You are on page 1of 31

vinyl makes

a comeback
Sales of the dated format increasing. PaGe 7
Privacy in Dorms
coulD chanGe
Search warrants may not be needed
for room entrance if policy change
goes into efect
this fall.
PaGe 4
athletes win
biG overseas
Basketball players join Team USA . PaGe 23
wednesday, july 22, 2009 www.kansan.com volume 120, issue 158
Next chancelor brings
new era for Jayhawks
Bernadette Gray-Little, the Universitys 17th
chancellor, reveals plan, recounts past
BY ROSS STEWART
rstewart@kansan.com
Editors note: The Kansan had the opportunity to sit
down in Chapel Hill, N.C. with Bernadette Gray-Little,
who will soon be the Universitys 17th chancellor, and
several of her colleagues and friends. The conversations
looked at who Gray-Little is and what she intends to do
at the University, which she said is the last university she
will work for.
Chapel Hill, N.C. Bernadette Gray-Little shoots
a contemplative look at the ceiling for a moment then
points out the window at something shes going to
miss.
I enjoy that sight right out there, Gray-Little said.
More days than not I stop on the way in or out or I
look out my window and I look out on that sight. Its
a great sight.
see ChanCellor on PaGe 16
All Electric
Flat Rate Utilities
Free Wireless Internet
Individual Leases
(785) 842-5111
campusapartments.com/naismith
Sign now for $0 down
Now offering
all inclusive
reduced rates!
WEATHER
Wednesday, July 22
84 62
Thursday, July 23
86 66
Friday, July 24

Saturday, July 25
Sunday, July 26
Monday, July 27
Tuesday, July 28
www.weather.com
NEWS 2
wednesday, july 22, 2009
QUOTE OF THE DAY
I dont go looking for
trouble. Trouble usually fnds
me.
Harry Potter
FACT OF THE DAY
The school motto of
Hogwarts is Draco dormiens
nunquam titillandus, which is
Latin for Never Tickle a Sleep-
ing Dragon.
http://www.associatedcontent.com
ET CETERA
The University Daily Kansan
is the student newspaper of
the University of Kansas. The
first copy is paid through the
student activity fee. Additional
copies of The Kansan are 25
cents. Subscriptions can be
purchased at the Kansan
business office, 119 Stauffer-
Flint Hall, 1435 Jayhawk Blvd.,
Lawrence, KS 66045.
The University Daily Kansan
(ISSN 0746-4967) is published
daily during the school year
except Saturday, Sunday, fall
break, spring break and exams
and weekly during the summer
session excluding holidays.
Periodical postage is paid in
Lawrence, KS 66044. Annual
subscriptions by mail are $120
plus tax. Student subscriptions
are paid through the student
activity fee. Postmaster:
Send address changes to The
University Daily Kansan, 119
Stauffer-Flint Hall, 1435 Jayhawk
Blvd., Lawrence, KS 66045
CONTACT US
Tell us your news.
Contact Jesse Trimble or Amanda
Thompson at (785) 864-4810
or editor@kansan.com.
Kansan newsroom
111 Stauffer-Flint Hall
1435 Jayhawk Blvd.
Lawrence, KS 66045
(785) 864-4810
INDEX
News. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P.4
Entertainment . . . . . . . . . P.9
Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . P.13
Classifeds . . . . . . . . . . . P.18
Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . P.23
Are Lawrence`s state-named
streets in the order that they
joined the Union? Sort of.
Twenty two streets, from
Delaware St. to Florida St. are
in order, with the exception
of fve east Lawrence streets
(New York St. to Mass St.).
DAILY KU INFO
NEWS NEAR & FAR
INTERNaTIoNal
1. Nicaraguan president
forced out of ofce in coup
MANAGUA, Nicaragua Aides
to ousted President Manuel Zelaya
pushed Monday for international
sanctions against Honduran of-
fcials who took power in a coup
and foreign nations stepped up
pressure after negotiations for his
return reached a deadlock.
Zelaya, a wealthy rancher who
shifted left during his presidency,
charged that the current constitu-
tion protects a system of govern-
ment that excludes the poor.
The aftermath of the coup is
turning into a major test of Latin
American democracy and of the
Obama administrations policy
toward the region.
The U.S., the United Nations
and the Organization of American
States have demanded that Ze-
laya be reinstated, and no foreign
government have recognized his
replacement Micheletti.
2. Iraqi military rejects U.S.
requests for movement
BAGHDAD The Iraqi military
has turned down requests from
American forces to move unescort-
ed through Baghdad and conduct a
raid since the transition of respon-
sibility for urban security at the
end of last month, an Iraqi military
commander said Monday.
U.S. combat troops withdrew
from urban areas on June 30 under
a security agreement with Iraq that
requires all U.S. troops to be out of
the country by the end of 2011.
Outside urban areas, where U.S.
troops are still free to move without
Iraqi approval, Americans are as-
sisting with the search and arrest of
insurgents, manning checkpoints
and continuing ongoing eforts to
train Iraqi forces.
3.Militants and soldiers
killed during operation
PESHAWAR, Pakistan Paki-
stans military said more than 50
militants and three soldiers had
been killed in two days of clashes in
the countrys restive northwest.
The clashes came during a two-
day operation in Lower Dir, an area
bordering the Swat Valley where
the army had been wrapping up an
ofensive against Taliban militants.
There is no way to independently
confrm the casualty fgures be-
cause the area is closed to journal-
ists.
Sunny
NaTIoNal
4. Four seriously injured
in train crash improving
SAN FRANCISCO The four
most seriously injured victims in a
weekend light-rail crash were im-
proving Monday, as a union ofcial
said the operator of the train had
blacked out just before the collision
with a parked train.
Two of the victims were in good
condition, one was fair and the
fourth had been transferred to
another hospital for non-medical
reasons, said Rachael Kagan,
spokeswoman for San Francisco
General Hospital.
A total of 47 people were injured
in the crash, including the driver.
The hospitalized driver told of-
fcials from San Franciscos transit
workers union that a medical
condition was to blame for his loss
of consciousness, said Irwin Lum,
the unions president.
The San Francisco Municipal
Transportation Agency identifed
the driver Monday as Henry Gray.
5. Astronauts spacewalk
for 40 year celebration
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. The as-
tronauts aboard the shuttle-station
complex celebrated the 40th anni-
versary of mans frst moon landing
with their own spacewalk Monday,
heading outside to stockpile some
big spare parts.
In the second outing of their
mission, David Wolf and Thomas
Marshburn anchored a 6-foot dish
antenna on the international space
station for future use, then did the
same with a hefty pump and an
engine for a rail car.
The spacewalk unfolded 40 years
to the day that two other astro-
nauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz
Aldrin strolled the moons dusty
surface.
6. Violence in New Jersey
reaches a record high
NEWARK, N.J. Three shoot-
ings in Newark on Monday have
left three people dead and seven
wounded in the latest outburst of
violence in northern New Jersey.
The three shootings happened in
a six-hour span, in a six-mile radius,
and just days after eight police of-
cers were injured in a confrontation
a short distance away in Jersey City.
Newark Police Director Garry Mc-
Carthy said of the frst two shoot-
ings didnt appear to be related.
Ofcials havent made an assess-
ment on the third incident.
No motive or suspects have been
named. No money was taken.
Authorities have not released
the names and conditions of any of
the surviving victims in the Newark
attacks.
Associated Press
Mostly sunny
85 62
Isolated T-storms
85 62
Isolated
T-storms
Mostly
sunny 84 64
85 67
Mostly
sunny
86 69
Scattered
T-storms
lawRENcE
City Commission approves
increase in parking fees
The increases to parking fees and
fnes downtown were approved
on fnal reading at last nights city
commission meeting. The changes
approved include doubling the cost
of meters, increasing parking tickets
from $2 to $3 and increasing meter
patrol end times from 5 p.m. to 6
p.m.
Dave Corliss, city manager, said
the next step would be to repro-
gram the parking meters within the
next six weeks and the city would
work on a publicity campaign to in-
form downtown parkers about the
changes to fees, fnes and enforce-
ment hours.
We arent ready to announce
what the exact efect will be, Corliss
said. But one thing we are going to
do is step back and see how can we
best publicize this.
Mike Bontrager
1
8Y\i[\\e
8gXikd\ekj
)*''NXbXiljX;i%./,$.+0$()//
5ee |eas|a ofce for deta||s
kestr|ct|oas may app|y
5pec|a|s sub[ect to chaae
5|a up for Zk0 dowa
Now offer|a fk kuust keat
w|th a !2 moath |ease
over our |atest spec|a|s!
=C@GFLK
1
news
4 wednesday, july 22, 2009
administration
Proposed change would afect privacy in dorms
BY DYLAN SANDS
dsands@kansan.com
If a room in the residence halls
is rocking, the University might do
more than come knocking. A pro-
posal at the University might allow
staff members to enter students
rooms if they have reasonable suspi-
cion that drugs or alcohol are being
consumed.
The University has been re-eval-
uating its stance on alcohol use on
campus in the wake of two student
deaths earlier this year. A recently
formed alcohol task force met for
the first time Tuesday afternoon
to discuss changes
in the Universitys
alcohol policies.
The current
policy on search-
ing residence halls
allows students
to deny entry to
resident assistants.
Supervisors need
a search warrant
to enter a students
room, even if they suspect drugs or
alcohol are being consumed inside.
The proposed policy entails a series
of steps whereby a supervisor could
enter a students room on suspi-
cion.
Jack Martin, deputy director of
communications for the University,
outlined the steps. If there is a rea-
sonable suspicion of
drug or alcohol use or
other violations and a
resident refuses to let
a resident assistant in,
the RA could then find
a senior staff member
and again ask for per-
mission to enter the
room. If the student
refuses entry twice
and two housing staff
members agree there is reasonable
suspicion to enter the room, they
can then use a master key to open
the door.
Martin said the reasonable sus-
picion policy could apply toward
other residence hall violations, but
the focus would be on preventing
alcohol abuse.
There is always potential for
other policy violations, but drug
and alcohol are the ones that have
got most attention, Martin said.
Martin said the policy was not
aimed at invading the privacy of
hall residents, but rather at protect-
ing residents as a whole regardless
of their behavior.
What this comes down to is that
one of the main reasons students
choose campus housing is they
expect it to be a safe place to study,
Martin said. If we cant enforce
rules like the policies on drugs and
alcohol then their rights arent being
protected.
Mason Heilman, student body
president, said the proposal would
be considered by student sen-
ate before any decision could be
made on the policy. He also said he
thought it was important to pro-
vide a safe environment for all hall
residents.
The halls are there to provide a
living environment that is condu-
cive to being in college and provide
areas where you can relax, Heilman
said. I dont have a definite feeling
either way; I can see both sides. I
would lean more towards this is an
invasion of privacy, but its impor-
tant to take into account students
that arent in violation.
Heilman said students who live
in the halls currently have the same
I would lean more
towards this is an
invasion of privacy...
mason Heilman
student body president
Search warrants may
become unnecessary
for room entrance
see policy on page 5
841-2100
sunowerbroadband.com
faster.
Fastest internet in Lawrence. Fastest for the price.
Gold Silver Bronze
Internet Internet Internet
Price $49.95 $29.95 $17.95
Speed Up to 21 Mbps Up to 7 Mbps Up to 1.5 Mbps
Keeping you connected.
more free HD!
fastest internet!
Sunower Broadband
gets you connected
1
wednesday, july 22, 2009
news
5
rights as a tenant of an off-campus
apartment.
The issue with that is there is
the document called the Code of
Students Rights and Responsibilities
that says students give up none of
their rights as tenants, Heilman
said. Clearly, no one can come into
your apartment without a search
warrant.
Heilman said the code would
have to be amended to allow room
searches.
This is still in the proposal
phase, Martin said. Were talk-
ing about how do we reduce the
instances of excessive and under-
age drinking among KU students.
Weve seen the tragic consequences
that can result in injuries and even
death.
Marlesa Roney, vice provost for
the office of student success, held the
first meeting of the new University
Alcohol Task Force on Tuesday.
Roney cited recent student deaths
as cause for alarm regarding alcohol
abuse on campus.
We decided we really need to
double our efforts in light of what
went on this spring and bring people
together in a new way, Roney said.
The task force is comprised of stu-
dents, Greek officials and University
staff and faculty. Roney, who men-
tioned being a resident assistant her-
self in the past, said the University
needed to step back and evaluate
the residence hall policy of granting
residents the same rights that off-
campus tenants have. She said some
students had learned to deny entry to
resident assistants and were exploit-
ing the loophole.
Roney added that
the new policies
would need to find
a balance between
respecting privacy
and promoting
safety.
It can become
a heated issue
when it comes to
individual rights,
Roney said. I do hope we have a
healthy discussion between students
and administration. Ralph Oliver,
chief of the office of public safety
and member of the task force, said
the current policy relied on search
warrants, which took a considerable
amount of time to get.
We can pull a search warrant
if we get called to a certain room
twice, Oliver said.
He added that the average time it
took to get a warrant was about four
hours.
Jennifer Wamelink, associate
director of the department of student
housing, said she hoped new poli-
cy changes would help limit police
involvement.
Were not interested in punishing
our students criminally, Wamelink
said. Opening the door enables staff
to talk to students and have an edu-
cational conversation. The goal is not
to punish; its to hold
students to their con-
tract.
Roney said that stu-
dent senate code was
usually revised every
other year and that it
was revised last year. She
said that the University
and the student senate
would make an excep-
tion this year to review
the code on students rights in the
residence halls.
Roney said she did not want to set
unrealistic goals in making changes
with the task force.
This is not about abstinence,
Roney said. Its about responsibil-
ity.
Heilman said he was awaiting the
return of student senators in the fall
to discuss policy changes.
Check Kansan.com Thursday to
learn more about the changes the
task force is considering.
Edited by Ross Stewart
policy (continued from 4)
The goal is not to
punish; its to hold
students to their
contract.
Jennifer wamelink
associate director of the
department of student
housing
LET US HELP
YOU FILL YOUR
FRIDGE.
23RD & LOUISIANA (785) 843-0023
L O C A L

F R E S H S A V E $ $ $
OPEN
HOURS
24
POWERADE 32 OZ
asstd vrty .66 EA
TONYS CRISPY CRUST PIZZA
9-10 OZ .78 EA
80% LEAN FRESH GROUND BEEF
economy pk $1.48 LB
SEEDLESS WATERMELON
large 45ct size $3.69 EA
1
2300 Wakarusa 785-749-1288
Studio Apartments starting at $465/month
$120 Visa card w/ 12 month lease
Some restrictions may apply
hogging your food?
ROOMMATES
Apple Lane
Apartments
See leasing ofce for details
Specials subject to change
Get your own space at
NEWS
7 wednesday, july 22, 2009
Music
Students, locals bring a novelty back to life
BY DAVID UGARTE
dugarte@kansan.com
Warren Gassaway found his first
record player in the closet of his high
school library at the end of his senior
year. He said he liked vinyl records
because they were a cheap way to lis-
ten to old music, plus they are kind of
cool to look at.
Gassaway, Neodesha junior, is not
the only one who thinks so.
According to two articles pub-
lished by Rollingstone.com in June
of 2008 and January of 2009, Nielsen
SoundScan reports showed that
vinyl record sales increased 85.8
percent between 2006 and 2007 and
89 percent between 2007 and 2008.
According to the Sydney Morning
Herald, figures released in the U.S. in
early 2009 showed that sales of vinyl
records nearly doubled in 2008, with
1.88 million sold up from 1 million
in 2007.
Gassaway said he had between
300 and 400 records of classic rock,
obscure bluegrass, country and pro-
gressive rock.
Most people I know have a little
stash of records from their parents,
Gassaway said. I feel like a lot of
people view it as a cool novelty. Its not
necessary, but its a cool item and its
cheap, which is good for people like
me without a lot of money.
Patrick Crough has worked at Half
Price Books, 1519 W. 23rd Street,
for two years. He said vinyl records
were more popular now than when he
started working there.
Crough said vinyl sales were still
below CD sales at Half Price Books,
but said it could be related to selec-
tion.
Its definitely changing, Crough
said.
Crough started listening to records
about 10 years ago when he was given
his parents old vinyl collection. He
also has between 300 and 400 records.
He said he liked to listen to 60s and
See vinyl on page 8
Chance Dibben/KanSan
Warren gassoway, nedosha junior, poses against a wall of decorative vinyl in his apartment. Gassoway has been collecting records since his senior
year of high school, and during that time has come across such rarities as a British print of the BeatlesRevolverand a copy of The Rolling StonesSticky
Fingerswith a zipper cover designed by artist Andy Warhol.
(&5
*/70-7&%
KUPedia LVQFEJB!HNBJMDPN
KUpedia is a student's guide te |iIe at KU in the Ierm eI a wiki. Like Wikipedia, anyene can edit er add te
KUpedia. 1he en|y diIIerence is that KUpedia is a|| abeut KU.
Prisen a|| CCSBD!LVFEV
Prisen a|| C|ub is an erganizatien that a||ews students te exercise in a Iun and epen envirenment. Prisen a|| is a
0edge-ba|| |ike game inve|ving twe teams, each en ene side eI the specihed ceurt, that ever the ceurse eI the game
peried try te put a|| eI the eppesing team's p|ayers inside "prisen".
|ayhawk Metersperts NJMMFSDK!LVFEV
|ayhawk Metersperts aims te educate students en the interactien eI design and preductien (specihca||y autemetive) whi|e
rewarding the team with Iun recreatiena| racing.
xperimenta| a||een 5eciety XIPFWFS!LVFEV
xperimenta| a||een 5eciety's purpese is te a||ew a|| students te participate in high a|titude
ba||een system experiments.
fer mere eppertunities te get inve|ved, check eut the
Iu|| |ist eI registered erganizatiens at www.si|c.ku.edu
news 8 wednesday, july 22, 2009
70s rock records.
If I hear something I like from the
60s or 70s, I try to find it on vinyl,
Crough said. Theres some things
that seem to sound better; the sound
is reproduced better.
Steve Wilson, manager of Kief s
Downtown Music, 823 Massachusetts
St., has worked at the record store
for about 35 years. He estimated his
personal collection of records to be
at about 5,000, including a floor-to-
ceiling shelf of records he has in his
house.
Vinyl is good because it is some-
thing basically knowledge-based, you
have to know the quality and resale-
ability of each record, Wilson said.
Its unique. If you buy smart, its a
reasonable way to work. Its more a
service to the customer.
Vinyl record sales at Kief s have
increased slightly to about 20-25 per-
cent of the total sales of the store, he
said. Wilson said vinyl really only
sounded significantly better if it was
high quality vinyl on a good record
player, which most people dont have.
Forty-fives (45s) sound have a
vibe. I think a lot of people get a
buzz off that sound, Wilson said. I
personally dont care much about the
medium, but I certainly have a lot of
good memories and if thats some-
thing young people are getting into,
then I think thats great.
Jacob Bigus, Paola sophomore, said
he took an interest in vinyl recent-
ly when he listened to his fathers
vinyl collection. But his first record,
Quadrophenia by The Who, came
from one of the dads of someone in
his Boy Scout troop when he was 14
or 15.
Bigus said he liked to have vinyl
records of all kinds of music.
I like to have enough vinyl record-
ings to put one on for every mood,
Bigus said.
He said he thought of vinyl records
comeback as more of a personal
comeback for individuals when they
discovered vinyl existed, which he
said happened to a lot of people in
college.
Compared to Cds
Gassaway said that when compar-
ing vinyl to CDs, vinyl was better
for listening at home. Bigus said he
thought the music sounded more
realistic and live.
If I get something on vinyl, I dont
listen to the CD anymore, Bigus
said.
Aley Shoffner, Wichita senior,
has worked at Love Garden, 936 1/2
Massachusetts St., for more than a
year. Love Garden, a CD and record
store, has been selling vinyl for almost
20 years. She said Love Garden sold
a lot more vinyl than CDs with its
combination of new and old records
available.
Shoffner said that when she really
liked an album she might get the CD,
but she always wanted it on vinyl,
too.
CDs are more disposable for me.
Records are like my back up copy,
Shoffner said. Its like a good, solid
copy to have.
Kent Szlauderbach, Wichita junior,
said he got into vinyl during his senior
year of high school.
The sound has richer tones; its
fuller, Szlauderbach said. It kind of
permeates the atmosphere better.
Szlauderbach said vinyls sound
quality was better than CDs and said
the only real drawback was that vinyl
record players were not portable.
He said CDs turned the music digi-
tal, changing it to numbers instead
of vibrations, as it was when it was
recorded on vinyl.
Crough attributed some of vinyls
re-emerging popularity to the new
bands that used vinyl.
People are definitely noticing
vinyl again, young and old, Crough
said. Record companies are taking
new releases and packaging them as
a record and digital download, which
seems to be a great idea, Crough said.
You get the big art and music right to
your computer.
What is bringing vinyl
baCk?
Shoffner said more releases were
coming out on vinyl as well as more
re-pressings, where new copies of old
albums are made. This also leads to an
increase in prices, she said, as record
companies take advantage of vinyls
growing popularity. Shoffner said she
thought vinyl was more popular in
Lawrence because the town had good
record stores where people could get
anything on vinyl, unlike Wichita,
where she grew up.
I think its awesome, Shoffner
said. I can get all kinds of releases I
couldnt get. Even smaller, local bands
have releases on vinyl.
Szlauderbach said the album covers
made vinyl records more aesthetically
pleasing and said he liked to listen to
old blues records.
Its nice to hear how people heard
it back then, Szlauderbach said. Its
definitely trendy.
He credited indie bands with put-
ting in a lot of effort to make quality
vinyl records. He said he tended to
purchase records with a strong sense
of album, meaning the songs transi-
tion smoothly and the band has a cer-
tain sound, or theme, to its album.
Its cool because it makes bands
focus more on making an album
instead of a single, Szlauderbach
said.
He said he liked to have albums he
would enjoy listening to all the way
through.
It may not be better, but its defi-
nitely different than shuffling on
the iPod, Szlauderbach said. Plus,
no matter what happens, if theres
an apocalypse, records will still be
there.
Edited by Derek Zarda
vinyl (continued from 7)
(&5
*/70-7&%
KU Ce||ege Repub|icans
VTBBUX!LVFEV
1he Ce||ege Repub|icans eI the University eI Kansas is a student greup that IaithIu||y uphe|ds and premetes the va|ues and princip|es eI the
Repub|ican Party en eur campus, in eur city, threugheut eur state, and acress eur natien.
KU eung 0emecrats BOESFXU!LVFEV
KU eung 0emecrats pursues the ideas eI |iberty, justice, and Ireedem Ier a|| regard|ess eI race, re|igien, er sex. We wi|| pursue these
ideas threugh suppert eI the 0emecratic Party and its ideas, idea|s, and candidates. We seek te pursue these ideas with the assistance eI
KU students and te eIIer them eppertunities te beceme mere active in the 0emecratic party.
KU federa|ist 5eciety EBYUFSKBTPO!HNBJMDPN
1he KU Law federa|ist 5eciety is a greup eI censervative, |ibertarian, and mederate students cemmitted te preserving the mainstays eI eur Iree
gevernment: Iedera|ism, the separatien eI pewers, and judicia| hde|ity te the text eI the Censtitutien.
fer mere eppertunities te get inve|ved, check eut the
Iu|| |ist eI registered erganizatiens at www.si|c.ku.edu
|ectiens Cemmissien
&MFDUJPOT$PNNJTTJPOFYJTUTUPFOTVSFFGGFDUJWFBOEGBJSFMFDUJPOTBSFIFMEUPFMFDUUIFTUVEFOUCPEZ
HPWFSONFOUBUUIF6OJWFSTJUZPG,BOTBT
olcxzcc;ku.cJu
1
9
sketchbook by drew stearns
horoscopes
@
check for
answers to
puzzles on
kansan.com
To get the advantage, check the
days rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0
the most challenging.
aries (March 21-april 19)
today is an 8
Loves in the air, so be careful. Only
let loose in appropriate surroundings
with the right person.
taurus (april 20-May 20)
today is a 5
A startling development causes you
to rethink your plans. Choose the op-
tion thats most cost-efective.
GeMini (May 21-June 21)
today is an 8
An investment in your area of passion
looks excellent. There are always a
few new things you need. Find them
on sale.
cancer (June 22-July 22)
today is a 7
You could fnd a great deal. This is
why you saved up, but if youre not
ready, youre not ready. Dont fake it.
Leo (July 23-aug. 22)
today is a 9
Theres a total eclipse in your sign,
which could be wonderful. Youll do
best if you partner with an analyst.
VirGo (aug. 23-sept. 22)
today is a 6
Watch out for jams at work, and not
the fun kind. Someone could change
his or her mind in the middle of the
project.
Libra (sept. 23-oct. 22)
today is a 7
Breakthrough conditions are in
efect, so what do you want to
change? Deciding is the important
part. Do that now.
scorpio (oct. 23-nov. 21)
today is a 5
A shake-up at the top can be to your
advantage. Youre always seeking
opportunities. See which way the
rubble falls.
saGittarius (nov. 22-dec. 21)
today is an 8
Something fails, and its not your
fault. But if you run into a storm and
youre unprepared, that IS your fault.
capricorn (dec. 22-Jan. 19)
today is a 6
Past fnancial troubles inhibit your
choices. Thats OK. Thats why we
get whomped every once in a while,
right?
aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
today is an 8
Youre fnally getting some relief and
some needed help. Theres more
competition and opposition coming,
too.
pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
today is a 5
Whoa, this is a surprising develop-
ment. You get the job, but nobody
knows what youre supposed to do.
Figure it out.
7-21-09
wednesday, july 22, 2009
entertainment
1
@
Check for
answers to
puzzles on
Kansan.com
7-22-09
Celebrity
Chris Brown apologizes, pleads guilty
BY ANTHONY MccARTNEY
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Chris Brown pub-
licly apologized Monday for the beating
of Rihanna, saying in a two-minute video
that hes still seeking help and wants to
live his life as a role model.
Brown released the video on his Web
site apologizing to fans and said he was
sad and ashamed of his conduct. He also
told viewers that he had repeatedly apolo-
gized to Rihanna.
Brown was arrested Feb. 8, hours afer
he fought with his then-girlfriend in a
rented sports car afer a pre-Grammy par-
ty. According to a police afdavit, Brown
tried to push the 21-year-old Barbados-
born singer from the car and repeatedly
hit her and choked her.
He lef the scene and later turned him-
self in to authorities during the Grammy
Awards, where he and Rihanna were slat-
ed to perform. He was later charged with
assault likely to cause great bodily harm
and making criminal threats. He pleaded
guilty to the felony assault charge last
month and faces sentencing Aug. 5.
He is slated to serve fve years of pro-
bation and perform six months of com-
munity labor.
In the video, Brown calls the beating
the incident. He vows to conduct inter-
views and answer some questions about
the beating, but said he wanted to speak
directly to fans frst.
I felt it was time you that heard di-
rectly from me that I am sorry, he said
on the video.
He calls his conduct inexcusable
and says his mother who has attended
some of his court hearings has taught
him better. He mentions that he witnessed
domestic violence growing up.
I saw frst hand what uncontrolled
rage can do, he tells viewers. I have
sought and am continuing to seek help
to ensure that what occurred in February
can never happen again.
Brown said on the video he wanted to
speak out earlier, but was advised not to
by his lawyer.
He acknowledged that the beating had
hurt his reputation. Although he didnt
mention it, Brown lost sponsorship deals,
radio stations stopped playing his music
and other artists condemned him afer
the attack.
Before the beating, Brown was consid-
ered a squeaky-clean R&B up-and-comer.
He rose to prominence afer the 2005 hit
Run It! He was nominated for a Gram-
my for No Air with Jordin Sparks and
named Billboards top artist in 2008.
I intend to live my life so that I am
truly worthy of the term role model,
Brown said at the videos conclusion.
entertainment
10 wednesday, July 22, 2009
1
smart break
Thats right! Break your lease at
the dorm and well pay for it!
*
*Up to $700
All Inclusive
Fully Furnished
Private Campus Shuttle
Free Continental Breakfast Mon - Fri
4101 W. 24th Place
Lawrence, KS 66047
785-856-5848
Legends@PlaceProperties.com
University
of
Kansas
S

C
r
o
s
s
g
a
t
e

D
r
S

I
n
v
e
r
n
e
s
s

D
r
S

I
o
w
a

S
t
S

K
a
s
o
l
d

D
r
West Clinton
Pkwy
W 24th Pl
1
reviews
12 wednesday, july 22, 2009
Super cheese. The best two
words to describe 311s new album,
Uplifter.Sure, 311 stuck somewhat
to its formula: heavy guitar rifs, S.A.
Martinez busting out fows, and
Nick Hexum singing about love
but with aging the band has lost its
edge.
Theres nothing surprising about
this new album. It sounds like a
combination of all the bad things
from the bands three latest studio
albums From Chaos,Evolverand
Dont Tread On Me.These bad
things include clich lyrics, guitar
licks that sound as if theyre featured
on a Sega Genesis video game
and chord progressions you swear
youve heard before on previous
albums.
If youve followed 311 from its
start you can hear with the album
Evolver,a shift towards a lighter,
more mature sound that doesnt
do what 311 used to do, which was
rock. Its disappointing, but one can
assume its expected from now on.
As much as I enjoy classic 311, I have
to say dont waste your money on
this album. The classic311 albums
far surpass this one.
Ross Stewart
Album: Uplifter by 311
Book: Water for Elephants
by Sara Gruen
The feelings of failure, sorrow and
loss are often associated with the
Great Depression.
However, in Water for Elephants,
author Sara Gruen displays a color-
ful aspect of the period by introduc-
ing the audience to an unknown
world of the depression-era circus.
The novel is narrated by an
elderly protagonist, who tells his
tale of a personal tragedy and an ac-
cidental fall into a life-altering circus
world. The experience reveals a
backstage appearance of the great-
est show on
earth.That
is, behind all
the glitz and
glamour lies
a world dedi-
cated to sex,
robbery and
debauchery.
Through
extensive
historical
research, Gruen is able to bring the
reader into an unthinkable world.
The world of the depression-era
circus is rough, erotic and full of
people who lack any sense of mo-
rality. It makes for a fantastic read,
one that not only enlightens but
also entertains.
HannahDeClerk
Album: Chemical Warfare
by The Alchemist
For those curious about whats
been going on in the hip-hop
scene, both mainstream and
underground, beatsmith The
Alchemists latest release Chemi-
cal Warfare gives hip-hop heads a
reason to rejoice.
Born in Beverly Hills and taken
under the wing of DJ Muggs, DJ/
producer for Cypress Hill and Soul
Assassins, The Alchemist is best
known for producing beats on
both sides of the coast, notably
for underground hip-hop crew
Dilated Peoples, Mobb Deep, Nas
and Fat Joe.
On what can be considered
the signature lazy summer track
Smile, guest MC Twista steals
the show with his impossibly fast
fows. On Keep the Heels On,The
Alchemist creeps back into some
stilted-eerie synth beats while
Prodigy of Mobb Deep brings
about his gritty rhymes that recall
the groups early hardcore roots.
Underground heavyweight Talib
Kweli, Kid Cudi and Evidence
stop by on Therapy to break
The Alchemists minimal guitar
rhythm open with stream-of-
consciousness fows. This album
altogether is a highlight for
hip-hop followers wanting proof
that their favorite rappers havent
faded away.
Derek Zarda
Movie: Harry Potter and
the Half-Blood Prince
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood
Prince, the sixth installment of the
series, broke a midnight-screening
record of $20 million last Wednes-
day. The movie was dark and
thrilling, yet more prevalent was the
coupling romances among teenag-
ers. Between Ron and Lavenders
snoggingscenes and Hermiones
jealousies, the movie focused less on
Harrys problems and more on hor-
monal angst. Harry seemed to run
solo with most of his problems, but
with Dumbledores help, Harry con-
tinued on his mission against Volde-
mort I mean, HE-WHO-MUST-
NOT-BE-NAMED. The sixth part of
the series proved the complexities
and depth of the seven series saga,
and may have been too confusing
for Harry Potter virgins, but crazed
fans could appreciate the smaller
humors dispersed throughout.
The transition from book to screen
demonstrated director David Yates
talented ability to turn a 652-page
book into a 2 1/2 hour movie. The
surprising ending left everyone
wanting more and a chance to look
forward to the last segment of the
Harry Potter story.
KristenLiszewski
tattoo
785-840-9553
s
,
Body Art
7 1 4 Vermont
joe
Fast, quality jewelry repair
custom manufacturing
watch & clock repair
817 Mass 843-4266
www.marksjewelers.com
1
Opinion
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
wednesday, july 22, 2009 www.kansan.com PaGe 13
United States First Amendment
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people
peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a
redress of grievances.
THE NExT INSTALLmENT
OF NOTES FROm AbROAD
COmINg wEDNESDAY
To contribute to Free for
All, visit Kansan.com or
call (785) 864-0500.
n n n
They say celebrity deaths come in
threes, trust Billy Mays to throw in
one EXTRA! FOR FREE!
n n n
My roommates a barista, Ill never
pay for cofee again!
n n n
Im so stoked for fnally being
back in school I can barely contain
myself.
n n n
HAHAHAHA
n n n
So cant seem to fnd a job in
Lawrence..Im about to become a
stripper.
n n n
Dear FFA, Is it bad that I have more
beer in my fridge than food?
n n n
Why does Facebook want to help
me fnd local goth singles?!
n n n
I have a girl crush on Jennifer
Connelly.
n n n
I am so depressed. Im just going to
sit on my couch and watch Scrubs
re-runs until i feel better.
n n n
I really shouldnt be allowed in
Wal-Mart after 9:00 pm, I end up
trying to relive my childhood with
some toy I never had as a kid
n n n
I lost my shirt at a party this
weekend. Great success!
n n n
Jesse Trimble, editor
864-4810 or jtrimble@kansan.com
Amanda Thompson, campus editor
864-4924 or athompson@kansan.com
Todd Brown, business manager
864-4358 or toddb@kansan.com
Cassie Gerken, sales manager
864-4358 or cgerken@kansa.com
MalcolmGibson, general manager and news adviser
864-7667 or mgibson@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
864-7666 or jschlitt@kansan.com
contact us
LeTTer GuideLineS
Send letters to opinion@kansan.com
Write LeTTer TO THe ediTOr in the
e-mail subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the
authors name, grade and hometown.
Find our full letter to the editor
policy online at kansan.com/letters.
how to submit a letteR to the editoR
ediTOriAL BOArd
Proposed policy infringes on privacy
Administrators at the University
of Kansas are considering perhaps
the biggest hit to student privacy
rights in decades.
A new proposal would allow
housing ofcials to enter a students
dorm room or scholarship hall
room if there is probable cause of
alcohol or drug use. Tis new policy
is an efort to decrease underage and
excessive drinking on campus.
Students on the Student Hous-
ing Advisory Board have already
approved the change in policy, and
it appears as if Student Senate will
have the fnal say in the matter.
Current housing policies only al-
low police or housing staf to enter a
students room with verbal consent
or a warrant granted by a judge. Of-
fcials in the department of student
housing should not be aforded
rights not granted to law enforce-
ment agents, except in cases of med-
ical emergency.
Although the University should
be commended for trying to curtail
excessive drinking, taking away stu-
dents privacy is not the only or
best way to accom-
plish that goal.
Te recent medi-
cal amnesty program,
which allows students
to call for help with an
intoxicated friend without the possi-
bility of disciplinary or legal action,
was a positive step in encouraging
responsible drinking behaviors.
Te recent changes in policy are
an obvious attempt to mend the
Universitys alcohol policy because
of the recent deaths of KU freshmen
Dalton Hawkins and Jason Wren.
Neither Dalton Hawkins nor Ja-
son Wren died in a dorm room.
Hawkins was found dead near a
University scholarship hall report-
edly afer a night of drinking at lo-
cal bars. Tis proposed policy would
only encourage students to drink in
other places, much like
Hawkins did the night of
his death. And it makes
little sense to say this pol-
icy could have prevented
Wrens death. Wren was
kicked out of Oliver Hall afer re-
peated drinking violations. If this
policy had been in efect at the time,
Wren would likely have only been
kicked out sooner.
Administration ofcials should
be applauded for implementing a
mandatory alcohol education pro-
gram. Education and awareness will
go much further than taking away
students privacy.
But these positive steps forward
dont rectify several steps backward.
Te administration is considering
other drastic measures that come
shockingly close to infringing upon
students First Amendment rights.
In a Summary of Alcohol Initia-
tives the administration identifes
reviewing the Universitys chalking
policy and mandating training for
members of student media outlets
to implement socially responsible
advertising. Alcohol deaths are
sad, tragic and everything possible
should be done to avoid them. But
recent proposals by University ad-
ministration go too far and ask too
much of students.
Kevin Hardy for the Editorial Board
nOTeS FrOM ABrOAd
First-hand tips for a good hostel experience
I
was sleeping on the bottom
bunk when my friend on the
top decided she wanted to get
some water in the middle of the
night. She slipped on the metal rail
above me, causing the bed to shake
a little. I apparently mistook the
shake for a murderer trying to kill
me in my sleep and woke up yelling.
This would normally be fine,
except for the six total strangers
who had been fast asleep before my
outburst. Thus concludes my first
night staying in a hostel.
The looks I got from the sleeping
strangers the next morning (and
the rest of my time in Galway City
Hostel) reminded me of the Ill pre-
tend Im not upset, but really whats
your problem? But I didnt let a few
bad looks ruin my hostel experi-
ence. Instead, I learned from them.
For example, a girl traveling with
me was put in a separate room
because we didnt book our stay
together. Her new roommate turned
out to be a 50-something year-old
man traveling alone named Eddie.
Eddie was sort of reliving his young-
er years by visiting as many places
as possible, or at least thats what he
told her while he relaxed in his box-
ers. Being a good person, Eddie felt
it was his mission to share the tricks
hed learned from his travels with
everyone he met. Sleeping in ceme-
teries, Eddie told our friend, was the
best money saving trick for travel.
Eddie was probably the high-
light of my hostel stay. Although I
appreciated his mildly insane pieces
of advice more than any practical
knowledge he offered, I figured
someone might find his logical bits
of wisdom helpful. So, in true Eddie
fashion, here are five tips for hostels.
1. Friends who book together stay
together.
If youre going with friends and
want to sleep in the same room,
make reservations on the same bill.
2. Make sure its not going to turn
into that Hostel movie.
Check reviews of hostels before
you book a bed.
3. Pack light and live freely.
Bring only what you need and
dont pack anything that you
wouldnt want to lose.
4. Sleep easy.
If youre nervous about the bed,
bring a bed bag and a spare pillow
case. Light sleepers should consider
earplugs or an eye mask.
5. Make it your home.
Bring a power adapter, shower
shoes and other practical items you
wouldnt normally bring for a hotel.
Editedby KristenLiszewski
By Kayla regan
kregan@kansan.com
KAnSAnS
n n n
OPiniOn
1
news
14 wednesday, july 22, 2009
Lawrence
White Owl claims to be banned from campus
BY ADAM SCHOOF
aschoof@kansan.com
White Owl, or the eccentric quasi-
mascot who is often outside Wescoe
Hall preaching and dancing, said
the University threatened to ban
him from coming onto campus and
attending sporting events, but that
may not be the case.
Jill Jess, associate director for news
and media relations for the University,
laughed when asked about the inci-
dent and said there was no record of
White Owl being banned from any
department.
White Owl is known for his long
hair, beard and appearing on ESPN.
For a while, White Owl was a star. He
was on television and Big Jay dressed
up like him at football games.
White Owl said he came to the
University to study Agent Orange,
a powerful herbicide used in the
Vietnam War, and its effects on vet-
erans. He said he didnt come here to
become famous.
I didnt understand my fame, but
I loved it, White Owl said. I never
asked anybody to interview me. I
never sought this at all.
Erina McKinney, Topeka junior,
said White Owl was a bystander to
his fame.
Its not a question of whether
he deserves it or not he gets it,
McKinney said.
White Owl said the story of his
banning started in the spring of 2008.
He said a woman talked with him
at the Jazzhaus, a venue located at
926 Massachusetts St., who said she
worked for the Universitys admin-
istration. White Owl said that the
woman told him KU administration
absolutely hated him, but that she
didnt tell him her name.
Because of this conversation, White
Owl said, he took two people seri-
ously who told him on Facebook that
he was going to be banned from the
University and wo also berated him
with various insults a few weeks ago.
White Owl said the peoples names
couldnt be found on Facebook after
their conversations with him. White
Owl said he started crying when he
received the messages.
My whole world collapsed, he
said.
White Owl said he went to campus
alone around midnight last Monday.
He said he sat outside Wescoe Hall,
praying to God that he hadnt been
banned.
White Owl said a police officer
came and talked with him and con-
firmed his suspicions. White Owl said
the police officer warned him not to
come to University events or on cam-
pus because he would be arrested.
Captain Schuyler Bailey of the
Public Safety Office said there was no
record of this happening.
White Owl said he left the University
that night and began driving with the
idea of fleeing to California. When
he got past Topeka, he said, he heard
God tell him to turn around.
White Owl said he had been on
campus since the midnight incident
to visit Curtis Marsh, program direc-
tor of KU Info, whom he sees on
a regular basis. Marsh said he was
skeptical that White Owl was telling
the truth.
I would be surprised if the admin-
istration would say an individual
would no longer be allowed to step
foot on campus, Marsh said.
Derek Martin, Prairie Village soph-
omore, said White Owl might have
thought he had been figuratively
banned from the University.
Alex Bowman, Medicine Lodge
junior, said White Owl was an asset
to the University and shouldnt be
banned.
He encourages people to be aca-
demically successful, Bowman said.
Everyone Ive seen him talk to,
hes been nothing but friendly and
encouraging.
Lauren Ashman, St. Louis, Mo.,
junior, also said White Owl should
not be banned from the University.
I think people only see him from
afar, Ashman said. If you actually
go up and talk to him, hes a nice
person.
When the fall semester starts, White
Owl said, he will go back on campus
with joy and scream between classes,
as per police recommendation, and
said he would buy season tickets so
he could go to every University game.
He said he was going to try to get a
student ID so he could buy tickets in
the student section.
Id rather be out amongst the stu-
dents than on TV.
Editedby HannahDeClerk
KANSAN FILE PHOTO
White Owl hangs out with friends in his usual
spot in front of Wescoe Beach. It is rumored that
he is currently banned from the University.
smart deals
All Inclusive
Fully Furnished
Private Campus Shuttle
4101 W. 24th Place
Lawrence, KS 66047
785-856-5848
- September FREE
- $1000 Visa Gift Card to the rst 20 leases
- Save $250! Well waive your administration fee
S
a
v
e
$
1
,
5
0
0
!
University
of
Kansas
S

C
r
o
s
s
g
a
t
e

D
r
S

I
n
v
e
r
n
e
s
s

D
r
S

I
o
w
a

S
t
S

K
a
s
o
l
d

D
r
West Clinton
Pkwy
W 24th Pl
1
wednesday, july 22, 2009
news
15
EnvironmEnt
Program could help students cut energy costs
BY MIKE BONTRAGER
mbontrager@kansan.com
The U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency is looking for community
projects that reduce green house
gas emissions while benefiting the
community. The Climate Showcase
Communities Grant Program, start-
ed by the EPA, will assist in funding
up to 30 projects nation-wide by
distributing $10 million among the
accepted plans. The city of Lawrence
submitted its proposal Monday.
Jeff Severin, director of the
Universitys Center for Sustainability,
said the city staff asked him for
project ideas. Severin said his idea
for a project that would benefit the
community while lowering emis-
sions came from a similar program
in Boulder, Colo., called Colorado
University Community Energy
Connections. This program employs
CU students who raise aware-
ness about energy conservation by
informing home owners and renters
about what they can do to con-
serve energy in their homes. The
program also offers optional home
energy audits done by students who
examine residences and give spe-
cific examples for ways to conserve
energy for each home.
Severin said the plan he proposed
differed from the CU Community
Energy Connection by recruiting
student volunteers instead of using
paid employees. Students would
around to student neighborhoods
and talk about what they could do
as renters to conserve energy and
efficiency in their apartments and
homes.
The idea is to focus more on what
can a renter do, Severin said. A lot
of stuff thats coming out right now is
retrofitting homes and that involves
the home owner, but what do you do
if youre a renter and you cant make
some of these major changes?
Severin said the program would
provide resources such as light bulbs,
smart power strips and weatheriz-
ing materials to help reduce energy
consumption. He said the program
would not only help reduce emis-
sions, but would also help save stu-
dents money.
Janie Chen, Olathe junior in
environmental studies, said she was
interested in the project and would
be willing to participate if the pro-
gram became a reality. She said she
thought students could do more to
conserve energy, particularly in plac-
es such as the student ghetto.
Even if we are renters, we need to
be educated about how to conserve
energy and conserve our money,
Chen said. Theres so much more
that we can do, and I just think that a
lot of people arent aware of it.
Chen said she tried to conserve
energy at her home by turning off
lights, keeping the air-conditioning
and heating down when she wasnt
at home, using power strips and
unplugging appliances that suck up
energy.
Those things actually take up a
lot more energy than you think they
do, Chen said.
She said she knew of other envi-
ronmental studies majors who
would want to know more about the
project.
Its a project thats close to home,
Chen said. I think its not too big
and something we can accomplish.
Ryan Callihan, Lenxa senior, is
president of KU Environs, a stu-
dent organization that promotes
awareness of environmental issues.
Callihan said he agreed that the plan
sounded like a good idea, especially
in the student ghetto because the
houses in that area were more prone
to being inefficient because of their
age.
Students dont want to take the
time to invest in a long-term invest-
ment for energy savings because
thats not really their prerogative,
Callihan said. They wont even be
there next year.
He said that it should be the land-
lords responsibility, but that because
they dont pay the electrical bill,
many landlords do not improve
energy efficiency much in their rent-
als.
Callihan coordinates student vol-
unteers for KU Environs. In order to
get students to volunteer for the pro-
gram, there would need to be some
incentive to get them to participate,
such as community service credit,
Callihan said.
Severin said the project would
not happen without the grant, which
would provide half the funding.
The actual man power could be
done on a volunteer basis, Severin
said. But we want to be able provide
some additional resources.
Severin said funding would be
very competitive because projects
would be submitted nation-wide,
and that there had already been
more than 250 proposals submit-
ted. He said this had made funding
opportunities for this project harder
to obtain.
Funds are expected to be avail-
able by January 2010 according to
the Climate Showcase Communities
Grant Web site.
Edited by Derek Zarda
Your door to comfortable living is here
Garber Property Management
785.841.4785
GARBERPROPERTY.COM
1900 sq.ft. at Lake
Pointe Villas
(Candy Lane)
3 & 4 Bdrm Homes,

Close to Clinton
Pets Welcome
$1200.00
3.5 Bath
Lake, K-10, & turnpike
news 16 wednesday, july 22, 2009 wednesday, july 22, 2009 news 17
Courtesy of the Ofce of University Relations
Incoming Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little leaves after a press conference.
Courtesy of the Ofce of University Relations
Incoming Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little greets Chris Reine, a 2009 KU graduate, at a press
conference.
Courtesy of the Ofce of University Relations
Incoming Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little meets with Chancellor Robert Hemenway and his
wife Leah, at the Chancellors residence (The Outlook).
She points out a window to a building, the
universitys Wilson library, which looks like a
regal whitewashed capitol building. Its two foot-
ball fields away from her office at the University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, across a vast
courtyard filled with criss-crossing sidewalks,
surrounded by trees and old academic halls.
Gray-Little ended her 38 years of employment
at UNC as provost July 8. She will begin her role
as the 17th chancellor of the University of Kansas
August 15.
Born and raised in Washington, N.C., a small
town in the then-segregated South, her parents
placed a great deal of worth on receiving an edu-
cation. Her younger brother Mark Gray said it
was presented to themas a way out of poverty.
Gray-Little still continues to pursue this early-
established ideal. She sees the worth in it.
Her time at UNCshows her dedication to edu-
cation. Her accomplishments, such as increasing
diversity, and creating an office of undergradu-
ate research and a first year seminar program,
bettered UNC. She plans to do the same for the
University.
GrowinGup: education
Gray-Little grew up the fourth child of eight
with three brothers and four sisters. The first
time she moved from her hometown was for
college. Her father was illiterate and worked in
construction. Her mother had a GED and was
a homemaker who occasionally did custodial
work.
Though her family did not have the means
to support her higher education, her parents
always pushed that education was a way out of
poverty, according to her brother, whos now a
lawyer in Greensboro, N.C.
In some ways, education became such a big
thing that it became the end as opposed to a
means to an end, Gray said. I just remember
education was the goal; I guess it was also a
means.
Washington was still segregated in the 1950s
when Gray-Little was growing up there. In spite
of this, she said, the only time she really experi-
enced segregation was when she left the neigh-
borhood. She said she didnt have one particular
instance to share showing that segregation dur-
ing her childhood really affected her choices in
life.
Her take on growing up and the difficulties she
had in affording an education reveals something
about her personality and how she approaches
problems and challenges. She said certain things
in life would be considered challenges in retro-
spect, but not at first.
You could say it was a challenge to leave a
small town in North Carolina and get a college
education at a time when I came from a small
school and my parents were not able to contrib-
ute anything to my education, Gray-Little said.
You might consider that a challenge, but at the
time it was just something that you worked on
and got it done. Its hard for me to pull things out
like that because at the time I didnt experience
themas a challenge.
Gray-Little attended an all girls Catholic
school, where nuns served as teachers, from
first grade to her senior year of high school. Her
brother, Gray, remembered her intelligence and
that the nuns took notice when the subject of
college came about. Without scholarships, Gray-
Little wouldnt have been able to afford college
and would have been limited to working a blue-
collar job or entering a convent, Gray said.
They said, Bernadette, youre bright. If you
want to get an education we could get you
a scholarship at Marywood up in Scranton,
Pennsylvania and you dont have to become a
nun, Gray said.
Gray-Little received scholarships and moved
fromWashington to Scranton for her undergrad-
uate degree in psychology. She said the segrega-
tion in Pennsylvania was not the same as it was
growing up in Washington. Segregation in terms
of stores and other public places was not there,
but in terms of neighborhoods it still was.
From Marywood University she went to St.
Louis University in St. Louis, Mo. for her masters
and doctorate in clinical psychology.
After that, she was offered a few professor-
ships, including one at the University and at
UNC. She took the position at UNC in 1971 as a
professor of psychology and has been moving up
in rank there ever since.
Life at unc
Her office didnt reveal she was in the process
of moving. Excellently clean, barely anything
covering her desk, with a single packing box in
the middle of it.
She ran a university and she would run the
University of Kansas with such order and preci-
sion that shed have ten pieces of paper on her
desk, Gray said. Just ten. Just ten.
Working as provost, Gray-Littles latest job at
UNC, meant she was in charge of personnel and
money. One would expect her office to be filled
with clutter from all the responsibilities that fall
under that, but it was so well kempt it looked like
an office froma model home.
While at UNC, Gray-Little accomplished
much as she worked her way up the academic
totempole.
Starting out as a professor, she later ran depart-
ments, served as the executive associate provost,
a dean and the executive vice chancellor and
provost.
Karen Gil, dean of the college of arts and sci-
ences at UNC, spoke highly of the work Gray-
Little had done and said she thought Gray-Little
accomplished a lot in every position she held.
Some of these programs were her legacy here
at North Carolina, Gil said.
Gray-Little spearheaded two prominent pro-
grams in 1999 when she was senior associate
dean for undergraduate education.
One was the office of undergraduate research,
where undergraduates were encouraged to use
UNC as a research institution. Undergraduates
prepared works focused on pressing issues local-
ly, nationally and internationally. This was a
focus of Gray-Littles at UNC, and may be at the
University as well, as she has made references to
increasing research here.
She made it a point to have undergraduates
understand what research is and how it can be
conducted.
The other programshe started was a first-year
seminar that all freshmen were required to take.
A class of about 20 students met with a professor
and studied that professors expertise. Gil, for
instance, taught a class on stress management,
her area of expertise, to 20 freshmen who found
the subject interesting. The idea behind the
seminar was not only to encourage freshmen to
learn about things that interested them, but also
to build substantial relationships with professors
in a close environment.
Home Life
Gray-Little has two children, Mark Little and
Maura Garcia, and a husband, Shade Little.
Mark is doing postdoctoral work at Duke and
is a consultant for the business school at UNC.
Maura just finished her masters in fine arts at
Howard University in Washington, D.C. She is
also a choreographer and runs a dance company
and is planning to relocate her dance company
to Kansas.
Shade grewup in Washington as well, and was
called a math genius by several people in Chapel
Hill. At the moment, he doesnt plan on teaching
at the University when the couple arrives, but
Gray-Little said he wouldnt be sitting still for
too long.
From what Mark said, his mother and father
are quite different fromone another.
Hes been banned from thrift stores, Mark
said. No going to themin Kansas.
Mark said his mother preferred very nice
things, while Shade enjoyed things purchased in
thrift stores. He said that she was style conscious,
didnt go to thrift stores and dressed well her
shoes and jewelry go together.
Though she and Shade are different, Mark said
he thought it was complimentary rather than
problematic.
Gray-Little, even at home, is quiet. But Mark
said that even with the contemplative side her
colleagues describe, shes actually a bit silly. Gray-
Little and Shade didnt allow TV in their house
on weekdays for the kids. If Mark ever had on a
silly movie or TV show shed tell him to turn it
off, but would still laugh at it.
People have a list of adjectives to describe
her, Mark said. In our home context the first
thing that comes to mind, shes a very silly per-
son. None of those people would use that word;
it wouldnt come to mind.
In comparison, Shade is said to be someone
who likes to speak his mind.
My father is very loud, Mark said. I used to
run track. You cant hear anything, but I could
always hear my father yelling Run! because hes
so loud. Its like night and day.
Gray, her brother, doesnt remember too much
about growing up with Gray-Little. She went off
to her first year in college when he was in first or
second grade, though he does remember meet-
ing Shade for the first time when Gray was in his
early teens.
I was easily bought off, Gray said. He
bought me off with a quart of milk.
ChanCeLLOR (continued from 1)
Visit Kansan.com to read the rest of the
in-depth story on Bernadette Gray-
Little.
@
CLASSIFIEDS 18 wednesday, july 22, 2009
1
YWCA of Topeka youth services has
several openings for program interns,
volunteers and part time staff. To view
position openings and apply visit
www.ywcatopeka.org
eliminating racism
empowering women
YWCA of Topeka
3 BR Townhomes $720/month
+ Washer & Dryer
2 BR with Study $670/month
+Washer & Dryer
2 BR $635/month
including Water
2 BR $535/month
Mention this ad & get $50 off
your first month rent
Village Square
Apartments
785-842-3040 mdiproperties.com
Subleasing my apartment at the Reserve
Apartments. Only $309 a month. Text
message 630-878-4561 if interested for
fall and spring semester next year. www.-
hawkchalk.com/3742
3 BR 2 BA. Near downtown & KU.
916 Indiana. $825/mo. Remodeled.
816-522-3333.
2 2BRs in a 4-plex for rent starting Aug.
1st., W/D, $525/mo, 928 Alabama. Close
to KU stadium. Great for college kids! Call
Edie at Silver Clipper 842-1822 for details.
2br/2ba Meadowbrook Apt for lease start-
ing in Aug. Great place to live! Please con-
tact at ashrun820@kc.rr.com with any
questions www.hawkchalk.com/3747
Free to good home 2 male chihuahua pup-
pies (brothers). Housebroke, current on
shots, and microchipped. Come with lots
of extras! email beccacop@ku.edu www.-
hawkchalk.com/3756
Accounting Major needed as PT assistant.
Various accounting duties.
Flexible Schedule.
E-mail resume to hr@microtechcomp.com
Going car-free!
Honda Civic 2006 53,000 miles
$12,500
Call Dan: (425) 773-0958
www.hawkchalk.com/3753
BARTENDING. UP TO $300/DAY. NO
EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. TRAINING
PROVIDED. 800-965-6520 EXT 108
Join our Street Fleet Team! Wages up to
$500 per person you get in the door.
Choose your own hrs. Great Resume
Builder. All Marketing tools supplied. Call
Today for more Information or to Inquire
about our Open Orientation Sessions.
Legends Place Apartments: 785-856-5848
End your day with a smile. Raintree
Montessori School at 4601 Clinton
Parkway-- located on 14 acres with pools,
a pond and a land tortoise named Sally--
is looking for a late-afternoon teacher for
children ages 3-12. Experience working
with children and a sense of
humor required.
(5 days per week M-F, 3:15-5:30 p.m.,
$9.75/hr)
Call 785-843-6800.
Part time 25-30 individuals needed to
clean empty apartments 7/29-8/1.
Call 785-550-1401 or 785-423-5664
Naismith Hall is looking to add more staff!
We need 3-5 more really great personali-
ties to be community assistants (also
known as CAs or RAs). Room and board
is compensation for 15-24 hours a
week where you will put together social
events, watch movies, and mingle
with your fellow residents. Being in the
hall to help the residents have a
safe and fun experience is what this job is
all about. Please call 785-843-8559 or ap-
ply online at www.leadlivelearn.com.
Apply by July 27th as training will start
Aug. 3rd.
Phoggy Dog - Now Hiring
Female barteders/waitresses
Apply M-F 2-4 PM
Professional Resume and Interview Prep
Conducted by Experienced Recruiters
Affordable for any Student. 913-439-1984
michael@strategicrcruitinginc.com
Teachers aide needed for varied hours
M-F starting as soon as June 29th.
Please apply at Childrens Learning
Center at 205 N. Michigan or email
clc5@sunower.com
1BR avail in 5BR, 2BA house w/base-
ment. Available August 1st. $275/mo. Call
Jay at 785-979-1648
Turner House Childrens Clinic looking for
a Clinic Manager under the direct supervi-
sion of the Lead Physician and Executive
Director; the Clinic Manager governs
clinical care services at Turner House
Childrens Clinic: RN with KS license; sig-
nicant experience in both nursing pedi-
atric care and clinical management; pro-
fessionalism & ability to foster cooperative
work environment; passionate about serv-
ing underserved populations. Prefer bilin-
gual Spanish/ English. Send resume &
cover letter: Heather Young, THCC, 21 N.
12th Street, #300 KC, KS 66102
hyoung@thcckc.org (913) 342-2552
1125 Tennessee 3BR & 4BR. Tons of
space! Includes W/D. Make Offer.
Please Call 841-4935
FREE SEPTEMBER RENT!
Parkway Commons.
1,2, and 3BRs
Only $200/BR security deposit.
3601 Clinton Pkwy. 842-3280
Female non-smoking roommate wanted
2bdrm 2bthrm apt 2603 Windsor Pl
$437.50/mo.Utilities included except elec-
tric.Lease starts Aug 1.Contact Victoria at
vajulian@live.com www.hawkchalk.-
com/3746
Female Roommate Needed! Beautiful
4BR/2BA home at 19th and Naismith. 10
minute walk to campus. Contact cpro-
hask@ku.edu for more details and pic-
tures www.hawkchalk.com/3758
Highpointe Apartments
2001 W. 6th Street
1, 2, & 3 BRs
Free August Rent for 3 BRs
1/2 off August Rent for 1 and 2 BRs
$200 Deposit
785-841-8468
www.rstmanagementinc.com
One roommate needed for 4 bedroom
house, great for pets @ 1009 22nd. 2
males, 1 female roommate so far. Text if
interested or if you have any questions!
Kim (785)640-5876 www.hawkchalk.-
com/3750
Only $265 per person! Fully equipped
3BR 2BA, W/D, pool, volleyball. Act fast,
this wont last! Please Call 843-6446.
Room avaiable in beautiful 524 Ohio
House. Rent=380/month. Year-lease.
Only 2 blocks from Mass St.
Historic house, very clean and updated.
785-204-2268 www.hawkchalk.com/3757
928 Ohio 4-8 BR, 8.5 BA.
Walk-in closets, completely remodeled.
Avail. January 1, 2010. Call 785-423-5665
FOR SALE
HOUSING
JOBS
HOUSING JOBS
KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
SALE SALE SALE
785-864-4358 HAWKCHALK.COM CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN.COM
housing
for sale
announcements
jobs
textbooks
SALE
KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
SALE SALE SALE
785-864-4358 HAWKCHALK.COM CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN.COM
housing
for sale
announcements
jobs
textbooks
SALE
CLASSIFIEDS 19 wednesday, july 22, 2009
2
Tutors Wanted
e Academic Achievement and Access Center is hiring more
tutors for the Fall Semester (visit the Tutoring Services website
for a list of courses where tutors are needed). Tutors must have
excellent communication skills and have received a B or better in
the courses that they wish to tutor (or in higher-level courses in
the same discipline). If you meet these qualications, go to
www.tutoring.ku.edu or stop by 22 Strong Hall for more
information about the application process. Two references required.
Call 864-4064 with questions. EO/AA
r 24/7

7353412345

ir curr
conrsiors [ro+
sn[[ort or
i corcrrs

www.hqcc.|awrence.|s.us
?
f
c`[
X
p

8
g
X
i
k
d
\
e
k
j
?
f
c`[
X
p

8
g
X
i
k
d
\
e
k
j
- Great oor plans - Walk-in closets
- Swimming pool - Laundry facilty
- KU bus route - Lawrence bus route
- Small pets allowed - Peaceful & quiet
1 Bedroom - $440 & up
2 Bedroom - $535 & up
3 Bedroom - $700 & up
4 Bedroom - $850 & up
2 Bedroom Townhome - $750
)((Dflek?fg\:flik(
./,$/+*$''((
EFNC<8J@E>=FI
JLDD<I8E;=8CC
Sunrise Place
Sunrise Village
Apartments and Townhomes
View plans, pricing,
and amenities @
sunriseapartments.com
or call 841-8400
Spacious, Remodeled homes
Sunrise Place
Sunrise Village
Apartments and Townhomes
View plans, pricing,
and amenities @
sunriseapartments.com
or call 841-8400
Spacious, Remodeled homes
Sunrise Place
Sunrise Village
Apartments and Townhomes
View plans, pricing,
and amenities @
sunriseapartments.com
or call 841-8400
Spacious, Remodeled homes
Sunrise Place
Sunrise Village
Apartments and Townhomes
View plans, pricing,
and amenities @
sunriseapartments.com
or call 841-8400
Spacious, Remodeled homes
Sunrise Place
Sunrise Village
Apartments and Townhomes
View plans, pricing,
and amenities @
sunriseapartments.com
or call 841-8400
Spacious, Remodeled homes
2, 3, & 4 Bedroom
Models Available
KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
SALE SALE SALE
785-864-4358 HAWKCHALK.COM CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN.COM
housing
for sale
announcements
jobs
textbooks
SALE
KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
SALE SALE SALE
785-864-4358 HAWKCHALK.COM CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN.COM
housing
for sale
announcements
jobs
textbooks
SALE
PAID INTERNET
off deposit
2 & 3 Bedroom $750-$820
KU ID GETS MAKEOVER, MEETS VISUAL STANDARDS WEEKLY SUMMER EDITION WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11, 2008
VOLUME 118 ISSUE 149
Wakarusa Wrap-up
SOCCER TEAM PLAYS EXHIBITION GAMES IN BRAZIL
SAFETY
OFFICE
RIDES WITH NEW SEGWAYS
Summer Kansan
Every Wednesday
WEEKLY SUMMER EDITION WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008
VOLUME 118 ISSUE 155
P. 13
Student looks for his
biological parents,
nds himself
Finished football
complex boasts
amenities that rival
most ve-star hotels
Former KU athlete
qualies for 2008
Olympics with lengthy
javelin throw
Keeping it fresh
Kansas basketball welcomes
seven new faces to campus
P. 26
P. 22
Some people live for the
WEEKENDS
We live for
WEDNESDAYS
news
20 wednesday, july 22, 2009
ENVIRONMENT
Paper no longer needed in classrooms
BY STEPH SCHNEIDER
sschneider@kansan.com
University teachers and the Center
for Sustainability are using computer
technology to produce as little waste
as possible. Paperless Classrooms
are becoming more possible on cam-
pus thanks to a computer network
system, which saves paper, printing
fees and students the hassle of hav-
ing to be physically present to submit
assignments.
Paperless classrooms are a trend
where teachers use Blackboard to
administer assignments, quizzes
and syllabuses to students to reduce
the amount of paper printed for the
class.
For the past three semesters, Stacey
Swearingen White, director of aca-
demic programs for the Center for
Sustainability and associate profes-
sor of architecture and urban plan-
ning, posted readings online and
had students submit papers through
Blackboard.
I think students
care about efforts
to save resources,
White said. Going
paperless is, I think,
ultimately easier and
cheaper for them as
well.
In the past, White
said, she was unsure
if students even read
comments on their
hardcopy papers. Now,
through her use of Blackboard and
the track changes and insert note
functions in Word, its easier for them
to read the comments online, she
said.
I have actually received notes from
students thanking me for my com-
ments, White said. I think it takes
more time for me to grade digitally,
but its important to show students
that I am committed to finding ways
to have a lesser impact on our envi-
ronment.
Dan Bernstein, director of the
Center for Teaching Excellence and
professor of psychology,
minimizes paper use by
having most assign-
ments done online and
returned electronically,
including term papers.
I encourage students
to read course materi-
als online rather than
printing them onto
paper, Bernstein said.
In the end, the only
required work on paper
are sit down exams.
White said students seemed to
appreciate her efforts in conserving
paper, and appreciated not having to
pay to print something out.
In efforts to conserve paper
through printing, Joshua L. Foster,
Lincoln, Neb., graduate student and
research assistant for the Center for
Sustainability, is working with the
Student Environmental Advisory
Board on a Student Senate bill.
The bill would encourage a reduc-
tion in paper use through the pur-
chase of duplex printers, or printers
that print on both sides of the paper,
Foster said.
Only specific departments
across campus, like the Student
Success Technology Services office
have implemented such policies so
far, Foster said. The adoption of a
University-wide policy would be ideal
but is only in the research stage.
In addition to the use of duplex
printing, the printer settings would
reduce default margins on Word doc-
uments from 1.25 to .5.
The Center for Sustainability is
using an example from the University
of Iowa, where a significant reduction
in paper use was the result of duplex
printing, to develop its own program.
According to its Web site, the duplex
printing at the University of Iowa
saved about 1.75 million sheets of
paper per semester.
Edited by Hannah DeClerk
Professors create a
paperless classroom
by using blackboard
I encourage stu-
dents to read course-
materials online rath-
er than printing them
onto paper.
-Dan bernstein
Director of the Center
for teaching excellence
LawSuIT
Dentist drops tools down
elderly patients throat
Winter ParK, Fla. a Florida
dentist is being sued for alleg-
edly dropping tools down the
throat of an elderly patient
twice.
relatives of 90-year-old
Charles Gaal Jr. recently fled the
suit in circuit court accusing Dr.
Wesley Meyers of negligence. an
answering message at Meyers
ofce in Winter Park said satur-
day that he was on vacation. He
did not reply to a message from
the associated Press seeking
comment.
the lawsuit said the doctor
dropped an implant screwdriver
tool in 2006 and a mini-
wrench in 2007.
the suit also said Gaal under-
went several medical proce-
dures to remove the tools but
never fully recovered. He died
in 2007.
Meyers was fned $17,000 by
the state a year later. the dentist
was found negligent in a settle-
ment.
Associated Press
wednesday, july 22, 2009
news
21
Crime
Six murdered in a two-state rampage
BY BILL POOVEY
Associated Press
FAYETTEVILLE, Tenn. Te
man accused of a two-state rampage
that lef six dead was targeting his
estranged wife and killed the others
frst so they couldnt stop the attack
on her, Tennessee authorities said
Tuesday.
Tennessee Bu-
reau of Investiga-
tion spokeswoman
Kristin Helm said
agents believe
38-year-old Traci
Shafer was the last
person to die and
that the couple had
been having mari-
tal difculties.
Her husband,
30-year-old Jacob Shafer, was ar-
rested Saturday in Fayetteville. Hes
charged with stabbing fve people
to death in two Fayetteville homes
and fatally beating a sixth person in
Huntsville, Ala.
Helm said Shafer went out of his
way to kill Tracis father Billy Hall,
57, and brother Chris Hall, 34, in
their home on a rural street in Lin-
coln County.
In this case, he wanted to make
sure the father and the brother who
were in close proximity wouldnt in-
terfere with him killing his main tar-
get, Helm said.
Helm said investigators thought
Shafer then crossed the street to a
duplex and killed his stepson Devin
Brooks and a neighbor, Robert Ber-
ber, both 16, before killing his wife.
Te only person lef unharmed
inside the home was Jacob Shafers
4-year-old daughter, Helm said.
She was probably asleep, Helm
said. As far as what she witnessed,
I dont know. But she was awake and
there when police showed up and
found him.
Helm said investigators were still
trying to fgure out the
motive in the beating
death of a 50-year-old
man found in a Hunts-
ville business.
Huntsville police said
Sidney Wade Dempsey
was the frst victim. He
was attacked at Hall
Cultured Marble Gran-
ite, where he worked
and was allowed to live.
Unlike the stabbings in Tennessee,
Hall died of blunt-force trauma, po-
lice said.
I think the guy (Dempsey) was
just in the wrong place at the wrong
time. I think the guy (Shafer) just
decided to start there, said Sgt. Mark
Roberts of the Huntsville, Ala., police
department.
Helm said Shafer made a state-
ment to police, but would not say if
he confessed to the murders.
Its a pretty solid case for us,
Helm said. Weve got everything we
need to prosecute him.
Two assistant public defenders
have been appointed to represent
Shafer. Ofcials from their ofce
were not immediately available Tues-
day for comment.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
This July 19 photo shows a fower lying on the front porch of a house in Fayetteville, Tenn., where
Chris Hall, 34, and father Billy Hall, 57, were found dead. The man accused of killing six people repeatedly
stabbed his estranged wife, her family and a neighbor, authorities said Monday.
Man accused of killing wife and five others
...he wanted to make
sure the father and
brother...wouldnt
interfere with him kill-
ing his main target.
Kristin Helm
tBi sPoKeswomAn
CRIME
Florida murder suspect
accuses planned attacker
PensAColA, Fla. Authori-
ties said a suspect in the deaths
of a Florida couple known for
adopting numerous children
with special needs told them that
one man planned the home inva-
sion and fatally shot the couple.
Court documents released
tuesday said 19-year-old Fredrick
thornton told investigators that
leonard Patrick Gonzalez Jr.
organized the attack on Byrd and
melanie Billings.
AssociatedPress
IntERnatIOnaL
Man called mentally ill
for short-lived protest
Berlin A court has ordered
psychiatric care for a man who
staged a short-lived protest before
Barack obamas speech in Berlin
during his campaign.
the 41-year-old German man
drove through barricades around
Berlins Victory Column the day
before obama was to speak and
poured red paint from his car.
the Berlin state court said the
man was protesting injustice and
poverty in the world and is not
guilty because of mental illness.
Associated Press
Christensen Floor Care
785-843-8315 ChristensenFloorCare.com
Carpet:
for each additional room
First room 60
$
also clean vinyl, tile, and wood bathrooms and hallways are FREE
20
$
tattoo
785-840-9553
s
,
Body Art
7 1 4 Vermont
joe
Apartments & Townhomes A t t & h
3 KU bus stops
24-Hour Maintenance
www.meadowbrookapartments.net
AVAILABILITY CHANGES DAILY
Floor plans and photos on our website
1
Technology
YouTube connects earthlings with NASA astronauts in space
BY MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.
When it comes to sneezing in a
spacesuit during a spacewalk in the
void of space, it is best to aim well.
That was the advice lead space-
walker David Wolf gave Tuesday
to Dawn from Indianapolis, who
along with more than a dozen others
had questions they had posted on
YouTube answered by some of the
crew of space shuttle Endeavour.
Ive done it quite a few times,
most recently yesterday, said Wolf,
who led the missions second space-
walk Monday and was set to go on
a third spacewalk Wednesday. You
learn in training, and I dont know
how to say this, aim well. It can mess
up your view and there is no way to
clear it.
The YouTube questioners, mostly
children and teenagers, had post-
ed their questions well before last
weeks launch of Endeavour on a
16-day mission to the internation-
al space station. Their posts were
played one at a time for commander
Mark Polansky, pilot Doug Hurley,
Canadian astronaut Julie Payette and
Wolf, who took turns answering the
questions live, more than 200 miles
above Earth.
Other questioners asked the astro-
nauts what they missed most in space
friends and family, what they did
in their spare time look out the
window, and what would happen if
the shuttle or space station flew into
a black hole dont know. There
are currently 13 crew members at
the space station seven visiting
from the shuttle and six living at the
station.
The YouTube questions were the
latest effort by NASA to embrace
social media. Polansky has a Twitter
account with more than 37,500 fol-
lowers, and since the mission began
last Wednesday, Polansky has tweet-
ed regularly with the help of workers
at the Johnson Space Center who
post his messages.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this image provided by NASA, astronaut Tim Kopra is pictured in the forward port side area of Endeavours cargo bay July 18 during the frst of
fve planned spacewalks to be performed on the International Space Station. When the Endeavour crew returns to Earth, Kopra will stay onboard the space
station to serve as fight engineer for ISS expedition duty.
(&5
*/70-7&%
Ab|eBawks
BCMFIBXLT!HNBJMDPN
Ab|e Bawks is the eIhcia| erganizatien en campus Ier students with disabi|ities and a|| Iu||y ab|e peep|e whe suppert disabi|ity as part eI diversity.
1egether as A||ies, peep|e with disabi|ities and peep|e Iu||y ab|ed werk tegether te bring awareness eI disabi|ities issues and te premete a envirenment
epen te a|| kind eI diIIerent abi|ities creating eppertunities te a||.
ueers & A||ies 2BOE"!LVFEV
ueers & A||ies is KU's eIhcia||y recegnized student greup Ier these whe identiIy as |esbian, bisexua|, gay, er transgender, and Ier these in the straight
cemmunity whe suppert them as a||ies. fer mere than yy years, &A has been the hub Ier queer educatien, suppert, cemmunity, and activism at KU.
nvirens
FOWJSPOT!LVFEV
nvirens is a KU student erganizatien which premetes awareness eI envirenmenta| preb|ems and issues. 1hreugh distributien eI inIermaiten,
educatien, and activism, nvirens enceurges seund envirenmenta| practices within the university and the cemmunity eI Lawrence.
KU merging Creen ui|ders XXXLVFHCPSH
1he KU Chapter eI the natiena| erganizatien merging Creen ui|ders, students at the University eI Kansas
dedicated te the deve|epment eI the green bui|ding mevement.
fer mere eppertunities te get inve|ved, check eut the Iu|| |ist eI
registered erganizatiens at www.si|c.ku.edu
frem |ue te Creen: Censerve KU
UFOEFST!HNBJMDPN
frem |ue te Creen is a campus and cemmunity wide, student-|ed mevement tewards a mere sustainab|e KU. fzC Iecuses en spreading awareness,
educating, and enab|ing actien.
news
22 wednesday, july 22, 2009
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Sports
RoYALS oN AN EIgHT-
gAmE LoSINg STREAK
Kansas City loses 10-2 to the L.A. Angles PAgE 26
wednesday, july 22, 2009 www.kansan.com PaGe 23
Commentary
Tips to
make most
of short
summer
By stephen montemayor
smontemayor@kansan.com
C
hances are if youre reading
this, youre either a student
or a faculty member taking
or teaching summer classes.
If youre like me, those Arbys
ads with Alice Coopers Schools
Out For Summer depress you. You
think summer school should be
deemed unconstitutional. You want
justice. Most of all, you want sum-
mer to start.
The finish line is in sight. Our
cruelly short summer is set to
begin. So, how shall we spend it?
Maybe you already have some-
thing lined up. If not, here are a few
thoughts to consider before we go
back to the daily grind and sunny
days and swimsuits become another
Kansas afterthought.
Get outside: This should be a
no-brainer. Were about to wrap up
eight weeks of sitting in front of a
projector for hours and will only
repeat the cycle too soon.
Go fishing: First, grab any gear
you need at Wal-Mart for a price
that wont set you back too far. Add
a fishing license, available there
or at Clinton Lake State Park, and
scour Clinton Lake for walleye,
Hooping for gold
By Jason BaKer
jbaker@kansan.com
It hasnt yet been a full week since
coming back to the states, but senior
forward Danielle McCray spent her
Monday afernoon working out at
the Anderson Family Strength and
Conditioning Center, even afer her
coach gave her two weeks of.
I cant stay still, McCray said.
But I guess thats a good thing.
McCray and sophomore guard Ty-
shawn Taylor were
the lone Jayhawks
representing Kansas
basketball for Team
USA. Both athletes
won gold med-
als, McCray in the
World University
Games and Taylor
in the U-19 divi-
sion.
Both the World
University Games and U-19 World
Championships are held every two
years. According to Team USAs Web
site, the World University Games are
for current or recently graduated
student athletes and the U-19 are for
athletes age 19 or younger. Taylor
turned 19 April 12.
Afer Kansas heartbreaking loss at
home in the Womens National Invi-
tational Tournament fnals, McCray
focused on the next best
thing: the upcoming season.
But in between that and the
end of the season, McCray
had been preparing for the
Team USA tryouts for the
World University games.
Playing for Team USA was
something McCray said she
had always dreamed of.
I remember asking like my
high school coach, How do you
get on Team USA? McCray said.
From the end of May through the
middle of June, both
McCray and Taylor
spent time in Colorado
Springs, Colo., going
through the process
of tryouts and cuts to
make the roster for
their teams.
McCray said she and
Taylor would catch up
afer practices.
We would just talk
about normal stuf, McCray said.
We were doing two-a-day practices
and we wouldnt want to talk about
basketball.
McCray said it was cool for both of
them to be there representing Kansas
basketball.
McCray said the selection process
for Team USAs World University
Games was scary. Te athletes sat in
a room waiting to hear whether their
names
would be
called.
Te frst cut was out of 30 girls,
Mcray said. I had fgured I did the
best that I could.
Afer making it through the frst
cut, she had confdence in making
the fnal cut.
Once she was ofcially on the
team, McCray traveled to Belgrade,
Serbia while Taylor headed out to
Auckland, New Zealand.
New Zealand is an interesting
place. We didnt really do much ex-
cept play basketball, Taylor said at a
press conference July 15.
Both Jayhawks played against play-
ers from around the world.
We played against guys my age, so
it wasnt the best of the best, but for
the
age
group,
I think
it was
good, Taylor
said at the con-
ference. We played
against some guys that play
professionally over there, so there
was a lot of great talent.
While abroad, McCray played for
Charli Turner Torne of Arizona State
and Taylor played for Jamie Dixon of
the University of Pittsburgh.
McCray said Torne was similar to
coach Bonnie Henrickson.
She said to always focus on the
little things, McCray said. If you
werent, then you were coming out of
the game.
McCray said Torne repeatedly
told the girls to stay focused and to
not let up on competition no matter
how far they were. She said one dif-
Top honor
awarded to
KU athletes
Two Kansas basketball players made
Team USA and went for the gold
SEE montemayor oN PAgE 24 SEE gold oN PAgE 25
I knew I could play
well like that. I just
think other people
didnt really know
how much I can do.
Tyshawn Taylor
sophomore guard
sports
24 wednesday, july 22, 2009
bass, crappie, catfish and other spe-
cies along the dam, marina, out on
a boat or in the spillway behind the
dam.
Camping, hiking, biking, swim-
ming, boating and water skiing
comprise a list of worthwhile diver-
sions once youve caught your limit
(or have no luck) at the lake.
Pat Dawson Billings North
& South lakes, 27th Street and
Crossgate Drive, and Marys Lake,
1/2 mile east of 31st Street and
Haskell Avenue, are smaller lakes
surrounded by walking trails and
ample amounts of nature.
Grill, grill, grill: Cooking outside
in the company of friends and fam-
ily, enjoying a cold drink on the
side and tasting the end result of a
job well done (or medium rare) is
one of lifes great pleasures. While
youre at it, try a different take on
the tired hot dog/hamburger rou-
tine and slap some bison steaks or
lamb chops on the grill instead.
More and more local grocery stores
are carrying these and other exotic
meats. Of course, if you were suc-
cessful on your fishing excursion, a
blackened catfish fillet would more
than suffice.
Get back in shape: The ads fol-
low us like rabid jackals. LOSE 18
LBS. IN FOUR DAYS. TRY THIS
PILL AND GET A SIX PACK.
Tell the bastards to piss off by
keeping your money in your pocket
and getting healthy the realistic and
effective way. The above mentioned
grilling is a start. And in addition
to lakeside activities, Lawrence is a
fine town for a run and the Ambler
Student Recreation Fitness Center
will still be open before classes
begin.
Take up a new sport: Recreation
Services features more than 40
mens and womens club and intra-
mural sports. Continue a career
not offered at the Division I level at
Kansas or learn a new one entirely.
Included are ultimate frisbee,
rugby, lacrosse, crew, rock climb-
ing, wakeboarding, and karate. A
full list and how you can join is at
recreation.ku.edu.
Read a book: Because God
knows you wont be able to when
classes roll around again. For a few
weeks, forget about Plato or mac-
roeconomics and chill outside with
Hemingway. These next few weeks
will be perfect for finally knocking
out those books youve been put-
ting off for too long or for re-read-
ing old favorites. Few practices are
as good an indicator of where you
once were in your life and where
you are now.
Edited by Derek Zarda
montemayor (continued from 23)
NFL
rams sign Brooks Foster
as their new wide receiver
ST. LOUIS The St. Louis Rams
have signed their ffth-round
draft pick, wide receiver pick
Brooks Foster.
Foster had 97 catches for 1,237
yards and six touchdowns during
his career at North Carolina.
He started seven of 13 games
last season and was second on
the team with 30 catches for 334
yards and two scores.
Foster becomes the second
member of the 2009 draft class
to sign.
Associated Press
ference she noticed in Torne was
her style of substitution rotation dur-
ing games.
She would bring fve of us in and
take the other fve out, McCray said.
We were equal to each other so it
didnt afect us at all.
For Taylor, playing under NBA-
style rules was something he had to
make an adjustment to.
Guys were taking extra steps and
the refs wouldnt call it, Taylor said at
the conference. It helped me prepare
for the next level because they didnt
call anything.
Taylor said that playing under
those rules helped him to be more
physical against guys who were big-
ger than his 6-foot-3-inch frame.
Both teams were undefeated going
into their gold medal matches. For
the World University Games fnals,
Team USA played against Russia, and
the U-19 Team USA faced Greece.
Both McCray and Taylor started in
the fnal game. Taylor lead the team
with 18 points, fve steals and six as-
sists leading Team USA to a 88 to 80
victory. Taylor played in eight total
games and started in six of them. He
was the leading scorer for Team USA
throughout the tournament, averag-
ing 10.8 points and 4.4 assists.
I felt like all the hard work paid
of, Taylor said at the press confer-
ence. We practiced a lot for two and
a half weeks.
McCray scored six points and
had three assists in the 83-64 vic-
tory against Russia. Troughout the
tournament, McCray was the sec-
ond leading scorer for the team and
started in fve of the seven games she
played.
Charless teammate Maya Moore
won National Player of the Year and
was McCrays roommate during the
tournament.
McCray said she had to guard
Moore during scrimmages and
that she and Moore had the same
strengths.
She never stops moving, McCray
said.
McCray said she texted Moore to
congratulate her afer she won the
ESPY award on Sunday for Best Fe-
male College Athlete. McCray con-
siders her a good friend now.
Before she was my roommate that
took forever in the bathroom; now
shes in my phone and I text her every
day, McCray said.
McCray said winning the gold
medal was bittersweet afer losing the
WNIT fnals.
For the upcoming season, McCray
will continue to take on the role of
being the leader. Even on her two
weeks of, McCray said she came to
early-morning practices to help cheer
on her teammates.
Although the loss of the fnals hurt
the team, McCray said it was nice
that it gave Kansas womens basket-
ball more publicity.
It really showed how you can
bring people in with success, Mc-
Cray said.
McCray said people were slowly
but surely paying more attention to
Kansas womens basketball, and be-
lieved that the frst game of the 2009-
2010 season would be much bigger
than last year.
While competing overseas, the
players were diferent about staying
in touch with their coaches. McCray
said she tried to update Henrickson
as much as she could through Skype.
Taylor said he hadnt spoken to Kan-
sas coach Bill Self about his experi-
ence in New Zealand, but said Self
was excited for him.
For Taylor, the upcoming season is
a chance to better himself as a player
afer playing overseas.
I just think other people didnt re-
ally know how much I can do, Taylor
said at the conference. I think I had
confdence before its just helping
me because I know Im going to be
around great players this year, too.
Editedby HannahDeClerk

1
wednesday, July 22, 2009
sports
25
gold (continued from 23)
NBA
Shaq to host show on ABC,
challenge other athletes
CLEVELAND NBA superstar
Shaquille ONeal is set to star in
Shaq Vs., a TV series where the
All-Star center will challenge top
athletes in their respective sports.
During one episode, which debuts
on Aug. 8 on ABC, Shaq will swim
against Olympic hero Michael
Phelps.
ONeal, now with the Cleveland
Cavaliers, will negotiate a handi-
cap with his opponents and train
for one week leading up to each
challenge.
Associated Press
211 Mount Hope Court #1 785-843-0011 www.holiday-apts.com
Youll find a place to relax,
y. and to enjoy
to grow, to reflect,
d
Youll find a p
- Great floor plans
- Walk-in closets
- Swimming pool
- Laundry facilty
- KU bus route
- Lawrence bus route
- Small pets allowed
2 Bedroom Townhome - $750
1 BR - $440 & up
2 BR - $520 & up
3 BR - $690 & up
4 BR - $850 & up
everything in moderation.
[please drink responsibly]
6OJWFSTJUZ%BJMZ,BOTBO
straight up, not falling down
sports
26 wednesday, july 22, 2009
BY JOHN MARSHALL
Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Erick
Aybar broke open a close game with
a three-run triple and had seven
hits in two games Tuesday, helping
the Los Angeles Angels complete a
doubleheader sweep with a 10-2 win
over the hapless Kansas City Royals.
Aybar used his bat and legs to
lift the Angels to an 8-5 win in the
opener, with three hits, three runs
and an RBI. He did all the damage
with his bat in the nightcap, finish-
ing a homer short of the cycle after
a bases-loaded triple off Juan Cruz
started the Angels seven-run seventh
inning.
Aybar was 7-for-9 in the two
games, raising his average this month
to .490.
The AL West-leading Angels had
25 combined hits, winning for the
ninth time in 10 games.
Kansas City got a shaky start from
Sidney Ponson (1-6), a decent one
from Bruce Chen (0-5) and another
disastrous night from its bullpen to
push its losing streak to eight games.
The Royals blew three straight leads
in a sweep by Tampa Bay over the
weekend, then let two close games
get away against the Angels by allow-
ing nine runs in eight innings.
Ponson allowed eight hits and six
runs in the first game, including one
a wild pitch in the third inning that
hit the backstop in the air and car-
omed all the way back to his glove.
Kansas City trailed 3-2 when Chen
left, but the bullpen imploded in the
seventh inning, facing 11 hitters as
the Angels pushed the lead to 10-2.
The Royals bullpen has allowed 27
earned runs over its last 26 innings
after posting a 2.78 ERA in the previ-
ous 18 games.
baseball
KC loses royally
against LA Angels
SOftBALL
US softball team wins
third World Cup title
OKLAHOMA CITY Lauren Lap-
pin homered to start a three-run
rally in the third inning, and the
United States beat Australia 3-1 in
the World Cup of Softball champi-
onship game.
Alissa Haber and Andrea Duran
added RBI singles to push the lead
to 3-0, and Monica Abbott and Cat
Osterman combined to make it
stand up for the Americans third
straight World Cup title.
Stacey Porter homered for Aus-
tralia, the bronze medalist at the
2008 Beijing Olympics.
The U.S. (6-0) outscored op-
ponents 51-4, reasserting its domi-
nance after losing the gold medal
game at last years Olympics.
Associated Press
6OJWFSTJUZ%BJMZ,BOTBO
everything in
moderation.
[please drink responsibly]
Live. Study. Dream.
Froo ln|orno| Swimming Pool n KU Bus Rou|o
Movio Thoo|ro Unlimi|od Mool Plon Tonning Bods
lndividuol Loosos Housokooping Sorvicos
Au|omo|ic Ron| Poymon| Gomo Room Compu|or Lob
Righ| Bo|woon |ho Roc Con|or & Tho Fioldhouso
www.livonoismi|h.com
Z85.843.855
wednesday, july 22, 2009
sports
27
InvestIgatIon
McNairs toxicology report
shows high alcohol level
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Authorities say
former NFL star Steve McNair had a
blood-alcohol level twice Tennes-
sees legal limit for driving when his
girlfriend shot him to death.
Tennessee Assistant Medical
Examiner Feng Li said a toxicology
report showed a trace amount of
marijuana in the body of Sahel
Kazemi. Police say the 20-year-
old Kazemi shot McNair July 4 in
a Nashville condo before killing
herself.
Police say McNair was likely
asleep when he was shot twice in
the head and twice in the chest. Li
said there was no way to tell from
the report how long before McNairs
death he had been drinking.
Kazemi was arrested for drunken
driving in Nashville two days before
the shooting. Police video of the
arrest showed her telling the ofcer
that she was high.
suspensIon
Vick fnishes his sentence
with hopes of NFL return
HAMPTON, Va. Suspended NFL
star Michael Vick ended his federal
dogfghting sentence, freeing him
to lobby for a return to the feld.
Vicks attorney Lawrence Wood-
ward told The Associated Press out-
side Vicks suburban Virginia home
that the former Atlanta Falcons
quarterback had been released
from federal custody as scheduled.
cycling
Armstrong and teammate Contador fnish strong
BY JaMeY Keaten anD
saMueL petReQuIn
Associated Press
BOURG-SAINT-MAURICE, France
Lance Armstrong mustered one of
his strongest showings yet at this
Tour de France on Tuesday, a daz-
zling burst of acceleration from yes-
teryear that allowed him to keep
second place.
The seven-time champion was so
buoyed by the performance that he
suggested to The Associated Press
he could still contend for the yellow
jersey if teammate and race leader
Alberto Contador has a bad day.
Armstrong, speaking after the
16th stage in the Alps, stressed he
didnt expect that to happen and only
a big shake-up would allow for
such a scenario.
Contador, the 2007 Tour winner,
had to fight to retain the overall lead
in the 99-mile stage from the Swiss
town of Martigny to Bourg-Saint-
Maurice, France, which was won by
Mikel Astarloza of Spain.
As Contador tried to keep pace
with two attackers on the final climb,
the 37-year-old Texan lagged. But
after dropping back at least 35 sec-
onds, he popped out of his saddle
and recovered lost ground.
I had no choice... So I waited
until we had a steeper section and
then I got away with an acceleration,
he said.
Contador was impressed, but not
surprised.
Its easy to explain hes a very
great rider, said Contador, who
leads his Astana teammate by 1:37.
He was in the past, and he showed
it once again.
Contador and Armstrong finished
in a small group of race leaders
behind Astarloza. The route featured
the highest peak this year, the snow-
capped Grand-Saint-Bernard pass on
the Swiss-Italian border, at 8,113 feet,
and its sister the Petit-Saint-Bernard
pass, on the Italian-French border.
Armstrong says hes feeling bet-
ter on his bike than he did during
Sundays entree into the Alps, when
Contador dusted him and the entire
pack on the ride up to the Swiss ski
station of Verbier.
I made some changes to my posi-
tion yesterday I raised the seat
height, he said. So in general, I was
pedaling better today.
Armstrong, back at the Tour after
3 years of retirement, committed
himself to help Contador win the
three-week race after the Spaniard
took the yellow jersey that day.
226 S. Beech Ottawa, KS
(785) 242-2067
(888) 466-2688 (KS only)
www.neosho.edu
Stand Out
The education you need.
The attention you deserve.
Some people live for the
WEEKENDS.
We live for
WEDNESDAYS.

summer
UDK


summer
UDK

summer
UDK


summe
UDK

summer
UDK

summer
UDK

summer
UDK

summer
UDK UDK

summer
UDK

summer summer
summer
UDK
summer
UDK

summer
UDK

summer
UDK

summer
UDK

summer

mmmer
DK DK

summer
UDK

summer
UDK
eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
JULY 22, 29
ONLY TWO
SUMMER
ISSUES LEFT!
sports
28 wednesday, july 22, 2009
MLB
Rockies edge out Diamondbacks
AssociAted Press
DENVER On May 29, Jorge De
La Rosa and the Colorado Rockies
were in a free fall. On Monday night,
they were the NL wild-card leaders.
What a difference nearly two
months makes.
De La Rosa pitched seven strong
innings in his fifth straight win
and drove in two runs, helping
the Rockies defeated the Arizona
Diamondbacks 10-6.
Were being chased now, said
Rockies manager Jim Tracy, who
took over when Clint Hurdle was
fired after an 18-28 start.
After Tracy took over, the Rockies
slipped to 20-32 before going on an
11-game winning streak. They are
now nine-games over .500 (51-42),
and have taken a half-game lead on
San Francisco, who lost to Atlanta,
for the wild card.
With the guys we had coming
out of spring training, we could
have been doing this from the very
beginning, second baseman Clint
Barmes said. Its just nice that it
came around. I definitely think we
have something special here.
The teams revival has paralleled
De La Rosas resurgence. The left-
hander started the season 0-6 but has
gone 7-1 since. On Monday, he gave
up one run on four hits, struck out
six and walked one. He had a career-
high two hits. I think my control is
much better and I have much better
command of my fastball, said De La
Rosa (7-7).
He kept the Diamondbacks in
check while the Rockies offense
jumped on Arizona starter Doug
Davis.
Every Colorado starter except
Hawpe had at least one hit, and the
Rockies scored at least one run in
each of the first five innings.
The Diamondbacks scored two in
the eighth off of reliever Joel Peralta,
and Stephen Drew hit a two-run
homer off of Manuel Corpas in
Arizonas three-run ninth.
It wasnt enough to keep the
Rockies from moving into the NL
wild card lead.
Its still really early in the second
half, but one thing you can bear in
mind, as of right now you know
you dont have to look around and
talk about, Well, we need help here.
Thats a nice situation to put yourself
in, Tracy said.
Arizona Diamond-
backs second
baseman Ryan
Roberts, left, and
Colorado Rockies
Dexter Fowler
look for the call
after Fowler stole
second base in the
fourth inning of a
baseball game in
Denver Monday. The
Rockies defeated the
Diamondbacks 10-6.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
STUDENT SPECIAL!
Large one-topping
$
6
99
Plus Tax
865-2323
LATE NIGHT
DELIVERY!
Not valid with any other offers. Delivery fee applies. Carry out - dine-in - delivery
Thursdays & Sundays til 1am
Fridays & Saturdays til 3am
ONE. BIG. BURGER.
New Angus Third Pounders
Tender, Juicy, & Flavorful
Buy any Angus Third Pounders
& receive a FREE Medium drink
* Valid only at McDonalds of Lawrence
expires 8/15/09
r 24/7

7353412345

ir curr
conrsiors [ro+
sn[[ort or
i corcrrs

www.hqcc.|awrence.|s.us
wednesday, july 22, 2009
sports
29
MLB
Dodgers player passes
Mickey Mantle record
LOS ANGELES Manny
Ramirez moved past Mickey
Mantle and into 15th place on the
career home run list.
Mantle is the ninth Hall of
Famer Ramirez passed on the
all-time list since the start of last
season.
EntErtainmEnt
Nude video of reporter leaked
BY PAT EATON-ROBB
Associated Press
BRISTOL, Conn. ESPN report-
er Erin Andrews was secretly video-
taped in the nude while she was
alone in a hotel room and the video
was posted on the Internet, her
attorney and the network said.
The blurry, five-minute video
shows a nude blond woman stand-
ing in front of a hotel room mirror.
Its unknown when or where it was
shot.
Andrews attorney, Marshall
Grossman, said the 31-year-old
reporter planned to seek criminal
charges and file civil lawsuits against
the unknown cameraman and any-
one who publishes the material.
While alone in the privacy of her
hotel room, Erin Andrews was sur-
reptitiously videotaped without her
knowledge or consent, Grossman
said in the statement. She was the
victim of a crime and is taking
action to protect herself and help
ensure that others are not similarly
violated in the future.
A woman answering the phone
Tuesday at Grossmans office said he
would have no further comment.
Andrews has covered hockey, col-
lege football, college basketball and
Major League Baseball for the net-
work since 2004, often as a sideline
reporter during games.
A former dance team member at
the University of Florida, Andrews
was something of an Internet sensa-
tion even before the videos circula-
tion. She has been referred to as
Erin Pageviews because of the
traffic that video clips and photos of
her generate, and Playboy magazine
named her sexiest sportscaster in
both 2008 and 2009.
She last appeared on the network
as part of its ESPY Awards broad-
cast on Sunday, and is scheduled
to be off until September, when she
will be covering college football,
ESPN spokesman Josh Krulewitz
said.
Erin has been grievously
wronged here, Krulewitz said.
Our people and resources are in
full support of her as she deals with
this abhorrent act.
It was not clear when the video
first appeared on the Internet. Most
of the links to it had been removed
by Tuesday.
Ephraim Cohen, a spokesman for
the video portal Dailymotion, could
not confirm the video had actually
appeared on his companys site, but
said it may have been there months
ago.
He said a search for the name of
the user who purportedly uploaded
the video showed the person had
opened an account in February, but
had since closed it.
As far as we can tell, the user
took the account and the video
down a while ago, he said.
Graham Cluley, who writes a blog
for the antivirus software maker
Sophos, wrote that several links
purporting to send Internet users
to the Andrews video actually sent
them to sites with malicious soft-
ware and computer viruses.
He said some of the hackers actu-
ally include a portion of the video
on their sites, apparently hoping
that the malware gets passed along
as users share the link with friends.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
This is a July 15, fle photo showing Erin An-
drews arriving at the ESPY Awards in Los Angeles.
ESPN reporter Erin Andrews attorney and the
network say she was surreptitiously videotaped
in the nude while she was alone in a hotel room.
colors.
Choose
from 8
designs in
multiple
$10
each
$25
3
for
p
shop us online at www.campuscloth.com
Game Day Shirt
Headquarters
campus cloth campus cloth campus cloth campus cloth


c
a
m
p
u
s

c
l
o
t
h


c
a
m
p
u
s

c
l
o
t
h


c
a
m
p
u
s

c
l
o
t
h


c
a
m
p
u
s

c
l
o
t
h


c
a
m
p
u
s

c
l
o
t
h


c
a
m
p
u
s

c
l
o
t
h


c
a
m
p
u
s

c
l
o
t
h


c
a
m
p
u
s

c
l
o
t
h


c
a
m
p
u
s

c
l
o
t
h


c
a
m
p
u
s

c
l
o
t
h


c a m p u s c l o t h c a m p u s c l o t h c a m p u s c l o t h c a m p u s c l o t h
Enroll now!
Most general
education courses
transfer to Kansas
Regent schools.
Enroll and find our
schedule online!
www.bartonline.org
Online college courses offered by Barton Community College
Having trouble getting
your class schedule to work?
Dropped a class?
Need to add a class?
Online College Courses
sports
30 wednesday, july 22, 2009
TENNIS
Rafael Nadel trains after
sidelined knee injury
MADRID Rafael Nadal is train-
ing for the frst time since being
sidelined by a knee injury. Nadal has
been out of action with tendinitis in
his right knee since losing to Robin
Soderling in the fourth round of the
French Open, where the Spaniard
had been the four-time defending
champion.
Nadal is hoping to resume
playing at next months Montreal
Masters. He was unable to defend
his Wimbledon title, and Roger
Federer won his record 15th Grand
Slam trophy and retook the No. 1
ranking. Nadal is returning from a
leg problem for the third time since
October.
Associated Press
NFL
Marc Anthony buys minor
rights to Miami Dolphins
NEW YORK Singer Marc
Anthony is the latest music star
to join forces with the Miami
Dolphins.
The team announced Tuesday
that he will become a minority
owner. Singer Gloria Estefan and
her husband, producer Emilio
Estefan, also bought a small stake
in the club last month.
Anthony will also perform
the national anthem on ESPNs
Monday Night Football on Oct.
12 against the New York Jets as
part of the NFLs celebration of
Hispanic Heritage Month.
Anthony is married to singer-
actress Jennifer Lopez. He has
sold more than 10 million albums
and is also an actor.
Stephen Ross, a New York real
estate billionaire, completed his
purchase of the Dolphins in Janu-
ary from Wayne Huizenga and
quickly set out to rebrand the
franchise. He has said he wants
to fll up the stands with a blend
of entertainment and winning
football.
Associated Press
sports
Violence by baseball
could result in felony
BY JAMES HANNAH
Associated Press
DAYTON, Ohio A minor-
league pitcher accused of throwing
a baseball during a brawl that struck
and injured a fan in the stands had
been angry and decided to hurt
someone, a prosecutor said Tuesday.
In opening statements during
the trial of Julio Castillo, assistant
Montgomery County prosecu-
tor Jon Marshall said the evidence
would show that Castillo, 22, of the
Dominican Republic, committed
felonious assault.
He decided he was going to hurt
someone, anyone, Marshall said.
He had in his hand a hard dense
object, a baseball. He decided to hurl
that baseball, that object, with great
force.
Castillo, who was pitching for the
Peoria Chiefs, is accused of throw-
ing a baseball into the stands during
a 10-minute, bench-clearing brawl
last July when the Chiefs played the
Dayton Dragons.
Dennis Lieberman said that as
tensions between the two teams
escalated, Castillo threw the ball at
the Dayton dugout to keep Dragons
players from rushing the field.
He throws it at the dugout at
the fencing in front of the dugout
to hit an inanimate object to scare
them away, Lieberman said. He
does it because he cant talk. He cant
speak English. ... He wasnt throwing
it at an individual.
Castillo has been charged with two
counts of felonious assault feloni-
ous assault with a deadly weapon
and felonious assault causing serious
physical harm. He has pleaded not
guilty. If convicted on both charges
and sentenced to consecutive terms,
he could face up to 16 years in pris-
on.
Castillo is on the roster of the
Boise Hawks, a Class A affiliate of
the Chicago Cubs, but is not allowed
to play. The Cubs are awaiting the
outcome of the trial to determine
whether that status will change.
Prosecutors say Castillo was
attempting to hit a Dayton player
in the dugout, but instead struck the
fan in the head. Montgomery County
Prosecutor Mathias Heck Jr. has said
Castillo threw the baseball to pur-
posely hurt someone, putting specta-
tors that included children in danger.
Defense attorney Dennis Lieberman
has said the charges arent justified by
the circumstances.
Video from the game shows
Castillo throwing a ball, but doesnt
show where the ball landed.
Officials in the Midwest League
suspended and fined 15 players and
both managers for the fight.
Hanover Place
A P A R T M E N T S
rPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPllaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaacccccccccccccccceeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
A P A R T M E N T S
A P A R T M E N T S
3 BR Townhomes with washer & dryer $720/month
2 BR with Study with washer & dryer $670/month
2 BR $635/month
including Water
2 BR $535/month
Mention this ad & get
$100 off your first month rent
785-842-3040 village@sunflower.com
The new wave in
apartments
2429 Iowa St. 785.749.1488 zcoz.com
7
$
Haircuts
Always
VOTED BEST SALON
TOP OF THE HILL, 2005-2008
ALL SERVICES PROVIDED BY
STUDENTS UNDER SUPERVISION OF
EXPERIENCED INSTRUCTORS.
EARLY BIRD
EXP. AUG. 10, 2009
$
5
SPECIAL
HI-LITE
EXP. AUG. 10, 2009
$
20
EXTRA W/ LONG HAIR
HAIRCUT
9AM - 1PM TUES/THURS
wednesday, july 22, 2009
sports
31
NFL
Quarterback taken to civil court for sexual assault
BY SCOTT SONNER
Associated Press
RENO, Nev. A woman has filed
a lawsuit accusing Pittsburgh Steelers
quarterback Ben Roethlisberger of
raping her last summer in his pent-
house room at a casino in Lake Tahoe
during a celebrity golf tournament.
Roethlisbergers lawyer adamantly
denied the allegations Tuesday.
Ben has never sexually assaulted
anyone. The timing of the lawsuit
and the absence of a criminal com-
plaint and a criminal investigation
are the most compelling evidence of
the absence of any criminal conduct.
If an investigation is commenced,
Ben will cooperate fully and Ben will
be fully exonerated, David Cornwell
said in a statement.
The claim seeks at least $390,000
in damages from the quarterback,
who has won two Super Bowls and is
one of biggest names in sports. The
lawsuit also alleges hotel officials for
Harrahs Lake Tahoe went to great
lengths to cover up the incident.
Teresa Duffy, a spokeswoman
for the sheriff s office in Douglas
County, which includes part of Lake
Tahoe, said no complaints were
filed about such an incident either
with sheriff s deputies or the district
attorneys office.
The womans lawsuit said she didnt
file a criminal complaint because
she feared she would be fired and
expected Harrahs would side with
Roethlisberger.
The woman said she had been pro-
moted from VIP shift manager and
was working as an executive casino
host when Roethlisberger struck up
a friendly conversation at her desk
during the golf tournament.
The next day, July 11, 2008, she
said he telephoned her to tell her his
television sound system wasnt work-
ing and asked her to look at it.
She said she was unable to find a
technician so she decided to handle
it herself because she had been told
how important it was to please celeb-
rities.
In Roethlisbergers room she said
she determined the TV was func-
tioning properly but as she turned
to leave but the 6-foot-5, 240-pound
quarterback stood in front of the door
and blocked her, the suit claims.
The lawsuit said he then grabbed
her and started to kiss her. It said
she was shocked and stunned that
this previously friendly man, that
appeared to be a gentleman in her
previous contacts with him, was
suddenly preventing her from leav-
ing, was assaulting her and battering
her.
She said she feared that because
he was a football player he could or
would physically harm her if she tried
to fight him off but that she objected
and protested several times.
But instead of stopping,
Roethlisberger began fondling plain-
tiff through her dress and between
her legs, the suit said. He then held
her against her will and physically
moved plaintiff and pushed her onto
his bed where he raped her, the suit
says.
She told him You dont want to do
this, and begged him I am not on
any type of birth control.
Afterward, he asked if there was a
security camera in the hallway. She
said he then instructed her to claim
she had repaired his television if any-
one asked why she was in his room.
The lawsuit says the woman
required hospitalization for treat-
ment for depression after the alleged
attack.
The womans lawyer, Calvin R.
Dunlap of Reno, declined to answer
questions about the lack of a criminal
complaint and why the civil action
was brought a year after the incident
allegedly took place.
The lawsuit also names eight
Harrahs employees as defendants
and alleges the cover-up involved
the chief of security at Harrahs Lake
Tahoe and was carried out with the
knowledge of John Koster, president
of Harrahs northern Nevada opera-
tions.
John Packer, spokesman for the
hotel-casino, did not immediately
return a telephone call seeking com-
ment.
The suit says Harrahs security
chief Guy Hyder gained the trust of
her parents while she was hospital-
ized for depression and persuad-
ed them to give him a key to her
home. She said Hyder and others
then entered her home and allegedly
erased information from her com-
puter and confiscated it.
The lawsuit claims that when the
woman first reported the attack to
Hyder he dismissed her distress and
crying and said she was over react-
ing.
The woman said Hyder told her
that most girls would feel lucky to
get to have sex with someone like
Ben Roethlisberger and that Koster
would love you even more if he knew
about this because Koster was good
friends with Roethlisberger and
admired him greatly.
Steelers spokesman Dave Lockett
said Tuesday the team is aware of
the lawsuit, and we are gathering
information.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
This is a May 28, 2009 fle photo showing Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlis-
berger watching the Orlando Magic play the Cleveland Cavaliers of the NBA Eastern Conference
basketball fnals. Roethlisberger has been accused of sexual assault in a civil lawsuit.
PARK & RIDE ALL DAY LONG
3 EASY STEPS
LOG ON TO KYOU PORTAL
CLICK ON SERVICES
FOLLOW THE ONLINE
INSTRUCTIONS!
PARK & RIDE PASS
$
90
mulberry saffron jade olive anthracite terra cotta coral
928 Massachusetts 843-0611 In Downtown Lawrence www.theetcshop.com etcowner@sunflower.com
The Colors of Hobo
m
u
l
b
e
r
r
y



s
a
f
f
r
o
n



j
a
d
e



o
l
i
v
e



a
n
t
h mulberry saffron jade olive anthracite terra cotta coral
s
a
f


o
n



j
a
b
e



o
l
i
v
e



a
n
t
h
r
a
c
i
t
e




t
e
1
$2 Imports
$3 Jger Bombs
$3 Guiness
$2 Boulevard
Draws
$2 Capt. Morgan
$3.75 Domestic
Gustos
$1 Wells
$2 Michelob Ultra
$1.50 Screwdrivers $3.75 Domestic
Gustos
$1.50 Domestic
Bottles
$2 Smirnoff
(Any Flavor)
$2 Honor Vodka
Two slices for $1.99 and/or 1 topping large for $8.00 (carryout special)
918 Mississippi 785.865.5775
749-0055 704 Mass.
Everyday special: One slice, salad & a drink-$6.35
.375 Special
sm. 1 top pizza,$3.75
med. 1 top pizza,$5.75
lg. 1 top pizza,$7.75
Large 16in Pizza
w/2 toppings &
2 drinks, $13.05
Buy sm, get another one-topping sm,$4
Buy med, get another one-topping med,$6
Buy lg, get another one-topping lg,$8
Medium 12in pizza
with 2 toppings & 2
drinks, &8.99
2 10in pizza w/2
toppings ea. & 2
drinks, $12.99
5IF6OJWFSTJUZ%BJMZ,BOTBOBTLTZPVUPQMFBTFESJOLSFTQPOTJCMZ
Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday
8&&,-:41&$*"-4
large 1-topping
pizza, $6.99
2 medium
1-topping
pizzas, $9.99
x-large pizza
up to 5 toppings
only $14.99
large specialty &
a 2 liter of Pepsi
only $14.99
large specialty &
larger 1-topping
pizza only $19.99
large specialty &
larger 1-topping
pizza only $24.99
x-large 1-topping
pizza onlt $9.99