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effects of global warming - "Facts about Global Warming You Should Know " By: Nathalie Fiset Global

warming is not a 20th century phenomenon. It has, in fact, occurred in the past more than once, along with periods of extreme cold known as the ice ages. With so much written and reported about global warming, sometimes it's difficult to detect which is fact and which is just part of scientific scare tactics. Here are some facts about global warming that might help: What exactly is global warming? Global warming is basically the increase in the temperatures of the Earth's atmosphere, land masses and oceans. The Earth's surface temperature is at an average of 59F and over the last hundred years, this figure has risen to about 1F. By the year 2100, the average change in the temperature of the Earth could range from 2.5F to about 10F, enough to melt glaciers and polar ice caps. The cause of global warming Global warming has and will always occur naturally. Why it has become such a concern in our lifetime is due to the fact that human activities and practices have contributed significantly to its occurrence and severity. With the advent of industrialization and careless environmental practices, we have caused the increase in the average global temperatures by contributing negatively to the greenhouse effect. This began about 240 years ago, when the Industrial Revolution was born. As more and more fossil fuels in the form of oil were mined and burned, gases as the byproduct of that process began to be released in the atmosphere. Currently, it is estimated that 75% of the increase in the carbon dioxide content of the Earth's atmosphere is caused by the burning of these fossil fuels. Global warming and the greenhouse effect Global warming is related to changes in the Earth's greenhouse effect. Gases naturally occur in the Earth's atmosphere and act both to protect and retain heat. These gases include carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and water vapor. Of these, water vapor is the most dominant and abundant greenhouse gas. Global warming and the greenhouse effect are not the same thing. The greenhouse effect refers to a natural process that occurs in the Earth's atmosphere. If this process is disrupted, then it could contribute to global warming. As the sun's rays hit the Earth, heat is bounced back to the atmosphere where these gases contain the heat and keep it there to warm the planet. This is an important natural process and allows life forms to flourish and survive. Problems only occur when these gases multiply and build-up, containing heat too efficiently and thus warming the Earth's atmosphere.

As the Earth's average temperature rises, effects in its landmasses and sea water level become apparent. Polar ice caps melt along with glaciers, contributing to higher and warmer sea levels. By the end of the century, it is estimated that sea levels can increase from 4 inches to a high of about 40 inches if global warming continues unabated. Global warming can also affect the behavior of the winds and can also contribute to a harsher and drier climate, with frequent visitings of strong hurricanes. Water from heavier rainfall will not stay long to irrigate the land, however because with a warmer climate, water on the Earth's surface will evaporate quickly. This has a significant effect on agricultural practices not only in the US but also for the rest of the world. Another phenomenon that is equated with global warming is the El Nino. The El Nino phenomenon has occurred for possibly thousands of years and is not caused directly by global warming. However, changes in the average temperature of the planet can contribute to its severity and frequency. Other human practices that contribute to global warming The agricultural revolution has also contributed to global warming. As more and more communities need lands converted from forests to residential and commercial areas, biomass is reduced, contributing to the increase in the presence of carbon dioxide in those regions. Since carbon dioxide is processed by plants and trees, their absence contributes to its increase. It is estimated that about 25% of the annual increase in the carbon dioxide found in the Earth's atmosphere is caused by extreme changes and usage of the Earth's natural resources. Other practices also include deforestation, salinization, desertification and overgrazing also contribute to global warming. However, many scientists surmise and agree that the contribution is slight and indirect. Facing the facts of global warming Countries all over the world have just begun to acknowledge the negative effects of global warming not only to the world's politics and economy but also to humankind in general. Many of the world's governments have encouraged implementation of measures to try to counteract the problem of global warming through careful measures and practices designed to protect and respect the environment. How these measures will fare and contribute to the long-term maintenance of our planet, though, remains to be seen. Article Source: http://www.bestglobalwarmingarticles.com

causes of global warming - "Top Ten Causes of Global Warming ( part 1)" By: George Christodoulou Global warming has been discussed over and over again. In recent months even politicians like Al Gore have gotten involved. He created a documentary called, "An Inconvenient Truth", to try and push for more action as well as to enlighten the public. His view is that there are solid facts that global warming exists and skeptic scientists don't. Many people believe that global warming does not exist because they are not being affected directly; however, scientists believe that the increase in natural disasters comes from global warming. In NY, I hear a few people here and there saying, "you call this global warming" just because the temperature is at 10 degrees even though this winter it only snowed once compared to the past. Have you ever seen the painting of George Washington sailing across the Delaware River? If you have, you know there is ice in that water. Now if you look at that river during the time of year that picture was taken, there is no ice. What about in the summer when you feel the heat of the sun and realize it is a little hotter now then a few years ago? That could all be in your mind due to media hype and all, but how can you tell? Where does all this global warming stem from anyway? Who or what is the cause of all this debate and discussion? Some People are afraid and they want answers to their questions. The following is the list of the top 10 causes of global warming. With all the facts laid out, one can make a better decision about what global warming is and how it might affect them. 1. Carbon Dioxide From power Plants One of the largest contributors to global warming is said to be pollution from power plants. Every time you turn on a light, you add to the tons of carbon spewed into the sky by long tubes connected to these massive coal or oil driven "machines". According to recent studies, approximately 40% of all carbon dioxide emissions comes form power plants. Natural gas, coal, and oil are the 3 types of polluting power plants. Coal is the biggest contributor out of the 3 because of it releases more carbon than the rest of them per capita. Studies, like the one done in the film, "An Inconvenient Truth", show that the levels of carbon in the atmosphere has increased drastically in recent years and will probably continue to increase in the years to come. Some skeptics believe that the levels of carbon are completely normal. According to Geocraft.com, the levels of carbon found in the atmosphere today mirror those found hundreds of thousands of years ago. They believe the scientific "proof" that global warming exists is taken out of cortexes because they look at the past 100 years instead of the bigger picture. The earth has been around of billions of years; earthquakes, monsoons, ice ages, meteors, and so forth, have all affected the earth without destroying every living thing on it.

Despite what others say, many people have created solutions for the pollution caused by power plants. For example, products that help to reduce the green house emissions have emerged. Filters that improve the quality of the air released into the atmosphere have been created to solve this problem. In addition, government regulations have been placed to force owners of large industrial buildings to improve the quality of the air produced by their buildings. Finally, hydrogen power has also become a way of reducing carbon. According to Tom Simonite using carbon is better than using water to generate power, and it is completely environmentally friendly. 2. Pollution Emitted from Cars Driving to work in the morning is one example of this. When your stuck in traffic, how long does your car stay idle on the road, releasing it's pollution into the air? There are approximately, 3 billion vehicles being used today. Similarly with the power plants, cars also emit carbon into the air. Cars emit millions of tons of pollutants into the air. In some dense cities, this causes some of the smog and ozone problems. 1,500 cases of cancer are reported each year from pollution according to www.nsc.org. Luckily, solutions are available. Many ask, "What can I do." One thing that can be done is a switch to more environmentally friendly vehicles such as hybrid or electric cars. Some countries are even using cars that run on hydrogen. In the near future, talk about ethanol to replace gasoline in cars seems to be a promising change. 3. Pollution from Trucks Trucks, although less in volume, make up for a large portion of the earth's pollution with each truck's individual output of pollutants. The difference between cars and trucks is the type of fuel used to run them. Diesel, the standard for trucks and other vehicles used for carrying large loads, is known to be less clean than gasoline. Trucks roaring down streets can bee seen from a mile away with a tiny smoke stack blowing out the product of having to carry large amounts of goods from one place to the other. How can our society get rid of trucks? They are vital for the economic health of certain companies. They are used to build homes and carry supplies, People go camping and carry gear with them, and the list goes on. According ucsusa.org, diesel is reaching a point where it can no longer meet the standards of government regulations. What kind of alternative can be used instead? Article Source: http://www.bestglobalwarmingarticles.com

Top 10 Things You Can Do to Reduce Global Warming Burning fossil fuels such as natural gas, coal, oil and gasoline raises the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and carbon dioxide is a major contributor to the greenhouse effect and global warming. You can help to reduce the demand for fossil fuels, which in turn reduces global warming, by using energy more wisely. Here are 10 simple actions you can take to help reduce global warming. 1. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Do your part to reduce waste by choosing reusable products instead of disposables. Buying products with minimal packaging (including the economy size when that makes sense for you) will help to reduce waste. And whenever you can, recycle paper, plastic, newspaper, glass and aluminum cans. If there isn't a recycling program at your workplace, school, or in your community, ask about starting one. By recycling half of your household waste, you can save 2,400 pounds of carbon dioxide annually. 2. Use Less Heat and Air Conditioning Adding insulation to your walls and attic, and installing weather stripping or caulking around doors and windows can lower your heating costs more than 25 percent, by reducing the amount of energy you need to heat and cool your home. Turn down the heat while you're sleeping at night or away during the day, and keep temperatures moderate at all times. Setting your thermostat just 2 degrees lower in winter and higher in summer could save about 2,000 pounds of carbon dioxide each year. 3. Change a Light Bulb Wherever practical, replace regular light bulbs with compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs. Replacing just one 60-watt incandescent light bulb with a CFL will save you $30 over the life of the bulb. CFLs also last 10 times longer than incandescent bulbs, use two-thirds less energy, and give off 70 percent less heat. If every U.S. family replaced one regular light bulb with a CFL, it would eliminate 90 billion pounds of greenhouse gases, the same as taking 7.5 million cars off the road. 4. Drive Less and Drive Smart Less driving means fewer emissions. Besides saving gasoline, walking and biking are great forms of exercise. Explore your community mass transit system, and check out options for carpooling to work or school. When you do drive, make sure your car is running efficiently. For example, keeping your tires properly inflated can improve your gas mileage by more than 3 percent. Every gallon of gas you save not only helps your budget, it also keeps 20 pounds of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere.

5. Buy Energy-Efficient Products When it's time to buy a new car, choose one that offers good gas mileage. Home appliances now come in a range of energy-efficient models, and compact florescent bulbs are designed to provide more natural-looking light while using far less energy than standard light bulbs. Avoid products that come with excess packaging, especially molded plastic and other packaging that can't be recycled. If you reduce your household garbage by 10 percent, you can save 1,200 pounds of carbon dioxide annually. 6. Use Less Hot Water Set your water heater at 120 degrees to save energy, and wrap it in an insulating blanket if it is more than 5 years old. Buy low-flow showerheads to save hot water and about 350 pounds of carbon dioxide yearly. Wash your clothes in warm or cold water to reduce your use of hot water and the energy required to produce it. That change alone can save at least 500 pounds of carbon dioxide annually in most households. Use the energy-saving settings on your dishwasher and let the dishes air-dry. 7. Use the "Off" Switch Save electricity and reduce global warming by turning off lights when you leave a room, and using only as much light as you need. And remember to turn off your television, video player, stereo and computer when you're not using them. It's also a good idea to turn off the water when you're not using it. While brushing your teeth, shampooing the dog or washing your car, turn off the water until you actually need it for rinsing. You'll reduce your water bill and help to conserve a vital resource. 8. Plant a Tree If you have the means to plant a tree, start digging. During photosynthesis, trees and other plants absorb carbon dioxide and give off oxygen. They are an integral part of the natural atmospheric exchange cycle here on Earth, but there are too few of them to fully counter the increases in carbon dioxide caused by automobile traffic, manufacturing and other human activities. A single tree will absorb approximately one ton of carbon dioxide during its lifetime.

9. Get a Report Card from Your Utility Company Many utility companies provide free home energy audits to help consumers identify areas in their homes that may not be energy efficient. In addition, many utility companies offer rebate programs to help pay for the cost of energy-efficient upgrades. 10. Encourage Others to Conserve Share information about recycling and energy conservation with your friends, neighbors and co-workers, and take opportunities to encourage public officials to establish programs and policies that are good for the environment.

These 10 steps will take you a long way toward reducing your energy use and your monthly budget. And less energy use means less dependence on the fossil fuels that create greenhouse gases and contribute to global warming. Source http://environment.about.com/od/globalwarming/tp/globalwarmtips.htm