luxuries and manufactured goods that once only arrived from home. Still, half a cargo is better than none, and on the way back to Spain the ota, ships are fully laden with silver, sugar, tobacco and coffee. Six heavily armed escorts accompany the galeones eet. They are all Spanish ships of the line, including at least two Second Rates, as its destination is Cartagena and its intended cargo the years production of silver from the mines at Potos. The galeones eet is both a more risky and more valuable prize than the ota, but it is a rare pirate captain who will contemplate a direct assault on it, however many ships she may have to call on. The subtle approach is always a possibility though and several pirates have grown rich just by taking a straggling vessel from the galeones, typically after it has been separated from the rest by damage or storms. The galeones travel between the Virgin Islands and Porto Rico, then head straight to Cartagena where they load up with gold. It rendezvous with the ota in Havana, where they all winter together before returning to Spain in the spring. So, what would one of these vessels be worth? A typical ota vessel in the midst of trading can be worth anywhere from 3,000 to 12,000 doubloons or more. A ota vessel fully loaded with silver is worth over 40,000 doubloons. The least of the galeones is worth, at the minimum, 160,000 doubloons.

EDWARD BLACKBEARD TEACH


Time of Operation: 1715-1718 Operational Area: The Americas

- Legends of Piracy -

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Of all the pirates in the Golden Age of Piracy, Roberts was certainly the most successful, but Blackbeard [Ftr9/Sof9, hp 190] was the most feared. Supposedly born to a well-to-do Bristol family, Teach, or Thatch as he liked to be called, came to the Caribbean to ght as an English privateer during the War of the Spanish Succession. Some accounts claim, though, that he was, in fact, born in the Caribbean. When the war ended, Blackbeard signed on with Benjamin Hornigold, who eventually gave him his own command, a captured French ship that Teach renamed Queen Annes Revenge. Shortly thereafter Hornigold retired to take the Kings Pardon. Thatch immediately proved himself by taking several large and heavily armed prizes. He was, by all accounts, an utterly terrifying opponent. His namesake covered most of his face and he used to tie slow burning match cords into it that created a smoky haze about his face. He wore a blood red coat with twinned swords, and was covered in bandoleers bearing multiple pistols and knives. Crews that resisted him were marooned and had their ships burned to the hull, though he was merciful to those who didnt put up a ght. Throughout 1717 and early 1718, Blackbeard roamed the Caribbean taking prizes at will. He soon accumulated a small eet and over 300 pirates with which he blockaded the port of Charleston, South Carolina for a week in May of 1718. He took a number of merchant ships there, as well as forcing medicinal supplies out of the town. Blackbeard soon withdrew to Bath, the capital of North Carolina, to accept the pardon of Governor Charles Eden, with whom he was rumored to have an understanding. Blackbeard and his men continued to take prizes along the coast, and in November of 1718, the Governor of Virginia, Alexander Spotswood, sent a pair of Royal Navy ships to hunt him. On November 22nd of 1718, a Lieutenant Robert Maynard confronted Blackbeard in a bloody struggle off Ocracoke Inlet. It took multiple pistol shots and over twenty sword cuts to bring Blackbeard down. His head was hung in triumph from the bowsprit of Maynards ship, and supposedly, his skull became a drinking cup for Maynard. Readers fond of the works of Tim Powers may wish to consider a different class set for Blackbeard: [Ftr6/Bok6/Sof8, hp 212]

Chapter XIII: Friends and Foes


This chapter gives a selection of generic NPC stat blocks as well as a collection of new monsters for use in Skull & Bones campaigns. Additionally, the humanoid species (but not the monstrous humanoids) presented are all suitable for use as new PC races, should the GM and players wish to have a more fantastical campaign in which the players have a wider range of options when making their characters.

- Sample Contacts and Generic NPCs

TF

he following stats are provided to help GMs quickly create the contacts and allies provided for in the backgrounds and fortunes chosen by players while creating their characters. The stats can also be used if the GM nds a need for a quick bit-player NPC.

RIENDLY MERCHANT

Class Levels: Exp3 {CF} Saves: Fort +1, Ref +2, Will +3 Abilities: Str 10, Dex 12, Con 9, Int 15, Wis 10, Cha 16 Skills: Appraise +8, Bluff +8, Craft (carpentry) +5, Diplomacy +8, Gather Information +9, Knowledge (local) +8, Profession (merchant) +8, Sense Motive +6 Relevant Feat: Skill Focus (Profession (merchant))

UNDERWORLD LACKEY
Class Levels: Rog2 {CF} Saves: Fort +0, Ref +6, Will -1 Abilities: Str 12, Dex 16, Con 10, Int 12, Wis 8, Cha 10 Skills: Appraise +5, Bluff +5, Escape Artist +5, Gather Information +5, Hide +8, Innuendo +2, Intimidate +5, Listen +2, Move Silently +6, Sense Motive+2, Sleight of Hand +8, Tumble +5, Use Rope +5

LOCAL NOBILITY
Class Levels: Ari3 {CF} Saves: Fort +1, Ref +2, Will +3 Abilities: Str 9, Dex 12, Con 10, Int 16, Wis 10, Cha 15 Skills: Appraise +9, Bluff +8, Diplomacy +10, Gather Information +7, Intimidate +7, Knowledge (colonial politics) +9, Knowledge (nobility) +7, Knowledge (wines) +8, Ride +3, Sense Motive +6, Speak Language (English, French, and Spanish) Relevant Feat: Skill Focus (Diplomacy)

ABLE SEAMAN
Class Levels: Sdg4, 30 hp {NPC} Saves: Fort +6, Ref +7, Will +2 Abilities: Str 8, Dex 16, Con 14, Int 12, Wis 12, Cha 11 Skills: Balance +7, Climb +3, Intimidate +3, Knowledge (geography) +6, Listen +3, Knowledge (navigation) +7, Profession (sailor) +6, Knowledge (sea lore) +9, Speak Language (English and Spanish), Spot +5, Use Rope+6 Relevant Feat: Skill Focus (Knowledge (sea lore)) Relevant Fortunes: Superstitious, Been-Round, Wastrel

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- Monstrous Races or as long as Europeans have traveled the seas, they have told tales of mermaids and other sea-dwelling folk. Sailors have described seeing everything from beautiful mermaids to sh-faced people to monks and bishops who live under the waves and wear the skins of eels. Some of the stories are true. Some are the product of drunken or fevered imaginations. If any of these races retain traces of the magic that the world once held, it is only known to them, and they keep their secrets close. When the New World was rst colonized, the Spanish expected to nd all kinds of strange humanoid creatures there. They had read accounts of such monsters both in Greek and Roman literature and in contemporary Bible scholarship, which hinted at descendants of Cain or of Noahs rebellious son Ham. These creatures are not thought to be supernaturaljust odd in appearance, habits, and society. Columbus was surprised at the beauty of the Arawak natives he met in the West Indies; he had fully expected to nd deformed sub-humans, cursed for turning against God centuries before. Columbus reassured his patrons at the Spanish court that men of the new lands are merely savages, not monsters. But he cannot have been certain: much of South America was still unexplored by Europeans several centuries later, at the time of the Golden Age of Piracy. We have presented a variety of monstrous races, with descriptions and game statistics, for you to use as you see t. Your campaign may be full of them, lurking in ambush round every corner of the Amazon River and atop every peak of the Andes. Or you may present them as entirely legendary creatures, relevant largely as a demonstration of European xenophobia and used by scholars in complex arguments to justify slavery. As ever, there is a middle ground; perhaps the best way to incorporate these creatures into your campaign is to have them as almost legendary, but not quite, occasionally to be glimpsed in the depths of the rain forest or on the highest, most inaccessible mountains. That way, these monstrous humanoids retain their sense of mystery and wonder, as does your campaign. Certain of the most experienced mystic navigators speculate that the monstrous races are, at least in part, created by the expectations of the European settlers, perhaps in much the same way that mystic navigators shape islands and coasts to their will. Could there be a land-based counterpart to Mystic Navigation, a sort of Mystic Geography or Mystic Cartography, which allows the most experienced explorers or rangers the power to forever alter mountains, jungles, valleys, and even the folk who inhabit them?

AMAZON
Medium Humanoid (Amazon: Human Subrace) Hit Dice: 1d8+1 (5 hp) Initiative: +6 (+2 Dex, +4 Improved Initiative) Speed: 20 ft. (breastplate); base 30 ft. AC: 17 (+2 Dex, +5 breastplate), touch 12, atfooted 15 Base Attack/Grapple: +1/+4 Attack: Shortspear +4 melee (1d8+3) or shortbow +3 ranged (1d6) Full attack: As above Space/Reach: 5ft./5ft. Special Qualities: Human traits Saves: Fort +3, Ref +2, Will +0 Abilities: Str 16, Dex 15, Con 12, Int 13, Wis 11, Cha 13 Skills: Climb +3, Craft (armorsmithing) +3, Handle Animal +3, Jump +3, Swim +3 Feats: Improved Initiative, Point Blank Shot Environment: Any land Organization: Company (2-4), patrol (8-16 plus 2 sergeants of 3rd-level or higher and 2 jaguars), or band (30-100 plus 10% noncombatants plus 1 3rd level sergeant per 10 adults, 5 5th level lieutenants, 3 7th level captains, and 3d6 jaguars) Challenge Rating: 1/2 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Usually neutral Advancement: By character class The records of Francisco de Orellana, a sixteenth century Spanish explorer, give a vivid account of meeting and battling with the Amazons of Greek legend during his quest to navigate the length of the Amazon River. Since his account, many have wondered if these ancient warriors could actually exist so far from their original home. Most dismiss de Orellana as a glory-hound, seeking to guild his reputation with wild tales of the dangers he encountered. Few know the truth of it; that the Amazons do exist in the jungle, living with their men and their children in temples and palaces like those of their Greek ancestors. Their legends say that they chose to migrate after the defeat of their queen Hippolyta by Heracles, the son of Zeus. They traveled for many years, over and under earth and sea, until they came to the banks of the great river and made it their home.

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In appearance Amazons reect their long travels, showing the inuence of European, Arabic, Asian, and African nations in their bloodlines, as well as that of the native tribes with whom they share the jungle that bears their name. Their language has also been affected by their travels, but they still strictly adhere to the worship of their old gods, particularly their patroness Athena. They are a beautiful people, almost without exception; the women tending to be slightly taller and stronger limbed then the men. They train their daughters in war and art from childhood, while the men are skilled in gentler pursuits, such as weaving and child rearing. Contrary to legend, warriors do not cut off their breasts to enhance their ghting ability, but they do bind them tightly before going into battle. Most Amazons encountered outside their home are on hunting or scouting missions, usually accompanied by two or more jaguars. While the Amazons do not hate outsiders, and will occasionally invite a woman or even a man who has impressed them in some way to live among them, they are cultural isolationists, who will go to great lengths to prevent their home from being disturbed. Amazons Speak Greek and Common.

COMBAT
Amazons favor the weapons of their ancestors, the sword, the spear, and the bow, but they are versatile warriors and will use anything available if necessary. They are highly skilled and organized in battle and make formidable foes. Human Traits (Ex): Amazons benet from a number of human racial traits. See human in the PHB.

AMAZON CHARACTERS
The stat block represents a 1st-level warrior, the default class for Amazons. An Amazons favored class is ghter.

BLEMMYAE
Medium Monstrous Humanoid Hit Dice: 3d8+6 (19 hp) Initiative: +2 (Dex) Speed: 30 ft., climb 15 ft. AC: 15 (+2 Dex, +3 natural), touch 12, at-footed 13 Base Attack/Grapple: +3/+8 Attack: Greatclub +8 melee (1d10+7) Full Attack: As above Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Scream of rage Special Qualities: Low-light vision Saves: Fort +3, Ref +5, Will +4 Abilities: Str 21, Dex 15, Con 14, Int 10, Wis 12, Cha 9 Skills: Climb +19, Hide +5, Listen +7, Spot +7, Jump +8 Feats: Cleave, Power Attack Environment: Any forest, hills, or mountains Organization: Solitary or family (3-12) Challenge Rating: 2 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Always neutral Advancement: By character class Blemmyae are naked, club-wielding savages with no heads, and their faces in either their chests or their backs. No one is sure of which exactly because pausing long enough to check typically results in the watcher being struck by one of the clubs that the blemmyae use in battle. Physically, they resemble large, muscular humans, standing about seven to eight feet tall with overlarge hands and feet. Their body hair is unusually thick and coarse, and can be any color. When they choose to wear clothing, both males and females dress in simple kilts that can be easily converted into slings for carrying heavy loads. Blemmyae speak their own complex language that sounds like a series of hoots, grunts, and whistles to outsiders, and they have a long tradition of storytelling and humor, wherein strange creatures with their faces on unnatural lumps atop their shoulders feature prominently. They shun humanity, whom they fear as abominations of nature, preferring to keep to themselves in the recesses of the jungle where they live alone or in small family groups. These groups are similar to those of the great apes, traveling across large territories to forage for food during the day, and bedding down in the trees at night, though some mountain dwelling groups will occasionally shelter in caves.

COMBAT
When encountered alone, blemmyae prefer to avoid combat by running away. If family groups are encountered, the females will aggressively defend their children by grappling with attackers and screaming while the males attack with clubs. Scream of Rage (Sp): The blemmyae have huge, resonating chest cavities with which they are able to produce horrendous noise at will. All creatures within 60 ft. must succeed at a Will save (DC 12) or be affected by the spell-like ability fear. Additionally, two rounds of exposure to this sound can cause deafness, requiring those within 60 ft. to succeed at a Fortitude save (DC 12) or be unable to hear for 1d4+2 rounds. Deafened characters suffer a 4 penalty on initiative and a 20% chance to miscast and lose any spell with a verbal (V) component the character casts. See the DMG for more details on the effects of deafness.

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CYNOCEPHALI (DOG FOLK)


Medium Humanoid (Cynocephali) Hit Dice: 2d8+2 (11 hp) Initiative: +1 (Dex) Speed: 30 ft. AC: 12 (+1 Dex, +1 natural), touch 11, atfooted 11 Base Attack/Grapple: +1/+2 Attacks: Bite +2 melee (1d4+1) or short sword +3 melee (1d6+1) Full Attack: As above Space/Reach: 5ft. by 5 ft./5 ft. Special Qualities: Blindsight, scent Saves: Fort +1, Ref + 4, Will +3 Abilities: Str 12, Dex 13, Con 12, Int 16, Wis 17, Cha 12 Skills: Gather Information +4, Decipher Script +5, Listen +5, Spot +5 Feats: Weapon Focus (short sword) Environment: Any temperate land Organization: Paired (2), company (3-5), or pack (6-20 with one Alpha of 3rd level or higher and one cleric) Challenge Rating: 1 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Usually neutral good Advancement: By character class One of the mostly hotly debated races to be encountered in the New World, cynocephali are quiet creatures that enjoy study and have the heads of dogs. Most of what is known of them has come from other native peoples, who claim to have long established contacts and trade agreements with the dog folk. Their bodies are humanoid and covered in short fur, usually a mottled brown or dun. They are quite personable and good-natured, and although they prefer to remain close to home, they do enjoy meeting other species with whom they can discuss politics and exchange cultural ideas. This has led some of the missionaries who have heard of them to put forth the theory that the cynocephali may actually have souls, an idea that has been vehemently dismissed by the Church in Rome. Cynocephali that travel outside their city-states are rare, and are of an adventurous nature, eager to record whatever they encounter in their travelogues. As a result of their interest in culture, the treasuries of the dog folk are heavy in interesting artifacts, collected for the objects intellectual value, rather than simple wealth. Among their own people, cynocephali are warm and affectionate, living communally in extended family groups headed by one or two alphas. Alphas, so named by one of the early missionaries, are natural leaders, and are larger and more intelligent than other dog folk. Twin, triplet, and even quadruplet births are common, so that at any given time nearly half of a household is composed of children. When in their own communities they typically wear no clothing, as they have adequate protection in their fur, and wear simple ornaments, such as carved bracelets, on their wrists and ankles. They do attempt to be more reserved with other races, and some have recently adopted the habit of wearing clothing when they travel, but this is not always successful as it is in their nature to be casual about their personal habits.

COMBAT
They are honorable combatants, preferring hand-to-hand ghting, either unarmed or with short swords and rapiers. Both sexes practice dueling as a way to settle disputes in a civilized manner, ghting to rst blood rather than to death. Blindsight (Ex): Cynocephali have an acute sense of hearing, alerting them to the presence of creatures that come within 30 ft. of them.

CYNOCEPHALI CHARACTERS
Cynocephali characters favored class is bard; most of their leaders are clerics or adepts.

GIANT TREE FROG


Medium Animal Hit Dice: 3d8+6 (19 hp) Initiative: +3 (Dex) Speed: 30 ft., climb 30 ft. AC: 16 (+3 Dex, +3 natural), touch 13, at-footed 13 Base Attack/Grapple: +2/+6 Attack: Tongue +2 melee (see text) or slam +2 melee (1d4) Full Attack: As above Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Adhesive

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Special Qualities: Footpads, low-light vision Saves: Fort +5, Ref +6, Will +1 Abilities: Str 10, Dex 16, Con 14, Int 2, Wis 10, Cha 12 Skills: Climb +28, Hide +13, Spot +10 Environment: Any warm land Organization: Solitary or domesticated Challenge Rating: 2 Treasure: None Alignment: Always neutral Advancement: 4-5 HD (Medium-size) Giant tree frogs are mostly gone from the world, the Tonaa type of Djab, described starting page 152have taken them into their and use them as mounts. Giant tree frogs brightly colored, typically startling greens and oranges, but their colors blend well into the of the Caribbean. but on care are foliage

COMBAT
Giant tree frogs are not exactly combatants but their accuracy with their great is unerring. Their great speed and climbing allow them to evade many foes. Adhesive (Ex): A tree frogs tongue is coated with an adhesive that allows it to things. This adhesive gives the tree frog a +4 grapple and disarm checks. They can make a disarm attempt without suffering an attack of opportunity. Foot Pads (Ex): Giant tree frogs can effectively climb any surface without penalty. They can even cling ceilings if they wish. Skills: Giant tree frogs receive a +5 racial bonus to Hide and Spot checks. The racial bonus to Climb checks, due to their footpads. skilled tongues ability

grab to

to frogs also receive a +15

HAIRY WILD MEN


Medium Humanoid (hairy wild men) Hit Dice: 2d8+4 (13 hp) Initiative: +2 (Dex) Speed: 30 ft.; Climb 15 ft. AC: 13 (+2 Dex, +1 natural), touch 12, atfooted 11 Base Attack/Grapple: +1/+4 Attack: Unarmed +4 melee (1d3+3 subdual) or quarterstaff +4 melee (1d6+3) Full Attack: As above Space/Reach: 5ft./5 ft. Special Qualities: Fast healing 1, illusion immunity, SR 5 Saves: Fort +5, Ref +2, Will +4 Abilities: Str 17, Dex 15, Con 14, Int 10, Wis 15, Cha 8 Skills: Climb +6, Hide +4, Listen +3, Spot +3 Feats: Iron Will Environment: Any land Organization: Solitary, pair, band (3-16 plus one 3rd level leader), clan (17-60 plus 2 3rd level leader and one 6th level chief ) Challenge Rating: 1 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Always Neutral Advancement: By character class The wild men are large, black, chinless, horned, and astoundingly hairy. They have dangling ears, long noses, and enormous feet. Or at least the single specimen ever brought out of the jungle did. Most people believe that it was merely some form of ape, though Edwin Tobias, the man who killed it, still carries the skull with its two small horns protruding from the forehead. The pelt he claims to have sold to a local bokor for unnamed purposes. He also claims that they speak a complex language unlike any other on land or sea, but if they have a name for themselves in their own tongue, he has not learned it. The hairy wild men have a strange, rolling gait that allows them to move quickly

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through the wilderness, and they are constantly looking around at the passing scenery, making surprise attacks exceptionally difcult. Wild men live in small bands that travel constantly, never remaining in the same location more than two days in a row. Since they have no lairs, they keep all of their possessions with them in crude carry-alls made of skins, which can contain anything from raw gemstones to interesting leaves, changing on a daily basis as they discard old treasures to make room for new discoveries. They also sometimes use crude walking sticks made by pulling down a branch of the appropriate length and stripping off the bark. They understand nothing of magic, having no experience with it among their people, and have a natural immunity to any spell dealing with illusion or mental deception because they simply do not believe it exists. Any spell that affects them physically they will automatically assign to the nearest possible physical cause, however improbable, and then disregard it. Because they are in a constant state of disbelief, all wild men automatically get an extra saving throw against magic.

COMBAT
Wild men will attack anything that does not back down from their challenge, or anyone who seems unwilling to share something that interests them. They attack at rst in a single group, and then tend to fall to squabbling among themselves for choice bits of loot, even in the midst of a ght.

WILD MEN CHARACTERS


The hairy wild mens favored class is ghter, and most wild men leaders are ghters or clerics.

ISLAND GIANT
Large Giant Hit Dice: 12d8+48 (102 hp) Initiative: -1 (Dex) Speed: 40 ft., swim 30 ft. AC: 20 (-1 size, -1 Dex, +9 natural, +3 hide), touch 8, at-footed 20 Base Attack/Grapple: +9/+20 Attack: Huge greatclub +16 melee (2d6+10) or rock +8 ranged (2d6+7) Full Attack: Huge greatclub +16/+11 melee (2d6+10) or rock +8/+3 ranged (2d6+7) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Rock throwing Special Qualities: Rock catching Saves: Fort +12, Ref +3, Will +4 Abilities: Str 25, Dex 8, Con 19, Int 6, Wis 10, Cha 17 Skills: Climb +9, Jump +8, Spot +4, Swim +16 Feats: Cleave, Improved Bull Rush, Improved Overrun, Power Attack, Weapon Focus (greatclub) Environment: Any hills, mountains, or underground Organization: Solitary, gang (2-5), band (6-9 plus 35% non-combatants), hunting/raiding party (6-9 plus 2-4 dire wolves), or tribe (21-30 plus 35% noncombatants plus 12-30 dire wolves) Challenge Rating: 7 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Always neutral Advancement: By character class And there were giants in the earth in those days. So says the Bible, but where have they gone? Perhaps they have retreated across the seas to rest in the New World. Perhaps they are only waiting to be rediscovered in the clouds that surround the mountaintops, or maybe they only want to be left alone. Previous contact with other forms of humanity did not go well for the giants, and now they prefer to remain in their mountain and island fastness. Island giants can grow to about 10 feet tall and weigh around 1,200 pounds. Otherwise they are as varied as humans in appearance. Alone of all the races spoken of in the Bible, they have kept their longevity, and can live to be almost 1,000 years old. They live in small bands on mountaintops or isolated islands, carefully using the resources of their immediate surroundings so they will not attract notice. Giant spellcasters often focus on the mastery of illusion to further aid this cause. Their homes are made in large caverns with the entrances cleverly disguised, often by simple spells. They prefer to avoid all contact with humanity, and will kill to keep their refuges secret; doing everything they can to ensure that there are no survivors left to carry the tale of their existence away. If their homes are discovered, they often move immediately with all their possessions, leaving no trace of their habitation behind. They do not want to be seen or spoken of, and that is all they desire from smaller races.

COMBAT

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Island giants use rocks in combat, resorting to greatclubs only at the last, and prefer to attack by ambush from behind, thereby cutting down an opponents chance of retreat. Rock Throwing (Ex): The range increment is 120 ft. for an island giants thrown rocks.

- Legends of Piracy EDWARD NED LOW


Time of Operation: 1721-1723 Operational Area: The Americas Low [Sdg3/Ftr4/Sof2, hp 61] was an American, a former Boston ship rigger and one of the nastiest bastards to ever go on the account. His own men described him as a sadistic maniac. He made the captain of a Nantucket whaler eat his own salt covered ears before killing him. After the capture of the Spanish galleon Montcova, he personally slew fty-three ofcers before forcing one to consume the heart of another. His career is a short series of ruthless slaughters and modest prizes. In the end, his own crew set him adrift in a dingy without provisions. Two days later, a French ship rescued him, but upon nding out who he was, swiftly tried and hung him.

JENNY HANNIVER
Small Animal (Aquatic) Hit Dice: 1d8+2 (6 hp) Initiative: +3 (Dex) Speed: 5ft.; Swim 30 ft. AC: 14 (+3 Dex, +1 size), touch 14, at-footed 11 Base Attack/Grapple: +0/-5 Attack: Claw +0 melee (1d3-1) Full Attack: 2 claws +0 melee (1d3-1), bite 5 melee (1d4-1), sting 5 melee (1d3) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Qualities: Scent Saves: Fort +4, Ref +5, Will +0 Abilities: Str 9, Dex 17, Con 14, Int 2, Wis 10, Cha 5 Skills: Listen +4, Spot +4 Feats: Alertness Environment: Ocean Organization: Schools (10-100) Challenge Rating: 1/2 Treasure: None Alignment: Always neutral Advancement: 2-4 HD (Medium); 5-7 HD (Large); 8-11 HD (Huge) Jenny Hannivers are a motley and voracious form of sea-life. They travel in schools, and are often found trailing alongside ships, competing with the sharks for the offal and refuse thrown overboard. A Jenny Hanniver can be anywhere from 2 to 4 feet long, and appears to be cobbled together out of different creatures. Some have the upper torsos of monkeys attached to the tails of sh; others appear to be mutated manta rays, while still others are a strange combination of lizard and porpoise. Dried Hanniver corpses are often seen for sale in coastal towns as mermaid babies, although they bear no real resemblance to the merfolk. Many who have seen them on shore view them as hoaxes because their grotesque features give them the appearance of having been stitched together by bored sailors.

COMBAT
Jenny Hannivers are driven by their hunger at all times. Swarms of them mindlessly attack anything that they perceive as a food source, tearing it to shreds with their teeth and claws.

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ONIJEGI
Medium Humanoid (Aquatic) Hit Dice: 1d8+1 (5 hp) Initiative: +1 (Dex) Speed: 5 ft.; swim 50 ft. AC: 13 (+1 Dex, +2 leather), touch 11, at-footed 12 Base Attack/Grapple: +1/+1 Attack: Trident +1 melee (1d8) or dagger +1 melee (1d4) or net +2 ranged Full Attack: As above Space/Reach: 5ft./5 ft. Special Qualities: Low-light vision, spell-like abilities Saves: Fort +3, Ref +1, Will +0 Abilities: Str 10, Dex 12, Con 12, Int 11, Wis 11, Cha 13 Skills: Listen +4, Spot +4 Feats: Alertness, Exotic Weapon Prociency (net) Environment: Temperate aquatic Organization: Company (2-4), patrol (11-20 plus 2 3rd level lieutenants and 1 leader of 3rd-6th level), or band (30-60 plus 1 3rd level sergeant per 20 adults, 5 5th level lieutenants, 3 7th level captains, and 10 porpoises) Challenge Rating: 1 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Usually chaotic good Advancement: By character class The onijegi are merfolk who dwell in the Caribbean. They are well known in legend to the land-dwelling people of the islands, who have long had tales of sh husbands and wives, and the ligahoo who live in the rivers. The onijegi are a beautiful people. They have dark skin and dark eyes, thick, black hair with green and blue highlights, and forearms and tails covered brightly colored scales similar to those of tropical sh. They adorn themselves with shells, coral, and jewelry woven from sea-grasses and decorated with rainbow hued beads, which they also wear braided into their hair. They are great storytellers and hunters; when humans see them it is usually because a pack has stopped to rest on the rocks and share in a round of tale telling. Onijegi have a close rapport with other sea life, and are often accompanied by dolphins and schools of sh. Hunters face single animal targets one on one, to give the creature a chance to ght for its life. While they are indifferent to humans in general, onijegi are ercely protective of their home seas. If they believe that human or other actions are harming their waters they will retaliate immediately, using such means as sending sharks to attack anyone who tries to approach a reef that they have taken under their protection, or causing minor tempests to swamp the boats of their enemies. When they judge the action vile enough, they have been known to declare war on the offenders, doing everything in their power to drive the destroyers out or kill them. Conversely, they will also aid those people who they deem to be living in harmony with the ocean by driving sh into their nets or showing them where oysters grow thick and heavy with pearls.

COMBAT
Onijegi favor tridents, coral or obsidian knives, and weighted nets woven from thick sea grasses with which they entangle opponents before nishing them off with blades. Spell-Like Abilities: 1/daycontrol weather. This ability is as the spell cast by a 7th-level sorcerer. Feats: Onijegi receive Exotic Weapon Prociency (net) as a bonus feat.

ONIJEGI CHARACTERS
The stat block represents a 1st-level warrior, the default class for the Onijegi. Onijegis favored class is bard; most leaders are bards.

PYGMY
Small Humanoid (Pygmy) Hit Dice: 1d8+1 (5 hp) Initiative: +1 (Dex) Speed: 20 ft. AC: 12 (+1 size, +1 Dex), touch 12, at-footed, 11 Base Attack/Grapple: +1/-4 Attack: Halfspear +1 melee (1d6-1) or blowpipe +3 ranged (1d2 plus poison) Full Attack: As above Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Qualities: Low-light vision Saves: Fort +3, Ref +1, Will +0 Abilities: Str 8, Dex 13, Con 12, Int 10, Wis 10, Cha 10 Skills: Hide +5, Listen +2, Spot +2, Move Silently +4 Feats: Point Blank Shot

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Environment: Temperate forests, hills, and mountains Organization: Solitary, company (2-4), or hunt (12-20, including one battle leader of 3rd to 5th level and/or one spellcaster of 2nd level or higher) Challenge Rating: 1/2 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Usually neutral Advancement: By character class Pygmies stand between two and three feet tall and have deep brown skin, black hair, and brown or black eyes. They dress in simple, camouaging garments woven from grasses and leaves, and ornament themselves with complex jewelry made of natural items such as leather, shells, and feathers. They are naturally curious, and will often follow adventurers who cross near their territory for miles, keeping just out of sight in the forest. Pygmies live in highly organized villages deep in the jungle or high in the mountains, usually in places where larger people have a difcult time traveling because of their size. Some jungle dwelling tribes even build their villages in the forest canopy, using the trees as foundations for their huts. They are efcient hunter-gatherers, and also cultivate some crops in secluded groves. When away from their villages they travel light, keeping most of their possessions close to home, unless they are on a trade expedition to another tribe or village.

COMBAT
Due to their small size, Pygmies prefer to attack from behind cover. Their favored weapon is the blowpipe, a hollow tube approximately 12 inches long with a mouthpiece at one end and a uted opening at the other, from which they can re darts fashioned from thorns and coated with toad poisons. The poison causes paralysis in the rst ve minutes, followed by unconsciousness, during which the Pygmies either kill the targeted creature or move it to a location safely away from their village. When forced to confront a target directly, a Pygmys weapon of choice is a small halfspear with a leaf-shaped blade. Blowpipes: On an attack roll of 1, the Pygmy must make a Ref. save (DC 15) or be susceptible to the poison used on the darts (a separate save against the poison is then required). Poison Dart: Type: Injury DC12, Initial Damage: Paralysis 1d6 min., Secondary Damage: Unconsciousness 1d3 hours.

PYGMY CHARACTERS
The stat block represents a 1st-level warrior, the default class for Pygmies. A Pygmys favored class is ghter. Most Pygmy leaders are ghters.

SEA MONK
Medium Humanoid (Aquatic) Hit Dice: 1d8+1 (5 hp) Initiative: +3 (Dex) Speed: 5ft.; Swim 50 ft. AC: 16 (+3 Dex, +3 Wis), touch 16, at-footed 13 Base Attack/Grapple: +0/+0 Attack: Unarmed strike +0 melee (1d6) or tail strike +0 (1d6) Full Attack: As above Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Unarmed strike, stunning attack, urry of blows Special Qualities: Evasion, low-light vision Saves: Fort +3, Ref +7, Will +5 Abilities: Str 10, Dex 16, Con 12, Int 11, Wis 16, Cha 13 Skills: Diplomacy +5, Escape Artist +5, Heal +5, Hide +5, Listen +5, Move Silently +5 Feats: Improved Unarmed Strike, Lightning Reexes Environment: Temperate aquatic Organization: Solitary, pair, brotherhood (6-12), or order (12-60, including one bishop of 5th level or higher and one 3rd-5th-level cleric) Challenge Rating: 1 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Always lawful Advancement: By character class (monk) When Europeans began to ood into the New World, they were accompanied by missionaries intent on converting the heathens to Christianity. Some of the

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heathens that they converted, almost by accident, were not altogether human. Some mermen heard the sermons given on board ships crossing their territories and sought to know more. Sea monks are unique for two reasons: rst, they are the only monastic orders to be found within the entire region, and second, they are they only non-humans to have adopted the Christian God as their own. Although the debate over whether they have souls at all is a strong one, sea monks are one of the more gentle species to inhabit the Caribbean seas. They are no different physically from other merfolk, but they differ radically in their philosophy, choosing to follow the teachings of Christ instead of the more common pursuits of music and mischief. Their bishops say that although they may not be blessed with souls here on earth, they hope that they may earn them through good works and meditation and thereby be allowed to enter into heaven when they die. Monks wear simple robes woven from seaweed, while bishops mark their rank with mitres and cloaks made of silvery sh skins. Monasteries are usually built on coral reefs, where the monks train the living coral into cells and halls of worship. While the monks themselves live austere lives, their chapels are often beautifully decorated with religious icons and other works of art. Some also have accommodations for air-breathing visitors built atop the coral, and may even have a brother in residence who specializes in human healing to aide in caring for visitors who are sick or wounded. Most orders prefer the isolation that dwelling beneath the waves offers. There they spend their days in prayer and contemplation, tending their kelp beds and schools of sh. Some also keep herds of manatee, usually assisted by one or two herd dolphins.

COMBAT
Sea monks prefer to turn the other cheek, avoiding combat whenever possible, but they will ght to defend themselves and others if the cause is just. Most orders follow a strict discipline that includes rigorous training in unarmed combat.

SEA MONK CHARACTERS


The stat block represents a 1st-level monk, the default class for sea monks. Sea monks continue to gain levels in the monk class only.

SIREN
Medium Monstrous Humanoid (Aquatic, Shapechanger) Hit Dice: 3d8+3 (16 hp) Initiative: +1 (Dex) Speed: 30ft.; Swim 50 ft. AC: 11 (+1 Dex), touch 11, at-footed 10 Base Attack/Grapple: +3/+4 Attack: Dagger +4 melee (1d4+1) Full Attack: As above Space/Reach: 5ft./5ft. Special Attacks: Paralyzing beauty, song of longing, spell-like abilities Special Qualities: Alter self, darkvision 60 ft. Saves: Fort +2, Ref +4, Will +7 Abilities: Str 12, Dex 13, Con 12, Int 13, Wis 14, Cha 18 Skills: Bluff +11*, Disguise +10*, Listen +7, Perform +7, Sense Motive +6, Spot +7 Feats: Alertness, Iron Will Environment: Any temperate aquatic Organization: Solitary, pair, or gang (3-6) Challenge Rating: 4 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Usually neutral Advancement: By character class Sirens are close cousins to the merfolk, with the same mischievous natures and enjoyment of life. They are quite varied in appearance, but always fair, having the forms and features of beautiful humanoid women from the waist up. From the waist down, they sometimes appear fully human, and other times with the tails and ns of great sh. Each siren can change at will between these two forms whenever it suits her to do so, until she begins to age. Individuals can live to be hundreds of years old, but as each one enters her third century she slowly begins to lose her more human features, becoming more and more sh-like until nally she slips away to live permanently beneath the waves. They live in colonies on rocky, coral-bound islands, whiling away their days with such trivial pursuits as tending one anothers hair or sunning on the rocks. They decorate themselves with natural ornaments like shells and coral, and jewelry from the treasure ships that wreck upon their coasts, of which there are many. There are no male sirens, but like most other species, sirens must mate to breed. Although they can couple, or wed as they call it, with merfolk, they prefer human husbands, mostly out of fear that interbreeding to far with other sh-folk will remove what humanity they have and cause their daughters to be born wholly sh. To attract mates, the sirens have two gifts; their great beauty, and their song. A sirens song is of such beauty, and full of such longing, that women will fall into ts of uncontrollable weeping when they hear it and men will hurl themselves into the waves to reach the source. Even when their sailors do not leap overboard, many ships have been lost on their shores as the pilots simply try to steer into the song. When this happens, the sirens dive into the sea and gather those men whom they would marry, leaving the others to escape or drown. Women they ignore completely unless one seems to threaten their claim upon a male the siren has chosen. Even when men survive the wrecks, their lot is not much better. Many are driven mad by constant exposure to the sirens beauty, or die from lack of water and shelter, or the constant attentions of their new wives.

COMBAT

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Sirens strike rst with their song. The only physical weapons they carry are daggers, and if they are engaged in battle on land, they will try to avoid further combat until they can trick their aggressors into the sea, where several sisters will attack

at once, pulling their opponent under the waves until he drowns. Paralyzing Beauty (Su): This ability operates continuously, affecting all male humanoids within 60 feet of the siren. Those who gaze directly at the siren must succeed at a Fort save (DC 15) or suffer paralysis for 1d4 rounds. The siren can suppress and resume this ability as a free action. Song of Longing (Su): The song of a siren calls to something deep in the soul of every humanoid within a 300-foot radius who hears it. Men must make a Will save (DC 15) every two rounds of singing or make every attempt to reach the siren. Women must make one Will save (DC 13) during the rst round or become incapacitated by helpless weeping until the song ends. Spell-Like Abilities: 1/daywail of the banshee. This ability is as the spell cast by a 9th-level sorcerer (DC 14 + spell level). Alter Self (Su): A siren can assume human or merfolk form at will. This works like the alter self spell as cast by an 18th-level sorcerer, but the siren can remain in the chosen form indenitely. It can assume a new form as a standard action. Skills: A siren receives a +4 racial bonus to Bluff and Disguise checks. When using alter self, a siren receives an additional +10 circumstance bonus to Disguise checks.

TROGLODYTE
Small Humanoid (Reptilian) Hit Dice: 1d8+4 (8 hp) Initiative: +3 (Dex) Speed: 30 ft. AC: 17 (+1 size, +3 Dex, +3 natural), touch 14, at-footed 14 Base Attack/Grapple: +1/-3 Attack: Claw +1 melee (1d3) Full Attack: 2 claws +1 melee (1d3), bite -4 melee (1d3) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., detect magic, immune to bludgeoning, slow fall Saves: Fort +3, Ref +3, Will +1 Abilities: Str 10, Dex 16, Con 12, Int 11, Wis 13, Cha 10 Skills: Hide +12*, Jump +4, Tumble +12* Feats: Toughness Environment: Any land Organization: Pack (6-12) or swarm (30-60 with 20% non-combatants) Challenge Rating: 1/2 Treasure: Unusual Alignment: Neutral evil Advancement: By Character class The troglodytes (or troggies) of the Caribbean are bestial and quite savage. Fortunately they are also small and rarely seen by travelers through their territory. They live in the complex caves of mountain ranges and hunt in packs, surviving on the raw meat of the animals and other creatures that they capture. Their language mimics the sounds of water dripping on stone and pebbles sliding down hillsides. When they remain perfectly still, they blend into the mountainsides seamlessly, their pebbly grey skin and moss-green shocks of hair giving them perfect natural camouage. Swarms are loosely organized into several hunting packs. Leadership is determined by duels to the death between

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individuals for pack leadership and slightly less deadly combat between packs for leadership of the swarm. Troglodytes ght using their razor sharp claws and teeth, which are quite effective for rending meat and bone, and they are tough, agile creatures, able to withstand forceful blows and falls from great heights with little or no damage. The only attacks they truly seem to fear are those similar to their own that deal slashing or piercing damage. Troglodytes are highly sensitive to magic, although they have none of their own. Perhaps because of this, they hate magic of any sort, and will swarm upon and viciously attack any creature that they sense using it, particularly bokor and hougan, who they seem to sense are responsible for bringing more magical beings into the world. On the other hand, troggies nd mechanisms fascinating, and the dens of wealthy swarms are often littered with broken mechanical bits and re-worked parts. What they might be attempting to build is any mans guess and quite probably terrifying.

COMBAT
Troglodytes attack in a communal swarm, their single-minded goal to bring down whatever prey has been unfortunate enough to cross paths with them. When attacking magical creatures or spellcasters, the group will often divide, with one portion distracting the magic user, even sacricing themselves to do so, while the rest of the group attacks from behind. Detect Magic (Su): A troglodyte is always aware of any magical auras within 60 ft. of him. This ability is similar to the detect magic spell. Immune to Bludgeoning (Ex): Bludgeoning weapons, even enchanted ones, deal no damage to a troglodyte. Slow Fall (Ex): A troglodyte takes damage from a fall as if the fall were 30 feet shorter than it actually is. Skills: Troglodytes receive a +5 racial bonus to Hide and Tumble checks. *The Hide bonus increases to +10 when in mountainous regions. Tumble is always a class skill for troglodytes.

TROGLODYTE CHARACTERS
The stat block represents a 1st-level warrior, the default class for troglodytes. Troglodytes favored class is ghter.

ZOMBI, SIMPLE
Medium Undead Hit Dice: 2d12+3 (16 hp) Initiative: +0 Speed: 30 ft AC: 12 (+2 natural), touch 10, at-footed 12 Base Attack/Grapple: +1/+4 Attack: Slam +4 (1d6+3) Full Attack: Slam +4 (1d6+3), 2 claws -1 melee (1d4+3) Space/Reach: 5 ft./ 5 ft Special Qualities: Undead traits Saves: Fort +0, Ref +0, Will +3 Abilities: Str 17, Dex 10, Con-, Int 2, Wis 10, Cha 1 Feats: Toughness Environment: Any land or underground Organization: Gang (2-5), squad (6-10), or mob (11-20) Challenge Rating: 1/2 Treasure: None Alignment: Always neutral Advancement: 3-7 HD (Medium-size) The dreaded servants of the bokor are far more dangerous than mere shambling corpses. These zombi are raised from the earth to do a bokors bidding. They are tireless, if distasteful, servants, but they are also inhumanly strong. While most religions regard zombi as abominations, practicing Voodooists particularly loathe them, mainly because they fear above all else becoming one. It is believed that a zombi is a being that has had its gros-bon-ange ritually stolen or destroyed. Such a one would have no chance of joining their ancestors or the Loa in the Other World, literally a fate worse than death to a faithful follower of the Loa. Zombi are functional only because theyve been given a small piece of a bokors gros-bon-ange, which can be recalled at anytime. They can follow simple commands of no more than few words. When their creator is present, they tend to function more efciently. Zombi smell of mildew and rot. Their skin is usually bloated and discolored; their pale eyes cataracted over, yet still functional. Their mouths are typically sewn shut with rough thread or twine and they seldom make any noise. Bokor tend to cut the esh off their hands making it easier to hone their nger-bones to sharp claws, suitable for both digging earth and rending esh. Undead: Immune to mind-inuencing effects, poison, sleep, paralysis, stunning, and disease. Not subject to critical hits, subdual damage, ability damage, energy drain, or death from massive damage.

TEMPLATE
The greater zombie template offers the GM several options that can be used to throw players for a loop or two.

ZOMBI, GREATER

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Considered by hougans to be the most dangerous earthly servants of the bokor, this greater zombi is, in fact, what most of the Followers of the Loa think all zombi are: a being who has had their gros-bon-ange ritually stolen and their body transformed. While this can be accomplished in different ways, the most infamous is the great zombi ritual which powerful servants of the Loa Baron Samedhi learn. The dreadful ritual pulls forth a persons gros-bon-ange and stores it in a mystically prepared skull. The resulting zombi becomes a dangerous tool for the bokor who created it.

CREATING A GREATER ZOMBI


Greater zombi is a template that can be applied to any humanoid corporeal creature of any alignment (hereinafter referred to as the base creature). The creatures type changes to undead. A greater zombi uses all the base creatures statistics and abilities except as noted here. In the Skull & Bones setting, this template is exclusively applied to humans who have been forced to undergo the great zombi ritual. This grants terrible power to the recipient but also makes them a slave of whoever holds their gros-bon-ange. The rest of this section refers to the greater zombi as a zombi. Hit Dice: Increase to d12. Speed: Same as the base creature. AC: Zombi have +6 natural armor. Attacks: A zombi retains all of a base creatures attacks and also gains a slam attack if it didnt already have one. A lost zombi (see page 152) acquires a claw attack at the base creatures highest attack rating. Damage: Zombi have slam attacks, and lost zombi have claw attacks. If the base creature does not have this attack form, use the damage values in Table 13-1. Creatures with natural attacks retain their old damage ratings or use the values listed on the table, whichever is better. Special Attacks: A zombi retains all the base creatures special attacks. Special Qualities: A zombi retains all of a base creatures special qualities and gains the following. Damage Reduction (Su): Zombi created through the great ritual are supernaturally stripped of mortal frailties, giving the zombi damage reduction 15/magic. Cold Immunity (Ex): Zombi are immune to cold. Turn Resistance (Ex): A zombi has +4 turn resistance. Undead: Immune to mind-inuencing effects, poison, sleep, paralysis, stunning, and disease. Not subject to critical hits, subdual damage, ability drain, energy drain, or death from massive damage. Saves: Same as the character. Abilities: A zombi gains +6 to Strength but loses its Constitution score, being undead. Skills: Zombi receive a +6 racial bonus to Intimidation, Move Silently and Spot checks--otherwise as character. Feats: Same as the character. Environment: The Caribbean.

TABLE 13-1: ZOMBIE ATTACKS


Size Fine Diminutive Tiny Small Medium-size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal Slam Damage 1 1d2 1d3 1d4 1d6 1d8 2d6 2d8 4d6 Claw Damage -1 1d2 1d3 1d4 1d6 2d4 2d6 2d8

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Organization: Solitary. Challenge Rating: Same as the base creature +2. Treasure: Typically none. Alignment: Neutral. Advancement: None; the transformation into a zombi removes any potential for new experience. Zombi are completely under the thrall of the possessor of their gros-bon-ange and must obey their orders without question. Some zombi learn to obey the letter of commands instead of the spirit, but they are rare. A zombi that has not yet succumbed to the state of undeath may be saved. A zombi has as many days as they originally had points of positive Wisdom and Constitution ability modiers to somehow regain their gros-bon-ange. If they do in the allotted time, they lose the zombi (greater) template. Once theyve passed beyond this threshold, they are considered lost zombi. They acquire a claw attack as their esh rots off. If, after that time, they get their gros-bon-ange back, they become free-willed, but retain the zombi template. What they choose to do with their unlife after that is up to them, but they can never gain experience again. Example: Cole the Younger is captured by a bokor who appreciates Coles ability with a blade. After a few weeks of torture, the great zombi ritual transforms Cole into an undead swashbuckler. Cole has a Wisdom score of 12 and had a Constitution of 16. Unless his friends can rescue his gros-bon-ange from the bokor and restore it to him by sunset of the 4th day following his change, Cole will leave the world of the living behind.

DELUSIONAL ZOMBI
Many shrewd bokor long ago determined that it would be easier to have docile human servants than walking monstrosities. Creating zombi is both exhausted and time consuming. Not to mention that the undead are not capable of fullling all of a bokors needs The bokor solution was to convince normal humans that they are zombi. This is accomplished in a number of ways; Ghedes Wine (see the Equipment chapter) is a common tool for those that know its secrets. Charm Person, Suggestion, and a devious mind are also useful. Remember that bokor frequently deal with a populace that strongly believes they could become zombi and that belief helps bokor with their sinister schemes. Delusional zombi seldom have their mouths sewn shut, but neither are they great conversationalists. They tend to walk slowly, simply because somewhere in their mind, they think theyre supposed to. If supplied with weapons, they will use them to the best of their ablilities. They have no undead immunities, though they do have a +6 circumstance bonus to resist Fear effects and they cannot be intimidated. Neither can they be turned by hougans. A delusional zombi can be saved from a bokor, though it takes a lot of effort once theyve nally been broken and convinced that they are undead.

- Djab o what exactly are the Djab? Thats a question bokor have asked for as long as their have been bokor to ask. Djab translates, roughly, as dark spirit and there are certainly many Djab of an evil bent. However, many beings that could be called elemental or nature spirits are also Djab. They range from the kindly to the incomprehensible. Finally, some of the stranger Loa are thought of as Djab. In the end, it is best to judge every Djab on its own merits or lack thereof. The Djab that follow are listed in a slightly modied d20 System format, reecting their place in the Skull & Bones setting. A number of the creatures here listed would be far more powerful on more magic conducive worlds then our own and should they nd their way into other worlds, they should be modied accordingly. Killing many of these beings simply banishes them from the Earth for 101 days. A Djab whose corporeal form has been slain cannot be summoned by any bokor for as long as they are banished.

AILUSAIRAD
Huge Elemental (Water, Djab) Hit Dice: 16d8+80 (152 hp) Initiative: +5 (Dex) Speed: 20 ft.; swim 90 ft. AC: 22 (+5 Dex, +9 natural, -2 size), touch 13, at-footed 17 Base Attack/Grapple: +12/+27 Attack: Slam +17 (2d10+10) Full Attack: Slam +17/+12/+7 melee (2d10+10) Space/Reach: 15 ft./15 ft. Special Attacks: Drench, vortex, water mastery Special Qualities: Elemental, damage reduction 10/magic, re immunity, ocean bound Saves: Fort +15, Ref +10, Will +7 Abilities: Str 25, Dex 20, Con 21, Int 12, Wis 15, Cha 12 Skills: Knowledge (history) +17, Listen +18, Spot +18 Feats: Cleave, Dodge, Great Cleave, Improved Bull Rush, Mobility, Power Attack Environment: Any ocean Organization: Solitary or three (The Three Sisters) Challenge Rating: 7 Treasure: None Alignment: Usually neutral Advancement: 17-20 HD (Huge) Typical Sacrice: A new and entertaining diversion. Destruction of an island.

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The Ailusairad have swum through the waters of the Earth since the time of the dinosaurs. They call themselves the People of the Tides and they know much about the sea that is hidden from the surface world. Most of them believe that their time

here is over and theyve slowly begun to dissipate back into the waters that gave birth to them. A few like humans and are fascinated with their sailing vessels. Others consider humanity to be a curse upon the harmony of the ocean and go out of their way to destroy lone vessels if they think they can do it unnoticed. One of the most dangerous of the Ancients is properly named Wooooshummmmrrrrr, but he lives in sailors tales as the Rogue Wave which comes from a calm sea to destroy a ship without warning. There are also tales circulated of the Three Sisters who always travel together.

COMBAT
The Ailusairad delight in bull rushing ships onto coral beds or diverting them onto sandbars. They are well aware that most humans have no chance against them and delight in tormenting them. Drench (Ex): The Ailusairads touch puts out torches, campres, exposed lanterns, and other open ames of nonmagical origin if these are of Large size or smaller. The creature can dispel magical re it touches as dispel magic cast by a sorcerer whose level equals the elementals HD total. Vortex (Su): The Ailusairad can transform itself into a whirlpool once every 10 minutes, provided it is underwater, and remain in that form for up to 1 round for every 2 HD it has. In vortex form, the elemental can move through the water or along the bottom at its swim speed. The vortex is 5 feet wide at the base, up to 30 feet wide at the top, and up to 32 feet tall (the Ailusairad controls the exact height, but it must be at least 10 feet). Creatures one or more sizes smaller than the Ailusairad (which are 10-50 ft. tall) might take damage when caught in the vortex and may be swept up by it. An affected creature must succeed at a Reex save (DC 25) when it comes into contact with the vortex or take 2d8 points of damage. It must also succeed at a second Reex save (DC 25) or be picked up bodily and held suspended in the powerful currents, automatically taking 2d8 damage each round. A creature that can swim is allowed a Reex save (DC 25) each round to escape the vortex. The creature still takes damage, but can leave if the save is successful. The elemental can eject any carried creatures whenever it wishes, depositing them wherever the vortex happens to be. A summoned elemental always ejects trapped creatures before returning to its home plane. If the vortexs base touches the bottom, it creates a swirling cloud of debris. This cloud is centered on the elemental and has a diameter equal to half the vortexs height. The cloud obscures all vision, including darkvision, beyond 5 feet. Creatures 5 feet away have one-half concealment, while those farther away have total concealment. Those caught in the cloud must succeed at a Concentration check to cast a spell (DC 25). Water Mastery (Ex): An Ailusairad gains a +1 attack and damage bonus if both it and its opponent touch water. If the opponent is landbound, the elemental suffers a -4 penalty to attack and damage. (These modiers are not included in the statistics block.) An Ailusairad can be a serious threat to a ship that crosses its path. The Ailusairad can easily overturn small craft (5 feet of length per HD of the elemental) and stop larger vessels (10 feet long per HD). Even large ships (20 feet long per HD) can be slowed to half speed. Elemental: Immune to poison, sleep, paralysis, and stunning. Not subject to critical hits. Oceanbound (Ex): The Ailusairad are, effectively, sentient sea water. They cannot get any farther out of the ocean than the tide.

AZAGON LA CROIX
Medium Outsider (Djab, Good) Hit Dice: 23d8+161 (264 hp) Initiative: +9 (+5 Dex, +4 Improved Initiative) Speed: 40 ft. AC: 30 (+5 Dex, +15 natural), touch 15, at-footed 25 Base Attack/Grapple: +23/+33 Attack: +3 vorpal spade +33 melee (1d4+13/15-20) Full Attack: +3 vorpal spade +33/+28/+23/+18 melee (1d4+13/15-20) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Spell-like abilities

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Special Qualities: Damage reduction 20/magic, darkvision 60 ft., SR 20, shapers hands Saves: Fort +20, Ref +18, Will +18 Abilities: Str 30, Dex 20, Con 24, Int 18, Wis 20, Cha 20 Skills: Balance +15, Craft (stonemasonry) +30, Escape Artist +20, Hide +25, Intimidate +30, Knowledge (fortications) +24, Knowledge (earthworks) +30, Knowledge (nature) +19, Listen +22, Move Silently +20, Profession (miner) +30, Sense Motive +22, Spot +20, Tumble +20, Use Rope +20 Feats: Cleave, Dodge, Great Cleave, Improved Critical (spade), Improved Initiative, Mobility, Power Attack, Spring Attack Environment: Any land or underground Organization: Unique Challenge Rating: 20 Treasure: No coins; double goods and items Alignment: Neutral good Advancement: By character class Typical Sacrice: An extremely rare uncut stone will do nicely. Putting a large number of the undead to an honorable rest will greatly aid in gaining his favor. Azagon will never manifest for a bokor that uses zombi. If legend is to be believed, Azagon La Croix was, in life, an honorable gravedigger who, despite great risk to himself, continually helped ease the burdens of slaves forced to toil in the mines of South America. Where and when this happened depends on who is telling the story. However, hougans that know about him say that he is on the verge of leaving his status as a Djab behind and joining the ranks of the proper Loa. He is known to have ties with both Ghede and Baron Samedhi, though the nature of his connection to them (other than the obvious grave correlation) is unclear. Azagon is a master of earth and stone. Bokor call upon him to build a fort or level someone elses. His advice can allow a ship captain to pound a harbor fortress to pieces with just a few volleys of re. Azagon is also a patron of the Deadspecically those that have been denied a proper burial or those that have been cheated after their demise. Pirates frequently wear earrings so that, if their body washes ashore, they are assured a proper burial. Those who would dare to steal from the dead, but not give them a proper burial, are targets for Azagons wrath. He can tell at a glance if someone has ever done such and he will kill them without compunction or mercy. Azagon appears to be a phenomenally strong hunchbacked man with dark skin, clad in dirty black breeches. His chest and face are always painted with pale grey-white paint that gives him the semblance of a skeleton.

COMBAT
Azagon doesnt like to ght. Nevertheless, he is one of deadliest beings one could ever face in combat. He carries a crossshaped +3 vorpal spade with an ivory head (treat as a kukri) which he wields with deadly accuracy. He frequently causes pits to appear under his opponents, and then buries them alive. Spell-Like Abilities: At willbulls strength, soften earth and stone, meld into stone, move earth, and stone shape; 3/day earthquake. These abilities are as the spells cast by an 18th-level sorcerer (save DC 15 + spell level). Shapers Hands (Su): Earth and stone move at Azagons command. With a gesture and a standard action, he can cause a 6 ft.-deep pit to appear, or can ll in the same. All of his attacks ignore the Hardness of any substance made of stone. He can knock down most walls with little effort.

BADESSY THE WIND


Huge Elemental (Air, Djab) Hit Dice: 24d8+96 (204 hp) Initiative: +16 (+12 Dex, +4 Improved Initiative) Speed: Fly 100 ft. (perfect) AC: 28 (+12 Dex, +8 natural, -2 size), touch 20, at-footed 16 Base Attack/Grapple: +18/+32 Attack: Slam +28 melee (2d8+9/19-20) Full Attack: Slam +28/+23/+18/+13 melee (2d8+9/19-20) Space/Reach: 15 ft./15 ft. Special Attacks: Air-mastery, spell-like abilities, whirlwind Special Qualities: Elemental traits, damage reduction 15/magic

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Saves: Fort +12, Ref +26, Will +10 Abilities: Str 22, Dex 34, Con 18, Int 15, Wis 15, Cha 16 Skills: Hide +22, Knowledge (old Africa) +12, Listen +17, Move Silently +22, Sense Motive +12, Spot +17 Feats: Combat Reexes, Dodge, Flyby Attack, Improved Critical (slam), Improved Initiative, Iron Will, Mobility, Weapon Finesse (slam), Weapon Focus (slam) Environment: Any land Organization: Unique Challenge Rating: 8 Treasure: None Alignment: Chaotic neutral Advancement: By character class Typical Sacrice: Badessy will help a bokor only if he is playing an exceptionally clever deception on someone. Badessy will insist on being told all the details before he agrees to help. Any suggestions he makes will have to be added to the plan to gain his approval. If the bokor or his allies alter the plan, Badessy will punish them for it. Part of the ancient sky pantheon of Dahomey, Badessy is a roaming trickster who was once worshiped as a god on the plains of Africa. If his loss in stature bothers him, none can say, as he never discusses it. He has a cheerful personality and is often up for a bit of fun, which includes such pastimes as blowing ships off course, delaying troop movements, swamping towns with sea water, etc. He will not intentionally kill any human beings unless theyve managed to seriously wound him, though he greatly enjoys a good ght. Badessy comes at rst as a gale force wind, slowly dropping to a summer breeze. His voice is thunderous and his eyes, which oat amidst billows of thick fog, seem to be made of frost. He is quick to laugh and slow to take offense, but he is certainly accustomed to being treated with respect.

COMBAT
Badessy will rush over his targets roaring loudly and in general, acting far ercer than he actually is. He typically attacks buildings and ships instead of people. Air Mastery (Ex): Airborne creatures suffer a -1 penalty to attack and damage rolls against Badessy. Spell-Like Abilities: At willcontrol winds and control weather; 1/daychain lightning. These abilities are as the spells cast by a 15th-level sorcerer (save DC 13 + spell level). Whirlwind (Su): Badessy can transform himself into a whirlwind once every 10 minutes and remain in that form for up to 8 rounds (1 round for every 2 HD he has). In this form, Badessy can move through the air or along a surface at his y speed. The whirlwind is 5 feet wide at the base, up to 30 feet wide at the top, and up to 50 feet tall. Badessy controls the exact height, but it must be at least 10 feet. Creatures one or more sizes smaller than Badessy might take damage when caught in the whirlwind (see the following table for details) and may be lifted into the air. An affected creature must succeed at a DC 22 Reex save when it comes into contact with the whirlwind or take 2d8 damage It must also succeed at a second Reex save (DC 22) or be picked up bodily and held suspended in the powerful winds, automatically taking the 2d8 each round. A creature that can y is allowed a Reex save (DC 22) each round to escape the whirlwind. The creature still takes damage but can leave if the save is successful. Badessy can eject any carried creatures whenever he wishes, depositing them wherever the whirlwind happens to be. If the whirlwinds base touches the ground, it creates a swirling cloud of debris. This cloud is centered on Badessy and has a diameter equal to half the whirlwinds height. The cloud obscures all vision, including darkvision, beyond 5 feet. Creatures 5 feet away have one-half concealment, while those farther away have total concealment. Those caught in the cloud must succeed at a Concentration check to cast a spell (DC 22). Elemental: Immune to poison, sleep, paralysis, and stunning. Not subject to critical hits.

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CARISONA
Large Outsider (Djab) Hit Dice: 10d8+60 (105 hp) Initiative: +7 (+3 Dex, +4 Improved Initiative) Speed: 40 ft. AC: 21 (+3 Dex, +9 natural, -1 size), touch 12, at-footed 18 Base Attack/Grapple: +10/+21 Attack: Bite +17 melee (2d8+10) Full Attack: Bite +17/+12 melee (2d8+10) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Gnaw, improved grab Special Qualities: Damage reduction 15/bludgeoning, darkvision 60 ft., endless maw Saves: Fort +13, Ref +10, Will +7 Abilities: Str 25, Dex 16, Con 22, Int 10, Wis 10, Cha 16 Skills: Hide +16, Intimidate +16, Jump +9, Move Silently +16, Spot +13, Survival +13, Swim +20 Feats: Dodge, Improved Initiative, Track, Weapon Focus (bite) Environment: Any Organization: Unique Challenge Rating: 11 Treasure: Double coins, goods, and items Alignment: Neutral Advancement: By character class Typical Sacrice: The esh of something he has never eaten before. (GMs call) Carisona the Hunter is an old legend in the Caribbean. He is the rst and greatest of the tropical cannibal spirits, the wendigo of the West Indies. The Caribs once held Carisona before all others, but he has diminished with their passage. Bokor summon him to hunt down particularly hated enemies, something at which he excels. Carisona is 10 feet tall with a razor fanged jaw that can open impossibly wide, almost half as large as he is tall. His entire body is covered with intricate line tattoos and wicked scars. Carisona feels neither fatigue nor pain. His endless hunger is so great that from the moment a bokor summons him, he begins chewing on himself until a bargain can be struck.

COMBAT
Carisona prefers to take his prey unawares, swiftly consuming them before they even realize theyve been attacked. He will ee if a ght turns against him, but only so he can return later and try another ambush. Gnaw (Ex): Carisonas teeth are capable of rending a man to pieces. Each round after the rst that a creature has been dealt automatic bite damage by Carisona, he must make a Fortitude save with a DC 10 + that rounds bite damage. Failure means whatever Carisona is chewing on is bitten off. Success means the body part remains intact. Breaking out of Cariosnas mouth requires a Strength or Escape Artist check (DC 25). Improved Grab (Ex): To use this ability, Carisona must hit with his bite attack. If he gets a hold, he automatically deals bite damage and can start to chew on his foe. Endless Maw (Su): Carisona is capable of swallowing anything without being harmed by it, and he never seems to be full. If a party should kill Carisona, a shantyman can try a Bardic Knowledge check (DC 20) and/or a bokor can make a Knowledge (Djab) check (DC 25) to recall tales of Braiote the Tracker, who used Carisonas stomach to hold a river. Cut from the body and cured, Carisonas stomach acts as a large bag of holding.

LEL-ZA-BOL
Medium Outsider (Djab, Evil, Incorporeal) Hit Dice: 14d8+56 (119 hp) Initiative: +8 (+4 Dex, +4 Improved Initiative) Speed: 50 ft. AC: 19 (+4 Dex, +5 deection), touch 19, at-footed 15 Base Attack/Grapple: +14/Attack: +2 ghost touch heavy mace +16 melee (1d8+2) or incorporeal touch +14 melee (1d4 temporary Constitution) Full Attack: +2 ghost touch heavy mace +16/+11/+6 melee (1d8+2); or incorporeal touch +14/+9/+4 melee (1d4 temporary Constitution) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Constitution damage, spell-like abilities Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., incorporeal Saves: Fort +13, Ref +13, Will +13 Abilities: Str-, Dex 18, Con 18, Int 18, Wis 18, Cha 20

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Skills: Diplomacy +22, Hide +21, Innuendo +20, Intimidate +22, Knowledge (arcana) +21, Knowledge (history) +21, Knowledge (religion) +21, Listen +20, Sense Motive +21, Spot +21 Feats: Cleave, Combat Reexes, Great Cleave, Improved Initiative, Power Attack Environment: Any land or underground Organization: Unique Challenge Rating: 13 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Neutral evil Advancement: By character class Typical Sacrice: The still beating heart of an innocent, cut out with an obsidian blade. Lel-Za-Bol was worshiped by the Aztecs as one of their nine Night Lords; a group of dark entities that the Aztecs placated with frequent sacrices. With the passage of the Aztec Empire, the various Night Lords lost much of their inuence and are little remembered by most save those with an active interest in the occult. Bokor typically summon Lel-Za-Bol for her knowledge of the Aztecs and their secrets, though she is also a dangerous opponent. She is willing to deal with bokor mainly because she misses the good old days and longs for a return to preeminence. Lel-Za-Bol appears as woman clad in leopard skins with a large obsidian mace. However, parts of her body constantly fade in and out of view.

COMBAT
Lel-Za-Bol revels in fear and terror. She seldom strikes down an opponent until theyve realized how little of a chance they stand against her. If confronted by an opponent that can actually hurt her, she tends to ee through solid objects, knowing that most beings have no chance of following her. She will never forgive or forget any that caused her such indignity, though. Constitution Damage (Su): Lel-Za-Bols touch deals 1d4 points of temporary Constitution damage to a living foe. A creature reduced to Constitution 0 by Lel-Za-Bol dies. The points return at the rate of 1 per day (or double that if the character gets total rest). Spell-Like Abilities: Lel-Za-Bol can use cause fear, protection from good, dispel good, bestow curse, and darkness at will; She can also use discern location 2/day and blasphemy, phantasmal killer, and harm 1/day. All spells are cast as a 15th-level sorcerer (save DC 15 + spell level). Incorporeal (Su): Lel-Za-Bol can only be harmed by incorporeal creatures and/or objects, +1 or better weapons, and magic. There is a 50% chance that shell ignore any damage from a corporeal source. She can pass through solid objects at will and her attacks pass through armor. She always moves silently.

- Legends of Piracy CHARLES VANE


Time of Operation: 1716-1719 Operational Area: The Americas Vane [Sdg4/Sof6, hp 54] originally served under Henry Jennings, but unlike his former captain, he was unwilling to accept the Kings Pardon. Vane ordered a ship set are and sailed it into Woodes Rogers small eet as they entered New Providences harbor, allowing him to escape with a ship full of plunder. Vane ranged along the Carolina coast for a time, capturing prizes as he went, though he lost some men to a minor mutiny. In late 1718, Vane ran into a French man-o-war and refused to engage it. This, coupled with a lack of prizes, caused Vane to be ousted in favor of his quartermaster, Calico Jack. Undaunted, Vane set out with a few men and a sloop. Within three months hed taken several rich prizes as he returned to the Caribbean. In 1719, a hurricane in the Bay of Honduras wrecked his ship and Vane seems to have been the only survivor. Vane was found by an old friend, a Captain Holford, who refused to rescue him, as he knew his piratical ways too well. Not long after, another ship found him, but he was soon recognized and sent to Port Royal, where he was hung for piracy in 1720.

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RATARON THE BOLD


Medium Outsider (Djab, Evil, Lawful) Hit Dice: 10d8+30 (75 hp) Initiative: +8 (+4 Dex, +4 Improved Initiative) Speed: 40 ft. AC: 22 (+4 Dex, +8 natural), touch 14, at-footed 18 Base Attack/Grapple: +10/+12 Attack: +2 keen rapier +16 melee (1d6+4/12-20 plus poison) Full Attack: +2 keen rapier +16/+11 melee (1d6+4/12-20 plus poison) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Poison use Special Qualities: Damage reduction 25/swords, darkvision 60 ft., poison immunity, SR 20, uncanny dodge Saves: Fort +9, Ref +10, Will +11 Abilities: Str 15, Dex 18, Con 17, Int 22, Wis 20, Cha 15 Skills: Bluff +15, Craft (alchemy) +19, Diplomacy +15, Intimidate +15, Knowledge (arcana) +19, Knowledge (history) +19, Knowledge (the planes) +19, Move Silently +14, Sense Motive +18, Spot +18, Tumble +17 Feats: Dodge, Improved Critical (rapier), Improved Initiative, Weapon Finesse (rapier) Environment: Any Organization: Unique Challenge Rating: 11 Treasure: No coins; double goods; standard items; +2 keen rapier Alignment: Lawful evil Advancement: By character class Typical Sacrice: Rataron will accept knowledge of poisons that he knows nothing about (a rarity, GMs call) for his services. He is also partial to rubies that have been steeped in the blood of three innocent intelligent beings. A counselor and a schemer with wide ranging plans and a duplicitous smile for all; Rataron is a master of deception. He is a skilled manipulator, expert in getting his victims to look at his right hand while his left hand is stabbing them in the back. He delights in the politics of the world and will happily assist bokor with the right attitude into positions of power. Rataron is summoned for his nearly perfect knowledge of poisons. He is one of the few beings who knows the secret of the dreaded Momgazi powder. He always requests the assassination of a target of his choice in exchange for the knowledge and use of a poison or an antidote. Rataron manifests as a slim man with solid purple eyes and a contemptuous smirk. He is always dressed in the latest fashions and he usually gestures with a silken handkerchief as he speaks.

COMBAT
The Bold One ghts with a rapier made of a thin sliver of unbreakable obsidian he calls Dramthal. It has the quality keen and grants +2 to combat and damage rolls. He always steeps it in a poison. Poison Use: Rataron uses Silpreth Moth Venom (Injury DC 18; Initial Damage 2d6 Dex; Secondary Damage 0) on his weapons. He carries enough poison with him for 2d4 applications, as the blade of his rapier must be recoated after each battle. Poison Immunity (Ex): Rataron is immune to all forms of poison. Uncanny Dodge (Ex): Ratarons supple dodging begins to disturb his foes when they realize that his bones must be bending unnaturally to allow him to move as he does. Rataron retains his Dex bonus to AC regardless of being caught atfooted, cannot be anked, and receives a +3 dodge bonus to AC and Reex saves versus traps.

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SIX THOUSAND MEN


Large Outsider (Djab, Evil) Hit Dice: 8d8+40 (76 hp) Initiative: +5 (+1 Dex, +4 Improved Initiative) Speed: Fly 50 ft. (perfect) AC: 20 (+1 Dex, +10 natural, -1 size), touch 10, atfooted 19 Base Attack/Grapple: +8/+18 Attacks: Bites +13 melee (1d8+9) Full Attack: 6 bites +13 melee (1d8+9) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Qualities: Damage reduction 10/magic, darkvision 60 ft., turning vulnerability Saves: Fort +11, Ref +7, Will +4 Abilities: Str 22, Dex 13, Con 20, Int 8, Wis 6, Cha 10 Skills: Intimidate +10, Intuit Direction +8, Listen +8, Search +5, Sense Motive +8, Spot +8 Feats: Dodge, Flyby Attack, Improved Initiative Environment: Any land or underground Organization: Unique Challenge Rating: 9 Treasure: None Alignment: Neutral evil Advancement: By character class Typical Sacrice: Six Thousand Men will demand the sacrice of a specic slaver or the burning destruction of a slave based plantation for its services. Six Thousand Men manifests as a swirling blue-white column of translucent esh consisting of moaning faces with jagged teeth and blank eyes. Six Thousand Men, or Similor as it is often called, is a being formed from the pieces of gros-bon-anges that are lost to the Pacic because of the slave trade. Frequently, slaves that are tossed overboard are eaten alive by sharks, forever engraving fear and terror into their gros-bonanges. Similor exists on vengeance and hatred. Its blind fury is difcult to direct and those bokor that call it, if they are wise, never turn their back on it.

COMBAT
Similor roars into its chosen targets, heedless of the damage inicted upon it. Its twisting faces repeatedly tear into foes, ripping off chunks of esh as they pass by in a whirlwind-like swirl. Similor doesnt comprehend subtlety: it simply kills. Turning Vulnerability (Su): Six Thousand Men, though an outsider, is formed of cursed souls and can be turned as if it was undead. It does not, however, gain any undead immunities.

SHIMERACK THE CHITTERER


Large Outsider (Djab, Evil) Hit Dice: 12d8+24 (78 hp) Initiative: +12 (+8 Dex, +4 Improved Initiative) Speed: 50 ft. AC: 27 (+8 Dex, +10 natural, -1 size), touch 17, at-footed 19 Base Attack/Grapple: +12/+18 Attack: +2 awl hook of speed +24 melee (1d6+4) Full Attack: +2 awl hook of speed +24/+19/+14/+24 melee (1d6+4) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Painful twist (2d6+4), spell-like abilities Special Qualities: Damage reduction 10/magic, darkvision 60 ft., immunities Saves: Fort +10, Ref +18, Will +12 Abilities: Str 15, Dex 26, Con 15, Int 17, Wis 15, Cha 10 Skills: Hide +23, Intimidate +15, Intuit Direction +14, Jump +14, Listen +12, Open Lock +20, Search +15, Sense Motive +17, Spot +17, Tumble +22 Feats: Improved Initiative, Iron Will, Lightning Reexes, Weapon Finesse (awl hook), Weapon Focus (awl hook) Environment: Any land or underground Organization: Unique Challenge Rating: 13

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Treasure: None Alignment: Neutral evil Advancement: By character class Typical Sacrice: Shimerack doesnt enter into pactsone summons, one assassination. The price is the sacrice of one of the summoning bokors ngers. Shimerack will attempt to kill his target until he succeeds or he is slain. If he is killed, he will never again accept a commission on the target he failed to eliminate. The next bokor that summons him will luck out, the price of Shimeracks commission after a failure is not a ngerits permission to go after the bokor that sent him after a target he couldnt kill. One of the most feared assassins of all the Djab, Shimerack the Chitterer has made his way into everyday sailors tales where he is known as Mr. Hooks. Bokor call on him reluctantly, though, for his standards and conditions on accepting commissions are well known. Shimerack is a tall grey humanoid, with long supple limbs that jut out at strange angles. His unusual sobriquet comes from the odd armor he wears which is made up of the nger bones of his previous employers, his victims and a variety of shhooks; it makes a chittering sound as he moves, reminiscent of distant conversation or a light rain on a taut sail.

COMBAT
Shimerack wields a +2 awl hook of speed made from seemingly indestructible bone with several cruel looking steel barbs along its length. The hook dissolves if Shimerack dies. Shimerack will do anything to kill his target. Anything. He has no comprehension of morality nor does he mind dying if that will kill his target. For example, Shimerack confronts his target in the hold of a ship but the targets friends all gang up on him, driving him back. Shimerack calmly retreats, slowly bringing his foes with him until, with a toothy smile, he tosses a torch into the powder room, and then blocks the staircase so theyll all blow up together. Painful Twist (Ex): If Shimerack successfully hits a target with 3 or more attacks, he deftly buries his hook in them and automatically inicts 2d6+4 points of damage. In addition, the victim of this attack must make a Fortitude save (DC 14) or drop anything they are holding from the pain. Spell-Like Abilities: At willinvisibility, spider climb, scare; 1/day foresight. These abilities are as the spells cast by an 18th-level sorcerer (save DC 10 + spell level). Immunities (Ex): Shimerack is immune to all fear, compulsion, and charm effects.

TONA
Small Outsider (Djab, Good) Hit Dice: 2d8+2 (11 hp) Initiative: +4 (+4 Dex) Speed: 20 ft. AC: 18 (+4 Dex, +3 natural, +1 size), touch 15, at-footed 14 Base Attack/Grapple: +2/-4 Attack: Dagger +7 melee (1d4-2 plus poison) Full Attack: As above Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Poison use, spell-like abilities Special Qualities: Damage reduction 5/magic, darkvision 60 ft. Saves: Fort +4, Ref +7, Will +6 Abilities: Str 6, Dex 18, Con 13, Int 12, Wis 16, Cha 15 Skills: Handle Animal +5, Heal +6, Hide +8, Knowledge (nature) +4, Move Silently +7, Perform +5 (ballad, chant, drums), Ride +7 Feats: Weapon Finesse (dagger) Environment: Any land or underground Organization: Solitary or band (4-10) Challenge Rating: 3 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Chaotic good Advancement: 3-5 HD (Small) Typical Sacrice: Save the animals and plants of an area that is being decimated by colonization.

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Tona are honorable nature spirits who roam the Caribbean bringing rain and tending to the animal population. They avoid humanity for the most part, preferring the company of wild creatures to any civilization. They will not come if summoned by an evil bokor. Tona are close to two feet tall with broad faces and clever hands. Their hair is typically bright green and their eyes are bright blue. Tona are famous for their singing, which echoes through the tropics on warm, rainy nights. Tona raise giant tree frogs as mounts. They have special harness saddles so they can take advantage of their mounts ability to climb anything.

COMBAT
Tona favor trickery over direct confrontation. They will let the local animal population do their ghting for them. If they must ght, they carry masterwork daggers treated with a special poison. Poison Use: Tona use Medium-size spider venom on their weapons (Injury DC 14; Initial Damage 1d4 Str; Secondary Damage 1d6 Str). Spell-Like Abilities: At willcommune with nature, dominate animal, invisibility, speak with animals;1/daycontrol weather. These abilities are as the spells cast by a 12th-level sorcerer (save DC 12 + spell level).

ZAPE TOTEC
Medium Outsider (Djab, Evil) Hit Dice: 8d8+24 (60 hp) Initiative: +10 (+6 Dex, +4 Improved Initiative) Speed: 60 ft. AC: 21 (+6 Dex, +5 natural), touch 16, at-footed 15 Base Attack/Grapple: +8/+12 Attack: Claw +12 melee (1d4+4) or foot rake +12 melee (1d10+4) Full Attack: 2 claws +12 melee (1d4+4) or foot rake +12 melee (1d10+4) Damage: Claw 1d4+4, foot rake 1d10+4 Space/Reach: 5 ft. by 5 ft./5 ft. (foot rake 10 ft.) Special Attacks: Foot rake, spell-like abilities, vicious charge Special Qualities: Damage reduction 10/magic, darkvision 60 ft. Saves: Fort +9, Ref +12, Will +9 Abilities: Str 18, Dex 23, Con 17, Int 15, Wis 16, Cha 10 Skills: Climb +15, Hide +21, Jump +14, Listen +14, Move Silently +17, Sense Motive +13, Spot +14 Feats: Dodge, Improved Initiative, Mobility Environment: Any land or underground Organization: Unique Challenge Rating: 10 Treasure: None Alignment: Chaotic evil Advancement: By character class Typical Sacrice: The pelt of a freshly skinned human. Zape Totec is called The Flayed Lord and it is oft-times thought of as a necessary evil for its ability to bring rain during times of drought. It is worshiped in parts of what will be Central America as a god. Its evil is amoral and self-centered. It cares nothing for others, seeing them merely as diversions to relieve its boredom. Bokor usually call upon it to hunt down a foe or eliminate a rain shortage. Zape Totec usually manifests with tawny yellow skin and large green cats eyes. Its legs resemble a raptors, with hooked claws and reverse bent knees. It always wears a cloak made of human skin.

COMBAT
Zape Totec loves to play with its victims. It is fond of disemboweling a foe, then parading about with their intestines draped about it to demoralize others. Foot Rake (Ex): Anyone coming into or going out of Zape Totecs reach (10 ft) is subject to an attack by his lightning-quick legs. A single opponent can be struck up to 6 times in one round (based on Zape Totecs Dex modier). This attack does not provoke an attack of opportunity. Spell-Like Abilities: Zape Totec can use control weather as an 18th-level sorcerer with a casting time of 1 action. Contrary to the spell description for control weather, Zape Totec can use this ability to punish those he considers disrespectful by giving them droughts, no matter the season. Vicious Charge (Ex): If Zape Totec charges a foe, it can make a full attack even if it has already taken a move action. This attack does not provoke an attack of opportunity.

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Chapter XIV: Islands of the Caribbean


The action of the Skull & Bones campaign takes place among the many islands of the Caribbean. From teeming ports to secret pirate havens to hidden civilizations, the New World is one of boundless opportunity and adventure. This chapter is geared towards providing locations that we hope can offer environments and inspiration for a variety of campaigns and adventure types.

- Explanation of Headings All islands are described in the following format:

ISLAND NAME (CONTROLLING POWER)


This entry is the name by which Europeans know the island in question. The text in parentheses explains which of the colonial powers controls it during the time period covered by this book.

PRODUCE
This indicates all the commodities that are made or harvested on the island, and that will typically be available for sale. Underlined goods are made almost entirely for export, and are available at much less than list price (list price less d6 x 10%) if bought in bulk. Sugar producing islands are isolationist, insular, and uncaring about their neighborsa pirate attack on Jamaica, for example, might be thought to benet Barbadoes, since the two are rival English sugar colonies. Most of the sugar producers import huge numbers of slaves, partly to expand their sugar plantations, and partly to replace those who have been worked to deathabout 15% of the slave population dies or escapes each year.

DEMAND
Almost all Caribbean islands have constant need of our, beef, pork, sh, timber, shingles, corn, peas, beans, rice, poultry, horses, oxen, sheep, hogs, oil, tar, shipbuilding materials (masts, spars and so on), soap, wool, candles, iron, manufactured goods (stoves, pans, kettles, nails, guns and so on) and luxury goods (perfume, hats, clothing, shoes and boots, and so on). Few are even close to being self-sufcient, since their European parent countries wish only to exploit the Caribbean climate and fertile soil to grow lucrative cropsparticularly sugar. An entry of None indicates that there is no particular commodity that the island wants more than any other, but that does not mean they arent willing to pay for any goods that it does not produce. Goods in the Demand section indicate commodities that are in particularly short supply on the island. These will command a premium (list price plus 1d6 x 10%), unless the circumstances are exceptional (for example, a pirate brought in six prize merchant ships laden with that commodity last week).

SCENARIO HOOKS
Some of the islands have one or more adventure ideas relating to them. Often it is easy enough for the GM to generate new adventure ideas based on the ones listed. For example, if the group succeeds in the St. Lucia scenario hook, the likely consequence is the destruction of the French colony there; the spy may then offer the group more money to contact the Caribs again only to betray and destroy them, so that the English can colonize the island.

ANGUILLA (ENGLISH)
Anguilla, the most northerly of the Leeward Isles, is a small island with a population of just 100 whites and 800 black slaves. One of the few features of interest in this beautiful but not particularly protable island is Devils Cave, a large cavern containing a freshwater fountain and native carvings, both on the walls and on a huge stalagmite. The stalagmite is over three yards tall and carved to represent a stern-looking gure. Devils Cave is shunned by the colonists, who believe it to be a place of evil Indian magic, but some of the slaves hold secret meetings and rituals there. The islands population recently evacuated to Antigua after an attack by the French, but the English colonists have now returned. Produce: Salt, Fish, Meat (Turtles) Demand: None Scenario Hook: An ancient people, called the Siboney or People of the Stones in the Arawak tongue, once held Devils Cave to be one of their most sacred places. They are long gone now, having left naught but shell inlaid axes and cups to mark their passage. Hougans that have been taught by the Arawaks can call the few spirits of the Siboney that havent moved on here. They once knew all of the Caribbean and their knowledge of lost places and long buried tombs is said to be extensive.

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ANTIGUA (ENGLISH)
Antigua has several good harbors and many beaches and coves, making it a popular waypoint and hurricane haven for legitimate traders, smugglers and pirates alike. Its population is about 12,000, at least 9,500 of whom are slaves and another 300 freed slaves. Deer, duck and wild pigeons can all be found in its forests, which enhance the islands appeal to freebooters looking for a hideaway. It is considered an important strategic gateway, being situated by one of the main trade routes from Europe to the Caribbean, and so the English have protected it well with a number of forts and gun batteries. These include Fort George and Blake Island Fort, which protect the main town of Falmouth. Produce: Sugar, Fish, Fruit and Vegetables, Tobacco, Indigo, Spices (Ginger) Demand: Meat, Slaves Scenario Hook: Alastair Codrington oversees the Codrington family fortunes in Antigua. His branch of the family has been feuding with another branch, led by Devon Codrington of Barbuda. Each quietly accuses the other of skimming prots, illicit dealings and trafcking with dark forces. Theyre both probably right.

ARUBA (DUTCH)
The Dutch captured Aruba from the nominal control of the Spanish more than half a century ago, but have not settled in great numbers as yet. The majority of the population consists of Arawak and African slaves who herd cattle, goats and horses for the Dutch. Herding is perhaps the best economic use for the islandalthough it is at and outside the main hurricane risk area, the soil is relatively infertile, and it has few other natural resources. The ruins of a pirate castle can be found at Bushiribana, almost two centuries old. Aruba is protected by Fort Zoutman. Produce: Fruit, Meat (Goat, Duck, Iguana, Beef ), Horses, Fish Demands: None Scenario Hook: It is no wonder that the Dutch have avoided colonizing in great numbers: Aruba is haunted. The pirate castle at Bushiribana, on moonless nights, stands undamaged in the darkness. Many a spirit sails the waterways here and the dead are restless. Then again, several massive treasures are supposedly buried or sunk here. Maybe these two facts have something to do with one another?

BAHAMAS (ENGLISH)
The Bahamas are a pirates dream in terms of a hideoutthere are hundreds of them, many of which are uncharted, and they have few natural resources, making them unattractive to law-abiding settlers. They are a veritable labyrinth of islands, islets, coral cays and reefs, right next to the Straits of Florida, through which all the Spanish treasure ships pass. Small wonder that Blackbeard makes his home in the town of Nassau on New Providence Island. Nassau has a wicked and lthy reputation, and is full of the dregs of the Caribbean: pirates, smugglers, and other criminals. It is protected by Fort Nassau, built as a safeguard against the Spanish. Its population is little more than a thousand people of all nationalities and backgrounds, with another thousand or so black slaves and ve hundred whites doing some farming of cotton and tobacco on several of the other islands. The Caicos Islands are effectively part of the Bahamas, although the nearby Turks Islands are technically governed by the Spanish from Santo Domingo. Produce: Fish, Luxury Goods (Sea Sponges), Cotton, Tobacco Demand: None Scenario Hook: Many believe that the islands of the Bahamas shift of their own accord. Those of a more scientic bent contend that it is only the natural forces of wind and wave that make them seem to move, but the superstitious know better. There is a young Portuguese boy named Helio Gama who supposedly knows all of the islands intimately. God touched Helio, they say, but in his mind a living map of the Bahamas dwells and any ship he sails upon can always nd its way through without incident. Needless to say, a number of unsavory characters have a great deal of interest in the boy . . .

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BARBADOES (ENGLISH)
The entire economy of Barbadoes is built around sugarit is Englands most successful sugar colony, although Jamaica is beginning to rival it. Its success has brought problems, though: its planters are even more greedy, selsh and isolationist than most colonists, they treat their slaves even worse than most English slave-owners do, and they are beginning to exhaust the fertility of the soil with their mania for sugar. Inevitably, these problems will spell eventual disaster for the colony, but there is little hint of that at present. The prots to be made are so enormous that the planters think of little else. The only other product exported from Barbadoes is rum, invented recently by the planter Abel Gay, and already proving popular. There is a market for almost any goods but sugar here, since nothing else is grown or produced and there is a lot of capital available to buy. Add 1d6 x 10% to the sale price of any goods other than sugar here (this is cumulative with the +1d6 x 10% for goods specically listed as in demand). Luxury goods of all kinds are particularly valued. Because the island is the most easterly of the English colonies in the New World, it often receives supply ships and slavers before the other islands, and it also functions as a trading center for the other colonies. Many planters from other islands buy their slaves and luxuries here rather than waiting for the depleted merchant ships to reach them. The economic importance of the island inevitably brings with it political signicance. Barbadoes has its own Parliament, and its richer planters also have quite some inuence over the English Parliament. There are around 70,000 slaves on the island, around 5,000 planters and other whites, and about a thousand Red Legs (see below). The white population includes small but signicant communities of Jews and Quakers. The largest settlement on the island is Bridgetown, a thriving and rich trading town on the far south of the west coast. Speightstown, also on the west coast but much further north, is essentially a private port for the commercial sugar empire of the Speight Company of Bristol. The other colonial powers would dearly love to pluck Barbadoes from the English, but would nd it a difcult task; the winds are against any attack from the west, and would necessitate a great deal of tacking back and forth to reach Bridgetown, all the while under re from the guns of Nedhams Forte and Willoughbys Forte. Speightstown is similarly protected by two forts. A land attack on Bridgetown would be difcult, since the north of the island is mountainous and rugged (and is named Scotland for that reason), the west has high cliffs that would make landing hard, and the south is protected by a Watch Tower and several gun batteries on coastal outcroppings. The lower classes of Barbadoes are descendents of indentured servants who were used extensively to work the sugar plantations before the planters decided that black slaves were hardier and cheaper. Because many of these indentured servants are easily sunburnt fair-skinned Scots, poor whites on Barbadoes are still known as Red Legs. Those who cannot nd work in the port of Bridgetown live in caves on the east coast of the island, making their living by stealing or shing. Produce: Sugar, Rum Demand: Slaves, Meat, Luxury Goods Scenario Hooks: A French spy offers 500 on completion of a job for rabble-rousers and agents provocateur. She wants the group to disguise themselves as Quakers and incite a slave revolt. She will provide religious tracts and letters purporting to be from the Quaker leadership, indicating that the Quakers are the spiritual heirs to the Diggers, Ranters and other anti-authoritarian movements. She also offers bombs, grenades, knives and muskets with which to arm the leading slaves. This is a two-pronged attack on the English colony here: even if the slave revolt is put down, the aftermath will tear the white community apart and even have repercussions in England and the other colonies, as Quakers fall under suspicion of anarchism and terrorism. The same spy offers 300 and a 1/72nd share in the pillage of Bridgetown for the group to attack the Watch Tower on the south coast, silencing its guards and spiking its guns, so as to allow a French force to land there and march west to sack Bridgetown itself. An elderly plantation owner, Mr. Berringer, is looking for someone with expertise in spiritual matters to exorcize his manor house of the ghost of his father, Colonel Berringer, who was killed forty years ago in a duel with his wifes lover. Mr. Berringer has tried the Church and is now willing to try other alternatives, including the assistance of bokor or hougans. He can pay well in sugar or guineas, and he is a potentially a useful contact. The ghost of Berringer will only be placated if the former home of his killer, John Yeamans, is ceremonially shot at with a blessed dueling pistolhow the group discovers this is up to them.

BARBUDA (ENGLISH)
Barbuda has just one town, Codrington, named for the Codrington family who effectively own the entire island. They use it to produce food for their slaves on Antigua, and as a place to breed slaves, again to work their plantations in Antigua. The island is almost surrounded by reefs, with this and its tiny population (less than 500 all told) and lack of wealth making it an unattractive target for raiders of whatever sort. Although it is listed as a producer of beef, maize and slaves, these are not available for saleall are reserved for export to the powerful Codrington holdings. Produce: Meat (Beef ), Maize, Slaves Demand: None Scenario Hook: The Codrington family is an ancient and disturbing line. Various branches of the family have yielded both saints and diabolists. The family head of Barbuda is one Devon Codrington, a man with both ambitions and gold to spare. He is engaged in a subtle war with his counterpart on Antigua, Alastair.

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BONAIRE (DUTCH)
Bonaire is a low, at land, full of all manner of tropical birds, from amingos to parakeets and terns. Sailors who visit it for the rst time often nd themselves unable to resist buying one of the beautiful green parrots for which the island is famous. Its only fort, Fort Oranje, is still only half-nished. Produce: Timber, Meat (Turtles, Beef, Duck, Goat, Iguana), Salt, Fish, Maize, Horses, Fruit Demand: Slaves Scenario Hook: Natives often speak of a great and ery bird that sweeps over Bonaire sometime during the mid-summer. While most colonists think this nothing more than a foolish superstition, some whisper that the bird is the last phoenix. If so, the value of such a creature is near incalculable.

CAYMAN ISLANDS (ENGLISH)


The Caymans have a large population of crocodiles, but not many permanent human occupants. Technically claimed by the English under the Governor of Jamaica, they are more commonly home to careening pirates than settlers. Occasionally colonists of one nationality or another try to establish a home here, but pirates kill them within a year or two at most. Fishing is good, and the sea turtles that have become the pirates staple food can also be found here in numbers. Produce: Nothing Demand: None Scenario Hook: Various ships have reported some odd stories about the Caymans. A few sailors have recently sworn that theyve seen crocodiles that walk upright. While most dismiss this as sailor nonsense, a number of colonists have vanished without a trace. Some countries may wish to get to the bottom of just what is going on here and theyll need some formidable lads to send in on a fact nding expedition.

COZUMEL (MAYAN)
Cozumels culture is a lot more like that of the nearby Yucatan Peninsula than most of the other Caribbean islands. It is populated entirely by Mayans: although the Spanish consider it to be under the jurisdiction of the Kingdom of Mexico, they have not bothered to colonize it. It is of great signicance to pirates, since the Spanish supply eet has to pass near here en route to Vera Cruz. Cozumel has many coves for pirates to hide in, and several reefs to make navigation difcult for sailors who are unfamiliar with the area. It is also of particular import to the Mayans, being the religious center for worship of their moon goddess Ixchel, whose temple is in the northeast of the island. Produce: Fish, Rope Demand: Nothing Scenario Hook: The Catholic Church has decided that the worship of Ixchel has to stop. They are soon to send a punitive force to wipe out the heathens once and for all. When it comes to dealing with heretics, the Church tends to become open-minded in its hiring practices. A group of pirates could nd themselves helping to persecute the savages or defending the noble native underdogs against the might of Spain.

CUBA (SPANISH)
Cuba is a huge island with a population of around 80,000 in total, about half of whom are white, with the black population being about 35,000 slaves and 3,000 free. The remainder are Arawak natives in the highest mountain valleys. There are few natives left, after a couple of centuries of ill treatment at the hands of the Spanish. Most of the whites are bandits, smugglers and prostitutes. Even Cubas merchants and planters are happy to trade with pirates, smugglers and anyone else offering a good deal, despite what laws and regulations may demand. Many of the plantation owners and merchants feel a growing resentment towards Spain and particularly its mercantilism; it is likely that this resentment will erupt into open revolt before too long. Havana, the main town of Cuba, is major military center for Spain in the Indies. It is surrounded by fortications, including the monstrously powerful castle of El Morro. As a shipbuilding center, it is also likely to have several small warships and merchantmen in its harbor at any time, more during the winter when the Spanish galeones and ota shelter here. It has a good natural defense in addition to the various castlesalmost the entire northern coast of Cuba is surrounded by a vast complex of treacherous reefs, rocks and islands known as the Great Bahama Bank. Attempting to navigate the Bank would be suicidal for any ship without detailed charts, and dangerous enough even with charts and a local pilot. Over the years, the Spaniards have laboriously mapped the Bank, but even now only a few of the most senior

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ofcers in the Spanish navy have either the charts or the rst-hand experience to sail through the various safe channels of the Bank. Trinidad is a smaller town on the south coast, protected by only a single fort and of more economic than military importanceit is a center for the trade of beef, cattle and sugar in particular. Nearly two centuries ago, a Hispaniolan Arawak named Hatuey led a rebellion against the Spanish here and was captured and burned at the stake. Offered baptism and absolution by a friar, he replied, If the Spaniards go to heaven, then I certainly do not want to go there, so do not baptize me, I would prefer to go to hell! These words created a legend, and his execution site, Yara, is a place of pilgrimage for all those who seek to defeat the white colonists of Cuba. It is said that if the proper ceremonies are performed, the Light of Yara will descend, granting greatly increased strength and fortitude for the battle against the Europeans. Produce: Tobacco, Copper, Sugar, Meat (Beef ) Demand: Slaves Scenario Hook: An English spy approaches the group and offers to pay them a small fortune (500 guineas each) if they will disguise themselves as Spanish shermen and make a detailed map of the Great Bahama Bank. They have to take the spy with them to ensure they do a proper job, and of course they will need a shing boat and Spanish-style clothing, which the spy is unable to provide.

CURACAO (DUTCH)
Curacao is the main Dutch trading center for slaves, and supplies not just other Dutch islands but also most of the Spanish colonies on the Main and in the Caribbean. Its biggest town and port, Amsterdam, is in one of the best-protected harbors in the Caribbean: it is set deep in a narrow bay, with both sides of the bay overlooked by heavily armed forts. Amsterdam is effectively one huge market, full of merchants, warehouses, and shops. Produce: Fruit, Fish, Slaves, Maize, Meat (duck, goat, and iguana) Demand: Slaves Scenario Hook: This place abounds with intrigue and a group of sharp lads will nd many leads and various offers of employment here as well. The Dutch need crews willing to waylay their competitors as well as escort their ships on occasion. Who better to protect a ship from pirates than pirates?

DOMINICA (CARIB)
The southernmost of the Leeward Islands, Dominica is the largest island to remain effectively under the rulership of the native Caribs, although both England and France have attempted to colonize it and no doubt will do so again despite their agreement to leave it neutral. The natives make full use of the mountainous and heavily forested terrain of the island to defeat any would-be conquerors. Produce: Nothing Demand: None Scenario Hooks: Either an English or French spy contacts the group and offers them a large sum of money to make a detailed map of Dominica, with particular reference to Carib settlements and defenses. It is no accident that the natives of Dominica have constantly repelled all invaders. One of the last ve members of the Scintillant Counsel, an ancient group of Couatl that once held dominion over much of the Caribbean and South America, makes her lair here. She advises the local Carib leaders on how best to thwart the French and English. A group of decent pirates could do worse than to have her as a patron. Her human pronounceable name is Esselio.

GRENADA (FRENCH)
The southernmost of the Windward Isles, its French colonists know Grenada as La Grenade. Grenadas terrain is varied, with mountainous, volcanic areas, crater lakes, dwarf forests, rainforest, mixed woodland, mangrove, beaches and coral reefs. It is occupied by just 250 whites (almost all French), 500 black slaves, and 50 free blacks. Almost all of the population is clustered around the port of St. Louis. Fort St. Louis and Fort Royal protect the harbor from both sides. Two smaller islands just north of Grenada, Carriacou and Petit Martinique, are presently uninhabited. The French conquered the island only half a century ago. Earlier attempts to take it by various English parties ended in disaster, with the local Caribs beating them off. The French colonists who nally defeated the Caribs forced them to the edge of the

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island, where they jumped into the sea over the cliff, which is still known as Caribs Leap. Caribs Leap has an evil, cursed reputation: it is said that the spirits of the dead Caribs lurk there still, nursing a powerful hatred for the white invaders. Produce: Spices (Nutmeg, Ginger, Cinnamon, Cloves), Cocoa, Tobacco, Indigo Demand: Slaves Scenario Hook: Bokor and hougans nd that the veil between worlds is indeed thin at Caribs Leap. Feats of legendary potency are possible here on spiritually signicant nights and a group of pirates may nd themselves employed as security for a powerful magic worker.

GRENADINES (CARIB)
This archipelago of tiny islands is unclaimed by Europeans. Fiercely hostile Caribs occupy many of the islands, and pirates often hide here or use the islands as a temporary base for preying on the Spanish Main. They are also a favorite site for pirates to careen their ships. Produce: Nothing Demand: None Scenario Hook: PC pirates may ee here after an unsuccessful raid. Can they repair their ship before the Caribs nd them?

GUADELOUPE (FRENCH)
Guadeloupe is actually twin islands, separated by a narrow channel of seawater known as the Rivire Sale. A wide stone bridge crosses this salt river. The west island, Basse-Terre, is rugged and hilly, with high waterfalls and dense rainforest. Basse-Terre is of volcanic origin, with its highest peak, Sufriere, being an active volcano. Grand-Terre in the east is low and at, with fertile soil. It is here that most of Guadeloupes crops are grown. Guadeloupe is the center of French sugar production, and was the rst French island to grow sugar at all. Dutch colonists ed their settlements in Brazil after a Spanish attack, coming here and bringing the secrets of sugar cultivation with them. There are around 4,000 white settlers and servants here, most of them French, and 7,000 black slaves. The island has long been coveted by the English, who regularly attack and invade it. So far the French have retained control of Guadeloupe, but have fought several tough battles to do so, most of them at Fort Louis Delgres. This huge and sturdy stronghold protects Basse-Terres main port, which is also called Basse-Terre. Just to the south of Guadeloupe is a smaller island named Marie-Galante which has a few French settlers, and four tiny isles known as Les Saintes which are occupied by a few Caribs. A few small, uninhabited islands can also be found to the north, east and west of Guadeloupe, including La Dsirade, Pigeon Island and the Isles de la Petite Terre. Produce: Sugar, Coffee, Cocoa Demand: Slaves, Meat Scenario Hook: There has always been a bridge here. Always. When the rst European settlers arrived here, they found a bridge whose complex construction seemed beyond the natives of the region. Some bokor whisper that it is more than a passage between islands; they say it is a road between worlds.

HISPANIOLA (FRENCH/SPANISH)
Since 1697, Hispaniola has been divided into St. Domingue (French) on the Western side (equivalent to modern Haiti), and Santo Domingo (Spanish) on the Eastern side. See the separate entries for St. Domingue and Santo Domingo.

JAMAICA (ENGLISH)
Recently conquered from the Spanish, this fertile and sunny island is already beginning to be signicant to the English economy, particularly as its new inhabitants devote more and more land to growing sugar. The English colonists originally tried to grow cocoa, as the Spanish had done, but the crops failed. Slaves who had been left behind by the Spanish claim that this is because the English are ignorant of the bizarre magical ceremonies that the Spanish performed to make the cocoa grow.

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Produce: Meat (Beef ), Sugar, Coffee, Cotton, Spices (Ginger) Demand: Iron, Manufactured Goods, Wool, Slaves Scenario Hook: Escaped slaves, known as the Maroons, have banded together in the northwest of the island. They are led by the erce and charismatic Cudjoe, and their hideouts are on the rugged mountain plateaus known as the Cockpits. The Barbadian authorities have been at war with the Maroons for decades, but do not seem able to wipe them out, and the Maroons constantly raid plantations and attack travelers. Many of the original Maroons are former Spanish slaves who escaped in the confusion of the English invasion, but further escapees since have joined them. There are 3,500 white colonists and 20,000 black slaves on the island, plus a few hundred Maroons.

MARGARITA (SPANISH)
A small island off the coast of the Spanish Main, just north of Cumana, Margarita is named for the Spanish word for Pearl. Its pearl oysters are unrivalled in the Caribbean, as is its beauty. The island is protected from pirates and other foes by several sturdy fortresses of Spanish construction. Spaniards, black slaves, and Guaqueri Indians inhabit it. The hill of Matasiete, on the northeast of the island, is a stronghold of the Guaqueri against the Spanish invaders. One of the most famous sights on Margarita is El Angel, a natural rock formation resembling a praying angel and said to be a place where magical and divine energies are strong. Produce: Pearls, Fish, Game (Venison, Wild Goat) Demand: None Scenario Hook: The Spanish have more than forts to protect their investment here. A Dragon Turtle protects the pearl beds. Captains that are in the know always have one or two heads of cattle to throw overboard in case Fuegara, as they call her, should show up. Pirates may be hired by one of Spains many enemies to put Fuegara down in preparation for a raid.

MARTINIQUE (FRENCH)
Columbus, who called it the most fertile, most delightful and most charming land in the world, rst discovered this northernmost of the Windward Islands. Martinique is still a little unstable after two attempted revolts in 1665 due to the colonists opposition to the French Exclusive, which severely restricts their trade opportunities. Its volcano, Mount Pele, is still active, emitting ominous vapors and rumbles. The population is around 7,000 whites and 23,000 black slaves. Martiniques main town, Fort-de-France, is on the west coast. It is defended by Fort Saint-Louis, a sturdy structure built on a rocky outcrop of land extending out into the bay and surrounded on three sides by water. Saint-Pierre, the second town, is also on the west coast and has its own fort, Fort Saint-Pierre. Produce: Nothing Demand: Nothing Scenario Hook: A group of bokor is working to force another eruption of Mount Pele, hoping to gain magical power beyond anything mortals have ever known by sacricing the entire population.

MONTSERRAT (ENGLISH)
Although it is nominally an English settlement, many of the colonists on Montserrat are Irish Catholics whose families were deported here by Cromwell. There is some religious tension here, as the English government requires anyone applying for a land grant to swear allegiance to the Anglican Church. The tense political situation in the Caribbean as a whole has been caused by repeated tit-for-tat raids by the English and French on one anothers islands, which means that the Irish are even more marginalized, since the English suspect they may welcome a French invasion. The English have good reasons for those suspicions; the Irish population here was recently swelled by the deportation of a number of Irish rebels from St. Christopher, who had sided with the French there. The population is around 1,500 white (mostly Irish), and 3,500 black (mostly slaves). The English colonists are, as might be expected, wealthy sugar planters. The island is volcanic. Although the cone is now long since covered over with earth and grass, hot volcanic springs known as soufrieres can be found throughout the island, indicating that the volcano is still active, and the islands beaches are black sand. A sulphurous volcanic spring near the northeast coast of the island is known as Hells Gate for its stench of brimstone and threatening appearance. The mountain is populated by large frogs, which the colonists hunt as a delicacy and refer to as mountain chicken. Forts at Plymouth and Kinsale, and coastal batteries at Bransby Bay, Old Road Bay, and Carrs Bay defend Montserrat. Whether the predominantly Irish militia would be prepared to man them in the case of an attack is another matter.

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Produce: Sugar Demand: Slaves Scenario Hook: Hells Gate acquired its name from more than simply a stench of brimstone. Bokor will nd that extremely powerful but darkly aspected Djab are easily summoned here. Bokor will also nd that the local Irish Catholic priests are aware of this, have a Bearer among them, and deal harshly with heretics.

NEVIS (ENGLISH)
As well as producing a surprising quantity of sugar for such a small volcanic island, Nevis is an important stopping-place and trading town for ships traveling to and from Europe, partly because it is such a pleasant place to stop. Inevitably this brings in a great deal of wealth, and recently the inhabitants have begun to build forts to protect that wealth. Charles Fort defends the capital, Charles Town. Several smaller fortications are under construction around the island, because the wealth its sugar plantations and commerce bring regularly attracts pirate raids and attacks by the French, Spanish and Dutch. Charles Town has a large Jewish community and perhaps the only synagogue in the Caribbean at this time. The island is still volcanically active, although there have been no real eruptions in living memory; it is also particularly exposed to hurricanes. Like Barbadoes, Nevis is a central distribution point for the slave trade. Its total population is 3,000 whites and 5,000 black slaves, and was recently reduced when several thousand whites and blacks died in a devastating epidemic of fever. Produce: Fish, Meat (Pork), Sugar, Tobacco Demand: Slaves Scenario Hook: An overly zealous group of Catholic priests have decided to drive the Jews from the New World. Their rst step is to hire a group of pirates to kidnap and kill the rabbi of the synagogue. The PCs can either be the group hired to kidnap him, or maybe they could be hired to protect the synagogue. Due to the nature of this adventure, it is recommended for mature players.

PORTO RICO (SPANISH)


Though it boasts a population of about 30,000 whites, 3,000 black slaves, and between 2,000-3,000 Arawak natives, Porto Rico is still the least prosperous Spanish colony in the New World. It is, however, strategically valuable, given its central location in the Antilles. It has been attacked by both the French and English on several locations, but is extremely well defended, with a network of massive stone fortresses protecting most of the approaches to the island. Produce: Ginger, Sugar, Meat (beef, pork, and goat), Grain Demand: None Scenario Hook: Rumors say that a high ranking government functionary is willing to have a handsome sum for a live Amazon, or some other rst-hand evidence that their legendary society exists.

SABA (DUTCH)
Saba is yet another pirate base. Although the Dutch rule it, many of the settlers are Irish, Scottish and English, and there is little farming to be had here. Most of the inhabitants must make their living by way of the sea, whether as shermen, merchants or pirates. Its only two communities are Trent Bay and The Bottoms, and its population a scant few hundred. Produce: Fish Demand: Meat, Fruit and Vegetables, Timber, Manufactured Goods Scenario Hook: The Bottoms has slowly acquired a disturbing reputation amongst seafarers. Some say that the inhabitants are not quite right. When pressed for details theyll shrug and change the subject, though a few might say the natives have a sort of shy look to them.

ST. CHRISTOPHER (ENGLISH, DISPUTED BY FRENCH)

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St. Christopher was the rst colony for both the French and the English in the Caribbean, and until recently colonists from both countries cooperated, but in the last few years political events in Europe have led to almost continuous conict here. Not only does the island seem to regularly change hands, but the long-term colonists also war intermittently on religious grounds, burning down one anothers churches. The English colonists are beginning to refer to it as St. Kitts, though most charts will still call it St. Christopher for many years to come. The enormous fortress of Brimstone Hill is still under construction, but even in its partially complete state it is a formidable stronghold. Green or vervet monkeys are

quite common, and make a favorite pet for visiting sailors. The population is around 2,500 (around 1,500 English and 1,000 French) whites, 5,000 black slaves. Produce: Sugar, Timber, Salt Demand: Slaves Scenario Hook: A French pirate has decided to target the English governor of St. Christopher by kidnapping his wife and children. His goal is both revenge and the hope of acquiring a huge ransom. The PCs can be involved on either side of this plot.

ST. DOMINGUE (FRENCH)


This is the western side of the island of Hispaniola. Buccaneers from Tortuga were the rst French settlers here about forty years ago. Their ferocious tenacity against Spanish attempts to displace or kill them soon led to assistance from France itself, and by 1697 the Spanish had no choice but to accept St. Domingue as a French colony. The precise border was never agreed on, although there have been few disputes as yet. St. Domingue is in theory under the stewardship of the French Knights of Malta, who settled here after abandoning their colonies in the Virgin Islands. However, a large number of the whites on the island are former buccaneers, choosing an honest but prosperous new life for themselves. The population is stands at 20,000 whites, 50,000 black slaves and 2,000 Arawaks. Produce: Sugar Demand: Slaves Scenario Hook: The Knights of Malta here have a long and illustrious history. Too bad theyve been corrupted. A small group of French nobles were exiled to the Caribbean in 1682 for practicing the ne arts of poisoning their rivals and performing twisted Black Masses to advance their social status. They drew upon their connections with the Knights of Malta to secure a place for themselves and the connections have only grown with the years. Pirates that ask no questions may nd themselves hired by certain members of the Knights for unusual errands. Pirates of a more honorable aspect, or those loyal to France, may nd themselves approached by a small group of honorable but desperate knights looking for aid against the diabolic forces that have all but destroyed their order.

ST. LUCIA (DISPUTED BY CARIBS, FRENCH AND ENGLISH)


St. Lucia, like Dominica and St. Vincent, is a Carib stronghold and will likely remain that way, since it too is favored with an easily defensible terrain. The French currently claim the island on the basis of a supposed treaty with the Caribs in 1660, but the French colonists have been warring with the Caribs almost continuously since then. The English Parliament desires the island, thinking it would make another good sugar plantation, although the struggling French village has barely had a chance to feed itself let alone grow crops for export. Produce: Nothing Demand: None Scenario Hook: An English merchant approaches the group and offers them a large sum of money to make peaceful contact with the Caribs of the island and supply them with muskets for use in their conicts with the French settlers. This could be the start of a lucrative partnership if it goes well; the merchant is actually a spy, of course, but often seems to have dangerous and lucrative work for a canny ship.

ST. MARTIN (FRENCH/DUTCH)


St. Martin (St. Maarten to the Dutch) has been settled peacefully by the French and Dutch for about half a century, the Dutch taking the southern half of the island and the French the north. The boundaries were settled by a footrace between a Frenchman and a Dutchman when the two groups rst colonized the island. The Frenchman won, thanks to sending his beautiful sister to distract the Dutchman, and so the French have a slightly larger territory than do the Dutch. A smaller island fteen miles off the southeast coast, StBarthelemy, has a few French colonists. Produce: Salt, Sugar, Meat (Beef ), Fish Demand: None

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Scenario Hook: A Dutch merchant is interested in expanding into the slave trade, but he wants to do it with a minimal amount of initial investment. As such, he is looking for a group of pirates willing to hunt down some slave ships and secure them for him.

ST. VINCENT (CARIB)


St. Vincent is unusual in that one group of Caribs, known as the Black Caribs, is partially descended from Africans who escaped several Dutch and Spanish slave ships that sank nearby between thirty and seventy years ago. Their culture, religion and society are a mixture of Carib and African traditions, and the sound of their war-drums is reminiscent of the drums of the Congo or Angola. The Black Caribs frequently war with the other inhabitants of the island, the Yellow Caribs. The English and French agreed by treaty forty years ago that they would leave the Caribs in possession of the islands of St. Vincent and Dominica, although their motives were more to keep those lands from one another than to recognize the rights of the natives. Still, any would-be conqueror will nd holding the island difcult, due to its heavily forested and mountainous terrain. Produce: Nothing Demand: None Scenario Hook: The Black Caribs on the island recently ran afoul a community of giants living in the islands interior. The Yellow Caribs are hoping to gain the friendship and trust of the giants and get them to help wipe out their traditional enemies.

SANTO DOMINGO (SPANISH)


The eastern two-thirds of Hispaniola, Santo Domingo is far poorer than its French neighbor. In theory, its main town (which is also called Santo Domingo) is the capital of the Kingdom of Santo Domingo, covering the Spanish islands in the Caribbean as well as part of the northern coast of the South American continent (modern Venezuela). In practice this island is insignicant now, since it has no gold or important crops. Even its sugar plantations are largely abandoned after repeated pirate raids. The population consists of 4,000 whites, 2,000 black slaves and 3,000 Arawaks. Santo Domingo nominally also governs the Turks Islands, tiny and largely insignicant islands at the southern end of the Bahamas, which are notorious pirate havens. The few Turks colonists grow a little cotton, but not much else. Produce: Sugar, Meat (Beef, Goat, Pork), Maize Demand: None Scenario Hook: While the shifting of trade and the threat of piracy may change what is real, the Other Side only acknowledges the spiritual. The Kingdom of Santo Domingo ails because it has no true ruler. So pirate, who dares seize the Spirit Mantle of the Caribbean and become King?

TABAGO (DISPUTED BY FRENCH, ENGLISH, SPANISH, DUTCH, COURLANDIANS, CARIBS AND PIRATES)
Tabago has been fought over almost continuously for the past couple of centuries, as place names like Bloody Bay, Pirates Bay, and Man o War Bay can attest. All the main powers, and even the Courlandians (from Latvia) have attempted to hold Tabago at one time or another in the last seventy years or so, massacring one another, being attacked by Caribs, and often abandoning their colonies. It has long been a pirate haven, too, and a group of Jamaican pirates once conquered it from the Dutch. Littered with ruined forts and villages, the island seems to have only one group of permanent inhabitantsthe native Caribs. A few scattered Dutch settlers and their slaves may remain, well-hidden away from the coast, and pirates, French merchants, and others still regularly use the island as a temporary base. Produce: Nothing Demand: None Scenario Hook: A pair of bokor who have somehow managed to enslave a pair of sirines have taken up residence in one of the ruined forts. They are gathering wealth and servants. Can someone stop them before they become a real threat? Or maybe someone will want to join them in whatever dreams of conquest they are cooking up.

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TORTUGA (LAWLESS/BUCCANEER)
This tiny island off the coast of Hispaniola is the birthplace of the buccaneers. Nominally Spanish, it now holds a uctuating population of lawless outcasts and pirates, anywhere between about 100 and 1,000 in number. Conditions are savage in the extreme, with buccaneers sleeping on the beach or in caves or simple huts. There is a primitive grog shop and a large number of loose women, but no brothel as such. Perhaps the strangest building on the island is the Buccaneers Church, a big circular hut with a grass roof and a spire made from a broken old mainmast. This church is still littered with paintings and tapestries, once of huge value but now furred with mold and mildew. These were plundered from the great Spanish church in Maracaibo fully thirty years past, along with a massive gold bell which still hangs from the spire. The bell is used as a general call to arms if an enemy is spied approaching the island. Most of the buccaneers regard the bell with a superstitious awe and would not think of plundering it for themselves; the few who have tried to have all been killed horribly by their fellows. They seem to have mixed feelings for the church, unsure whether it is a reminder of their damnation or the potential for their salvation. Few worship here, though occasionally a half-mad preacher will take it upon himself to bring the word of god to the godless, traveling to Tortuga then attempting to set up church services and preaching sermons to the buccaneers. Two more islands off the Hispaniolan coast, le Vache and Saona, are also populated by small numbers of French buccaneers, but Tortuga remains the main stronghold of the Brethren of the Coast. Produce: Nothing Demand: None Scenario Hook: A wealthy Spanish bishop offers a substantial reward (more than its value in bullion) to anyone who can bring him the gold bell from the Buccaneers Church. He regards it as a holy artifact. It is an extremely difcult task; the bell weighs some three hundred pounds, and is awkward enough that it might as well weigh four hundred, so it would be almost impossible to remove it by stealth. Taking it by force might be more perilous still.

TRINIDAD (SPANISH)
Trinidads population of 100 whites, 400 black slaves, and 2,000 natives (Arawaks, Caribs and others) is an explosive mixture. Many of the natives are kept in virtual slavery by the system of encomienda. Last year they rose up against the Spaniards, killing a number of whites in the capital city of San Jos de Orua, including priests and the governor of the island. The priests are particularly hated for their role in attempting to convert the native villages to Christianity. Produce: Pearls, Pitch Demand: None Scenario Hook: There are an extraordinary number of bats here, and lately theyve been swarming over passing ships in great numbers. Sailors are beginning to regard Trinidad with dread and avoid berthing there, which does nothing for their trade. The Spanish are becoming desperate to nd out whats going on, the kind of desperation that pays well.

VIRGIN ISLANDS (VARIOUS AND DISPUTED)


The population of the Virgin Islands is tinymost of the 100 islands are uninhabited, and the half dozen or so that are each have only a hundred to two hundred whites and up to a couple of thousand slaves. St. Thomas, St. John, and Crab Island are all tactically crucial due to their proximity to Porto Ricothey are under Danish rule, but the English have a strong desire to conquer them, and even the Prussians have an interest in the obscure Crab Island. St. John is particularly desirable for its excellent natural harbor, regarded as the best in the Virgin Islands. The main attraction, though, is the route of the Spanish supply eets: after leaving Cadiz or Seville, Porto Rico is their rst port of call in the Caribbean, and they pass between the Virgin Islands to reach it. St. Croix is currently a French colony, but that too could change at any time. The sole Prussian colony in the New World is on a small rock called St. Peter. Two other islands, Tortola and Virgin Gorda, have recently been settled by English colonists from Anguilla. As with the Bahamas, the combination of a large number of sparsely populated islands with a major trade route attracts all manner of pirates, freebooters and neer-do-wells. Blackbeard and others often drop anchor at the smaller islands such as Peter Island and Deadchest. Produce: Sugar, Salt, Cotton, Maize Demand: Slaves Scenario Hook: A curious alliance of sirens and Amazon outcasts are building a powerbase on one of the smaller, otherwise-uninhabited islands. They are bringing pirate captains and crews under their sway and are raiding the surrounding waters and islands.

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Chapter XV: Welcome to the Account


When the players create their characters, encourage them to take backgrounds and warn them theyre going to start out trapped on the Pirate Island of Tortuga.

H T

A SAMPLE ADVENTURE FOR SKULL & BONES

ere is one example of how to get a Skull & Bones campaign sailing. The following setup presumes that the players are going to start with 4th level characters as described in the section on troupe play. The players (and by obvious extension, their characters) are going to nd themselves swiftly schooled in the painful lessons of necessity as well as being thrust into the intricacies of pirate politics quickly.

- A Wretched Hive . . . he ever-shifting population of Tortuga rests at 500 or so lost souls, with a hundred swabs arriving every month to make up for the three to ve that die every day. Few pass on from natural causes, unless you count a cutlass in the back as natural. Sanitation is non-existent, and you get to eat only what food you can catch. There is a grog shop owned by a retired French brigand who answers to the name of LeVacher. He isnt a big believer in credit, and he places a great deal of faith in his twinned double-barreled pistols ability to keep his customers from getting unruly. There are no brothels, though there are a number of individuals who will gladly accept food or coin for sexual favors. Boarding and sleeping accommodations range from the beach to the rare unused cave. No honest ship ever docks at Tortuga. The only way off is a pirates berth, which brings us to the PCs respective situations. Have each player recount to the others his story in character and how they ended up on such a god-forsaken isle. If you have players that balk at this, remind them that this is an era long before radio and television. They are stuck on an island with just about no entertainment other than fornication and drinking. Thus, storytelling takes up a lot of the slack time.

AN INTERESTING PROPOSAL
After the PCs have been exposed to Tortugas charms just long enough to make them stir crazy, Antoine Boissiere, a thug of dubious reputation, approaches them with an offer. He and his brother Grard need to swiftly acquire a few hands to help them deal with a windfall situation that has just come to their attention. A ship was forced to berth in a Hispaniola cove due to a recent hurricane and it is ripe for the plucking. They have canoes and some swabs, but not enough experienced men to get the job done right. Would the characters be interested in a share of the prize and a trip off this rock? Players who are into the spirit of adventure will doubtless agree to Antoines proposal, but some of their characters may have concerns, legitimate ones at that, that this offer is a little too convenient. Checking into the Boissiere brothers past will reveal that Grard is a bit of a lout, but a leader of successful raids. His brother has a distinct kin-ship with sharks and a wise hand doesnt show a backside to him. Neither is regarded as a liar. They need experienced hands because their last raid, while successful, got a lot of their men killed. Those that survived had no complaints with their shares, though. The real truth behind the Boissieres desperation for hands on the double is simple: they believe that it is no mere passing merchant ship that lies in that Hispaniola cove, but a Spanish supply ship. Such a prize is worth many risks, including bringing on untried men.

THE PLAN
Grard, while an obnoxious individual (see his description at the end of this section) seems to have a decent plan worked out (Antoine did most of the work on it). They have two long canoes and a pair of hourglasses to coordinate timing. The idea is to hide in a cove several miles east of where the merchant ship is resting till three bells. The PCs and some of the swabs will then take one of the canoes and row just beyond the cove while the Boissieres and their men will bring the other canoe east of the harbor mouth. At four bells, as indicated by their hourglasses, they will row in and simultaneously attack both sides of the anchored ship, hopefully taking them by surprise in the pre-dawn hours. A solid plan by all accounts. Allow the PCs to make various suggestions, which Grard may agree to, though he will not allow the PCs to come with him and his brother. The reason why he loses so many hands on his raids is simple: he doesnt show up on time. He fully intends to wait past the fourth bell and show up when most of the ghting is already done.

THE ISABELLA

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The ship is, indeed, a Spanish supply ship, but not the type that a rum-puncher can retire on. Shes a supply vessel loaded with salt beef, brandy and a few luxury goods. Her cargo, in total, is worth around 3,000 doubloons. She also carries

passengers, one of them being decidedly unusual. Her crew is by and large drunk and/or sleeping soundly, although they will try to arouse themselves once the alarm bell is rung.

CAPTAIN SOSOS
The Isabellas Captain, Largo Sosos, has been expecting trouble since the moment the hurricane blew his ship off course. After a quick prayer, he dives out of his cabin, guns blazing. He unloads his blunderbuss on the most likely looking target, and then draws his pistols. The Captain isnt interested in negotiation or surrender, as he knows what pirates typically do to resisters. He will ght to the death. There should be two crewmen for each PC with a variable number to ght the swabs the PCs brought with them. Three rounds after the Captain joins the fray, the Boissieres will arrive to join the melee. As soon as the Captain goes down, the rest of the crew will surrender. The Players may accuse the Boissieres of duplicity at this point. Grard will claim that it was slight differences in the hourglasses they used to synchronize the raid and will state that they sped up the second they heard gun shots. If they players believe him (ha, right) or at least, decide to abide a bit longer before making their move, go to the next section. If not, cut to The Duel.

WHAT HAVE WE HERE?


The pirates and the PCs will doubtless cheerfully ransack the ship. They will come upon several different passengers as they do so:

A LEGITIMATE BUSINESSMAN
There is a colonial merchant named Archer McKay who was catching a lift to the Bahamas. Archer is a portly man, with an affable grin and wonderfully exible morals, at least from a pirates viewpoint. Archer doesnt really have anything to steal other than his traveling money, which amounts to 30 doubloons in pieces of eights and gold dust. Archer will explain to the most intelligent looking PC who he is and what he does. Those that are swift on the uptake might arrange for Archer to keep some of his cash and thus become a future contact for brokering their ill-gotten goods.

THE HONEYMOONERS
A terried young couple, Bartolo and Alena Montalva, who are on their honeymoon. Bartolo will valiantly defend his new wife, threatening dire consequences to anyone that touches her. Unfortunately, Alena is beautiful and certain members of the pirate crew will doubtless get ideas. The young couple is grateful to anyone that defends her honor, despite the fact that they are pirates and will promise to pray for their salvation.

MAN OF MYSTERY
An individual that will show the PCs that not all is usual in the Caribbean of the Skull & Bones setting, Monsignor Domino has a large berth, especially for a man that is clearly of African descent. Indeed, his skin is nearly charcoal black, though his appearance is cadaverous. He wears a domino mask and carries a heavy skull-topped cane. His bright smile shows a single golden tooth. Superstitious characters will take one look at him and back away at top speed. He will calmly come up on deck if requested, looking about at the proceedings with interest. There is a small group of barrels and other goods in the forward hold that he will indicate is his. He will politely state: It is enough that you are inconveniencing me. You may not take any of my goods. This is obviously completely against the pirate grain; the PCs should be surprised that all the other pirates, including the Boissieres, agree to this without question. If the PCs decide to take exception, see the section Monsignor Domino on the next page for his response. Note that none of the rest of the crew will lift a nger to help them if they take Monsignor Domino on.

THE DUEL
The PCs may or may not have believed Grards claim as to why he was late. If they didnt, they will doubtless challenge him on it and he will immediately demand a duel. If they did believe him, his and his brothers behavior during the rest of the raid will doubtless send them over the edge. He will claim the Captains master-crafted pistols for himself, instead of allowing them into the general pool to be auctioned off which is the normal procedure. His brother may menace young Alena, causing the more chivalrous minded PCs to intervene. Regardless of how it comes about, sooner or later, one of the PCs will have to face Grard in a duel. Pirate duels are typically fought with a cutlass and this one is no exception. Room is cleared on the decks, lanterns hung for proper lighting, and the duel commences.

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- Legends of Piracy WOODES ROGERS


Time of Operation: 1708-1711 Operational Area: The World Rogers [Exp5/Sof8, hp 68] was an English merchant who turned privateer for a group of Bristol merchants who had lost ships to piracy. In a voyage that circumnavigated the globe from 1708 to 1711, Rogers harassed the Spanish along the Pacic Coast, rescued Alexander Selkirk, the man who inspired Defoes Robinson Crusoe, and seized prizes amounting to more than 150,000. Upon arriving back in England, Rogers had to ght off spurious accusations by the East India Company that he had disrupted their trade. When King George II decided to bring the pirates of the Caribbean to heel, he rightly gured it would take one to do it. Rogers was appointed Governor of the Bahamas in 1717, and was charged with restoring order. He offered royal pardons to all who wanted them, and set those who took them to hunting those that wouldnt, which proved to be an amazingly effective deterrent. Lack of nancial support caused him to return to England in 1721. His successor failed to quell piracy as effectively as he had, and in 1728 Rogers was reappointed governor, this time with a proper salary. He died in Fort Nassau in 1732, under mysterious circumstances.

Grard will always Power Attack regardless of his opponents armor. If he begins to lose, he draws his pocket pistol and gloats before he pulls the trigger, giving other PCs time to take him out for cheating. The various assembled pirates will root for whoevers winning. If his brother gets killed Antoine says that he deserved it, but will slit the throat of those responsible the rst chance he gets.

GERARD BOISSIERE
Grard is a huge, bullying buccaneer and the de facto leader of a small group of renegades and outcasts on Tortuga. He has a reputation as a domineering braggart, but one that gets results. He attempts to cultivate a reputation for cunning, but most of his plots and intrigues are pathetically transparent. The few genuinely sneaky ideas that he appears to have are almost inevitably whispered to him by Antoine. His physical size is impressive and frighteninghe is a little over six feet tall, and wider than most men. He is quite fat, but he is also clearly light on his feet and strong, so few openly cross him. Grard loves food and drink in enormous quantity, tucking in everything from boucan-cooked meat and cheap grog to the best feasts and wines that the Caribbean can offer. As a result he tends to frequently and loudly belch and break wind. Many of his closest cohorts suspect that he does this for disgusting and intimidating effect; he seems to have the self control to avoid doing so when necessary, such as when a loud fart may startle a ships lookout or a prey animal when he is hunting. Grard has a nely worked pocket pistol, brass inlaid with mother-of-pearl and gold. Despite the constant temptation to show it off to all and sundry, he is extremely careful to keep it a secret, on his brothers advice. It is his last ditch weapon, kept hidden beneath his broad leather belt and it is always primed and ready. This is the only item of value he owns; anything else gets spent on food and drink as soon as he hits port.

ANTOINE BOISSIERE
Antoine is the brains and cunning behind Grards brawn. He thinks he is far cleverer than he actually is, though, and this arrogance will surely trip him up sooner or later. Far less popular than his brother, Antoine is not trusted by the other buccaneers, who rightly suspect him of cheating them on their shares. He is nevertheless feared. He is cold and dangerous, rarely being drawn into duels but not above causing those he dislikes to accidentally get pushed overboard or be stabbed by the foe while on raids. Unlike his brother, Antoine is short and skinny. Although unappealing to look at, he attempts to cultivate a rakish air, wearing a battered but fancy tricorn hat and sporting a long waxed mustache. He is also unlike his brother in that he is a miser, keeping careful track of the loot he has stolen. Most of it is in the form of three beautiful necklaces, one of pearls, one of gold and rubies, and the last of silver and diamonds. He wears them next to his skin, hidden by his shirt and coat. He also has two pouches, one at his belt with small change; the other stitched into his left sleeve and lled with small uncut gemstones of various kinds. In total, he carries around 150 doubloons worth of loot on his person.

A-PIRATING WE GO
After the duel, the PCs will have some decisions to make. If they handled themselves well, a number of the pirates are looking to them for guidance. If Antoine is alive, he will certainly be plotting revenge and will make for an excellent Enemy fortune. Theyll have some loot to distribute and if theyre feeling really cheeky, a Spanish merchantman to modify into a suitable pirate ship, though the coast of Hispaniola is not the place to attempt such. They will have several passengers to deal with and the manner in which they choose to do so can certainly frame the rest of the campaign and their reputations in the Caribbean as well. Monsignor Domino at least, expects to be delivered to his destination, regardless of whether the ship has come under new management. Oh, youre wondering about Monsignor Domino?

MONSIGNOR DOMINO

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Fortunately for the PCs, Monsignor Domino is on his way to a pressing engagement and doesnt really have time to play with them. If, however, reckless nature prevails against all sense, hell certainly oblige them. Among Dominos goods are several barrels of salt pork. They contain four zombi, which will explode out of their barrels in suitably dramatic fashion if the bokor snaps his ngers. Domino will make jokes to anyone present about the expense of traveling these days and makes comments like Hmm, wonder where theyre going? when several terried pirates leap overboard. While the PCs are

Dramatis Personae
TYPICAL ISABELLA CREWMAN (CF)
Sdg1; CR 1; Medium-size; Init +1; Spd 30 ft; AC 11 (Dex); Atk +2 melee (1d6+1/18-20/x2 cutlass); SA Close quarters; AL N; SV Fort +2, Ref +3, Will1; Str 10, Dex 12, Con 11, Int 10, Wis 9, Cha 10. Skills and Feats: Balance +4, Climb +3, Profession (sailor) +6, Spot +3, Swim +4, Use Rope +3; Dodge (when in light or no armor), Skill Focus (Profession: sailor), Weapon Focus (cutlass).

CAPTAIN SOSOS (NPC)


Sdg6; CR 6; Medium-size; 42 hp; Init +4 (Dex); Spd 30 ft; AC 16 (buff coat + Dex); Atk +6/+1 melee (1d6/x2 metal pistol butts/club), +10/+5 ranged (d20/x3 Blunderbuss) or +11/+6 ranged (2d4/x3 master-crafted pistols); AL N; SV Fort +7, Ref +9, Will +2; Str 10, Dex 18, Con 15, Int 14, Wis 10, Cha 13. Skills and Feats: Balance +10, Climb +5, Hide +6, Intimidate +5, Jump +3, Knowledge (geography) +8, Knowledge (navigation) +8, Listen +2, Move Silently +6, Profession (sea captain) +6, Knowledge (sea lore) +5, Speak Language (Spanish and English), Spot +5, Swim +0, Use Rope +10; Crabs Rush, Dodge (when in light or no armor), Mobility (when in light or no armor), Point Blank Shot, Spring Attack, Improved Two-Weapon Fighting.

GERARD BOISSIERE (NPC)


Buc6; CR 6; Medium-size; 30 hp; Init +1 (Dex); Spd 30 ft; AC 11 (Dex); Atk +6 melee (1d6+2/18-20/x2 cutlass), +6 ranged (2d4/x3 master-crafted pocket pistol); SQ Expert pilot, resilient, survival; AL N; SV Fort +6, Ref +4, Will +1; Str 15, Dex 12, Con 9, Int 10, Wis 7, Cha 14. Skills and Feats: Appraise +8, Balance +6, Climb +7, Hide +7, Intimidate +11, Jump +8, Profession (sailor) +2, Search +5, Knowledge (sea lore) +2, Speak Language (French and English), Spot +2, Survival +4; Cleave, Endurance, Great Fortitude, Point Blank Shot, Power Attack.

ANTOINE BOISSIERE (NPC)


Rog3/Buc2; CR 5; Medium-size; 20 hp; Init +2 (Dex); Spd 30 ft; AC 14 (buff coat + Dex); Atk +6 melee (1d6+1/ 19-20/x2 short sword), +6 ranged (2d6/x3 long musket) or (2d4/x3 pocket pistol); SA sneak attack +2d6; SQ Expert pilot, survival; AL NE; SV Fort +4, Ref +8, Will +0; Str 12, Dex 16, Con 11, Int 15, Wis 6, Cha 8. Skills and Feats: Appraise +8, Bluff +6, Concentrate +7, Escape Artist +7, Forgery +4, Gather Information +4, Hide +7, Intimidate +7, Listen +8, Move Silently +9, Open Lock +9, Profession (sailor) +4, Read Lips +8, Search +8, Sleight of Hand +9, Speak Language (English, French, Dutch and Spanish), Spot +3; Alertness, Dodge, Lightning Reexes, Skill Focus (Bluff ), Weapon Finesse (short sword). Fortune: Dolls Eyes.

MONSIGNOR DOMINO (NPC)


Bkr9; CR 9; Medium-size; 38 hp; Init1 (Dex); Spd 30 ft; AC 9 (Dex); Atk +3 melee (1d6-1/x2 club); AL LE; SV Fort +4, Ref +2, Will +10; Str 8, Dex 9, Con 13, Int 15, Wis 14, Cha 18. Skills and Feats: Bluff +10, Concentration +13, Craft (alchemy) +9, Intimidate +10, Knowledge (arcana) +11, Knowledge (local) +7, Knowledge (Djab) +9, Knowledge (voodoo) +9, Speak Language (English, Spanish and Mburra), Sense Motive +9, Voodoo Ritual +18; Combat Casting, Craft Drogue, Create Zombi, Skill Focus (Voodoo Ritual), Wanga Focus (Enchantment). Wanga: 3/3/3/2/2. Rituals: Djabs Call, Wisdom from the Past. Important Possessions: His staff is a drogue with 4 charges of fear.

distracted by the zombi, Domino picks the most able ghter of the bunch and employs a lesser geas asking the chosen warrior to protect me from your comrades till I reach my destination. He follows this up by casting hold person on those ghting his zombi and then uses suggestion to prompt nearby pirates to remove the treacherous PCs. If at any point the PCs stop ghting hell immediately stop his minions attacking them. In return for sparing their lives, hell take 90% of their shares of the haul. Depending on how the PCs interact with him, Domino may prove to be either a useful contact or a dangerous enemy in the future. He will remember how he is treated, good or ill and will one day respond in kind, when he has time to spare. Should the PCs think theyll get the jump on him as they are taking him to his chosen port, know that the Monsignor was slaying children decades before they are born and is already well prepared for them with alarm, invisibility, major images and a large number of subtle suggestions to various crew members.

MORE ADVENTURES
With the seeds planted in this short adventure, you can continue a campaign for several more sessions. Some characters, like Antoine and Monsignor Domino, may play a recurring role in the lives of your PCs. With a ship, some swabs, and the beginnings of a reputation, the PCs are ready to go on the account.

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Appendix: Reference Tables


TABLE 7-1: PARRYING MODIFIERS
Situation Smallsword parrying a Medium-size weapon (other than another smallsword) One-handed weapon parrying a two-handed slashing weapon One-handed weapon parrying a two-handed bludgeoning weapon Parry Modier

TABLE 7-2: HIT POINT RECOVERY


Hit Die Type Healing per Minute (4 + Con modier) x Level (3 + Con modier) x Level (2 + Con modier) x Level (1 + Con modier) x Level d10 or d12 d8 d6 d4

2 4 6

TABLE 8-2: FAME


Circumstances Accepting a pirate name Base attack bonus of 15 or higher Choosing a pirate name Defeating a British ship of the line Defeating a ship of the line Each ability score you have at 22 or higher First time you drink a true rumfaustian in front of 25+ witnesses First time you perform an impossible stunt in front of 25+ witnesses First time you slaughter a crew that surrendered First time you spare an enemy crew First time you survive a direct hit from a cannonball First time you use magic in an obvious way in front of 25+ witnesses Living through a fatal event Regularly using an obviously magical weapon Sailing under a unique ag Slaying a beast of the deep with 20+ HD Still breathing after six deaths Still breathing after three deaths Taking a haul of 5,000 or more pieces of eight Ten or more enemy crews spared Ten or more surrendered crews slaughtered Upgrading your vessel to a ship/galleon You commit an act of colossal stupidity and survive Fame Bonus Captain 3 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 3 2 2 4 1 1 Fame Bonus Others 3 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 3 1 1 2 1 1

TABLE 8-4: SWAY CHECKS


Situation Assigned to guard a cargo of ne brandy Find a cask of brandy while taking a prize ship More than half ships company dead Ordered to guard prisoners Outnumbered by enemy Outnumbered by enemy navy Wounded in combat Sway DC 15 20 20 15 15 25 15 Consequences of Failed Check Open it and drink it Open it and drink it Flee or surrender Torment them Flee or surrender Flee or surrender Flee or surrender

TABLE 8-3: SWAY MODIFIERS


Circumstance Sway Modier Company sober 4 Each week at sea without a prize 1 High share value +1 per 1,000 dbl per share Crew is hungry 2 More than 1/3 of crew injured 2 More than 1/3 of crew diseased 2

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TABLE 7-3: AFFLICTIONS


Result 1-3 4-6 7-8 9 10 11-13 14-16 Afiction Impressive scar Battle scar Hideous scar Disguring scar Throat wound Lose one eye Lose one hand Bonuses/Penalties +1 Charisma +1 Fame -2 Diplomacy, +2 Intimidate -2 Charisma Voice carries half normal distance -2 to initiative checks, Dex-based skill checks, and Reex saves -2 to attack rolls with two-handed weapons, and to Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Forgery, Open Lock, Sleight of Hand, and Use Rope checks -10 ft. to movement, -2 on Climb, Swim, Jump, Ride, Tumble, Balance, and Move Silently checks, and Reex saves -4 to attack rolls with two-handed weapons, and to Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Forgery, Open Lock, Sleight of Hand, and Use Rope checks -1 Strength, -1 Dexterity, and -2 Constitution -2 Strength, -2 Dexterity, and -4 Constitution

17-19 20

Lose one leg Lose one arm

21-23 24+

Weathered Worn

AFFLICTION MODIFIERS
Circumstance Each life previously lost The Devils Own Luck fortune Strange Luck fortune Modier +2 -2 Adjust the rolled result by one slot up or down

TABLE 11-1: ROLLING THE BONES


Roll 2 3 4 5 6-8# 9* Result Snake Eyes; an utter and disastrous failure. The character promptly loses a life regardless of any other circumstances. If the character was in a ght and this result came in the midst of a dramatic event, their opponent runs them through and leaves them for dead. 20 to skill check. 15 to attack roll or saving throw. In addition, something odd occurs, and in this case odd means bad. The characters weapon breaks, a pistol explodes in their hand, they slip and fall ending up in the rigging, or similar bad circumstances. 15 to skill check. 10 to attack roll or saving throw. 10 to skill check. 5 to attack roll or saving throw. Fickle Fate ignores you. No result. +10 to skill check. +5 to attack roll or saving throw. If this causes a successful hit, +2d6 to damage. Succeed or fail, something odd will occur. In this case odd means, well, anything. All kind of unusual things occur with this result. A ying sh leaps from the depths and knocks your foe over the side, yourcharacter slips and falls only to have a cannonball impact where they hadjust been standing, etc. +15 to skill check. +10 to attack roll or saving throw. If this causes a successful hit, +2d8 to damage. +20 to skill check. +15 to attack roll or saving throw. If this causes a successful hit, +2d10 to damage. Wind in your sails. An impossible success is possible with this result, e.g. a high level bokors reball doesnt even singe the character, the character rides an explosion across a bay, and so on. If this result came with an attack roll, dont bother to roll damage, your character kills their opponent with this blow.

10* 11* 12*

*All positive results gained by Rolling the Bones (ie a roll of 9-12) have an additional effect if the character is making an attack. Driven by fate luck or what-have-you, the attack ignores damage reduction, spell resistance, incorporeality, and the like. Complete immunity, however, is not overcome. #A character with the Strange Luck fortune has the description under 9 (other than the bonus to roll) occur to them on any roll of a 6 through 9.

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TABLE 9-2: BOKOR ARCANE WANGA


0-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA
arcane mark bokor (mage) hand dancing lights daze detect poison disrupt undead are ghost sound light mending open/close prestidigitation ray of frost resistance ghoul touch glitterdust hypnotic pattern knock levitate locate object magic mouth minor image mirror image misdirection obscure object owls cunning pyrotechnics resist energy scare shatter spectral hand summon swarm touch of idiocy web whispering wind re shield re trap ame arrow y hallucinatory terrain haste illusory wall lesser geas locate creature minor creation minor globe of invulnerability phantasmal killer protection from arrows rainbow pattern remove curse shout solid fog stoneskin wall of re greater dispelling guards and wards ice storm legend lore mass suggestion mislead move earth overland ight owls wisdom, mass permanent image repulsion symbol of fear symbol of persuasion Tazs transformation true seeing veil

1ST-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA


alarm animate rope cause fear charm person chill touch detect undead disguise self endure elements erase expeditious retreat feather fall hold portal hypnotism identify jump mage armor magic weapon message mount obscuring mist protection from good/evil/ chaos/law ray of enfeeblement shield shocking grasp silent image sleep spider climb true strike unseen servant ventriloquism

7TH-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA


banishment baleful polymorph control undead delayed blast reball disintegrate Draxs instant summons nger of death forcecage hold person, mass insanity invisibility, mass limited wish mords sword phase door power word, stun prismatic spray sequester shadow walk simulacrum spell turning symbol of stunning symbol of weakness teleport, greater teleport object vision waves of exhaustion

blink cone of cold clairaudience/clairvoyance dismissal color spray dominate person detect thoughts dream fabricate dispel magic displacement false vision gaseous form feeblemind gentle repose reball greater magic weapon lightning bolt gust of wind magic jar halt undead major creation hold person mind fog illusory script mirage arcana invisibility nightmare passwall keen edge magic circle against good/ persistent image prying eyes evil/law/chaos magic missile seeming major image sending nondetection stone shape phantom steed symbol of pain protection from energy symbol of sleep telekinesis ray of exhaustion teleport sleet storm transmute mud to rock slow transmute rock to mud stinking cloud wall of force 2ND-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA suggestion wall of iron Tazs hideous laughter alter self wall of stone tongues arcane lock waves of fatigue vampiric touch bears endurance water breathing 6TH-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA blindness / deafness wind wall blur acid fog 4TH-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA analyze dweomer bulls strength burning hands antimagic eld arcane eye cats grace bears endurance, mass bestow curse command undead bulls strength, mass confusion darkness cats grace, mass contagion darkvision chain lightning crushing despair daylight circle of death dimension door eagles splendor control water dimensional anchor false life control weather emotion foxs cunning eagles splendor, mass enervation aming sphere eyebite Evans black tentacles fog cloud foxs cunning, mass explosive runes

5TH-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA 3RD-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA cloudkill

8TH-LEVEL BOKOR WANGA


antipathy charm monster, mass clone demand discern location horrid wilting incendiary cloud iron body maze moment of prescience Ozs irresistible dance polar ray polymorph any object power word, blind prismatic wall protection from spells prying eyes, greater screen sunburst symbol of death symbol of insanity sympathy

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fear

geas / quest

0-LEVEL
create water cure minor wounds detect poison guidance inict minor wounds light mending purify food and drink resistance virtue

TABLE 9-3: HOUGAN DIVINE SPELLS


detect snares and pits divine favor doom endure elements entropic shield inict light wounds magic weapon obscuring mist pass without trace protection from evil remove fear sanctuary shield of faith consecrate cure moderate wounds darkness delay poison eagles splendor endurance enthrall gentle repose hold person inict moderate wounds lesser restoration make whole owls wisdom resist energy shatter shield other silence sound burst spiritual weapon warp wood zone of truth

3RD-LEVEL
bestow curse create food and water cure serious wounds daylight deeper darkness dispel magic inict serious wounds locate object magic circle against evil magic vestment negative energy protection prayer remove curse remove disease searing light speak with corpse {dead} stone shape water walk wind wall

1ST-LEVEL
bane baton legba {shillelagh} bless bless water cause fear command cure light wounds detect animals or plants

2ND-LEVEL
aid augury barkskin bears endurance bulls strength calm emotions

TABLE 9-1: HOUGAN MATERIAL COMPONENTS


Spell School Abjuration Conjuration Divination Enchantment Evocation Illusion Necromancy Transmutation Appropriate Material Components Mineral salts, quicksilver, whale oil, sandalwood ash Tobacco, gold dust, rum Eggs from a speckled hen, lodestones Bat nut, buckeye nuts, cinnamon, sage, mint Angelica root, ve nger grass, whale penis bone Powdered glass, fools gold, parrot feathers Blood from a black-furred animal, graveyard dust Rattlesnake skin and rattles, insect cocoons

TABLE 9-4: POSSESSION


AT A CEREMONY
Status Favored Horse fortune Hougan Hougan, ofciating Nonbeliever Petitioner Base DC 20* 25 15 15 20

TABLE 9-6: VOODOO RITUALS CHECK MODIFIERS


OLD WORLD LOA
Loa Legba Ogun Agw Erzulie Damballah Wdo Ayida Wdo Ability Score Intelligence Constitution Strength Charisma Wisdom Dexterity

*The DC rises to 30 if your Loa attempts to possess you.

ANY OTHER TIME


Status Favored Horse fortune Hougan Nonbeliever Petitioner Base DC 20 5 10 15

NEW WORLD LOA


Loa Carrefour Baron Samedhi Dan Petro Congo Zandor Ashadeh Bc Ability Score Intelligence Charisma Wisdom Constitution Dexterity

TABLE 9-7: ENGAGEMENT RITUAL SUMMARY


Favor request: DC 15 + sum of requested favor levels. Skill check: Voodoo Rituals + relevant ability modier. Calling in a favor: DC 30 - favor level. Skill check: Voodoo Rituals + relevant ability modier. Success means the Loa arrives instantaneously. For every point the DC was missed, the Loa arrives a round later.

THE EXCEPTIONS
Loa Simbi Loco Ayizan Ghede Ability Score Intelligence Intelligence Wisdom Charisma

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TABLE 9-8: UNIQUE FAVORS


Favor Damage Level Range 4 5 6 7 8 9 Touch 50 ft. 200 ft. 800 ft. Sight Unlimited Damage Target or Area Single creature Two creatures or 5-ft.-radius sphere Ten creatures or 10-ft.-radius sphere 50-ft.-radius sphere 100-ft.-radius sphere or a small town 1,000-ft.-radius sphere or a small island Duration Instantaneous or 2d6 rounds Instantaneous or 2d6 minutes Instantaneous or 2d6 hours Instantaneous or 2d6 days Instantaneous or 2d6 weeks Instantaneous or permanent Targets Single Target Multiple Targets Saving Throw 10d6 15d6 15d6 20d6 20d6 25d6 10d6 10d6 15d6 15d6 20d6 20d6 Will negates Will half Will half None None None

TABLE 10-1: CREW QUALITY


Circumstances Captain has a Fame of 5-15 Captain has a Fame of 16+ Lax discipline Firm discipline Brutal discipline Adjusted Seamanship 0-2 3-4 5-9 9-12 13+ Modier +1 +2 1 +1 1 Crew Quality Rabble Poor Average Superior Expert

TABLE 10-8: DAILY MOVEMENT RATES


Knots 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Daily Movement 24 48 72 96 120 144 168 192 216 240 264 288 312 336 360

TABLE 10-5: BEARING


Wind Bearing 0-2 points off the bow 3-4 points off the bow 5-6 points off the bow Larboard or starboard +1/-1 3-6 points off the aft 0-2 points off the aft Description Dead Hauling Beating Reaching Quartering Running Modier no movement possible -0.9 -0.5 -0.25 None -0.1

TABLE 10-3: SKELETON CREW


Skeleton Crew Less than 25% 25-40% 41-60% 61-80% 81-99% Action Penalty No action allowed -4 -3 -2 -1 Time Penalty N/A Quadrupled (x4) Tripled (x3) Doubled (x2) None

TABLE 10-4: WIND SPEED


Wind Force Calm Light Moderate Strong Severe Windstorm Hurricane Wind Speed (Knots) 0 1-12 13-23 24-35 36-58 59-85 86+ Speed Limit (Knots) 0 1-3 4-6 7-10 1-15 16-20 21+

TABLE 10-2: SHIP SIZE


Ship Size Tiny Small Medium-size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal Equivalent Creature Size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal Colossal Colossal Colossal AC/Maneuverability/ Ramming Modier +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -4 -8 Hit Dice 1 2-3 4-5 6-8 9-10 11-12 13+ Example Rowing Boat Fishing Boat Frigate Pinnace West Indiaman Galleon First Rate

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TABLE 10-6: SAILS


Sail No sail Minimum sail Fighting sail Plain sail Full sail Extra sail Speed Modier No movement -50% -20% No modier +20% +50% Description Ship will drift unless anchored. Headsails and driver only . . . enough to give the ship headway. Topsails, which are running reefed (half deployed) All mainsails and topsails. All mainsails, topsails, topgallants, and royals. Fast and hard to maneuver. (-2 to maneuver checks) As full, but with every extra piece of canvas strapped on to any surface that will take itstudding sails, courses, gaff sails, staysails, etc. Hard to handle, but blindingly fast. (-5 to maneuver checks)

TABLE 10-7: CREW MODIFIERS TO SPEED


Crew Quality Rabble Poor Average Superior Expert Speed Modier 3 knots 2 knots No modier +2 knots +3 knots

TABLE 10-10: DISTANCE TO THE HORIZON


Altitude Rowboat (6 feet) Deck of a ship (12 feet) Poop deck of a ship (24 feet) Crows nest of a ship (48 feet) 100-foot fortress on a cliff Horizon Distance 3 miles 4 miles 6 miles 8 miles 12 miles

TABLE 10-9: SHIP CRITICAL DAMAGE


d20 Roll 1 2-8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21+ Effect Major leak Minor leak Rigging torn loose (mainmast) Rigging torn loose (foremast) Rigging torn loose (aftermast) Yard breaks off, threatening focsle Yard breaks off, threatening waists Yard breaks off, threatening quarterdeck Mainmast snaps, threatening waists Foremast snaps, threatening focsle Aftermast snaps, threatening quarterdeck Bulwark breaks off, threatening focsle Bulwark breaks off, threatening waists Bulwark breaks off, threatening quarterdeck Anchor cable breaks

TABLE 10-12: SIGHTING MODIFIERS


Size of Target Tiny Small Medium-size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal Small Island Island Coastline Other Lookouts have Telescopes Target silhouetted in sun Target is lit with lanterns Time of Day Dawn/Dusk Day, Cloudy Day, Bright Night, New Moon Night, Cloudy Night, Moon Night, Full Moon Weather Haze Light Rain Steady Rain Downpour Fog Modier -60% -50% -30% -20% -10% +0% +10% +20% +40% +80% Modier +20% +20% +40% Modier -20% -20% 0% -80% -60% -50% -40% Max Distance 1d6 +6 miles 1d4+4 miles 1d4+1 miles 1d4 miles 1d20 x 10 yards

TABLE 10-13: CREW MOVEMENT EFFECT


Crew Quality Rabble Poor Average Superior Expert Base Sail Change 20 rounds 15 rounds 10 rounds 6 rounds 3 rounds

TABLE 10-11: SIGHTING DISTANCE


Sighting Altitude 6 12 24 48 100 6 6 7 9 11 15 12 7 8 10 12 16 Object Height 24 48 9 10 12 14 18 11 12 14 16 20 100 15 16 18 20 24

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TABLE 10-14: CREW RELOAD MODIFIERS


Crew Quality Rabble Poor Average Superior Expert Circumstances Minimum crew Half crew Expert Gunner feat Base Reload Time 30 rounds 24 rounds 20 rounds 16 rounds 12 rounds Reload Modier As a crew two steps worse As a crew one step worse -2 rounds

TABLE 10-15: RAMMING DAMAGE


Enemy Ship Size Tiny Small Medium-size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal Structural Damage 1 1d6 2d6 3d6 4d6 5d6 6d6

TABLE 10-16: CREATURE RAMMING DAMAGE


Ship Size Tiny Small Medium-size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal Damage Caused 1 1d10 2d10 3d10 4d10 5d10 6d10

TABLE 10-17: LOCKED SHIP MODIFIERS


Circumstance Enemy ship is Colossal Enemy ship is Gargantuan Enemy ship is Huge Enemy ship is Large Enemy ship is Medium-size Enemy ship is Small Enemy ship is Tiny Ramming ship has no ram Your ship is Colossal Your ship is Gargantuan Your ship is Huge Your ship is Large Your ship is Medium-size Your ship is Small Your ship is Tiny Modier -8 -4 -2 -1 +0 +1 +2 +5 -8 -4 -2 -1 +0 +1 +2

TABLE 10-18: MORALE CHECKS


Circumstances Ships structure points reduced by 50% Ships structure points reduced by 75% Attacked by warship at least two size classes larger Attacked by multiple ships of same size or larger DC 15 10 15 10 +2 per ship

MORALE CHECK MODIFIERS


Circumstances Captain present Captain present with Leadership feat Modier + Captains Cha modier + Captains character level

TABLE 10-19: BOARDING ATTACK MODIFIERS


Circumstances Vessels two size classes apart Vessels one size class apart Attackers crew size larger than defenders Attackers vessel is a warship Defenders vessel is not a warship Every additional ship attempting to board defender Modier -4 -2 +2 +2 +4 +4

TABLE 10-21: BOARDING ACTION MORALE CHECK DC


Circumstances Crew wounds reduced by 50% Crew wounds reduced by 75% Crew wounds reduced to one third of current score in a single round Crew suffers more damage in a round than enemy Crew is struck by enemy with three times or greater crew wounds DC 15 20 10 15 15

TABLE 10-22: CANNON TYPE


Type Demi-culverin Culverin Demi-cannon Cannon Structural Damage Range Increment 1d4 2d4 3d4 4d4 100 ft 100ft 150ft 150ft

BOARDING ACTION MORALE MODIFIERS


Circumstances Captain present Captain present with Leadership feat Modier + Captains Cha modier + Captains character level

TABLE 10-20: BOARDING ACTION CREW COMBAT


Crew Wounds are. . . Twice enemys Three times enemys Five times enemys Ten times or more enemys 50% of enemys 33% of enemys 20% of enemys 10% or less of enemys Attack Roll Modier +1 +2 +3 +5 -1 -2 -3 -5 Damage Roll Modier x2 x3 x5 x10 x1 x1 x1 x Morale Modier +1 +2 +3 +5 -1 -2 -3 -5

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CURRENCY
SPANISH CURRENCY
Doubloons 1 Pieces of Eight 4 Crown 4 Daalder 2 1/2 Reales 32 Shilling 20 Florins 5 Maravedi 1,090 Pence 240 Stuiver 100

ENGLISH CURRENCY
Pound 1

DUTCH CURRENCY
Ducat 1

CURRENCY CONVERSIONS
CONVERSION RATES
Doubloons 1 Pounds 1 Ducats 1
D20 CURRENCY

Pounds 3/4 Doubloons 1 1/3 Doubloons 1/2 Reales 1 Shillings 4/5

Ducats 2 Ducats 2 2/3 Pounds 3/8 Stuiver 1 1/2

Silver Pieces 1

MELEE WEAPONS
SIMPLE MELEE WEAPONS
Weapon Belaying pin, Medium Boarding pike* Dirk Halfspear* Marlinespike Quarterstaff## Cost Damage Critical Range Increment Weight 10 ft. 20 ft. 10 ft. 20 ft. 10 ft. 3 lb. 3 lb. 1 lb. 3 lb. 1 lb. 4 lb. Type Bludgeoning Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Bludgeoning Size M L T M T L Free 1d6 x2 1 poe, 6 rl 1d8 x3 1 poe 1d4 19-20/x2 1 poe 1d6 x3 6 rl 1d4 19-20/x2 1 poe 1d6/1d6 x2

EXOTIC MELEE WEAPONS


Weapon Cavalry saber Cost 5 dbl Damage 1d8 Critical 18-20/x2 Range Increment Weight 4 lb. Type Slashing Size M

MARTIAL MELEE WEAPONS


Weapon Belaying pin, Small Belaying pin, Large Boarding axe Broadsword Buccaneer knife Cutlass Dueling rapier Greatsword Hatchet Longspear*# Rapier Sap Smallsword Tomahawk Cost Free Free 2 poe 1 dbl 1 poe, 7 rl 3 poe 15 dbl 5 dbl 6 rl 2 poe 5 dbl 1 poe 12 dbl 1 poe, 3 rl Damage 1d6** 1d10 1d8 1d8 1d6 1d6 1d6 2d6 1d6 1d8 1d6 1d6** 1d6 1d6 Critical x2 x2 x3 19-20/x2 19-20/x2 18-20/x2 18-20/x2 19-20/x2 x3 x3 18-20/x2 x2 18-20/x2 x2 Range Increment Weight 10 ft. 3 lb. 10 lb. 4 lb. 3 lb. 1 lb. 2 lb. 3 lb. 15 lb. 3 lb. 9 lb. 3 lb. 3 lb. 1 lb. 2 lb. Type Bludgeoning Bludgeoning Slashing Slashing Piercing Slashing Piercing Slashing Slashing Piercing Piercing Bludgeoning Piercing Slashing Size S L M M S M M L S L M S S S

* If you use a ready action to set this weapon against a charge, you deal double damage if you score a hit against a charging character. **The weapon deals nonlethal damage rather than regular damage # Reach weapon ##Double weapon Refer to the weapon description for special rules.

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GRENADOE FUSES
Roll 25+ 20 15 Less than 15 Fuse Perfect: the grenadoe explodes as soon as it lands. Good: the grenadoe explodes one round after landing. Adequate: the grenadoe explodes d3+1 rounds after landing. Poor: the grenadoe explodes d6+4 rounds after landing.

GUNPOWDER WEAPONS
SIMPLE GUNPOWDER WEAPONS
Weapon Musket, long* Musket, short Pistol Cost 5 db 3 db 8 db Damage Critical Range Increment Reload Time 2d6 2d6 2d4 x3 x3 x3 60 ft. 40 ft. 10 ft. 6 full rounds 6 full rounds 6 full rounds Weight 25 lb. 20 lb. 5 lb. Type Piercing Piercing Piercing Size L L S

MARTIAL GUNPOWDER WEAPONS


Weapon Cost Damage Critical Range Increment Reload Time x3 x3 x3 x3 x3 x3 x3 x3 x3 x3 5 ft. 15 ft. 150 ft. 150 ft. 150 ft. 150 ft. 5 ft. 80 ft. 100 ft. 40 ft. 10 full rounds 12 full rounds Varies Varies Varies Varies 7 full rounds 6 full rounds 6 full rounds 12 full rounds Weight 10 lb. 25 lb. n/a n/a n/a n/a 3 lb. 25 lb. n/a n/a n/a Weight 10 lb. 10 lb. 35 lb. Type Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Piercing Type Piercing Piercing Piercing M L n/a n/a n/a n/a T L n/a Blunderbuss pistol* 12 db d12* Blunderbuss* 3 db 2d10* Cannon 400 db 4d4 x 10 Culverin 150 db 2d4 x 10 Demi-cannon 200 db 3d4 x 10 Small culverin 90 db d4 x 10 Pocket pistol* 12 db 2d4 Rie* 35 db 2d6 Swivel-gun* 50 db loaded w/one ball 4d6 loaded w/ pistol balls d20

EXOTIC GUNPOWDER WEAPONS


Weapon Cost Damage Critical Range Increment Reload Time 5 ft. 10 ft. 30 ft. 40 ft. 10 ft. 5 ft. 5 ft. 5 ft. 6 full rounds 6 full rounds 6 full rounds 6 full rounds n/a 6 full rounds 6 full rounds 6 full rounds Size S S L Double-barrel pistol, side by side* 24 db 2d4/4d4 x3 Double-barrel pistol, over and under* 30 db 2d4 x3 Double-barrel musket, side by side* 20 db 2d6/4d6 x3 Double-barrel musket, over and under* 25 db 2d6 x3 Grenadoe* 5 rl 1d8/1d3 x3 Hatchet-pistol 350 db as hatchet 1d6 x3 as pistol 2d4 x3 Spear-pistol 350 db as spear 1d8 x2 as pistol 2d4 x3 Sword-pistol 450 db as sword 1d8 19-20/x2 as pistol 2d4 x3 *See weapon description for more details.

35 lb. Piercing L 4 lb. Bludgeoning S 7 lb. S Slashing Piercing 14 lb. M Piercing Piercing 9 lb. M Slashing Piercing

GUNPOWDER WEAPON AMMUNITION AND ACCESSORIES


Item Dozen powder and shot, pistol* Dozen powder and shot, blunderbuss pistol Dozen powder and shot, blunderbuss Dozen powder and shot, musket** 1200 powder and shot, swivel-gun 200 powder and shot, demi-culverin 100 powder and shot, culverin 75 powder and shot, demi-cannon 40 powder and shot, cannon Prepared charges (musket or pistol) Bayonet, plug Bayonet, ring Cost 2 reales 4 reales 5 reales 2 reales, 10 maravedi 20 doubloons 20 doubloons 20 doubloons 20 doubloons 20 doubloons +1 reale per dozen 5 reales, 12 maravedi 1 Piece of Eight Weight 1 lb. 2 lb. 4 lb. 2 lb. 1 ton 1 ton 1 ton 1 ton 1 ton N/A 1 lb. 1 lb.

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*Also suitable for pocket pistols. **Suitable for short muskets, long muskets, and ries.

POWDER DETERIORATION
Condition One year stowed perfectly in a ships hold One month stowed well in a ships hold One week stowed badly in a ships hold Two years stowed perfectly in an armory on shore Two months stowed well in an armory on shore Two weeks stowed badly in an armory on shore One month stowed perfectly about ones person One week stowed well about ones person One day stowed badly about ones person One day loaded in a gun Stowed well and exposed to sea air for one day Stowed well and exposed to light rain for one hour Stowed well and exposed to heavy rain for one hour Stowed badly (or loaded in a gun) and exposed to sea air for one hour Stowed badly (or loaded in a gun) and exposed to light rain for one minute Stowed well and exposed to tropical storm for one hour Stowed badly (or loaded in a gun) and exposed to heavy rain for one minute Stowed badly (or loaded in a gun) and exposed to tropical storm for one minute Dunked underwater Misre (on 1d20) 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-4 1-4 1-4 1-6 1-6 1-10 1-17

ARMOR
Armor Armor Maximum Armor Bokor Spell Bonus Dex Bonus Check Penalty Failure Speed (30 ft.) Weight Cost

LIGHT ARMOR
Fencing jacket Buff coat +1 +2 +8 +7 0 0 5% 5% 30 ft. 30 ft. 2 lb. 5 lb. 6 dbl 2 dbl, 2 pieces of eight

MEDIUM ARMOR
Pitch jacket Breastplate Breast and back +3 +4 +5 +5 +5 +4 -2 -2 -3 20% 15% 20% 20 ft. 20 ft. 20 ft. 15 lb. 10 lb. 20 lb. 2 pieces of eight 1,200 doubloons 2,000 doubloons

HEAVY ARMOR
Munition armor +6 Three-quarter plate+8** Plate armor +9** +2 +1 +1 -5 -5 -6 30% 35% 35% 20 ft.* 20 ft.* 20 ft.* 30 lb. 40 lb. 50 lb. 1,500 doubloons 3,500 doubloons*** 5,000 doubloons***

SHIELDS
Buckler Cloak +1 +1 -1 0% 5% 2 lb. 1 lb. 1 piece of eight, 6 rl 6 dbl

*When in heavy armor, you may not move any faster than triple your base speed, even when running. **There is only a 10% chance that looted heavy armor will t properly; ill-tting armor suffers a -2 penalty to armor bonus. ***Starting characters cannot begin the game with these unless they have the Booty fortune and the Gentleman-Adventurer background.

POISONS
Poison Type Initial Damage 1d6 Wisdom Special Secondary Damage 1d6 Wisdom Special Price 1,000 dbl 2,000 dbl Mongazi powder Ingested DC 15 Ghedes wine Ingested DC 13*

*If administered for up to three consecutive days, the DC rises by 3 each day (from 13 to 16 the second day, and from 16 to 19 the third day.)

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GOOD AND SERVICES


TOOLS & PERSONAL EFFECTS
Item Book (fanciful tale) Buttons, gross Comb, horn Comb, ivory Iron nails, two dozen Logbook Medicinal leeches, one bottle Navigators instruments Navigators instruments, masterwork Needles, three dozen Pocketwatch Pox medicine Scissors Shipwrights tools Shoemakers knife Speaking trumpet Surgeons tools Telescope, paper and vellum Telescope, paper and vellum Thimble Thread, one pound Tobacco, eight ounces Cost 2 poe 2 dbl 1 poe 2 poe 2 rls 2 dbl 1 poe 18 dbl 45 dbl 1 poe 3 dbl 4 dbl 1 poe 8 dbl 1 poe, 4 rls 1 poe 20 dbl 45 dbl 20 dbl 2 rls 1 dbl 4 rls

VICTUALS AND QUARTERS (CONTINUED)


Item Meal, ne Meal, good Meal, poor Milk, gallon Mutton, joint Pig Turkey Cost 1 dbl 2 poe 1 rl 22 mar 1 rl, 12 mar 1 dbl, 3 poe 1 poe, 2 rls

DRINK
Item Ale, quart Claret, bottle Old rotgut, gallon Rum, gallon Wine, ne Wine, good Wine, poor Cost 7 mar 2 poe 15 mar 1 dbl 1 dbl, 1 poe 4 rls 12 mar Cost

TRADING GOODS
Item Brandy, barrel 45 poe Cattle, one head (two barrels of cargo) 32 poe Cocoa, cask 25 poe Cotton, bale (one barrel of cargo) 35 poe Flour, barrel 18 poe Fresh water, pipe 1 poe, 4 rls Fruit, barrel 30 poe Furniture, one piece 80 dbl Indigo, cask 100 dbl Italian shoes, fty pairs 100 dbl Ivory tusk 5,000 dbl Jesuits Bark (Cinchona), pound 20 dbl Molasses, barrel 24 poe Oil, pipe 12 dbl Paper, ream 29 poe Persian rug, one piece 25 dbl Pitch, barrel 20 poe Provisions, one months (ve tons of space) 500 poe Rice, barrel 16 poe Rum, barrel 30 dbl Salt beef, barrel 22 poe Salt, barrel 15 poe Sandalwood, pound 10 dbl Silk, bolt 1,000 dbl Spice, barrel 35 poe Standard ale, barrel 60 poe Sugar, bag 16 poe Sugar, barrel 30 dbl Vinegar, barrel 26 poe Wheat, bushel 3 poe Wine, barrel 60 poe Wine, pipe 100 dbl

CLOTHING
Item Belt, leather Boots, leather Cotton chemise Extravagant gentlemans hat Fancy plumed hat Gentlemans outt Gentlewomans outt Gentrys wig, fancy Gentrys wig, simple Paupers outt Poor womans outt Sailors cap Sailors outt Shoes, fancy Shoes, simple Shoes, womens pumps Silk chemise Silk frock coat, fancy Silk frock coat, simple Silk overcoat, fancy Silk overcoat, simple Tradesmans outt Tradeswomans outt Wool and linen frock coat Wool overcoat Cost 1 poe, 3 rls 2 dbl 3 rls 10 poe 1 poe 25 dbl 40 dbl 15 dbl 2 poe 3 rls 1 dbl, 6 rls 6 rls 1 dbl 3 poe, 2 rl 2 poe, 1 rl 2 poe 25 dbl 100 dbl 40 dbl 140 dbl 70 dbl 4 dbl 6 dbl 2 dbl, 2 poe 6 dbl Cost 1 poe, 4 rls 18 mar 25 mar 3 rls 3 rls 1 rl 3 dbl 1 rl 1 poe, 3 rls 3 rls 12 mar 3 rls

VICTUALS AND QUARTERS


Item Beef, pound Bread, loaf Butter, tub Cheese, wheel Chicken Eggs, one dozen Goat Lodging, common Lodging, ne Lodging, good Lodging, poor Meal, common

MISCELLANEOUS GOODS AND SERVICES


Item Dowry, common Dowry, ne Dowry, good Feminine company, common Feminine company, ne Feminine company, good Feminine company, poor Parakeets, one dozen Parrot, polite talking Parrot, talking Cost 75 dbl 4,500 dbl 1,500 dbl 20 rls/hour 1 dbl/hour 1 poe/hour 2 rls/hour 2 poe 8 dbl 5 dbl

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A
Able Seaman 139 Adjinakou 85 Adventures Bokor 17 Buccaneer 11 Hougan 20 Sea Dog 13 Shantyman 15 Agwe 81 Ailusairad 152153 Alignment Bokor 17 Buccaneer 11 Hougan 20 Sea Dog 14 Shantyman 15 Amazon 140141 Anguilla 162 Antigua 164 Armor 5961 Art 135 Aruba 164 Ashadeh Boco 8384 Ayida Wedo 82 Ayizan 86 Azagon La Croix 153154

Index
Buccaneer 1113 Hougan 1921 Sea Dog 1315 Shantyman 1517 Classes, Prestige 3650 Diestro 3638 Master of Fence 3840 Master of Scrimia 4044 Mystic Navigator 4546 Ofcer 4749 Sea Ofcer 4849 Warrant Ofcer 4950 Class Features 1415 Bokor 18 Buccaneer 1113 Diestro 3638 Hougan 2021 Master of Fence 3840 Master of Scrimia 4044 Mystic Navigator 4546 Sea Ofcer 4849 Shantyman 1617 Warrant Ofcer 4950 Class Skills Bokor 17 Buccaneer 11 Diestro 36 Hougan 20 Master of Scrimia 40 Mystic Navigator 45 Sea Dog 14 Sea Ofcer 48 Shantyman 16 Warrant Ofcer 49 Clothing 135 Coins and Metals 132 Congo Zandor 84 Contacts 910 Sample 139 Cozumel 166 Crew 96101 Captain 96 Inferior Ofcers 9899 Lieutenants 96 Marines 100 Masters 96 Petty Ofcers 99 Quality 101 Roster 100101 Seamen 99100 Sea Ofcers 98 Servants 100 Cuba 166167 Cuisine, Bucaneer 12 Curacao 167 Currency 5152 Cynocephali (Dog Folk) 142

E
Erzulie 82 Every, Henry Long Ben 10

F
Fame 7071 Feats 9 Armed to the Teeth 23 Crabs Rush 23 Crack Shot 23 Craft Drogue 23 Craft Garde 2324 Create Zombi 24 Crimp 24 False Attack 24 Firearms Drill 24 Forge Silver Shot 25 Loas Grace 25 Murmur of the Earth 25 Port Savvy 25 Quicksilver Eyes 25 Riposte 25 Seagoing 25 Swashbuckling 26 Swordsmans Gambit 26 Weapon Display 26 Fortunes 10, 2935 Ally 32 Been-Round 32 Booty 32 Cause 32 Code of Honor 29 Deadeye 32 Devils Own Luck 33 Dolls Eyes 29 Drownin Look 30 Enemy 34 Enlightened 30 Ex-Zombi 30 Favored Horse 30 General 2932 Good 3233 Hangin Look 30 Ill 3435 Kid 30 Kin to Whales 34 Letter of Marque 33 Loa Patron 33 Loose Tongue 34 Magic 33 Obligation 34 Old Salt 3031 Parrot Perch/Monkey Magnet 33 Quick-Fingered 31 Seasick 34 Strange Luck 31 Superstitious 31 Touched 3132 True Thomas 34 Vice 35 Wanted 35 Wastrel 35 Whiskey Johnny 35 Woman Disguised as a Man 32 Worm 32 Friendly Merchant 139

B
Backgrounds 9, 2729 Charisma Check Modiers 27 Colonist 27 Contacts Gained 27 Gentleman-Adventurer 28 Indentured Servant 28 Native 28 Pressed Man 28 Scum 2829 Seaman 29 Sea Devil 29 Skill Ranks Gained 27 Slave 29 Badessy the Wind 154155 Bahamas 164 Barbadoes 165 Barbuda 165166 Baron Samedhi 84 Blackbeard 138 Blemmyae 141 Bonaire 166 Bonny, Anne 31 Brasiliano, Roche Rock 60

C
Campaign Outlines 126130 Caribbean, The 162173 Carisona 156 Carrefour 84 Cayman Islands 166 Characteristics Bokor 17 Buccaneer 11 Hougan 20 Sea Dog 1314 Shantyman 15 Character Creation 810 New Steps 9, 910 Christianity 9495 Cinq Jour Malheureux 85 Classes 89 Classes, Core 1121 Bokor 1719

D
Damballah 82 Dan Petro 85 Davis, Howell 26 Dinnerware 134135 Djab 85, 152161 Dominica 167 Drinking 68 Drogues 2325 Duels 7477 Pirate Duels 76 Prizeghts 76 Stage Gladiator Matches 7677

G
Gambling 70 Gems 134 Ghede 86 Giant Tree Frog 142143

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Good and Services 6263, 188189 Grenada 167168 Grenadines 168 Guadeloupe 168

O
Ogun 83 Onijegi 146

H
Hairy Wild Men 143144 Hornigold, Benjamin 34 Hougans Ex-hougans 21

P
Paper 135 Plunder 132140 Poisons 61 Porto Rico 170 Portugues, Bartholomew 47 Possession 87 Pygmy 146147

I
Idlers 99100 Island Giant 144

R
Race 8 Rataron the Bold 158 Reade, Mary 31 Requirements Diestro 36 Master of Fence 38 Master of Scrimia 40 Mystic Navigator 45 Sea Ofcer 48 Warrant Ofcer 49 Roberts, Bartholomew Black Bart 43 Rogers, Woodes 176 Rolling the Bones 124125

J
Jamaica 168169 Jennings, Henry 41 Jenny Hanniver 145 Jewelry 134

Speed 108 Storm Hazards 111 Third Rate 107 West Indiaman 106 Wind Speed 108 Yawl 104 Ship Names 131 Simbi 8687 Siren 148149 Six Thousand Men 159 Skills 9 Knowledge (navigation) 22 Knowledge (sea lore) 22 Voodoo Rituals 23 Slavery 77 Spanish Treasure Fleets 137138 St. Christopher 171 St. Domingue 171 St. Lucia 171 St. Martin 171172 St. Vincent 172 Sway 7174

L
Legba 8283 Lel-Za-Bol 156157 Level Progression Bokor 18 Bucaneer 12 Diestro 37 Hougan 20 Master of Fence 39 Master of Scrimia 42 Sea Dog 13 Sea Ofcer 49 Shantyman 16 Warrant Ofcer 50 le Grand, Pierre 130 Lives 10 Loa 8187 Djab 85 Exceptions 8587 New World 83 Old World 8183 Local Nobility 139 Loco 86 Low, Edward Ned 145 Lowther, George 50

T
Tabago 172 Teach, Edward Blackbeard 138 Tides 110 Tona 160161 Tortuga 173 Trinidad 173 Troglodyte 149150 Troupe-style play 125126

S
Saba 170 Sailing 108109 Santo Domingo 172 Sea Battles 113119 Armor Class 115 Attack 114 Boarding 117118 Cannon Fire 118119 Crew 116 Initiative 114 Miniatures 113 Morale 117 Ramming 116 Rounds 114 Sighting 113114 Sinking 116 Structure Points 115 Sea Monk 147148 Seduction 70 Shimerack the Chitterer 159160 Ships 102107 Barge 104 Bearing 108 Brigantine 105106 Corvette 106 Critical Damage 112 Daily Movement 109 Dhow 104 Fire 119 First Rate 107 Fishing Boat 104 Fourth Rate 107 Frigate 106 Galleon 106 Lugger 104 Pinnace 106 Rowboat 104 Running Aground 109 Schooner 105 Second Rate 107 Ships Boat 104 Sloop 104105

U
Underworld Lackey 139 Unusual Items 136

V
Vane, Charles 157 Virgin Islands 173 Voodoo 7893 Voodoo Burdens 8889 Voodoo Favors 9091 Voodoo Rituals 8793 Baka Ritual 93 Djabs Call 92 Djabs Pact 92 Djabs Trust 92 Engagement Ritual 8990 Great Caille Ceremony 89 Wisdom from the Past 9192 Zombi Ritual 93

M
Magical Items 136137 Christophers Staff 94 Clements Anvil 95 Dove, The 95 Ettekovans Pens 137 Holy Relics 9495 LOlonnois Hanger 136 Ochoas Plate 137 Splinter of the True Cross 95 Magical items Fish, The 95 Marassa, The 86 Margarita 169 Martinique 169 Master of Fence Class Skills 38 Monstrous Races 140151 Montserrat 169170 Morgan, Sir Henry 94

W
Wages 68 Weapons 5259 Gunpowder 5559 Masterwork 52 Melee 5254 Weather 110111 Whoring 70 Winds 109110

Z
Zape Totec 161 Zombi, Simple 150152

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Nevis 170

SHIP NAME:

- Ship Record Sheet WEAPONS AFT: WEAPONS BROADSIDE: DAMAGE: SPECIAL QUALITIES: CREW: PASSENGERS: CARGO: OTHER NOTES:

SHIP CAPTAIN: SHIP OFFICERS: SIZE AND TYPE: DRAFT: STRUCTURE DICE:
STRUCTURE POINTS:

HARDNESS: MANEUVERABILITY: SPEED: TURN RATE: ARMOR CLASS: WEAPONS FORE:

- Crew Roster Sheet CLASS: LEVEL: CREW SIZE: CREW WOUNDS: ATTACKS: DAMAGE: CREW QUALITY: ARMOR CLASS: SAVES: FORT: REF: SEAMANSHIP: FEATS: WILL:

- 191 -

- NPC Record Sheet NAME: CLASS: LEVEL: ALIGNMENT: BACKGROUND: LIVES: SWAY: ATTRIBUTES: STR: INT: SAVES FORT: HIT POINTS: ARMOR CLASS: MELEE ATTACK(S): REF: WILL: EQUIPMENT: DEX: WIS: CON: CHA: FORTUNES: CLASS ABILITIES: FEATS: SKILLS: DAMAGE: RANGED ATTACK(S):

CON DAMAGE: INITIATIVE:

SWAG:

- Cannon Fodder Record Sheet NAME: CLASS: LEVEL: ALIGNMENT: BACKGROUND: ATTRIBUTES: STR: INT: SAVES FORT: CON DAMAGE: ARMOR CLASS: INITIATIVE: REF: WILL: DEX: WIS: CON: CHA: FEATS: FORTUNES: OTHER NOTES: SKILLS: DAMAGE: RANGED ATTACK(S): MELEE ATTACK(S):

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