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K:\2037631\00195\20919_MR\20919P22CE
MICHAEL J. GEARIN (admitted pro hac vice)
MICHAEL B. LUBIC (SBN 122591)
K&L GATES LLP
10100 Santa Monica Boulevard, Seventh Floor
Los Angeles, California 90067
Telephone: 310.552.5000
Facsimile: 310.552.5001
Email: michael.lubic@klgates.com
michael.gearin@klgates.com

Attorneys for California Public Employees
Retirement System

UNITED STATES BANKRUPTCY COURT
CENTRAL DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA
RIVERSIDE DIVISION

In re

CITY OF SAN BERNARDINO, CALIFORNIA,

Debtor.
Case No. 6:12-bk-28006 MJ

Chapter 9


PRELIMINARY OBJECTION OF CALPERS
TO THE CITY OF SAN BERNARDINOS
CHAPTER 9 PETITION AND REQUEST FOR
RELIEF UNDER 11 U.S.C. 941

Date: November 5, 2012
Time: 10:00 a.m.
Place: United States Bankruptcy Court
3420 Twelfth Street
Courtroom 301
Riverside, CA 92501



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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

I. INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 1
II. BACKGROUND ....................................................................................................................... 2
A. The Bankruptcy Filing.................................................................................................... 2
B. The Citys Financial Records Are in Disarray ............................................................... 3
C. The Pre-Pendency Plan................................................................................................... 4
D. Ongoing Financial Performance..................................................................................... 5
E. CalPERS is the Citys Largest Creditor ......................................................................... 6
III. ARGUMENT............................................................................................................................. 7
A. The City Cannot Demonstrate a Desire to Effect a Plan............................................. 8
B. The City Cannot, at this Time, Demonstrate that it Filed its Petition in Good
Faith ............................................................................................................................ 10
C. Request for Relief Under Section 941.......................................................................... 12
D. CalPERS Reserves the Right to Object to the Citys Eligibility on Other
Grounds. ....................................................................................................................... 13
IV. CONCLUSION........................................................................................................................ 13
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-ii-

TABLE OF AUTHORITIES
Page
FEDERAL CASES
CalPERS v. Moodys Corp.,
Nos. C09-03628 SI, C09-03629 JCS, 2009 WL 3809816 (N.D. Cal. Nov. 10, 2009) .............. 6
Kaplan v. CalPERS,
1999 WL 33623292,
No. 99-15295 (9
th
Cir. Aug. 12, 1999)....................................................................................... 6
Loop Corp. v. United States Trustee,
379 F.3d 511 (8
th
Cir. 2004)..................................................................................................... 12
STATE CASES
Cal. Ass'n of Profl Scientists v. Schwarzenegger,
137 Cal. App. 4th 371 (2006) .................................................................................................... 6
City of Oakland v. Pub. Emps. Ret. Sys.,
95 Cal. App. 4th 29 (2002) ........................................................................................................ 6
In re City of Bridgeport,
129 B.R. 332 (Bankr. D. Conn. 1991) ..................................................................................... 10
In re City of Vallejo,
408 B.R. 280 (9th Cir. BAP 2009)..................................................................................... 7, 8, 9
In re Cottonwood Water & Sanitation Dist.,
138 B.R. 973 (Bankr. D. Colo. 1992) ........................................................................................ 7
In re N.Y.C. Off-Track Betting Corp.,
427 B.R. 256 (Bankr. S.D.N.Y. 2010) ................................................................. 7, 9, 10, 11, 12
In re Orange County,
183 B.R. 594 (Bankr. C.D. Cal. 1995)....................................................................................... 8
In re Pierce Cnty. Hous. Auth.,
414 B.R. 702 (Bankr. W.D. Wash. 2009) ................................................................................ 13
In re Suffolk Regl Off-Track Betting Corp., 462 B.R. 397,
(Bankr. E.D.N.Y. 2011) ............................................................................................................. 7
In re Sullivan County Regl Refuse Disposal Dist.,
165 B.R. 60 (Bankr. D.N.H. 1994) ............................................................................ 7, 8, 10, 11
In re Town of Westlake, Texas,
211 B.R. 860 (Bankr. N.D. Tex. 1997) ...................................................................................... 8
In re Villages at Castle Rock Metro Dist. No. 4,
145 B.R. 76 (Bankr. D. Colo. 1990) ........................................................................................ 11
In re Wright Air Lines, Inc.,
51 B.R. 96 (Bankr. N.D. Ohio 1985) ....................................................................................... 12
FEDERAL STATUTES
11 U.S.C. 109(c) ................................................................................................................................. 7
11 U.S.C. 109(c)(1)-(5)................................................................................................... 7, 8, 9, 10, 13
11 U.S.C. 109(c)(5)(C) ..................................................................................................................... 13
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-iii-

11 U.S.C. 1112(b) ............................................................................................................................. 12
11 U.S.C. 1112(b)(1)......................................................................................................................... 12
11 U.S.C. 921(c) ....................................................................................................................... 7, 9, 10
11 U.S.C. 930.................................................................................................................................... 12
11 U.S.C. 930(a)(2)........................................................................................................................... 12
11 U.S.C. 930(a)(3)........................................................................................................................... 12
11 U.S.C. 941.............................................................................................................................. 12, 13
STATE STATUTES
CAL. GOV. CODE 20000....................................................................................................................... 6
CAL. GOV. CODE 20001....................................................................................................................... 6
OTHER AUTHORITIES
California Public Employees Retirement System, Office of Public Affairs, Facts at a Glance:
General (2012) ........................................................................................................................... 6



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The California Public Employees Retirement System (CalPERS), by and through its
undersigned attorneys, hereby submits this preliminary objection to the chapter 9 petition (the
Petition) of the City of San Bernardino (the City) and respectfully requests that the Court set a
deadline under Section 941
1
for the City to submit its proposed plan of adjustment and continue the
status conference on eligibility to allow sufficient time to review the plan.
I. Introduction
The City appears to be operating postpetition at a substantial deficit and has so far been
unable to produce a budget that covers its ongoing operating expenses, let alone allows it to pay any
prepetition claims. Accordingly, CalPERS believes that it is premature for the Court to consider
eligibility. In filing this preliminary objection, the goal of CalPERS is not to start a costly battle over
eligibility but rather to defer any dispute about eligibility until the City has produced credible
projections which could form the basis of a feasible plan.
As set forth in the Citys initial pleadings filed in the case, the City filed its Petition under
extreme duress. At the time of the bankruptcy filing, it appears as though the City had no un-
assigned or un-restricted funds available to service its operations. The City declared a fiscal
emergency and, without negotiations with its creditors regarding a potential plan of adjustment,
hastily sought the haven of bankruptcy. Subsequently, the City proposed a short term unbalanced
budget and operating plan. The City has failed to operate in accordance with its plan and appears to
be operating at a significant deficit. Its obligations to CalPERS, trade creditors, and other creditors
are accruing rapidly. The City has not proposed a balanced budget for approval by its City Council
and has not filed a pendency plan to support its allegation that it desires to effect a plan to adjust its
debts. At this point in the case, it is impossible to determine whether the City meets the eligibility
requirements of chapter 9 because, despite its previous promises, the City has failed to provide
interested parties with reliable financial information and a purported plan upon which to evaluate the
Citys legitimate desire to effect a plan of adjustment. Before any determination is made on the


1
Unless otherwise indicated, all statutory references are to Title 11 of the United States Code.
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Citys eligibility for chapter 9 protection, the City should be required to present the Court and the
interested parties with a plan of adjustment, including realistic projections of revenues and expenses.
II. Background
A. The Bankruptcy Filing
On July 18, 2012, the City declared a fiscal emergency and determined that it would be
unable to pay its debts, including payroll obligations, within the subsequent sixty days. See
Resolution No. 2012-205 & 206 (attached as Exhibits G & H to Declaration of Georgeann Hanna in
Support of City of San Bernardinos Memorandum of Facts and Law in Support of the Statement of
Qualifications Under Section 109(c) of the Bankruptcy Code [Docket No. 129] (the Hanna
Declaration)). Previously, the Citys Finance Department issued a budget report concluding, inter
alia, that:

(1) the City faced a budget deficit preliminarily estimated to be over
$45.8 million in its current fiscal year; (2) the City had depleted all of
its General Fund reserves and reserves in its internal service fund
accounts and other funds to cover substantial budget deficits in the last
four consecutive fiscal years; (3) immediate and substantial action had
to be taken to reduce spending and preserve cash for the City to
continue to provide essential services to the Citys residents; (4)
reviews of the Citys General Fund revealed that the balances at the
start of the 2010-11 and 2011-12 fiscal years had been erroneously
reported by City staff and actually totaled over $4.5 million less than
reported, and that the beginning General Fund balance for the current
fiscal year was estimated to be a cash deficit of over $18.2 million; and
(5) the City did not have enough unrestricted cash or any reserves
available to pay its financial obligations as and when those obligations
were due or to become due beginning in July of 2012 and continuing
through the remainder of the current fiscal year and beyond.
See City of San Bernardinos Memorandum of Facts and Law in Support of Qualifications Under
Section 109(c) of the Bankruptcy Code [Docket No. # 125] (Citys Memorandum), at 3-4
(footnotes omitted). The City alleges that [i]n order to preserve enough cash to meet its August
payroll obligations and provide essential services through the end of September assuming that a
Chapter 9 case would be filed, the City approved [a] Fiscal Emergency Plan on July 24, 2012[,] and
deferred payments totaling over $6 million. Id. at 6-7.
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B. The Citys Financial Records Are in Disarray
The Citys fiscal emergency did not arise overnight. The City alleges that, as recently as
April 2012, the former City Manager believed that that the Citys estimated budget shortfall for
fiscal year 2011-12 would be about $3.1 million which the City believed could be remedied by
additional cuts to department budgets, continuing a hiring freeze on filling vacant positions and
making revenue adjustments. Declaration of Andrea Travis-Miller in Support of City of San
Bernardinos Memorandum of Facts and Law in Support of the Statement of Qualifications Under
Section 109(c) of the Bankruptcy Code [Docket No. 126] (the Travis-Miller Declaration), 5.
According to the Citys current Director of Finance, who began working in his current
position on March 28, 2012, the monthly reconciliation of the bank statements for the Citys bank
accounts to the Citys ledgers for the General Fund account had not been done since June 30, 2011
and was nine months behind schedule, and the financial audit for the 2010-11 fiscal year had not been
completed [when he took over as Director of Finance]. Declaration of Jason P. Simpson in Support
of City of San Bernardinos Memorandum of Facts and Law in Support of the Statement of
Qualifications Under Section 109(c) of the Bankruptcy Code [Docket No. 127] (the Simpson
Declaration), 6. In connection with analyzing the status of the Citys reserves and the Citys
budgets from 2007, the Director of Finance discovered that the budget shortfall from the prior
fiscal year was $6.3 million more than previously reported and the Citys fund balance was actually
negative $1.2 million as of June 30, 2011 (as opposed to a positive $2.0 million previously reported),
and he forecasted a negative $10.6 million balance as of June 30, 2012. Id.
The Citys publicly-available financial reports, however, focus on the impact of the recession
pending since 2008 while only casually mentioning these financial reporting and budgeting problems.
See City of San Bernardino Budgetary Analysis and Recommendations for Budget Stabilization dated
July 9, 2012,
2
at 1 (executive summary mentioning accounting errors among a variety of issues
causing the City to face insolvency).


2
Attached as Exhibit B to Hanna Declaration.
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After filing the Petition on August 1, 2012 (the Petition Date), the City began developing a
Pendency Plan designed to result in an eventual plan of adjustment of its debts in this case. Citys
Memorandum at 30. More than two and a half months after the filing of the bankruptcy case, the
City has not yet filed or communicated its pendency plan to parties in interest.
C. The Pre-Pendency Plan
On August 29, 2012, a Pre-Pendency Plan
3
was presented to the City Council. The Pre-
Pendency Plan proposed a variety of cost-reductions in an effort to address the Citys cash shortfall,
but does not proposed a balanced budget for ongoing operations. See also, Simpson Declaration 16
(The City does not have a balanced budget for its current fiscal year).
With respect to CalPERS expenditures, the Pre-Pendency Plan sets forth the following
assumption:

CalPERS costs are driven by the States actuarial report that includes a
0.5% lower CalPERS discount rate for investment earnings which
contributes to a 14.4% increase in costs for FY 2012-13 and a 4.6%
increase from FY 2012-13 to FY 2013-14. Lower City payroll will
drive up part of the CalPERS liability rate that pays off the unfunded
liability. The major risk is additional reductions in the discount rate
and/or CalPERS investment performance, which would drive employer
rates up further. Future labor negotiations or court rulings could result
in changes to the Citys costs related to retirement benefits.
Pre-Pendency Plan at 39. The Pre-Pendency Plan appears to contemplate reduced payments to
CalPERS going forward on account of reduced payroll obligations resulting from headcount
reductions, driving up the contribution rate needed to amortize unfunded liability in light of the
reduced payroll.
The Pre-Pendency Plan indicated that the City would continue making its required payments
to CalPERS. This understanding was confirmed to CalPERS by the City shortly after the Pre-
Pendency Plan was make public. Consequently, CalPERS expected that the City intended to continue
making its required payments to CalPERS.



3
Available at http://www.ci.san-bernardino.ca.us/civica/filebank/blobdload.asp?BlobID=14136, and
attached hereto as Exhibit A.

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D. Ongoing Financial Performance
Recently, however, CalPERS has learned that, contrary to the Pre-Pendency Plan, the City has
failed to make certain required payments to CalPERS. Indeed, it now appears that the City knew it
was not making these payments when it issued the Pre-Pendency Plan. Further, CalPERS has been
informed, but has not yet verified, that the City has not made substantially all of the personnel cuts
approved by the City Council and which form the basis for the Pre-Pendency Plan.
Since the Petition Date, the City has made certain cash flow reports available to the public
though its website.
4
The most recent cash flow report, dated October 8, 2012 (the October 8 Cash
Report),
5
states that the City has increased its cash position by $8,545,520 since the Petition Date,
but notes that the increase in cash is primarily due to deferral of currently due obligations totaling
($23,578,368) including payments due to bond holders, CalPERS, trade payables, prior litigation
costs, and employee leave bank cashouts. Indeed, the October 8 Cash Report sets forth five missed
biweekly payments to CalPERS, four of which relate to postpetition pay periods, totaling in excess of
$5.2 million.
6
The October 8 Cash Report contemplated a $1,035,000 payment to CalPERS on
account of the pay-period ending October 15, but that payment has not been received by CalPERS.
Similarly disconcerting when attempting to evaluate the Citys going-forward viability is that unpaid
trade payables have ballooned postpetition by more than $3 million since the Petition Date. See
September 4 Cash Report
7
(disclosing $5,054,206 in unpaid trade payables as of July 31) and October
8 Cash Report (disclosing $8,150,364 in unpaid trade payables as of October 8).


4
Available at http://www.ci.san-bernardino.ca.us/home_nav/chapter_9_bankruptcy/default.asp.

5
Available at http://www.ci.san-bernardino.ca.us/civica/filebank/blobdload.asp?BlobID=14299, and
attached hereto as Exhibit B.

6
Based on CalPERS' calculations, since the Petition date the City has made payments to CalPERS
totaling approximately $2.7 million. The City has represented that it paying in full all of the
employee contributed share of pension obligations to CalPERS, but that it is deferring payment of the
employers share.

7
Available at http://www.ci.san-bernardino.ca.us/civica/filebank/blobdload.asp?BlobID=14226, and
attached hereto as Exhibit C.
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It appears that the City is financing its postpetition operating deficit by incurring postpetition
obligations and simply not paying its postpetition bills. The City is digging a hole that gets deeper
every day and there is nothing in the record that suggests that the City will be able to pay in full these
administrative expenses, which is a prerequisite to plan confirmation.
E. CalPERS is the Citys Largest Creditor
CalPERS is an arm of the state,
8
and as such enjoys the sovereign rights of the State of
California. The Public Employees Retirement Law (CAL. GOV. CODE, 20000 et seq.) (PERL)
establishes a retirement system for certain state and local government employees. City of Oakland v.
Pub. Emps. Ret. Sys., 95 Cal. App. 4th 29, 33 (2002). The purpose of the PERL is to effect
economy and efficiency in the public service by providing a pension plan to pay retirement
compensation and death benefits. CAL. GOV. CODE 20001. The California Legislature established
CalPERS in 1931, and the system became operational in 1932 when it began providing retirement
benefits to California State employees. California Public Employees Retirement System, Office of
Public Affairs, Facts at a Glance: General (2012).
9
CalPERS provides pension fund and healthcare
services for approximately 1.6 million California public employees, retirees, and their families. Id.
A state employee generally becomes a member of the Public Employees' Retirement System ...
upon his or her entry into employment. Cal. Ass'n of Profl Scientists v. Schwarzenegger, 137
Cal. App. 4th 371, 376 (2006) (citations omitted). Local government employers may enter into a
relationship with CalPERS to provide pension and retirement benefits to their employees. The City
has contracted to participate in the California Public Employees Retirement System.


8
See, e.g., CalPERS v. Moodys Corp., Nos. C09-03628 SI, C09-03629 JCS, 2009 WL 3809816 at *
6 (N.D. Cal. Nov. 10, 2009) (citing cases). In fact, the State of California agrees with this
conclusion. See also Brief filed by California State Attorney Generals Office in Kaplan v. CalPERS,
1999 WL 33623292, No. 99-15295 (9
th
Cir. Aug. 12, 1999) at 8 n.2 (The California Public
Employees Retirement System is an arm of the State.); accord Kaplan v. CalPERS, 221 F.3d 1348
(9th Cir. 2000) (unpublished) (holding Eleventh Amendment barred suit against CalPERS under the
ADEA).

9
Available at http://www.calpers.ca.gov/eip-docs/about/facts/general.pdf, and attached hereto as
Exhibit D.

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The City lists CalPERS as its largest unsecured creditor with a prepetition claim in excess of
$143 million. See List of Creditors Holding 20 Largest Unsecured Claims [Docket No. 41]. The
City asserts that this amount constitutes the book value of the Citys unfunded CalPERS liability,
but submits that the market value of the obligation is $319.5 million. See Citys Memorandum at
14.
III. Argument
The decision to file a chapter 9 petition is one of last resort and should only occur after an
out-of-court attempt to avoid bankruptcy has failed. In re Sullivan County Regl Refuse Disposal
Dist., 165 B.R. 60, 82 (Bankr. D.N.H. 1994) (citation and quotation omitted). This is so because,
given Tenth Amendment and sovereignty concerns, the bankruptcy court has very little control over
the actions of a debtor once a chapter 9 petition is approved. Id. at 82; see also In re N.Y.C. Off-
Track Betting Corp., 427 B.R. 256, 264 (Bankr. S.D.N.Y. 2010) (Bankruptcy courts should review
chapter 9 petitions with a jaded eye. Principles of dual sovereignty, deeply embedded in the fabric of
this nation and commemorated in the Tenth Amendment of the United States Constitution, severely
curtail the power of bankruptcy courts to compel municipalities to act once a petition is approved.)
(citation omitted). As a result of these concerns, the Bankruptcy Code imposes several substantial
eligibility requirements that the City has the burden of establishing before it can be determined to be
eligible for chapter 9 and an order of relief can be granted. In re City of Vallejo, 408 B.R. 280, 289
(9th Cir. BAP 2009) (citing 109(c)(1)-(5)); see also In re N.Y.C. Off-Track, 427 B.R. at 264-65 (In
light of these concerns, bankruptcy courts scrutinize petitions for relief under chapter 9.) (citing In
re Sullivan, 165 B.R. at 82 & In re Cottonwood Water & Sanitation Dist., 138 B.R. 973, 979 (Bankr.
D. Colo. 1992)); In re Suffolk Regl Off-Track Betting Corp., 462 B.R. 397, 414-15 (Bankr. E.D.N.Y.
2011) (citing cases).
As explained in more detail below, as it now stands, neither this Court nor CalPERS have
been provided sufficient information to determine whether the City has met its burden on eligibility.
Indeed, there are serious questions under certain of the 109(c) factors, as well as under 921(c).
Consequently, CalPERS respectfully requests that this Court defer any determination regarding
eligibility until sufficient information has been made available. The City has represented that it is
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-8-

working on a Pendency Plan and that it may be filed as soon as a few weeks from now. At a
minimum, determination of eligibility should be deferred until parties in interest have had an
opportunity to review this plan.
A. The City Cannot Demonstrate a Desire to Effect a Plan.
Under Section 109(c)(4), the City must establish that it desires to effect a plan to adjust its
debts. This requirement should be tested as of the date of the petition is filed. In re Town of
Westlake, Texas, 211 B.R. 860, 867 (Bankr. N.D. Tex. 1997). As the court in Vallejo observed, given
the highly subjective nature of this inquiry, no bright-line test exists to determine whether this
element has been established. Vallejo, 408 B.R. at 295 (citing cases). That said, however, this
element may be established by attempting to resolve claims or by submitting a draft plan of
adjustment. Id. (citing, inter alia, In re Orange County, 183 B.R. 594, 607 (Bankr. C.D. Cal. 1995)
& In re Sullivan County). At a minimum, the evidence presented by the City must establish that the
purpose of the filing of the chapter 9 petition not simply be to buy time or to evade creditors.
Vallejo, 408 B.R. at 295 (quotation and citation omitted). Here, the City has neither sought to resolve
claims or put forth a draft plan of adjustment. Consequently, creditors remain in the dark as to the
Citys financial circumstances and its plans for adjusting its debts.
As of the date of this filing, the City has not prepared or provided either the Court or the
parties with its Pendency Plan, although it specifically relied upon such a Plan as evidence of its
desire to effect a plan to adjust its debts. See, e.g., Citys Memorandum (As further evidence of the
Citys desire to effect a plan to adjust its debts, the City is developing a Pendency Plan designed to
result in an eventual plan of adjustment of its debts in this case.) at 30; see also Declaration of
Michael Busch in Support of City of San Bernardinos Memorandum of Facts and Law in Support of
the Statement of Qualifications Under Section 109(c) of the Bankruptcy Code (the Busch
Declaration) [Docket No. 128] at 5 (declaring that Citys consultant, Urban Futures, Inc., is
currently assisting the City in developing its Pendency Plan.). Although the City made several
promises in its August 31, 2012 submissions to this Court that it was diligently preparing its
Pendency Plan, the City has simply not produced the Plan. This raises significant concerns regarding
the Citys intentions with respect to the use of the bankruptcy process. See Sullivan County, 165 B.R.
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at 82 (noting that debtors post-filing actions tend to confirm that the bankruptcy option was chosen
with no real thought or sincere intention of debt adjustment in an overall plan sense and therefore
could not meet the good faith requirement of Section 921(c)). The Citys failure to provide the
Court and parties with its Pendency Plan several months into the case, combined with its continued
operating deficit and failure to meet its postpetition obligations, raises a serious question of whether
its underlying purpose has been merely to buy time and evade creditors.
In support of its position, the City relies heavily on the BAPs decision in Vallejo where the
court affirmed a finding that Section 109(c)(4) was satisfied where Vallejos postpetition efforts in
implementing its Pendency Plan sufficiently demonstrate[d] that its petition was designed to result in
an eventual plan of adjustment of debts by which creditors claims would be satisfied or discharged.
Vallejo, 408 B.R. at 295. Here, in sharp contrast, the Citys postpetition efforts have so far not
resulted in the creation of, let alone the proposed implementation of, a Pendency Plan or any plan that
is even facially viable. In addition, given the absence of the Pendency Plan, or any proposed terms, it
is impossible to determine whether any proposed plan can be effectuated under chapter 9. Accord
Sullivan County, 165 B.R. at 78 (finding that debtors failed to meet good faith requirement of Section
109(c)(5) where proposed plan was not a plan that could be effectuated in chapter 9); see also id. at
77 (noting that the fact that debtors chose to waffle and evade any serious attempt to come up with a
feasible plan until some four or five weeks before the filing supported conclusion that good faith
requirement of Section 109(c)(5) was not met). Thus, we are all in the dark as to whether any plan
proposed by the City could ever be confirmable.
In its Qualifying Statement, the City makes much of the fact that the City Manager declared
under penalty of perjury that the City desires to effect a plan to adjust its debts. See Citys
Memorandum at 29-30. While this may be true, such a statement alone is insufficient to satisfy
Section 109(c)(4). See, e.g., Vallejo, 408 B.R. at 295 (noting that such statement, coupled with pre
and postpetition negotiations with unions were sufficient to affirm trial courts finding that Section
109(c)(4) was satisfied); see also N.Y.C. Off-Track Betting, 427 B.R. at 272 (Courts examining this
requirement have determined that a filed statement indicating intent to affect a plan of reorganization,
combined with efforts made towards negotiating and drafting a plan, fulfill this requirement.)
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(emphasis added; citation omitted).
10
In short, until the City actually provides the Court and the
interested parties with its promised Pendency Plan, any determination that the City has satisfied
Section 109(c)(4) is premature. This is all the more important because, as explained above, courts
must view chapter 9 petitions with a jaded eye given the lack of control the courts have over
municipalities such as the City once they are allowed into chapter 9.
B. The City Cannot, at this Time, Demonstrate that it Filed its Petition in Good
Faith
11
.
Although the term good faith is not defined in the Bankruptcy Code, such a requirement
provides a useful means for the Court to preserve the protection of the Code for those for which it
was actually intended. Sullivan County, 165 B.R. at 79-80 (citations omitted). In ascertaining the


10
At least two federal judges have noted that the City has been less than forthcoming about its
financial situation in the past. See, e.g., Declaration of Arthur K. Cunningham In Support of City of
San Bernardinos Memorandum of Facts and Law in Support of the Statement of Qualifications
Under Section 109(c) of the Bankruptcy Code [Docket No. 130], Exhibit B at 1 (noting that even
while City was publically stating its intention to file for bankruptcy, it continued to profess that it
has continued to meet its financial obligations to vendors, creditors, and employees and intends to
meet those obligations over time.) (quotation omitted); Declaration of Joseph Arias In Support of
City of San Bernardinos Memorandum of Facts and Law in Support of the Statement of
Qualifications Under Section 109(c) of the Bankruptcy Code [Docket No. 131], Exhibit B at 2-3
(The Citys public statements concerning its fiscal emergency and impending bankruptcy filing
states in part: As of this [July 18, 2012], it has continued to meet its financial obligations to vendors,
creditors, and employees and intends to continue to meet those obligations over time. This is not
true concerning the settlements which in this case, include monies on which two very young children
are dependant for their care, support, medical needs, food and housing.) (certain alterations omitted).
The Citys statements with respect to its intentions to continue to meet its obligations to CalPERS
have likewise proved to be unreliable.
11
The City, without citation to authority, suggests that the burden of proof under 921(c)s good
faith requirement rests with the objecting party as opposed to the City. See Citys Memorandum at
35 n.30. This position is incorrect for several reasons. Placing the burden of proof on the objecting
party, as opposed to the party asserting its good faith is contrary to longstanding rule that the party
seeking relief should bear the burden of proof. See, e.g., In re City of Bridgeport, 129 B.R. 332, 334
(Bankr. D. Conn. 1991) (The general rule is that the burden of proof is imposed upon the party who
asserts the affirmative of an issue[.]). Here, given the City has claimed it filed its petition in good
faith, objecting parties should not bear the burden of proof. Access to chapter 9 relief has been
designed to be an intentionally difficult task given the constitutional concerns, In re Sullivan
County, 165 B.R. at 82, and therefore the Codes requirements must be read in light of this concern.
Appropriate allocation of the burden of proof furthers Congresss intent that any time a debtor seeks
to enter into chapter 9 its efforts must be appropriately scrutinized. In re N.Y.C. Off-Track, 427 B.R.
at 264-65.

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meaning of this phrase, the court in Sullivan County exhaustively reviewed case law under previous
versions of the Bankruptcy Act to determine what constitutes good faith. Id. at 80-82. In sum, the
court determined summarized the requirement as follows:

In the Chapter 11 context, good faith has been described as a requirement which
prevents abuse of the bankruptcy process by debtors whose overriding motive is
to delay creditors without benefitting them in any way or to achieve reprehensible
purposes. Determining whether a petition has been filed in good faith requires an
evaluation of a debtors financial condition, motives, and the local financial
realities. These comments would appear to be equally applicable, at least in part,
to a Chapter 9 petition.
Id. at 82 (quoting In re Villages at Castle Rock Metro Dist. No. 4, 145 B.R. 76, 81 (Bankr. D. Colo.
1990)) (citations omitted). At bottom, municipal debtors must explore alternative avenues of
adjustment before its filing can be considered to be one made in good faith. N.Y.C. Off-Track
Betting, 427 B.R. at 282.
A mere wish is not sufficient to demonstrate good faith. There is no dispute that the City did
not realistically explore any options before filing for chapter 9 protection. In fact, within several
weeks of discovering its financial distress, in lieu of taking a step back and exploring whether
alternatives existed, the City quickly moved to file its petition. Here, as in In re Sullivan County, the
Citys decision to file bankruptcy was not the end result of considered debate, weighing the benefits
and consequences of the petition. 165 B.R. at 82. A filing born of desperate financial circumstances
does not evince good faith. As explained above, the fact that the City has not demonstrated, either
pre or postpetition, any serious attempt at negotiating with its creditors or creating a Pendency Plan in
an effort to adjust its debts in a manner that is both feasible and potentially confirmable under chapter
9 weigh against its claim that it filed this petition in good faith. Id. at 82 (The debtors immediate
post-filing actions tend to confirm that the bankruptcy option was chosen with no real thought or
sincere intention of debt adjustment in an overall plan sense.). Given the inherent advantage that
municipal debtors have over (most) creditors in a chapter 9 proceeding, and the lack of the courts
ability to control such a debtor once the gates to chapter 9 are opened, chapter 9 filings must be
properly scrutinized before the court allows a municipal debtor into chapter 9. By its very design,
access to chapter 9 is an intentionally difficult task. Id. Here, because the City made no efforts to
negotiate with its creditors before filing for chapter 9 protection, and has failed to provide the Court
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and the interested parties with the promised Pendency Plan, it cannot be said that the City filed its
petition in good faith.
The appearance of administrative insolvency further heightens the level of scrutiny that this
Court should employ in evaluating eligibility. In the event that the City is administratively insolvent
and cannot effect a plan of adjustment, dismissal may be warranted under 930. See In re New York
City Off-Track Betting Corp., 2011 WL 309594, at *2-3 (Bankr. S.D.N.Y. Jan. 25, 2011) (dismissal
under Section 930(a)(2) warranted where debtors creditors were not being paid undisputed amounts
due during administration of case and where debtor ceased operations and concluded all efforts to
seek confirmation of plan). Under chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code, one example of cause for
dismissal is the continuing loss to or diminution of the estate and absence of a reasonable likelihood
of rehabilitation. 11 U.S.C. 1112(b)(1). This circumstance exists where a debtor experiences
negative cash flows and cannot evidence an ability to rehabilitate. See, e.g., Loop Corp. v. United
States Trustee, 379 F.3d 511, 516 (8
th
Cir. 2004) (stating that a negative cash flow situation alone is
sufficient to establish continuing loss to or diminution and citing In re Wright Air Lines, Inc., 51
B.R. 96, 100 (Bankr. N.D. Ohio 1985) for the proposition that rehabilitation means to put back in
good condition; re-establish on a firm, sound basis). While there is no estate in a municipal
bankruptcy, the concept embodied in Section 1112(b) should nevertheless apply by analogy under
Section 930. The City should not be able to evade its creditors under the protection of the automatic
stay while it deteriorates financially and fails to set forth a viable plan of adjustment.
C. Request for Relief Under Section 941
CalPERS requests that the Court set a date by which the City must file a plan of adjustment,
including financial and operating projections. CalPERS is not in a position to evaluate whether the
City truly desires to effect a plan of adjustment (and is therefore eligible for relief under chapter 9)
before either the material terms of the Citys plan are disclosed, or the plan itself is filed. The
Bankruptcy Code requires that the City file a plan of adjustment either with its petition or at such
other date as the Court fixes. See 11 U.S.C. 941. The Citys failure to file a plan in a timely
fashion is cause for dismissal of this case. See 11 U.S.C. 930(a)(2) (3) (court may dismiss case
under chapter 9 for cause, including unreasonable delay by the debtor that is prejudicial to
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creditors or failure to propose a plan within the time fixed under section 941 of this title.).
Because the Citys disclosure of the terms of its plan of adjustment bear on the question of whether
the City desires to effect a plan of adjustment, the Court should require the City to file such plan
sufficiently in advance of the evidentiary hearing on the Citys eligibility to allow parties in interest
to meaningfully examine the Citys intentions regarding its plan of adjustment. This would include
time to allow discovery with respect to the plan.
D. CalPERS Reserves the Right to Object to the Citys Eligibility on Other
Grounds.
Because CalPERS only recently learned that the City was intentionally withholding payments
due to CalPERS and other postpetition creditors, it simply has not had the opportunity to sufficiently
analyze the facts related to the Citys failure to comply with its Pre-Pendency Plan and other issues
related to eligibility such as whether the City has met established the insolvency requirement under
Section 109(c)(3) or whether negotiations with all of the Citys creditors was impracticable under
Section 109(c)(5)(C). Before the City is able to benefit from chapter 9, CalPERS must be assured
that the Citys bankruptcy filing was a result of its insolvency, evaluated prospectively from the date
of the petition. See In re Pierce Cnty. Hous. Auth., 414 B.R. 702, 710-11 (Bankr. W.D. Wash. 2009).
In addition, CalPERS has also not had the opportunity to determine whether a true fiscal
emergency existed so as to dispense with the pre-filing negotiations required by California
Government Code section 53760. See 11 U.S.C. 109(c)(2) (requiring municipalities to be
specifically authorized . . . by State law to seek chapter 9 protection.). Accordingly, CalPERS
reserves the right to later object on other grounds after conducting proper discovery and obtaining a
clear picture of the Citys finances and the events that lead to the Citys filing.
IV. Conclusion
For the foregoing reasons, CalPERS respectfully requests that the Court (1) fix a date,
pursuant to 941, for the City to file the necessary plan of adjustment, including financial and
operating projections (2) allow CalPERS sufficient time to review and analyze the plan and conduct
discovery with respect to eligibility, and (3) in order to allow sufficient time for the foregoing two
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items, continue the November 5 status conference on eligibility. CalPERS fully reserves its rights
and remedies available under applicable law, including
the right to seek relief related to the failure of the City to make required payments to CalPERS and
relief related to the apparent administrative insolvency of the City.



Respectfully submitted,

K&L GATES LLP

Dated: October 24, 2012 By: /s/Michael B. Lubic
Michael B. Lubic
Michael J. Gearin
Attorneys for California Public Employees
Retirement System

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PROOF OF SERVICE OF DOCUMENT

I am over the age of 18 and not a party to this bankruptcy case or adversary proceeding. My business
address is: 10100 Santa Monica Blvd., 7
th
Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90067

A true and correct copy of the foregoing document entitled (specify): PRELIMINARY OBJECTION OF
CALPERS TO THE CITY OF SAN BERNARDINOS CHAPTER 9 PETITION AND REQUEST FOR RELIEF
UNDER 11 U.S.C. 941

will be served or was served (a) on the judge in chambers in the form and manner required by LBR 5005-2(d);
and (b) in the manner stated below:

1. TO BE SERVED BY THE COURT VIA NOTICE OF ELECTRONIC FILING (NEF): Pursuant to controlling
General Orders and LBR, the foregoing document will be served by the court via NEF and hyperlink to the
document. On (date) 10/24/12 , I checked the CM/ECF docket for this bankruptcy case or adversary
proceeding and determined that the following persons are on the Electronic Mail Notice List to receive NEF
transmission at the email addresses stated below:

Jerrold Abeles abeles.jerry@arentfox.com, labarreda.vivian@arentfox.com
Franklin C Adams franklin.adams@bbklaw.com,
arthur.johnston@bbklaw.com;lisa.spencer@bbklaw.com;bknotices@bbklaw.com
Joseph M Adams jadams@lawjma.com
Andrew K Alper aalper@frandzel.com, efiling@frandzel.com;ekidder@frandzel.com
Thomas V Askounis taskounis@askounisdarcy.com
Anthony Bisconti tbisconti@bmkattorneys.com
Jeffrey E Bjork jbjork@sidley.com
Sarah C Boone sboone@marshackhays.com, ecfmarshackhays@gmail.com
J Scott Bovitz bovitz@bovitz-spitzer.com
Jeffrey W Broker jbroker@brokerlaw.biz
Deana M Brown dbrown@milbank.com
Michael J Bujold Michael.J.Bujold@usdoj.gov
Christopher H Conti chc@sdlaborlaw.com, sak@sdlaborlaw.com
Christina M Craige ccraige@sidley.com
Alex Darcy adarcy@askounisdarcy.com
Susan S Davis sdavis@coxcastle.com
Robert H Dewberry robert.dewberry@dewlaw.net
Todd J Dressel dressel@chapman.com, lubecki@chapman.com
Chrysta L Elliott elliottc@ballardspahr.com, manthiek@ballardspahr.com
Scott Ewing contact@omnimgt.com, sewing@omnimgt.com
Paul R. Glassman pglassman@sycr.com
David M Goodrich dgoodrich@marshackhays.com
Everett L Green everett.l.green@usdoj.gov
Chad V Haes chaes@marshackhays.com, ecfmarshackhays@gmail.com
James A Hayes jhayes@cwlawyers.com
M Jonathan Hayes jhayes@hayesbklaw.com,
roksana@hayesbklaw.com;carolyn@hayesbklaw.com;elizabeth@hayesbklaw.com
D Edward Hays ehays@marshackhays.com, ecfmarshackhays@gmail.com
Eric M Heller eric.m.heller@irscounsel.treas.gov
Bonnie M Holcomb bonnie.holcomb@doj.ca.gov
Whitman L Holt wholt@ktbslaw.com
Michelle C Hribar mch@sdlaborlaw.com
Steven J Katzman SKatzman@bmkattorneys.com
Jane Kespradit jane.kespradit@limruger.com, amy.lee@limruger.com
Mette H Kurth kurth.mette@arentfox.com
Michael B Lubic michael.lubic@klgates.com
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Richard A Marshack rmarshack@marshackhays.com,
lbergini@marshackhays.com;ecfmarshackhays@gmail.com
Gregory A Martin gmartin@winston.com
David J Mccarty dmccarty@sheppardmullin.com, pibsen@sheppardmullin.com
Reed M Mercado rmercado@sheppardmullin.com
Aron M Oliner roliner@duanemorris.com
Scott H Olson solson@seyfarth.com
Dean G Rallis drallis@sulmeyerlaw.com
Christopher O Rivas crivas@reedsmith.com
Kenneth N Russak krussak@frandzel.com, efiling@frandzel.com;dmoore@frandzel.com
Gregory M Salvato gsalvato@salvatolawoffices.com, calendar@salvatolawoffices.com
Mark C Schnitzer mschnitzer@rhlaw.com, mschnitzer@verizon.net
Benjamin Seigel bseigel@buchalter.com, IFS_filing@buchalter.com
Diane S Shaw diane.shaw@doj.ca.gov
Jason D Strabo jstrabo@mwe.com, apolin@mwe.com
Matthew J Troy matthew.troy@usdoj.gov
United States Trustee (RS) ustpregion16.rs.ecf@usdoj.gov
Anne A Uyeda auyeda@bmkattorneys.com
Annie Verdries verdries@lbbslaw.com
Brian D Wesley brian.wesley@doj.ca.gov
Kirsten A Roe Worley kworley@wthf.com, bcordova@wthf.com

SEE NEF FOR CONFIRMATION OF ELECTRONIC TRANSMISSION TO THE U.S. TRUSTEE AND ANY
TRUSTEE IN THIS CASE, AND TO ANY ATTORNEYS WHO RECEIVE SERVICE BY NEF

2. SERVED BY UNITED STATES MAIL:
On (date) 10/24/12 , I served the following persons and/or entities at the last known addresses in this
bankruptcy case or adversary proceeding by placing a true and correct copy thereof in a sealed envelope in
the United States mail, first class, postage prepaid, and addressed as follows. Listing the judge here
constitutes a declaration that mailing to the judge will be completed no later than 24 hours after the document
is filed.

Bryan C Altman
The Altman Law Group
6300 Wilshire Blvd Ste 980
Los Angeles, CA 90048
Roger Jon Diamond
2115 Main Street
Santa Monica, CA 90405



3. SERVED BY PERSONAL DELIVERY, OVERNIGHT MAIL, FACSIMILE TRANSMISSION OR EMAIL
(state method for each person or entity served): Pursuant to F.R.Civ.P. 5 and/or controlling LBR, on (date)
10/24/12 , I served the following persons and/or entities by personal delivery, overnight mail service, or
(for those who consented in writing to such service method), by facsimile transmission and/or email as follows.
Listing the judge here constitutes a declaration that personal delivery on, or overnight mail to, the judge will be
completed no later than 24 hours after the document is filed.

The Hon. Maredith A. Jury
United States Bankruptcy Court
3420 Twelfth Street
Suite 325 / Courtroom 301
Riverside, CA 92501-3819

I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the United States that the foregoing is true and correct.

10/24/12 Carolyn Orphey /s/Carolyn Orphey
Date Printed Name Signature

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Exhibit A
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-1 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit A Page 1 of 94
PRE-PENDENCY PLAN
City of San Bernardino

Drafted By:
Andrea Travis Miller, Acting City Manager
Jason Simpson, Finance Director
Michael Busch, President, Urban Futures Inc.
August 29, 2012

EXHIBIT A PAGE 15
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i
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................................... 1
I. FISCAL EMERGENCY .................................................................................................................. 9
A. What is the Purpose of a City? ............................................................................................ 9
B. A Service Level Emergency Creates a Fiscal Emergency .................................................. 9
C. Fiscal Emergency Legal Authority ................................................................................... 10
D. Evidence of San Bernardinos Fiscal Emergency ............................................................. 11
II. DECLINING REVENUES AS A FACTOR CONTRIBUTING TO THE STRUCTURAL
DEFICIT ........................................................................................................................................ 15
A. The Recession has Taken a Toll on the San Bernardino Economy ................................... 15
B. San Bernardino Revenues Have Decreased, With Only Moderate Growth Forecast
Going Forward .................................................................................................................. 16
C. General Fund Expenditures ............................................................................................... 21
III. PERSONNEL & RETIREMENT COSTS AS A FACTOR CONTRIBUTING TO THE
STRUCTURAL DEFICIT ............................................................................................................. 24
A. Overview of Pension Benefits ........................................................................................... 24
B. Overview of Other Post-Employment Benefits ................................................................ 26
C. The Citys Retirement Contributions are Steadily Increasing ........................................... 27
D. The Primary Cause of the Dramatic Increase in Retirement Costs is a Significant
Increase in Unfunded Liabilities ....................................................................................... 28
E. The Impact of Enhanced Benefits ..................................................................................... 29
F. Failure to Meet Earnings Expectations ............................................................................. 30
G. Increase in the Number of Retirees ................................................................................... 31
H. Conclusion ........................................................................................................................ 31
IV. EFFORTS TO ADDRESS THE FISCAL CRISIS AND CONSIDERATION OF
ALTERNATIVES TO CHAPTER 9 BANKRUPTCY ................................................................. 33
A. Past Budget Workshops and the Citys Budgetary Analysis and Recommendation
for Budget Sustainability ................................................................................................... 33
B. Best Cases Revenue Scenario Does Not Solve the Problem ............................................. 37
C. CONCLUSION ................................................................................................................. 38
V. BUDGET & OPERATIONAL RESTRUCTING PLAN ............................................................... 39
A. Preliminary Fiscal Year 2012-13 General Fund Budget ................................................... 39
B. Fiscal Year 2012-13 General Fund Reduction Methodology ........................................... 40
C. Preserving Essential Safety Services ................................................................................. 41
D. Maintaining the Citys Investment in Infrastructure Through Service Delivery
Changes in Community Development, Public Works, and Parks, Recreations &
Community Services ......................................................................................................... 54
EXHIBIT A PAGE 16
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ii
E. Implementing Service Efficiencies and Consolidation of Administrative Services
Functions ........................................................................................................................... 61
F. Summary of Proposed Staffing Reductions ...................................................................... 68

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1 - 5 Year Budget and Fund Balance Estimates (Amount in Millions) ......................................... 1
Table 2 - Major Revenue Trends from 2008-2012 ............................................................................. 2
Table 3 - Historical Home Starts, Sale and Investment ...................................................................... 3
Table 4 - Land Use by Net Taxable Value ....................................................................................... 4
Table 5 - Sales Tax Comparison ..................................................................................................... 4
Table 6 - Historical Pension Expenses ............................................................................................. 5
Table 7 - 5 Year (2012-13 to 2016-17) Budget Projections by Department .......................................... 6
Table 8 - Land Use by Net Taxable Value ......................................................................................17
Table 9 Property Tax Revenue 2002-2003 to 2011-2012 ................................................................18
Table 10 Sales Tax Revenue 2002-2003 to 2011-2012 ...................................................................19
Table 11 Utility Tax Revenue 2002-2003 to 2011-2012 .................................................................20
Table 12 Revenues vs. Expenditures (10 Year) .............................................................................22
Table 13 Enhanced Pension Formulas for the Citys Retirement Plans .............................................25
Table 14 Other Post-Employment Benefits Annual Pay Go Estimates ...........................................26
Table 15 CalPERS Actuarial Valuation Rate Miscellaneous Plan .................................................27
Table 16 CalPERS Actuarial Valuation Rate Safety Plan.............................................................28
Table 17 City Contribution Retirement Rates (as a Percent of Payroll) ............................................28
Table 18 Proposed Fire Department Staffing Reductions ...............................................................48
Table 19 Proposed Sworn Staffing Reductions .............................................................................50
Table 20 Proposed Non-Sworn Staffing Reductions ......................................................................52
Table 21 Total Estimated Savings ...............................................................................................54
Table 22 Proposed Public Works Staffing Reductions ...................................................................59
Table 23 Proposed City Clerk Staffing Reductions ........................................................................62
Table 24 Proposed Information Technology Staffing Reductions ....................................................63
Table 25 Proposed Human Resources Staffing Reductions .............................................................65

APPENDICES
Appendix A Summary of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance (General Fund)
Appendix B Fiscal Year 2012-2013 Pre-Pendency Plan

EXHIBIT A PAGE 17
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1
INTRODUCTION
San Bernardino is facing a crisis. To address budget shortfalls in thirteen of the past sixteen years, the
City has already cut staffing levels, added new revenue sources, expended reserves, and is now faced
with eliminating services and programs. Nonetheless, to correct for the Citys further projected
shortfalls in the current year and over the years just ahead, the level of required cuts must be done in
such a manner to allow the City to provide acceptable services. For example, the City is faced with the
undesirable prospect of closing fire stations, libraries and community centers, while still not having
enough money to fund acceptable levels of police and fire protection. This statement of crisis is not
made lightly, but reflects the Administrations profound concern that San Bernardino faces a service-
level crisis that can only be classified as a fiscal emergency.
The primary focus of this report is on the Citys General Fund, which supports a large majority of
municipal services. However, the impact the negative cash of roughly $18 million and escalating
operational costs affects all City funds and services. As the General Fund balance continues further into
the negative and operational costs escalate, it drives up the cost for sewer services, integrated waste
fund, Internal Service Funds, the Development Fee Program, and other special funded services paid by
every resident through monthly fees and other direct assessments.
While a number of factors have contributed to this crisis, by far the most significant and difficult to
control has been increasing operating costs occurring at a time when the Citys revenues continue to
decline. As the chart below depicts, as of June 30, 2011 the Citys fund balance has declined to a
negative $1.2 million. Without substantial and immediate restructuring of the organization, both
operationally and financially, the City will not be able to provide basic services.
Table 1 - 5 Year Budget and Fund Balance Estimates (Amount in Millions)
Actuals 2008-09 to 2010-11 Projected Budget 2011-12 to 2016-17

(250.00)
(200.00)
(150.00)
(100.00)
(50.00)
-
50.00
100.00
150.00
2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
M
i
l
l
i
o
n
s

Expenditures
Revenue
Fund Balance
EXHIBIT A PAGE 18
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2
Declining Revenues
Since the Citys peak General Fund revenue of $133 million in 2008, the City has experienced severe
losses in key areas such as sales tax, property tax, franchise fees, utility users tax (UUT), permits, and
funds transferred from the Economic Development Agency (EDA). The chart below details the
reduction of roughly $11.69 million in General Fund revenues.
Table 2 - Major Revenue Trends from 2008-2012
Revenue Source Peak Revenue
2007-2008
2011-12 Revenue Variance
Property Tax Secured $11.6M $9.5M ($2.1M)
Property Tax in Lieu of
Vehicle License Fees
$18.9M $15.7M ($3.2M)
Sales Tax $22.3M $19.03M ($3.27M)
Franchise Fees $3.32M $2.88M ($450K)
Utility User Tax $24.4M $22.5M ($1.9M)
Licenses and Permits $9.2M $8.6M ($600K)
Totals $89.72M $78.21M ($11.69M)

The chart above is consistent with the findings in other California cities. However, many cities in
California have begun to recover from declines in revenues. With the exception of sales tax, most
significant General Fund revenues remain flat or are increasing extremely slow to the point that prior
peak levels are not expected to be reached within the next five years. Overall, General Fund revenues
remain roughly $11.7 million below peak levels.
Of specific concern are revenues derived from property taxes which continue to be impacted by a
significant drop in housing prices in 2008 and on-going foreclosures throughout the City. According to
recent housing data, the City may have reached the bottom of the decline in housing values. This
doesnt mean prices will increase significantly any time soon. Usually towards the end of a housing
bust, normal prices move sideways for a few more years, and real prices adjusted for inflation could
even decline for another two or three years.
It is reasonable to assume housing values will stabilize and begin to grow at some point in the very near
future; if it hasnt begun already. The chart below provides an illustration of the national housing
market since 1968. While this may be the steepest decline in over 40 years, we shouldnt assume an
aggressive recovery of investment or pricing. Rather, the Administration is assuming flat property tax
revenues for residential properties in 2012-2013 with slight growth over the next fiscal years.
Commercial properties continue to search for the bottom, as evidenced by the $17.2 million of non-
residential property tax appeal exposure for fiscal year 2012-2013.
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3
Table 3 - Historical Home Starts, Sale and Investment

Because we do not anticipate much growth with housing new starts or employment in the near future,
and with the loss of the EDA, the Administration assumes construction-related permit activity will also
be flat or possibly continue to decline. Permit activity in most California cities has been very volatile
with trends pointing to decreasing activity.
The chart below reflects the Citys property tax base according to land use. Typical of a large, older
community, the City is fairly balanced with 52% of taxable property as residential, 19% commercial and
15% industrial. Despite the diversity in property tax generation, 80% of the Citys taxable parcels are
residential. Because of the high percentage of residential parcels, service requirements will remain high
and a sustainable and resilient revenue base is vital to supporting essential City services.
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4
Table 4 - Land Use by Net Taxable Value

Based on data provided by HdL, the Citys sales tax revenue diversity reflects the statewide average for
all business types (see charts below).
Table 5 - Sales Tax Comparison

The overall diversity of the sales tax base within the City presents an opportunity for future revenue
growth. The Citys population, size, and opportunities for economic development of former EDA
properties provide for an optimistic outlook. Despite these positive traits, the City will need to play a
role in job creation in order to fully realize its true sales tax potential. As of June 2012, the
unemployment in San Bernardino was 19.9%. When compared to the State of California and San
Bernardino County unemployment figures for April 2012 of 10.9% and 11.7% respectively, we begin to
understand this as a component of a decline in sales tax-generating revenues well below the peak in
2008.
Category Net Taxable Value Number of Parcels
Residential $5,337,905,953 44,947
Commercial $1,988,781,002 2,295
Industrial $1,557,715,525 721
Miscellaneous $86,979,310 346
Government $5,397,890 12
Institutional $56,282,161 207
Dry Farm $1,382,185 7
Recreational $25,292,404 58
Irrigated $43,094 1
Vacant $356,918,079 4,524
Exempt $0 3,347
Outer Parcels $7,500 9
SBE Nonunitary $5,219,774 54
Personal (Unsec) $862,093,032 3,967
Unknown $24,201,315 61
$10,308,219,224 56,526
Source: HdL 2011-12 Property Tax Reports
Residential
52%
Commercial
19%
Industrial
15%
Miscellaneous
1%
Government
0%
Institutional
1%
Dry Farm
0%
Recreational
0%
Irrigated
0%
Vacant
4%
Exempt
0%
Outer Parcels
0%
SBE Nonunitary
0%
Personal (Unsec)
8%
Unknown
0%
Land Use by Net Taxable Value
Restaura
nts &
Hotels
11.60%
General
Consume
r Goods
29.75%
Fuel and
Service
Stations
14.16%
Autos
and
Transport
ation
15.57%
Building
and
Construct
ion
10.17%
Business
and
Industry
12.71%
Food and
Drugs
6.03%
City of San Bernardino
Restaura
nts &
Hotels,
13.00%
General
Consume
r Goods,
27.06%
Fuel and
Service
Stations,
14.52%
Autos
and
Transport
ation,
14.50%
Building
and
Construct
ion,
7.80%
Business
and
Industry,
16.51%
Food and
Drugs,
6.60%
Statewide Totals
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5
In order to restore revenues to prerecession levels, multiple voter approved measures would be required.
With local voter reluctance to increase taxes, the Citys revenue generation options are significantly
limited by required majority voter approval (50%+1) for general taxes and two- thirds voter approval for
service-specific taxes.
Increasing General Fund Operating Costs
Over the past ten years, the Citys population has grown by roughly 13% resulting in increasing
demands for services to the community. In order to meet growing service demands, the City has
maintained a workforce exceeding 1,140 employees. Maintaining a large workforce has exposed the
City to rising operational costs outside of the Citys control. Despite recent reductions of 250
employees, retirement costs have increased from $6 million in 2000-2001 to $22 million in 2009-2010
(see the chart below).
Table 6 - Historical Pension Expenses

While the Citys pension costs have been growing steadily over the past several years, significant
increases are due to the Citys decision to implement enhanced retirement plans for all employees. A
secondary impact, and of less significance, are increases to the total number of retirees and investment
losses by the Citys retirement administrator; the California Public Employee Retirement System
(CalPERS). To mitigate increasing retirement costs and to manage long-term retirement liabilities, the
City reduced its total workforce and implemented a two-tier retirement plan, which provides basic level
retirement benefits to all new employees.
Even after these considerable workforce reductions and numerous other cost-reduction strategies
implemented by the City, the General Fund shortfall for 2012-2013 is projected at $45 million, which
represents 30% of total projected General Fund Expenditures for the coming fiscal year. The following
chart further illustrates the degree to which prior efforts to stabilize operational costs are unsustainable
beyond 2011-2012.
0
5000000
10000000
15000000
20000000
25000000
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
2005 Series A-2 Capital
Appreciation Bonds
Employee Portion
Police
Fire
Misc
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6
Table 7 -
5 Year (2012-13 to 2016-17) Budget Projections by Department

As a result of the above trends, personnel costs are consuming progressively larger portions of the
Citys operating budget resulting in unsustainable workforce levels.
Debt Obligations
The City also has significant bond indebtedness obligations. As noted in the chart below, the Citys
General Fund has roughly $90 million of outstanding debt obligation. Additionally, with the loss of
redevelopment and the Citys election to be the Successor Agency, the City, has additional debt
obligations of roughly $200 million.



-
20.00
40.00
60.00
80.00
100.00
120.00
140.00
160.00
180.00
2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
M
i
l
l
i
o
n
s

Police
Fire
General Government
Public Works
Community
Development
Parks & Recreations
City Attorney
Debt Service
City Clerk
Finance
Issuer Issue Par Amount
Closing
Date
GENERAL FUND BONDED DEBT
City of San Bernardino Lease Revenue Refunding Bonds Series 1996 16,320,000 $ 12/18/1996
San Bernardino Joint Powers Financing Auth Public Facilities Lease Revenue Refunding Bonds, 1997 Series A 10,370,000 $ 7/31/1997
San Bernardino Joint Powers Financing Auth Refunding Certificates of Participation 15,480,000 $ 9/29/1999
City of San Bernardino Taxable Pension Obligation Bonds, 2005 Series A-1 36,050,000 $ 10/28/2005
City of San Bernardino Taxable Pension Obligation Bonds, 2005 Series A-2 14,351,583 $ 10/28/2005
REDEVELOPMENT BONDED DEBT
San Bernardino Joint Powers Financing Auth Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds, Series 1998A 27,590,000 $ 4/2/1998
San Bernardino Joint Powers Financing Auth Subordinated Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds, Series 1998B 8,590,000 $ 4/2/1998
San Bernardino Joint Powers Financing Auth Tax Allocation Bonds, Series 2002A 3,635,000 $ 1/24/2002
San Bernardino Joint Powers Financing Auth 2002 Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds 30,330,000 $ 4/11/2002
San Bernardino Joint Powers Financing Auth Tax Allocation Revenue Refunding Bonds Series 2005A 55,800,000 $ 9/30/2005
San Bernardino Joint Powers Financing Auth Tax Allocation Revenue Refunding Bonds Series 2005B 21,105,000 $ 9/30/2005
San Bernardino Joint Powers Financing Auth Tax Allocation Bonds (20% Set Aside) Taxable Series 2006 28,665,000 $ 4/26/2006
San Bernardino Joint Powers Financing Auth Tax Allocation Bonds Series, 2010A 7,065,000 $ 12/23/2010
San Bernardino Joint Powers Financing Auth Tax Allocation Bonds Series, 2010B 3,220,000 $ 2/9/2011
ASSESSMENT DISTRICT BONDED DEBT
City of San Bernardino Limited Obligation Improvement Bonds, Assessment District No. 985 1,101,682 $ 2/28/1990
City of San Bernardino Limited Obligation Improvement Bonds, Assessment District No. 987 709,105 $ 12/18/1991
Prepared by: Urban Futures, Inc.
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7
Budgetary Impacts
Unfortunately, there is no silver bullet for increasing revenues significantly or stabilizing operational
costs. The rapid disparity between revenues and expenses is due to significant declines in general taxes
and increases in personnel and debt liabilities.
The Budget Sustainability Plan presented to City Council in June 2012 contemplates a range of potential
solutions to address the General Fund structural imbalance in an effort to continue to provide essential
City services. These strategies are being actively pursued, and include but are not limited to creating a
cost sharing retirement program, investigating raising the real property transfer tax, stabilizing medical
costs by sharing plan increases with employees, eliminating sick leave payouts, regionalizing services,
and reducing the burden of the constant manning provision within the Fire Department. Unfortunately,
these solutions alone are not projected to be sufficient. Although the City has been successful in
achieving some cost reductions, other City proposals will require further collective bargaining with its
employee bargaining units and, in some instances, Charter changes via the electoral process. Further,
while additional revenue would be very beneficial, increasing revenue rates and/or sources will, again,
require a vote of the people, with such approval doubtful in the current economic environment.
Given all of the above constraints, some have suggested that the City should simply take actions to sell
City assets, such as integrated waste operation, lease-revenue opportunities from cell towers located on
City owned land and local water rights. Unless there is a specific and sound basis for selling City assets
which provide continuous annual revenues to the City, this approach could jeopardize the long-term
sustainability of City operations.
San Bernardino faces a service-level emergency and must now address its financial issues through a
comprehensive approach and significant operational and financial restructuring.
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8
CONCLUSION
The outlook for City services, already reduced over the last three years because of the severe economic
downturn, remains bleak for 2012-2013 and beyond. While the City has been managing deficits, the
shortfalls in recent years have become increasingly difficult to resolve as wave after wave of revenue
losses have continued to hit. The Administration believes that the next round of workforce cuts
required to balance the budget in the face of such a severe deficit will be best implemented and
managed through an analysis of impacts to the department, organization, individual wards and
community compared to prospective financial savings, as outlined in the following matrix.
Impact Low Medium High
Department X
Organization X
Ward X
Community X
Financial Savings X
Using the above methodology, all non-essential programs were evaluated prior to their submittal for
reduction or elimination. The recommendations contained in this report reflect reductions in workforce
or programs based on the lowest possible impact to individual wards and the community possible while
meeting the Citys budget reduction goals.
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9
I. FISCAL EMERGENCY
A. What is the Purpose of a City?
In recent years, the City of San Bernardino has made efforts to implement strategies of fiscal
prudence and good management. In particular, the City is struggling to balance its budget amid
weakened revenues and rising costs, including rapidly-increasing personnel costs. The City is a
service organization with approximately two-thirds of the Citys General Fund budget
attributable to personnel costs. Unlike a private employer, a public agency cannot simply decide
to go out of business or otherwise stop providing certain essential services to the public.
Under the California Constitution, cities have broad authority and responsibility in the areas of
public health and safety. See Cal. Const., Art. XI, 7 (A county or city may make and enforce
within its limits all local, police, sanitary, and other ordinances and regulations not in conflict
with general laws.). However, while a citys powers are derived from the state constitution
and other laws enacted by the Legislature, cities themselves are created only by the request and
consent of the residents in a given area. Because of this, municipal governments are responsible
for providing services that directly affect the lives of their residents. Through fire and police
protection, cities safeguard lives and property. Through public works and other programs, cities
construct and maintain streets and look after the health, recreational, and social needs of
residents. Charter cities like San Bernardino are formed when citizens specifically frame and
adopt a charter to establish the organization of and basic laws of the city.
The core purpose of the City of San Bernardino is to provide essential services to the public as
established in its City Charter. San Bernardinos essential functions are set forth in its Charter,
which identifies the establishment of certain City Departments including Police, Fire, Water,
Parks and Recreation, and Library. Notably, although the Mayor and Common Council may at
any time abolish or discontinue some departments, the Mayor and Common Council is required
to provide those services established under the Charter.
B. A Service Level Emergency Creates a Fiscal Emergency
In fulfilling its core purpose of providing essential services, the City must navigate between City
Charter requirements and Mayor and Common Council mandates. On the one hand, the City
Charter establishes departments as set forth in the paragraph above for the purpose of providing
basic municipal services. On the other hand, the City Charter requires the City to balance its
annual budget. Currently, the City is unable to comply with both of these City Charter mandates
and provide basic municipal services to City residents. Unfortunately, on August 1, 2012, the
City filed for Chapter 9 Bankruptcy and will likely be forced to reduce services below those
levels acknowledged by the City Council as the baseline for basic municipal services in order to
balance its annual budget for 2012-2013. All projections show that recessionary affects will
remain and additional cuts may be required to balance the upcoming 2013-2014 budget, as
required by the Charter.
The meaning of the term emergency may vary depending on the context in which it is used.
While some courts have defined an emergency as an unforeseen situation calling for
immediate action, not all emergencies occur in an instant, like an earthquake. An employers
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10
dire financial condition which worsens over a period of time may qualify as an emergency
justifying the suspension or modification of certain contractual obligations.
A public agencys inability to provide essential services is a strong indication of a fiscal
emergency. As noted by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB), the common
themes that have been either formalized or are working definitions of financial sustainability
include the ability to continue public services and/or existing programs. This comports with
the definition of financial condition adopted by the International City/County Management
Association (ICMA). In particular, ICMA defines a municipalitys financial condition as the
ability to (1) maintain existing service levels, (2) withstand local and regional economic
disruptions, and (3) meet the demands of natural growth, decline, and change. ICMA also
categorizes financial solvency in four distinct ways:
1. Cash solvency: governments ability to generate enough cash over a 30 to 60 day period to
meet its obligations.
2. Budgetary solvency: governments ability to generate enough revenues over its normal
budgetary process to meet its expenditures and not incur deficits.
3. Long-run solvency: governments ability to meet expenditures that may not be addressed
as part of the normal recurring annual budgetary process.
4. Service-level solvency: governments ability to provide services at the level and quality that
are required for the health, safety, and welfare of the community and to meet its citizens
desires.
This report focuses on all categories above: Moving forward as a well-run and forward-looking
city, San Bernardino must budget in an effort to meet its contractual obligations, build reserves
and ensure that budgetary shortfalls are addressed through balancing actions each year.
However, the City has reached the point at which previous budget balancing actions combined
with the budgetary outlook for 2012-2013 and beyond have triggered a financial and service-
level emergency, jeopardizing the health and safety of San Bernardinos residents. The threat
posed by continued service reductions is imminent, and despite all other measures taken to this
point and those still to be implemented, no viable alternative plan that is sufficient to address
this problem has been identified that does not require major changes in services delivery of all
departments and changes to the Citys compensation strategy. As such, the Administration
believes San Bernardino faces a service-level emergency, a form of fiscal emergency which
requires Chapter 9 Bankruptcy protection while we get our fiscal house in order.
C. Fiscal Emergency Legal Authority
In this plan, the evaluation of conditions for declaring a fiscal emergency and subsequent filing
for Chapter 9 protection has focused on the primary causes of the current condition, which are
declines in revenue and increases in operational costs. Therefore, the goal has been
development of solutions that appropriately addresses the primary causes of the Citys current
fiscal situation within the City legal limitations.
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11
While no California cases have upheld an impairment of a government entitys own contract,
case law from other jurisdictions supports the notion that a public agencys inability to provide
essential services is a strong indication of a fiscal emergency. In those jurisdictions, courts have
recognized that a sharp decline in revenues coupled with the concurrent inability to provide
essential services constitutes an emergency justifying the impairment of contractual
obligations. For example, in Subway-Surface Supervisors v. N.Y.C. Transit Authority, 44
N.Y.2d 101 (1978), the New York Court of Appeals upheld the Citys suspension of a
wage increase set forth in the Citys collective bargaining agreement, where the Citys fiscal
emergency would have rendered it unable to provide essential services to its inhabitants or
meet its obligations to the holders of outstanding securities, and, without cuts, it would not
have been able to pay employee salaries or its vendors and would have defaulted on payments
due on other outstanding obligations.
Federal and State courts recognize the constitutional power of a local municipality in response
to an emergency to act in the publics interest, to preserve the health, safety and well-being of
City residents. The scope of the power includes the ability to impair contract obligations under
certain limited circumstances. As such, the Mayor and Common Council elected to declare
Chapter 9 Bankruptcy to address the Citys structural imbalance while preserving essential
services to the community.
D. Evidence of San Bernardinos Fiscal Emergency
1. San Bernardinos Inability to Provide Services at Required Levels
As demonstrated below, the rise in salary and retirement costs combined with decreased
revenues (which have declined in absolute terms, and are not projected to grow at a rate
sufficient to keep up with these expenditure increases) have staggering implications on
San Bernardinos ability to provide essential services. The San Bernardino City Charter
provides guidance as to which services are essential to the City: Administration,
Police, Fire, Water, Library, and Parks and Recreation are some of the service-providing
departments specifically established pursuant to the City Charter. Other departments,
such as Finance, Personnel, and Community Development, are not directly established
by City Charter but are obviously necessary to support the Citys operations.
Since 2007-2008, the General Fund has experienced shortfalls which were addressed, in
part, with the elimination of approximately 250 positions citywide. Previous budgets
closed General Fund shortfalls through a combination of strategies including,
reduced/eliminated services, a variety of cost savings strategies, and new revenues.
Despite these efforts, prior reductions did not address deferred liabilities, such as other
post-employment benefits (OPEB), which are now estimated at more than $61 million.
A significant portion of the costs of providing services to the community are the salaries
and benefits paid to City employees, with nearly two-thirds of the Citys General Fund
tied directly to personnel costs. This is because municipal services are generally labor-
intensive, with City employees such as police officers and firefighters providing
essential services. In an effort to maintain service levels, the City has implemented cost
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12
control measures, including the following:
Organization-wide hiring freeze, with exemptions based on requests critically
necessary to perform essential functions of the department;
Expenditure controls on technology, marketing, office furniture, equipment, and
vehicle purchases;
Two-tiered pension plans;
Salary freeze for unrepresented employees (including executives and professionals)
and most City bargaining groups; and
10% reduction in the total compensation (from the baseline 2009-2010 fiscal year)
for City employees within the General Unit, Middle Management Unit, Police
Management, Fire Management, and the Management / Confidential Unit.
Persistent General Fund budget shortfalls have necessitated deep service reductions in
departments that rely on the Citys General Fund, including freezing vacant positions in
Police and Fire services, the inability to open and operate new City facilities, a reduction
in the days and hours of operation of the City's library services. With escalating total
operational costs and declining revenues, the budget shortfalls in the last two years have
been the most severe. Staffing levels for the City of San Bernardino have been reduced
by 14% since 2007-2008, with the majority of the impact experienced in 2008-09, 2009-
10 and 2010-11. In recent weeks, the City has lost 60 employees due to attrition. As
staffing continues to erode at a rapid pace, the Citys capacity to provide the essential
services set forth in the Charter is diminished. Staffing reductions to date have impaired
the governments ability to provide services at the level and quality that are required for
the health, safety, and welfare of the community.
With the drop in staffing levels and the magnitude of the General Fund shortfalls, no
service area has been spared from deep cuts. In 2000-2001, when retirement costs were
at their low watermark, the City had 1,174.5 full time equivalent employees. With the
position reductions proposed in the 2012-2013 Budget, San Bernardino will likely drop
staffing to levels not seen in over 20 years.
2. Service Levels will be Impaired for the Foreseeable Future
While there is much evidence to conclude that the service impairment will rise to the
level of an emergency, a critical consideration is whether economic conditions and
rising operational costs will further weaken the Citys ability to provide public services
into the foreseeable future. As demonstrated later in this report that answer is,
unfortunately, a resounding yes. As described in detail below, operating cost
increases coupled with the retirement cost increases projected in the next few years will
make dramatic service-level reductions a necessity to balance the budget.
As noted by GASB, financial insolvency is directly tied to the ability of an entity to
continue public services and/or existing programs. By that standard, the City is already
financially insolvent. Without significant operational and financial restructuring, the
likely budget balancing scenarios over the next three years include:
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13
Police Department
Reduction in proactive resources such as District Resource Officers, Narcotics, Gang
Officers, Etc.
During peak demand times, police response may be limited to high priority, violent
crimes, or crimes in progress.
The average response time for Priority 3 and 4 calls will increase, with some of these
kinds of calls going without any response during peak times
The Police Department may reach a point where misdemeanor and property crimes
may go uninvestigated, if the Department lacks the resources to investigate all but
the most serious crimes;
The City will be unable to respond effectively when multiple critical events occur
concurrently;
San Bernardino is currently experiencing an increase in overall crime. The increases are
likely to continue as police resources diminish. Community based policing efforts will
also continue to decline as resources are eliminated and the Department adjusts
resources to respond to calls for service. Community frustration at low service levels
from the police department will likely increase.
Fire Department
Response times for fires and medical emergencies will increase, and will, on a
regular basis, likely exceed current standards, leading to increased risk of loss of life
and significant property damage.
The operational efficiency of several of our specialty programs will be negatively
impacted. Materials Response unit, Urban Search and Rescue unit, SWAT Medic
program, and Fire Investigation unit, among other program areas, will have to be re-
evaluated to see if it is feasible to continue providing these services.
The City will consider alternative service provision models as necessary to keep
most fire stations open and operational at accepted standards for a City of our size
and call volume.
The Department will have reduced capacity to respond to two or more sustained
structure fires that occur within the same time period, as well as reduced response to
wildland fires and other large scale incidents such as natural disasters, terrorist
incidents, civil disturbance, etc. Moreover, as the largest firefighting force in the
County, the Department cannot rely on mutual or automatic aid from neighboring
jurisdictions to provide basic levels of fire and emergency medical services. These
agencies have had to reduce responding units as well; typically, other agencies rely
on SBFD for assistance.
The Department will need to consider whether to continue to provide advanced life
support services, as it presently does. Other models of providing this service will
have to be studied to provide our citizens the level of emergency medical care
provided by the current model. We have established response time standards that
have been adopted by the City Council and are regulated by the County. Further
degradation in our ability to meet these established standards will necessitate a
change in our service delivery method. This could result in a decrease in the level of
service and care currently provided as well as a possible increase in cost to our
citizens.
The Departments ability to provide comprehensive fire prevention services will
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14
continue to erode; this will result in longer delays for developers and builders
wishing to start projects in the City. We will continue to experience a decrease in
revenue generated by commercial building inspections; this could result in more
fires with an associated increase in life and property loss.
Library Services
Three out of four currently operational branches are likely to close for the remainder
of 2012-2013;
Library programming, including educational programming, will be eliminated;
School-aged children visiting branch libraries after school each day, many of whom
are not accompanied by a parent or caregiver, will no longer have a safe,
constructive, and educational after-school option; and
Property values for the homes in close proximity to the closed branch libraries may
decrease.
Parks, Recreation and Community Services
All City recreational programs will be discontinued and the Citys Community
Centers will be closed unless partner agencies are able to pay operations and facility
overhead;
Teen programs will be eliminated;
Gang-intervention and graffiti abatement programs will be reduced to skeletal levels;
and
Property values for the homes in close proximity to the shuttered Community
Centers may decrease.
Impacts on Other City Services
Traffic maintenance programs will be further reduced, impacting traffic sign
maintenance, roadway striping, and marking maintenance;
Continued deferred maintenance of public facilities; and
General Government departments such as Council Appointees, Finance, Human
Resources, Information Technology, and Mayor and Common Council will be
further cut, resulting in reduced staffing for oversight, management, internal
controls, and compliance.
These public services are essential to the functioning of San Bernardino. In the absence
of these essential city services, business owners and residents will perceive a disconnect
between taxes paid and services provided. The City must avoid this potential downward
spiral by working to maintain services that provide social and economic benefits to the
community.
In conclusion, San Bernardino has experienced a sharp increase in service delivery costs,
driven primarily by fast-rising operational costs, in tandem with sustained declines and
ongoing weaknesses in City revenues. In turn, in the Citys effort to maintain a budget
balance, these factors have required year after year of escalating service cuts. Given the
extent of these service reductions to date, and the anticipated impact of the next round of
cuts to be required if no corrective action is taken, these unsustainable trends have now
reached the point of fiscal emergency leading to Chapter 9 Bankruptcy.
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II. DECLINING REVENUES AS A FACTOR CONTRIBUTING TO THE
STRUCTURAL DEFICIT
A. The Recession has Taken a Toll on the San Bernardino Economy
San Bernardino, along with many other cities, has been heavily affected by the current economic
downturn. The financial impact from the economic downturn has been severe and continues to
linger. However, as discussed below, the Citys current crisis has been compounded by
increases in operational costs, especially pension and retiree healthcare costs.
The City faces a structural budget gap: the growth in the cost of the Citys recurring
expenditures most significantly, for employee retirement benefits outpaces the growth in
City revenues. This unsustainable imbalance preceded the decline in City revenues and will
continue to imperil City services for years to come if no corrective action is taken. While the
City has taken extraordinary steps to address and control these costs shrinking its workforce,
decreasing total compensation by 10% across the board, and increasing fees and other revenues
the Citys ability to fund its remaining services continues to deteriorate and solutions are
becoming more and more elusive. The budget pressures faced by the San Bernardino municipal
government reflect the broader economic problems faced by San Bernardinos residents. By
almost any measure, the Great Recession continues to have a devastating effect on San
Bernardinos residents and their economic resources:
The unemployment rate for the City of San Bernardino has doubled since the onset of the
recession. As of June 2012, the unemployment was 16.9%.
Median single family home sale prices have fallen sharply, to over 40% below the 2007
peak annual levels as of June 2012.
As of June 2012, San Bernardino foreclosure rates are 3.5 times above the national average.
In turn, as further detailed in the analysis to follow, these economic factors have weakened the
Citys tax base and revenue streams, while adding to community service demands. As in
communities around the nation, the downturn has created severe pressures on the City of San
Bernardino budget.
While the recession that began nationally in December 2007 may have ended in June 2009, the
economy has yet to generate the strong levels of growth required for full recovery. Moreover,
even normal growth is insufficient to achieve true recovery. Real recovery requires a return to
trend in other words, where the economy would have been normal growth continued without
the contraction of a recession.
Of further concern, recent projections show economic growth continuing to lag below
normal levels through calendar year 2012. In the July 2012, the Federal Office of Management
and Budget Mid-Session Review, the 2012 fourth quarter forecast was reduced to 2.3% based on
data through June. National forecasters also project prolonged weakness in the labor market,
including continued high unemployment rates. In the Second Quarter Survey of Professional
Forecasters, unemployment nationally is projected to stand at an annual average rate of 8.1% in
2012 and to remain high at 7.7% in 2013, 7.2% in 2014, and 6.6% in 2015. In contrast, the
national average in 2007, before the full onset of the recession, was just 4.6%. Statewide, recent
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forecasts estimate double-digit unemployment rates of 10.7%; the third highest in the United
States.
B. San Bernardino Revenues Have Decreased, With Only Moderate Growth
Forecast Going Forward
The City of San Bernardinos primary revenue streams are highly sensitive to the overall
economy, and have been eroded by the economic downturn. The Citys two largest revenue
sources, property taxes and sales taxes alone comprise nearly half of overall General Fund
revenues, and have both experienced recession-driven declines. At the same time, multiple
other significant City revenue streams, including business taxes and many of the Citys licenses
and permits, have also fallen.
1. Overall Revenue Performance and Projections
Overall, the estimated 2012-2013 General Fund revenue estimates remain 10% lower
than peak 2007-2008 General Fund revenues of $133 million. Based on the Citys five-
year General Fund Forecast, which excludes one-time revenues and grants, General
Fund revenues are not expected to return to previous peaks during the five-year forecast
period.
At no point during the forecast period are General Fund revenues projected to approach
what they would have been had growth continued at 3% per year since 2007-2008.
Estimated 2012-2013 General Fund revenues are $21 million lower than hypothetical
General Fund revenues of $145 million, assuming General Fund revenues had grown by
3% per year from peak levels in 2007-2008.
2. Property Taxes
The chart below reflects the Citys property tax base according to land use. Typical of a
large, older community, the City is fairly balanced with 52% of taxable value as
residential, 19% commercial and 15% industrial. Despite the diversity in property tax
value, 80% of the Citys taxable parcels are residential, which points out the relative low
assessed value of the Citys housing stock when compared to commercial and industrial
uses. The high ratio of residential parcels is a measure of service demand and an
indication that a sustainable and resilient revenue base is vital to support essential City
services.
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Table 8 - Land Use by Net Taxable Value







Property taxes account for more than twenty percent (22.6%) of projected General Fund
revenues in 2012-2013. In San Bernardino, as in communities across California and the
nation, the collapse of the U.S. housing bubble in 2007-2008 led to sharp declines in
home values and significant increases in foreclosures. In turn, as these economic factors
have worked their way through the property assessment and taxation process, property
tax revenues have experienced decline nationally and in San Bernardino.
In addition to housing market factors, San Bernardinos ability to raise property tax
revenue to keep pace with rising expenditures is severely constrained from a structural
viewpoint by Proposition 13 and subsequent related amendments to the California
constitution. Proposition 13 limited the ad valorem tax rates to 1% of assessed value
absent approval of two-thirds of the citys voters for a higher rate. The proposition also
limited any increase in the assessed value of real property to the California Consumer
Price Index up to a maximum of 2% per year, the result of which effectively locked in
the total property taxes paid by many California residents to their 1978-1979 levels,
adjusted by a maximum increase of 2% annually. Property that changes ownership or
has major alterations may be assessed at current fair market value, and thereafter is
limited to the 2% increase in assessed value per year.
As shown in the graph below, San Bernardinos property tax revenue collections peaked
at approximately $32.8 million in 2008-2009, and then fell sharply for the next two
fiscal years to $26.7 million in 2011-2012. As the 2012-2013 Proposed Budget
forecasts no significant recovery in this large City revenue source, the projected $26.8
million would still be approximately 18% below the levels reached three years earlier.
If the growth rates assumed in the 2012-2016 Five-Year Forecast issued in June 2012
are applied to the 2012-2013 Property Tax estimate, Property Tax revenues would not be
expected to return to pre-recession levels until well after 2014-2015 under the Citys
best case scenario. Further, at no point during the forecast period do projected revenues
come close to the levels that would have been reached had property taxes continued to
grow at an annual rate of 3.0% since 2008-2009, shown in the chart below as the top
dotted line. Given continued housing market weakness and the legal constraints on
Category Net Taxable Value Number of Parcels
Residential $5,337,905,953 44,947
Commercial $1,988,781,002 2,295
Industrial $1,557,715,525 721
Miscellaneous $86,979,310 346
Government $5,397,890 12
Institutional $56,282,161 207
Dry Farm $1,382,185 7
Recreational $25,292,404 58
Irrigated $43,094 1
Vacant $356,918,079 4,524
Exempt $0 3,347
Outer Parcels $7,500 9
SBE Nonunitary $5,219,774 54
Personal (Unsec) $862,093,032 3,967
Unknown $24,201,315 61
$10,308,219,224 56,526
Source: HdL 2011-12 Property Tax Reports
Residential
52%
Commercial
19%
Industrial
15%
Miscellaneous
1%
Government
0%
Institutional
1%
Dry Farm
0%
Recreational
0%
Irrigated
0%
Vacant
4%
Exempt
0%
Outer Parcels
0%
SBE Nonunitary
0%
Personal (Unsec)
8%
Unknown
0%
Land Use by Net Taxable Value
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property tax increases in place under the California constitution, property tax revenues
will remain flat for years to come.
Table 9 Property Tax Revenue 2002-2003 to 2011-2012


As outlined above, overall economic recovery remains weak and uncertain, and the
housing market continues to be similarly challenged. Home prices as of August 2012
were still at summer 2003 levels on a national basis down 31.2% from five years
previously (seasonally adjusted; based on a composite of 20 metropolitan areas).
Looking at data specific to San Bernardino, median home sale prices for single-family
residences within the City paralleled the regional area trends. As noted previously, San
Bernardino median home sales prices remain roughly 40% below peak 2007 annual
levels as of June 2012.
As property values drop, so does property tax revenue. Under Proposition 8, temporary
reductions in assessments are applied when the current market value of a property is less
than the current assessed value. As a result of the housing market downturn, the number
of revaluations has increased, contributing to reduced property tax revenue for many
municipalities, including San Bernardino. San Bernardinos non-residential sector is
even weaker, with anticipated softness in commercial property values throughout the
Citys 2012-2016 five-year forecast.
$7,962,053.00
$8,787,965.00
$18,574,168.00
$23,093,720.00
$28,239,909.00
$31,429,967.00
$32,788,532.00
$28,815,780.00
$26,965,590.00
$25,820,605.00
$26,867,362.00
Property Tax Revenue
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3. Sales Taxes
Sales tax revenues are another important revenue stream for San Bernardino and account
for 22% of General Fund revenues in the 2012-2013 Proposed Operating Budget. Sales
and property taxes combined account for nearly half of San Bernardinos revenues. Like
property taxes, sales tax receipts have declined significantly due to the general economic
downturn. The City estimates sales tax revenues peaked in 2005-06 at $36.7 million. In
2009-10 the Citys sales tax plummeted to $20.4 million. In recent years, the City has
realized growth in sales tax receipts however revenues remain well below peak levels.
Overall, estimated 2012-2013 sales tax revenues remain roughly 29% lower than peak
2005-2006 sales tax revenues of $36.7 million.
Table 10 Sales Tax Revenue 2002-2003 to 2011-2012


Estimated 2012-2013 sales tax receipts are projected to reach $27 million. This figure
factors out a sizeable amount of one time prior year adjustments and applies a 3%
economic growth factor. If the growth rates assumed in the 2012-2017 five-year
forecast issued in June 2012 are applied to the 2012-2013 sales tax estimate, City sales
tax revenues would not be expected to return to 2007-2008 levels until 2013-2014.
Further, much as with property tax receipts, at no point during the forecast period are
sales tax revenues projected to come close to what they would have been had growth
continued at 3.0% per year since 2005-2006.
$29,894,441.00
$32,277,342.00
$34,768,847.00
$36,753,095.00
$34,848,749.00
$29,589,971.00
$23,796,942.00
$20,412,101.00
$23,612,474.00
$26,024,043.00
$27,050,431.00
Sales Tax Revenue
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Overall, the Administration anticipates moderate growth in sales tax receipts with 3%
underlying economic growth in 2012-2013 and growth ranging from 2% to 3% annually
in the out years of the forecast period.
4. Other Revenue Sources
In the aggregate, the Citys other revenue sources are projected to generate steady, but
not high, rates of overall growth across the Citys 2012-2017 five-year forecast period.
Major categories for these other sources are outlined below.
Utility Tax & Franchise Fees account for approximately 18.5% of estimated General
Fund revenues in the 2012-2013. The City collects franchise fees from companies using
public property in the distribution of natural gas, and electricity. The City also collects
franchise fees from its integrated waste department and cable television providers.
Utility taxes are charged to the users of any given utility (electricity, gas, water,
telephone). Utility and franchise fees are less sensitive to the economy than sales and
property taxes, and historically have been consistent sources of revenue for San
Bernardino in general. At the same time, these revenues are not considered high growth.
Similar to other major revenues, Utility User Tax (UUT) revenues have declined
significantly since the peak of 2006-2007. This is due primarily to the Citys exposure
to foreclosures, which were 3.5 times above the national average. The chart below
summarizes the Citys collection of UUT revenues over the past 10 years.
Table 11 Utility Tax Revenue 2002-2003 to 2011-2012


$20,204,082.00
$21,802,368.00
$22,477,545.00
$24,093,905.00
$25,106,730.00
$24,407,034.00
$24,355,172.00
$22,630,460.00
$22,089,888.00
$22,500,000.00
$22,500,000.00
Utility User Tax Revenue
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Transfers and Reimbursements account for funds received by the General Fund from
other City funds through a combination of means, including operating and capital
fund overhead charges, transfers, and reimbursements for services rendered. The
revenues in this category can vary significantly each year and are influenced by the
following: changes in staffing costs, staffing levels, and the relative proportion of
services delivered to other funds; the availability of funding in other funds that are
appropriate to transfer to the General Fund; and the performance of Gas Tax
revenues, which are transferred to the General Fund to reimburse the City for
eligible expenditures.
Business Registration, Licenses and Permit Revenues are generated from payments for
the issuance of Business Licenses, Building Permits, Fire Permits, and miscellaneous
health and safety-related licenses and permits. For most licenses and permits, the
fees charged by a given department are based on full recovery of the estimated costs
for providing each service. The demand for these licenses and permits, particularly
development-related building and fire permits, are sensitive to economic downturns.
Other Agencies includes revenues from local agencies, revenues from the State of
California, and revenues from the federal government. City receives revenues from
the State of California in a number of different forms and grants to deliver services.
The federal government also provides grant funding to support a variety of programs
and services.

Other Revenues include the following categories: Fines, Forfeitures, and Penalties;
Transient Occupancy Tax; Other Revenue; and Use of Money and Property. While some
of these revenue sources are highly dependent upon market performance, such as
Transient Occupancy Tax and interest earnings, the majority of these revenues are not
driven primarily by economic conditions.
C. General Fund Expenditures
While City revenues have paralleled the weakness in the overall economy, key spending
categories have grown much more rapidly outpacing revenues. Over the past 10 years, General
Fund revenues and expenses have closely followed one another with expenses significant
outpacing revenues since 2007 (see the chart below). City retirement contributions were by far
the primary drivers of the City's personnel cost growth across this period. Such benefit cost
growth in excess of revenues has severely eroded the City's fiscal resources for maintaining
staffing, service, and wage levels, and will continue to do so unless steps are taken.
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Table 12 Revenues vs. Expenditures (10 Year)

The critical takeaway here is that for the City, the cost per employee has been increasing at an
unsustainable rate as personnel costs have continued to increase. This is most apparent when
looking at the budget information as compared to decreasing positions throughout the City.
Over the past three years, the City has eliminated 250 positions. Meanwhile, as noted the
comparative pie chart below, General Fund departmental budgets have increased by 27% from
$94.5 million in 2001-2002 to $127.2 million in 2011-2012. Because the cost of each employee
has risen, the City and its departments have been forced to reduce staff and services in an effort
to budget in balance.
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The Citys budget is heavily focused on public services. In turn, governmental service delivery
is labor-intensive relying on the City workforce to patrol the streets, respond to emergencies,
provide libraries and community programs, and deliver the other direct and supporting services
of San Bernardino. Nevertheless, the City must continue to seek services delivery efficiencies
in order to continue to provide desired services within available resources. As a result, and as
noted elsewhere in this report, employee wages and benefits account for two-thirds of the 2012-
2013 Budget for the General Fund.
Summary descriptions for the major categories of General Fund expenditures

are as follows:
Public Safety: This category represents 69% of the 2012-2013 Budget and reflects the services
provided by the Police and Fire Departments. The major expenditures include emergency
response to calls for service, fire suppression, emergency medical services, and Police patrol and
investigations.
Non-Departmental: The Non-Departmental category represents 8.4% of the 2012-2013
Budget and includes city-wide expenses. The largest components of city-wide expenses
include workers compensation payments, sick leave cash outs, fleet services, and information
technology.
Community Services: This category represents 14.6% of the 2012-2013 Budget. It covers
programs such as public works, parks, libraries, recreation centers, planning and building
development services, and code enforcement.
General Government: This category represents 6.7% of the 2012-2013 Budget and reflects the
cost for all management and administrative functions of the City and independent officials,
including Human Resources, Finance, City Manager, Mayor, Common Council, City Attorney,
City Clerk, and Civil Service Commission.
Debt Service: This category represents 1.3% of the 2012-2013 Budget and reflects General
Fund costs associated with the debt obligations to the Citys General Fund. This does not
include the Citys 2005 issue of pension obligation bonds (public safety), as that costs is
included with public safety.
Fiscal Year 2011-2012
General Fund Expenditures
Police
61,161,400
48%
Other
Departments
35,083,600
28%
Fire
30,927,600
24%
Total Public
Safety 72%
FY 2001-2002 General
Fund Expenditures
Police
42,004,232
45%
Other
Departments
31,446,995
33%
Fire
21,041,818
22%
Total Public
Safety 67%
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III. PERSONNEL & RETIREMENT COSTS AS A FACTOR CONTRIBUTING TO THE
STRUCTURAL DEFICIT
It is projected that over the next five years, the Citys cumulative retirement contributions will
exceed $108 million in all funds with projected annual contributions totaling $19 million in
2012-2013, increasing to over $22 million by 2016-2017. This is not the worst case scenario.
Staff was recently informed the CalPERS rate of return for its investment portfolio was 1% for
2011-12 which is 6.5% below the assumed discount rate. This will very likely increase the
Citys future contributions.
This is not simply a short term issue. These costs are growing at such a rate and are of such a
magnitude that they require an ever-increasing share of the City expenditures regardless of the
program or revenue source. Retirement reform is needed for the long-term sustainability of the
retirement plans and in order to continue to provide even the most basic municipal services to
the public.
For the purpose of understanding the root causes and likely outcomes of the Citys deteriorating
financial condition, it is essential to understand certain aspects of the Citys pension and Other
Post- Employment Benefits (OPEB). The key points in this section are the following:
The Citys pension and OPEB costs are increasing at a rapidly accelerating rate and will
result in broad impairment of the Citys services;
The rapid increase in the cost of retirement benefits is due, in part, to improved retirement
pension plans, but also to numerous factors beyond the Citys control, including very large
investment losses, the likelihood that the plans will not attain current investment return
assumptions, actuarial losses, changes in actuarial assumptions based on experience, and the
increasing number of retirees relative to active employees;
The expected changes in GASB pension accounting rules, while not directly addressing
changes in funding, will report additional liabilities by requiring public entities to more
accurately portray their pension liabilities;
The impact of these factors will worsen over time and contribute to a dramatic increase in
the unfunded liabilities of the plans, with a resulting rapid increase in annual retirement
costs;
The increased retirement costs that the City will experience are unsustainable; and therefore,
Immediate, major intervention is necessary now.
A. Overview of Pension Benefits
The City provides a pension benefit for vested employees (those with 5 or more years of PERS
service credit) based on the members years of service and his or her single highest years
compensation at the time of retirement. Because the City Charter does not include language
regarding retirement plans, the employee labor groups were successfully able to negotiate
enhanced pension programs through labor negotiations when the Citys coffers and retirement
funds were flush. Listed below is a brief summary of the Citys enhanced retirement plans.
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Table 13 Enhanced Pension Formulas for the Citys Retirement Plans


Police and Fire

Non-Safety
Age and Years of
Service Eligibility
Age 50 with 5 years of service Age 55 with 5 years of service


Benefit Formula

3% of highest years compensation for each year
of service

2.7% of highest years
compensation for each year of
service
Maximum
Benefit

90% of final compensation

90% of final compensation
COLA Guaranteed 2% per year Guaranteed 2% per year

Final
Compensation

Average base pay of employees highest 12
consecutive month period with the City;
excludes overtime and expense allowances
Average base pay of highest 12
month period with the City;

does not include overtime or
specialty pay
Date of
Implementation


Fiscal Year 2001-02

Fiscal Year 2007-08


To reduce the future cost of employee pension benefits, the Mayor and Common Council,
through labor negotiations, implemented the following second-tier of pension plans for safety
and non-safety employees.
Police and Fire Department Retirement Plan

Base
Formula

Benefit

Year of Change
Age and Service
Requirement
3% of final
compensation for
each year of service
At 55 with 5 years of service

2011

Miscellaneous City Employees Retirement Plan
Base
Formula

Benefit

Year of Change
Age and Service
Requirement
2% of final
compensation for each
year of service
At 60 with 5 years of service

2011

In addition to the plans above, retirees receive an annual 2% cost of living adjustment (COLA),
regardless of the CPI or the state of the retirement funds. This guaranteed COLA was added to
the plans many years ago, increasing to the total cost of the Police and Fire Plan and the
Miscellaneous Plan.
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Pensions are paid out of retirement funds administered by the California Public Employees
Retirement System (CalPERS). The plan is designed to prefund pension benefits, meaning
annual contributions made over the course of an employees career (by both the City and the
employee) along with investment earnings are expected to pay for all future pension benefits.
The normal cost of pension benefits refers to the contribution amount allocated to an
employees current year of service. Separate and apart from the normal cost, additional
payments may be necessary due to market losses, retroactive benefit enhancements, unmet
assumptions or other circumstances that may result in plan underfunding.
B. Overview of Other Post-Employment Benefits
The Citys retirement plans also provide for other post-employment benefits (OPEB);
specifically retiree medical and dental coverage. Generally, employees are eligible for retiree
medical insurance coverage after retirement from public service. Employees are eligible to
retire at pre-Medicare age (55 for Miscellaneous and 50 for Police and Fire), which contributes
to the significant cost of the benefit. For 339 eligible retirees the benefit covers $112 a majority
of retirees and $200 to $450 based on years of service for retired police officers to cover
monthly premium costs for healthcare insurance. A few eligible police retirees receive a similar
benefit as active general employees. This is an anomaly, since retiree healthcare benefits are
commonly less than what is provided to active employees.
The OPEB plans are funded through separate trust funds associated with the retirement plan.
The plan has an independent actuarial analysis, which establishes the contribution rates and
funding levels. Unlike pension costs, retiree medical costs are limited to fixed dollar amounts.
Currently, the Citys OPEB benefits and unfunded obligations are funded on a pay-as-you-go
basis. Annually, the City pays roughly $628,000 towards OPEB obligations. Currently, the
unfunded liability for OPEB benefits is $61 million. Similar to pensions, the Citys annual pay-
go OPEB costs are also steadily increasing. The Chart below provides estimated growth in pay-
go costs over the next ten years.
Table 14 Other Post-Employment Benefits Annual Pay Go Estimates
Fiscal Year Pay-Go Total $ Change From
2010-2011
% Change From
2010-2011
2010-11 $628,000
2011-12 $738,000 $110,000 18%
2012-13 $855,000 $227,000 36%
2013-14 $975,000 $347,000 55%
2014-15 $1,099,000 $471,000 75%
2015-16 $1,220,000 $592,000 94%
2016-17 $1,344,000 $716,000 114%
2017-18 $1,470,000 $842,000 134%
2018-19 $1,603,000 $975,000 155%

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C. The City's Retirement Contributions are Steadily Increasing
By any standard, the City's pension and OPEB costs have been increasing and are expected to
continue current trends. Because of this, over the past 10 years the City has experienced a
profound increase in the percent of payroll that it pays to the retirement plans for these benefits.
In 2011-2012, the City spent just over $20 million on retirement benefits. Absent swift action to
reduce the cost of these benefits, the City is expected to be required to contribute more than $24
million for pension and OPEB costs in 2016-2017- only four years from now.
While these estimates cover all fund sources, the impact on the City's General Fund is
significant since it carried the entire burden of public safety costs. Unfortunately, this is not
even the worst-case scenario. Future investment losses would increase the unfunded liability, as
would actuarial experience losses, and/or decreases in investment earning assumptions.
The two charts below depict the growth in annual pension costs and unfunded liability. The
City has experienced a significant impact with the implementation of the 2.7% @ 55 benefit
enhancement in 2007-08 and with the issuance of pension obligation bonds in 2006-07 for
public safety. Both of these events contributed significantly to increasing rates along with
market losses and adjustments to actuarial assumptions.
Table 15 - CalPERS Actuarial Valuation Rate- Miscellaneous Plan
Fiscal Year Employer Employee Benefit Unfunded
Liability
2012-13 17.355% 8.00% 2.7%@ 55 $55,855,277
2011-12 17.248% 8.00% 2.7%@ 55 $53,627,697
2010-11 13.276% 8.00% 2.7%@ 55 $27,164,865
2009-10 12.544% 8.00% 2 . 7 % ~ 5 5 $19,572,835
2008-09 13.427% 8.00% 2.7% ~ 5 5 $24,580,218
2007-08 15.266% 7.00% 2.7% @ 55 $23,751,661
2006-07 8.947% 7.00% 2%@55 $(312,406)
2005-06 7.555% 7.00% 2% em 55 $(6,769,844)
2004-05 0.000% 7.00% 2 % ~ 5 5 $(36,697,738)
2003-04 0.000% 7.00% 2 % ~ 5 5 $(69,615,583)
2002-03 0.000% 7.00% 2 % ~ 5 5 $(77 ,006,869)

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Table 16 CalPERS Actuarial Valuation Rate Safety Plan
Fiscal Year Employer Employee Benefit Unfunded
Liability
2012-13 30.115% 9.00% 3% @ 50 $87,479,247
2011-12 28.277% 9.00% 3% @ 50 $81,636,613
2010-11 23.105% 9.00% 3% @ 50 $55,738,948
2009-10 23.356% 9.00% 3% @ 50 $51,811,181
2008-09 24.009% 9.00% 3% @ 50 $50,058,297
2007-08 18.600% 9.00% 3% @ 50 $83,165,714
2006-07 26.882% 9.00% 3% @ 50 $80,042,391
2005-06* 26.678% 9.00% 3% @ 50 $72,805,694
2004-05 27.386% 9.00% 3% @ 50 $59,128,137
2003-04 20.902% 9.00% 3% @ 50 $17,457,260
2002-03 12.619% 9.00% 3% @ 50 $(6,953,487)
*City issued $50.4 million in pension obligation bonds (not included in the unfunded liability)
As set forth below, in 2000-2001 City pension contribution rates are 7% of pay for
Miscellaneous and 14% for Police and Fire. For 2012-2013, however, the Citys contribution
rates are expected to increase to 25% of pay for Miscellaneous and to 39% of pay for Police and
Fire.
Table 17 City Contribution Retirement Rates (as a Percent of Payroll)
2000-2001 2012-2013
Miscellaneous 7% 25%
Safety 14% 39%
D. The Primary Cause of the Dramatic Increase in Retirement Costs is a
Significant Increase in Unfunded Liabilities
It is important to recognize that the problems leading to this huge increase in retirement costs
cannot be addressed by continuing with business as usual. Absent major changes in the pension
and OPEB programs, retirement costs will overtake available resources, rendering the City
unable to provide even the most basic services to the public.
In general, the increasing costs of pension benefits are attributable to a dramatic increase in the
plans unfunded liabilities. Because unfunded liabilities must be amortized over the
remaining life of a retirement plan, the amount that must be contributed to pay off that liability
must also increase.
1. The Citys Unfunded Liabilities
a. Unfunded Pension Liabilities
The most current estimate of the Citys total pension liability is $959.2 million. In
other words, there should be $959.2 million in the bank to assure sufficient
funding for pension promises already made. However, the two plans had a
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combined $639.7 million in assets (market value) or $319.5 million less than what
was needed. Thus, using the market value of assets, the Citys unfunded
liability for both pension plans totaled approximately $319.5 million as of June
30, 2010.
b. Unfunded OPEB Liabilities
Unlike pension benefits, which have traditionally been funded during the working
life of an employee, little money was set aside to pay for retiree health benefits
even though, like pension benefits, an actuarial liability arose. In fact, as GASBs
adoption of Statements 43 and 45 in 2004 demonstrated, when actuarial studies were
required, many cities and counties found they had a very large liability. In San
Bernardinos case, this has resulted in an estimated $61 million in unfunded
liabilities as a result of promised OPEB benefits.
c. Funded Ratios have Significantly Declined
Adequate funding of a retirement plan is often viewed as a percentage of full
funding. As noted earlier, a plan that is fully (100%) funded has all of the assets
necessary to pay for the present value of all benefits already earned. The funded
ratios of retirement plans have fallen dramatically and are one of many significant
issues facing many municipalities throughout the State.
2. Underlying Causes of the Increase in Unfunded Liability
There are four major causes of this increase in unfunded liability:
1. Timing of increases in benefits beyond the basic plans, which were not paid for
during the working lives of employees receiving benefits;
2. Investment losses, leading to a failure to meet earnings expectations on plan assets;
3. Actuarial changes in actuarial assumptions based on experience, including increased
longevity; and
4. An increase in the number of retirees and the size of their pensions.
These factors have combined to take the pension plans from being at or above full
funding levels during the last decade to being underfunded now.
E. The Impact of Enhanced Benefits
Over the years, the City Council has increased pension benefits from the basic levels. These
changes which included increases in pension formulas (age at retirement, years of service,
multiplier, and calculation of final compensation) occurred as a result of bargaining with
employee labor groups. The impact of these changes cannot be overstated.
Importantly, in the case of virtually every pension improvement, the enhanced benefits have
been applied to an employees full service with the City, including service which occurred
before the change. These retroactive adjustments have a direct impact on the Citys unfunded
liability. As an example, consider an employee whose pension formula is enhanced after 29
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years of service. For this employee, the City and the employee had contributed to the plan at the
lower rate for 29 years. Then, the employees formula is converted to the higher rate
retroactively, regardless of years served under the lower benefit plan. Therefore, neither the
City nor the employee contributed to the plan for 29 years at the level necessary to fund the
higher level of benefit that this employee will now receive for all 30 years of service when the
employee retires a year later. This difference gets added directly to the unfunded liability.
1. Pension Formulas
With respect to pension formulas, the most dramatic changes have occurred in the Police
and Fire Plan. Currently, they may earn up to 90% of their final salary. In addition, the
minimum retirement age has been lowered from 55 to 50 and changed the
determination of final compensation from highest three-year average compensation
to highest 12-month average compensation for both plans.
2. COLA
The cost of living allowance (COLA) guarantees annual cost-of-living increases, even in
the first year of members retirement. The current system provides that all pensions
receive an automatic 2% increase, regardless of actual changes in the cost of living.
Because the COLA is effective on a date certain for each plan, a Police and Fire member
can retire on January 31st at 90% of salary and on February 1st the COLA adjustment
effective date receive a 2% increase, resulting in a pension of 92% of final salary.
3. Other Post-Employment Benefits
At the time Other Post-Employment Benefits (OPEB) were granted, their cost was
minimal, and it is safe to assume that no one involved fully anticipated the long-term
consequences. Over time, of course, the amount paid and the number of retirees has
increased, and the problem is compounded by lower retirement ages, meaning more
years before a retiree is covered by Medicare. As a result, as noted previously, the
City has an estimated $61 million in unfunded liabilities resulting from promised
OPEB benefits.
F. Failure to Meet Earnings Expectations
The cost of increasing pension benefits was masked, to some degree, during the decade
preceding 2008 because of rising equity markets leading to miscellaneous plan becoming fully
funded and the safety plan in a well funded status. However, with the recession beginning in
2008, the plans became underfunded rapidly and are not expected to recover any time soon.
One of the variables responsible for the increase in unfunded liabilities is the failure of the plans
to achieve the annual earning assumptions on which they have been premised. Until 2002,
CalPERS assumed earnings of 8.25% when it began phasing in a reduction of the earnings
assumption to 7.75%. From 2000-2002 to 2008-2009, much of the new unfunded pension
liabilities were caused by investment losses and adjustments. As this report goes to publication,
the CalPERS Board has adjusted its assumed earnings rate to 7.50%.
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Even strong returns are unlikely to be able to make up for recent market losses. During 2009-
2010, each plan saw strong net investment returns 12% for both Miscellaneous and Police and
Fire. Positive returns were realized in 2010-2011. However, it would take extraordinary returns
over a sustained period to make up for the very severe losses in calendar year 2008 and few
are predicting such returns. Indeed, even the very positive returns for 2010-2011 have
undoubtedly been eroded by declines in the equities markets since June 2011.
Nationally, the trend for earnings assumptions has been downward, reflective: (a) the lower
yields on bonds comprising 30-40% of pension portfolios, and (b) reduced expectations for
equity (stock) investments given the global overhang of sovereign and consumer debt. If the
CalPERS Board reacts to this by reducing the actuarially assumed investment rates of return
below its current level of 7.5%, the Unfunded Actuarial Accrued Liability (UAAL) for the plans
would increase because the difference would need to be made up in contributions. On the other
hand, if the CalPERS Board were to leave the earnings assumptions unchanged, and the actual
rate of return on invested assets falls below the plans assumptions, then the UAAL would
increase due to the disparity between actual investment results and the actuarially assumed
investment rates of return.
Either way, the amortization of those differences would increase the Citys annual required
contribution beyond current projections.
G. Increase in the Number of Retirees
Another factor in the increase in pension costs and one that will likely worsen significantly
over time is the rising number of retirees relative to active employees. The increasing ratio
creates a risk of even higher future contribution rates. This means that the annual cost to pay
down the unfunded liability is spread across fewer active employees
In San Bernardino, as the number of active employees as a percentage of overall pension plan
membership has decreased, the payments to retirees out of the plans have exceeded
payments by active employees into the plans. The negative effect of this maturation of the
plans during a down market cannot be overstated. As a result of the confluence of events, the
impact of negative investment performance is exaggerated because the system has a negative
cash flow. With not enough new money flowing in, the system is forced to sell assets at
historically low values, when it should be buying low in anticipation of the eventual market
recovery. Now the cost of recovering from a recessionary market decline escalates.
H. Conclusion
Without compensation reforms, pension and OPEB contributions are expected to amount to
roughly 14% of total General Fund Expenditures by 2015-2016 totaling about $24 million
(excluding pension obligation bond debt).
In absolute dollars, San Bernardinos General Fund employee pension costs have risen from
$6.2 million in 2000-2001 to $19 million by 2012-2013, and are projected to reach $22.6 million
by 2015-2016 if no reforms are adopted in total, a $3.6 million increase in annual spending.
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Unsustainable compensation costs are not San Bernardinos problem alone. Retirement costs
have significantly increased across the country. Concern about how to pay for retirement
benefits is a national issue. What is important to grasp from these increases is that the City has
worked very hard to absorb these increases to date. There have been severe consequences to this
as we find ourselves facing Chapter 9 Bankruptcy.
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IV. EFFORTS TO ADDRESS THE FISCAL CRISIS AND CONSIDERATION OF
ALTERNATIVES TO CHAPTER 9 BANKRUPTCY
The City has made reasonable efforts over the last several years to address its fiscal situation,
and continues to do so. Most recently, the Mayor and Common Council adopted a Fiscal
Emergency Operating Plan to address the Citys budget shortfalls. Moreover, as discussed
below, the City has considered and continues to consider - other proposed solutions for
addressing the rising personnel costs. However, it must be noted that the service-level impacts
are in fact another alternative, albeit one with potentially unacceptable consequences since the
City will be rendered unable to provide basic municipal services. That dire situation will be the
unacceptable outcome if the City does not swiftly address the fiscal emergency and reduce its
operational costs.
The City has also considered and is pursuing other ways to control costs and avoid unacceptable
service cuts. Some of these are discussed below. Ultimately, even if the City is successful in
achieving all of the ways to control costs outside of changes to retirement benefits, they are
insufficient to solve the crisis.
A. Past Budget Workshops and the Citys Budgetary Analysis and
Recommendation for Budget Sustainability
Over the past decade, the City has balanced General Fund budget shortfalls through a
combination of strategies, including cost reduction strategies and revenue strategies. Given the
severity of the Citys current financial condition and immediate cash flow issues, it is no longer
feasible to rely on these strategies alone to balance the budget without reducing services and
seeking Chapter 9 Bankruptcy protection.
On April 3, 2012, and July 09, 2011, the City Manager presented opportunities and options to
deal with the Citys rapidly declining fiscal health to the Mayor and Common Council. It
should be noted that the Common Council has subsequently provided additional direction on
materials presented. The recommendations contained in the presentations were designed to
balance cost reduction strategies and revenue enhancements. Following is a discussion of those
strategies, some of which have already been implemented.
1. Cost Reduction Strategies
The budget workshop and Budgetary Analysis and Recommendation for Budget
Sustainability Plan identified several strategies to reduce costs, including departmental
cuts, reduced compensation for existing employees; reduced costs for sick leave
payouts, vacation buybacks and overtime pay; and cost sharing of retirement obligations
necessary to avoid further increases in retirement costs. Through bargaining, the City
achieved a 10% total compensation reduction from most employees and established a
two-tier pension plan for new employees. Although this reduction saved approximately
a net $10 million per year, it is not enough to resolve the continuing increases in
retirement and operational costs.
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As part of the Budgetary Analysis and Recommendation for Budget Sustainability Plan,
the City is pursuing the elimination of sick leave payouts, reduction in overtime and
elimination of sellback programs. The City is meeting and conferring with the rest of
the bargaining units and will continue to do so through the bankruptcy process. It is the
Administrations goal to phase out sellbacks and to pursue changes to overtime
identified in the Budgetary Analysis and Recommendation for Budget Sustainability
Plan during this round of negotiations.
Although the savings above identified in the Budgetary Analysis and Recommendation
for Budgetary Sustainability Plan are significant, the most significant are cost sharing of
retirement benefits, which will require successful collective bargaining.
2. Revenue Strategies
The Budgetary Analysis and Recommendation for Budgetary Sustainability Plan
identified the following revenue measures: (1) Real Property Transfer Tax; (2) Utility
User Tax Modernization; (3) Transient Occupancy Tax; and, (4) 911 Communications
Fee. Each of these revenues measures, however, would require voter approval.
It is important to note that the Citys ability to raise revenue through taxes and fees is
severely constrained by the California Constitution, as modified by several statewide
ballot measures, ranging from Proposition 13 in 1978, to Proposition 218 in 1996, to
2010s Proposition 26.
Proposition 13 limited the revenue that cities may receive from property taxes by
capping both the assessed value of property and the tax rate allowed. Proposition 13
also imposed a requirement that special taxes be approved by a two-thirds
supermajority of voters. In 1984, Proposition 62 extended a voter approval requirement
to general taxes imposed by cities. In 1996, Proposition 218 imposed further
restrictions on cities ability to impose property-related fees, reaffirmed voter approval
requirements for all taxes, and granted voters the right to repeal or reduce taxes or fees
through the initiative process. Although Proposition 218 continues to be interpreted
through the courts, it is clear that it has created an additional significant barrier for local
governments in attempting to control financial outcomes.
Proposition 26, the most recent restriction on the Citys ability to raise revenue,
extended voter approval requirements to regulatory fees by reclassifying such fees as
taxes. An example of a regulatory fee is a fee imposed on manufacturers of products
containing lead to fund health services and mitigation of the environmental impacts of
lead. By requiring voter approval for such fees, Proposition 26 significantly restricted
one of the few remaining options for cities to raise revenue.
A challenge facing Mayor and Common Council whenever evaluating whether or not to
place revenue measures before the voters is how to weigh the marginal support typically
seen in pre-vote surveys. In judging whether to place a measure before the voters, the
Mayor and Common Council must weigh the likelihood that marginal voters who are
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leaning in support of a measure will vote in favor of the measure, against the
knowledge that the City generally will only get one bite at the apple when it comes to
any particular revenue measure, and that the cost for that one bite is extremely high,
whether it wins or loses. According to most well regarded advisory firms, once voters
reject a measure, it is often significantly more difficult to pass in a subsequent election.
In other words, the likely chance of passage is reduced once a ballot measure has been
rejected. These combined concerns have prompted the Administration to take a cautious
approach when considering recommending revenue measures to the Mayor and
Common Council.
Following is a discussion of each of the four potential tax measures included in the
Budgetary Analysis and Recommendation for Budget Sustainability Plan.
Real Property Transfer Tax
In California, localities including San Bernardino have imposed a tax on the transfer of
property located within the city. The tax, known as the documentary transfer tax or real
property transfer tax, is largely based on the federal documentary stamp tax, which was
repealed in 1976. In California, counties and cities have been authorized to impose a tax
on deeds of transfer of realty located within such county or city. The amount of the tax is
based on the consideration or value of the realty transferred. The current County rate is
one dollar and ten cents ($1.10) for each one thousand dollars ($1000) of value. Of that
amount, the City receives $0.55 and the County receives the remaining $0.55. Charter
cities, however, may impose transfer taxes at a rate higher than the county rate. The
transfer tax must be paid by the person who makes signs or issues any document subject
to the tax or for whose use or benefit the document is made, signed or issued. Real
Estate Transfer Taxes, authorized as documentary transfer taxes by the California
Revenue and Taxation Code on the sale or transfer of real property are currently levied
by all counties and many cities.
Real Property Transfer Taxes may be applied only to residential sales or to other types of
real estate transactions including commercial and industrial sales. Revenue raised from
the Real Property Transfer Tax is added to the Citys General Fund.
It is recommended the City Council consider implementing a rate of $5 per $1000 of
value to provide a base level of funding necessary to deliver essential services to the
community. The proposed rate would generate roughly $3 million annually.
Utility User Tax
Many cities charge a tax on utilities, ranging up to 9.5% (Huntington Park). San
Bernardino currently charges 7.75%. Each 1% increase on utilities currently taxed
(telephone, cable, electric, and gas) would yield approximately $3 million annually.
Each 1% on utilities not currently taxed (sanitary sewer service, sanitation, refuse
collection) would yield several hundred thousand dollars annually.
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Utility user taxes (UUT) are paid by San Bernardino residents and businesses and are
collected by the utility providers who serve them. The utility then remits the tax
payments to the City. Annual revenue in FY 2010-11 from utility user taxes (electric,
gas, cable, land line phone, and cell phone) was $22 million. The City has made annual
revenue projections considering possible tax increases at 1% and 2%. Further, sanitary
sewer service, sanitation, and refuse collection are currently not part of the utility user
tax. The City may want to consider modernizing and expanding the utility user tax to
cover utilities not currently included.
A utility user tax increase can only be voted on during a general election. A simple
majority is needed unless the City Council declares a fiscal emergency and puts the
potential tax increase to a vote during a special election. It should be noted that costs for
special elections are higher. For San Bernardino, a special election costs approximately
$200,000.
Transient Occupancy Tax
The Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) is a tax charged on hotel stays. San Bernardino
presently has a TOT rate of 10%, which is the County average. In the San Bernardino /
Riverside County area, some cities charge as much as 12.7% (Palm Springs). For our
City, TOT generates just under $2,500,000 per year in revenues, meaning that each 1%
of the tax generates about $250,000.
Increasing the rate by 1% would put the rate at the highest level in the County and
would generate only $250,000 in revenues. There might also be some negative impact
of the higher tax rate on occupancy rates at the local hotels and spas. For these reasons,
we are not recommending an increase of the existing TOT.
911 Communications Fee
While often called a fee, this potential revenue source is actually a tax requiring voter
approval. A 911 communications fee would yield approximately $6.7 million a year.
The tax would be charged on most personal and business telephone lines and cell phones
in the City. Some exemptions typically exist, mainly relating to customers on lifeline
service and service to non-profit organizations and government offices.
The City of San Jose has implemented this fee and estimates that approximately 90% of
the phone accounts in their community are taxed. The justification for charging a fee to
telephone subscribers is that only people who have telephones can call 911 for
emergency services. As stated in the San Jose ordinance, Subscribers to telephone
service derive significant benefits from ongoing operation of the modernized integrated
system installed at the San Jos Emergency Communications Center in the form of
more efficient dispatch of services to a 911 emergency request.
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B. Best Cases Revenue Scenario Does Not Solve the Problem
Certain measures included in the Citys Budgetary Analysis and Recommendation for
Budgetary Sustainability Plan have been considered by the Mayor and Common Council in
recent years. While approval of all the measures would provide substantial new revenues to the
City, placing multiple revenue measures on the same ballot is likely to reduce support for all of
them. However, it is important to note that, in the context of declaring a fiscal emergency, all of
these potential revenues together would only garner about $12 million annually, which would
only cover approximately 27% of the FY 2012-13 projected shortfall.
1. Other Revenue Alternatives Rejected
While not included in the Budgetary Analysis and Recommendation for Budgetary
Sustainability Plan, the Administration has also reviewed political and voter support for
a number of other potential revenue measures, none of which has demonstrated
sufficient support to merit serious consideration. Among these are:
General purpose taxes requiring a simple majority to pass:
Increase in the Sales Tax
Parcel taxes requiring a super-majority (two-thirds) to pass:
Parcel tax supporting landscape and energy-efficient lighting:
Parcel tax to support police, fire, and other critical services:
Parcel tax to help maintain City library services:
Parcel tax to protect and maintain City infrastructure services like libraries,
street and park maintenance, traffic signals and roadway markings
maintenance:
Parcel tax to protect and maintain public safety services like police patrols, 9-
1-1 emergency response, and fire protection:
2. Spending Down Reserves
In a time of fiscal crisis, the use of reserves is one of the options to consider as a short-
term approach to bridge funding gaps in order to continue providing essential municipal
services. The City has drawn down its reserve levels over the last several years, and this
practice has proven unsustainable. Effectively, San Bernardinos actions have been
equivalent to those of a homeowner drawing down from their savings account to pay for
monthly mortgage and grocery bills that exceed their regular paycheck. So long as the
savings last, such a practice can buy time to either find a better paying job, and/or to cut
down on monthly expenses. Because insufficient changes were not made with such
recurring income and spending, the Citys reserves have been depleted.
The Administration strongly believes the City needs to implement strategies to restore
reserves to address any unforeseen circumstances as it serves as the Citys safety net.
Without these funds, the City would not be equipped to address significant unforeseen
expenditure needs or to offset large drops in revenues in the future. It is imperative that
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the City be in a position to meet its financial obligations each year and must prudently
plan to do so.
There are strong budgetary and strategic reasons for the City to maintain adequate
reserve levels and to avoid using one-time funds to balance the budget. More
importantly, because this deficit is structural in nature and because reserves by definition
are one-time monies, the City would simply be shifting the budget problem out one year.
Then, the City would be worse off the following year as it would have to not only
resolve the added gap, but it would also have no reserves or one-time monies to balance
the budget or to address unforeseen circumstances.
C. CONCLUSION
The City of San Bernardino faces a fiscal crisis of staggering proportions. The City has
attempted to close budget shortfalls every year for the past decade, largely through reductions in
staffing and one-time revenues. Citywide staffing levels have dropped by almost 20% in recent
years, reserves have been fully depleted and General Fund cash is negative $18 million.
Despite these reductions, the Citys cost of providing services has continued to rise. Personnel
costs are the major factor driving the increased cost of providing services. Expressed as a
percent of payroll, retirement contribution rates have increased from 7% of pay for the
Miscellaneous Retirement Plan and 14% for the Police and Fire Retirement Plan to a projected
25% of pay for Miscellaneous and more than 39% of pay for Police and Fire. In other words,
for every $100 paid for police and fire payroll, the City will be required to pay an additional $25
to $39 into the retirement system.
As a result of these increasing costs, the City projects budget shortfalls for the foreseeable
future. Those shortfalls are anticipated to grow on a cumulative basis, if no corrective action is
taken, from $40 million in FY 2012-13 to over $45 million by FY 2015-16. Absent a dramatic
change to the accelerating cost of employment, the City will have to close these budget gaps by
cutting and potentially eliminating already reduced services below acceptable levels.
For all of the foregoing reasons, the Administration recommended the Mayor and Common
Council adopt a resolution of fiscal emergency and seek Chapter 9 Bankruptcy protection based
upon the need to find and implement solutions that may require the assistance from the
Bankruptcy Court.
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V. BUDGET & OPERATIONAL RESTRUCTING PLAN
A. Preliminary Fiscal Year 2012-13 General Fund Budget
The Preliminary FY 2012-13 General Fund budget of $166.2 million represented a baseline
budget, which is a continuation of the status quo with projected increases in pension costs and
other post-employment benefits, one time equipment purchases, as well as other services and
supplies that must be purchased by the City to maintain the current level of service. The
estimates in the Proposed Budget assume the restoration of the employee concessions, many of
which have expired, and do not include Cost of Living Adjustments (COLA) or other
compensation increases such as step increases.
Appendix A is the Proposed FY2012-13 General Fund Budget, which reflects $121.9 million in
revenues, not including transfers, and $143.9 million in department proposed expenditures. The
budget includes the Summary of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in Fund Balance,
Requested Budget by Department including Line Item Detail, Salary and Benefit Schedules by
Department, and Department Organization Charts.
Key expenditure assumptions for FY 2012-13 include:
Significant restructuring is proposed in each department (detailed below). Overall, the
Administration is seeking a 30% reduction in expenses to balance General Fund expenses
with estimated resources in this fiscal year.
CalPERS costs are driven by the States actuarial report that includes a 0.5% lower CalPERS
discount rate for investment earnings which contributes to a 14.4% increase in costs for FY
2012-13 and a 4.6% increase from FY 2012-13 to FY 2013-14. Lower City payroll will
drive up part of the CalPERS liability rate that pays off the unfunded liability. The major
risk is additional reductions in the discount rate and/or CalPERS investment performance,
which would drive employer rates up further. Future labor negotiations or court rulings
could result in changes to the Citys costs related to retirement benefits.
Increases in salaries in FY 2012-13 is the result of absorbing the costs related to safety
personnel that had been paid by grants in the past. Changes in safety grant funding have
occurred since the preparation of budget documents. The impact of these changes will be
addressed later in this report.
Employee health care costs are estimated to grow by 5%. There is the risk that future labor
negotiations or court rulings could result in higher City costs.
Other Post Employment Benefit costs continue to increase. The June 30, 2009, actuarial
report assumes annual growth averaging 8 to 9% over the next 5 years.
Net debt and equipment lease costs are projected at $5,185,548.
Key revenue assumptions for FY 2012-13 include:
Pursuant to the revenues budget, property tax will increase in FY 2012-13 by 4%. The FY
2012-13 estimates was provided by HdL, the Citys property tax auditor. Looking forward,
Proposition 13 will hold down property tax growth as the annual assessed value adjustments
of properties, which are already selling at deflated levels, are limited to the lesser of the
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change in the California Consumer Price Index (CPI) or two percent, unless sold. Sale
prices will depend on the rate at which the market recovers and whether trends shift to
renting closer to work, rather than owning property farther away from work. The long-term
trend is a straight line, although it is anticipated there will be short term fluctuations.
Sales tax is based on HdL estimates through FY 2015-16, and assumes 3% annual growth
per year. Long-term CPI growth is projected at 2.5%. The shift toward non-taxable services
and non-taxed internet sales will hold down growth over time.
There is no growth projected for the Utility User Tax as increased utility costs, which would
generate more revenue are negated by increased user conservation, vacant properties as a
result of foreclosures and cost savings measures.
Business Registration Fees are projected to grow 4% in FY 2012-13 due primarily to
increases in sales and business to business activity.
The Franchise Tax is subject to similar user conservation and technology trends, and
therefore, is anticipated to be flat when compared to previous year revenues.
New revenues which may be considered and approved by the Mayor and Common Council
in the future arent included because no new revenue sources have been approved, and even
if approved, new revenues would not be realized until some future date, or would not be
immediately available.
B. Fiscal Year 2012-13 General Fund Reduction Methodology
Given the limited resources to the City, the recommendations that follow include profound
budget cuts that in many cases will have significant impacts on service delivery and Citys
employees. Given the significant cash flow problems facing the City and immediacy of the
problem, the Administration was unable to engage the community in the process of prioritizing
programs and services prior to making recommendations for service cuts. Despite the inability
to engage the community, the Administration has worked to minimize the impact and preserve
basic services to the community.
The following core concepts have guided the development of the Proposed FY 2012-13 Budget:
Priority was placed on front-line public safety services;
Basic levels of infrastructure and public property maintenance were preserved;
As many basic programs and services as possible were retained;
Minimum levels of leadership and administrative support were maintained to the extent
practical; and
Opportunities to build operating reserves, begin to fund unfunded liabilities, and to address
the cash deficit will require additional cuts, and therefore, the Administration will seek
further policy direction from the Mayor and Common Council in the near future.
The Proposed FY 2012-13 Budget is a balanced approach which reduces overall General Fund
expenditures from the preliminary budget of $166 million to $143.9 million. Recognizing that,
the Proposed Budget focused on the elimination of specific non-essential programs and services
and related personnel costs.
Key elements of the Proposed FY 2012-13 Budget include:
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Elimination of mid-management positions in the City Managers Office and reassignment of
the Grants Coordinator position to the Parks, Recreation and Community Services
Department.
Existing personnel in the City Managers Office would assume responsibility for the
Economic Development programs as a result of the State dissolution of Redevelopment
Agencies.
Consolidation of the Finance, Information Technology, and Human Resources Departments
into an Administrative Services Department resulting in the elimination of two Department
Director positions.
Administrative positions in the Mayors Office, which were responsible for neighborhood
services and environmental programs and projects would be eliminated and the duties
absorbed by the remaining personnel in the City Managers Office. The two Operation
Phoenix sites would be eliminated.
The Code Enforcement function, which is currently in the Community Development
Department, would be moved to the Police Department to provide greater efficiency and
coordination of the various enforcement functions.
Disaster Preparedness, which is currently in the Fire Department, would be moved to the
Police Department to provide greater organizational awareness and preparedness.
The Community Development Department would assume responsibility for the Housing
functions previously handled by the Economic Development Agency that was recently
dissolved by the State.
Responsibility for the maintenance of the Citys Landscape Maintenance Districts, park
maintenance, and street tree maintenance could be moved from the Parks, Recreation, and
Community Services Department to the Public Works Department and the work would be
contracted with private vendors.
Custodial services throughout the City would be contracted with a private vendor.
Workers Compensation and Risk Management functions would be contracted to a third
party administrator to reduce costs and enhance efficiencies.
Essential services such as front-line police and fire personnel are preserved; however, cuts to
proactive policing and fire prevention programs, parks, community development, libraries,
and public works programs are substantial.
Personnel reductions and organizational restructuring are estimated to reduce salary and
benefit costs by $15.66 million annually.
C. Preserving Essential Safety Services
1. Fire Department
Continued cuts to the Fire Department will have a negative impact to internal operations
and will affect the residents of San Bernardino. However, the Administration and Fire
Department Management, have the responsibility of taking the necessary actions to
insure the City will continue to provide essential services to the public for the long term.
Nevertheless, cuts to public safety cant be ignored during a bankruptcy. In fact,
necessary but prudent cuts will have to be made.
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Fire Department Comparisons
To put the proposed cuts in context, Fire Management staff researched two cities that
have filed bankruptcy in California. The comparison is based on how the cities of
Vallejo and Stockton managed their fire departments prior to and after bankruptcy.
VALLEJO - Upon entering bankruptcy, four of Vallejos eight fire stations were closed.
These closures caused daily fire suppression staffing to be reduced from 28 to 15 on-
duty personnel. Vallejo has since re-opened one fire station after obtaining a SAFER
grant. (Information obtained through personal contact with Vallejo Finance
Administration Staff and a National Public Radio On-line Report 9-27-10)
STOCKTON Stockton had a fire department that was similar in size to San Bernardino
and a population that is larger by approximately 100,000 people, with similar
demographics. Two years ago, Stockton began by eliminating a five-person truck
company and followed that by closing a four-person engine company. The City of
Stockton continued budget cuts by reducing the 13 remaining engines to three-person
staffing and three truck companies to four-person staffing. This resulted in 36
firefighters being laid off. (Information obtained through personal contact with Dave
Rudat, Interim Fire Chief, on July 13, 2012)

In addition to the above, Vallejo and Stockton Fire Department employees gave up
significant salary and/or benefits, either prior to the bankruptcy filing or as a result of the
filing.
Several of the Citys neighboring fire departments have reduced fire suppression staffing
the last several years:
Colton Fire Department has eliminated an Engine Company, paramedic squad, and a
Chief Officer position
Rialto Fire Department eliminated an Engine Company, 2 Chief Officers, and the
Fire Marshal position
Redlands Fire Department has eliminated 3 Chief Officers positions
Loma Linda Fire Department eliminated a Chief Officer position and is sharing
administrative duties with the Colton Fire Department
Prior Budget Reduction Actions
Like other City departments, the Fire Departments cuts began in 2008 with concessions
from the fire management group and then continued with various concessions from all
the employee groups within the Fire Department over the following years. Personnel
cuts have also been made during this time period and have resulted in some unavoidable
negative impacts.
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Fire & EMS Program - Eighteen firefighter positions have been eliminated, this
resulted in six engine companies being reduced from four-person staffing to three-person
staffing. Currently, only two truck companies and one single engine company has four-
person staffing. This equates to an 11% reduction in fire suppression personnel
compared to 2008 levels.
This has caused firefighting companies to lose efficiency on the fireground, as well as
other emergency incidents they respond to. Staff members have been asked to do more
with less and have done a terrific job. The recommended standard as set by the
National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is for engine companies to be staffed with
four people. The Citys goal was to work toward that recommendation prior to the
downturn in the economy. The Administration and Fire Management recommend the
City continue to seek the NFPA recommended level of four personnel per company
when financially possible.
Chief Officers - A total of three chief officer positions (Deputy Chief, Fire Marshal and
Training Division Chief) have been vacated. These vacancies became effective with the
action the City Council on July 2, 2012. This has resulted in a daily staffing level of one
Fire Chief during the day and two Battalion Chiefs working a 24-hour shift schedule.
Prior to this cut, there had already been a reduction of one Chief Officer Position and a
management re-organization to handle the responsibilities in a safe and effective
manner. The current management structure of the Fire Department is unsustainable for
any length of time. The Deputy Chief and Fire Marshal positions need to be filled
within this fiscal year.
The current staffing equates to a 30% reduction of Chief Officers as compared to 2008
levels.
Community Risk Reduction Program To date, a total of 6 of the 15 positions have
been eliminated: Senior Administrative Assistant, Fire Plans Examiner, Fire Prevention
Officer, Fire Prevention Technician, Code Enforcement Officer II, and Public Education
Officer. In addition, a Fire Prevention Officer (FPO) retired effective August 1, 2012,
and the position will be left vacant. Any further vacancies in the Community Risk
Reduction Program can be held vacant, thereby achieving further cost savings.
The continued reduction in staff will result in a loss of revenue, delays of fire plan
checks, reviews/inspections, inspections of permitted occupancies (i.e. restaurants, day
cares, churches, commercial buildings, etc.), and delays of multi-family housing
inspections, as well as a decrease in service to developers interested in beginning
projects in San Bernardino. At this time, it is not possible to calculate the loss of
revenue. The department will no longer have a proactive Public Education program, and
the City will be limited in their participation in community events.
During the remaining portion of this fiscal year, the Administration and Fire
Management anticipate the need to either out-source or hire part time personnel to assist
with fire plan check reviews. Primary reasons are due to the complexity of the plans and
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lack of staff available to review them in a timely manner.
The Community Risk Reduction Program is self-sustaining and provides an essential
service. After reviewing the structure and complexity of the program, Administration
and Fire Management do not feel that the same job can be handed off to someone else
to provide the service without a significant loss of revenue and service to the citizens.
There would be no viable cost savings associated with any further re-organization of the
Fire Prevention Bureau.
The current staffing equates to a 30% reduction of the Community Risk Reduction
Program compared to 2008 levels.
Administration and Fleet & Equipment Program The Administration and Fleet &
Equipment Program has sustained a total loss of three positions: Training Captain,
Administrative Assistant Training, and an Equipment Mechanic II. This has left only
four personnel in the Fire Shop and seven personnel in Administration.
The Fire Department is no longer able to offer training classes, which did provide a
source of revenue, to the department members and to those outside the department. The
ability to maintain the fire apparatus is becoming increasingly challenging due to limited
manpower and lack of funding for replacement parts and/or apparatus. Further cuts to
shop personnel would greatly jeopardize response capabilities and the safety of
personnel.
Administration and Fire Management recommend no further cuts be imposed in the
Administration and Fleet & Equipment Program area. In the event of future retirements,
some of the positions may be held temporarily vacant requiring staff to come in on
overtime to continue essential operations based on the need of the department. The
exceptions would be that if either the Emergency Medical Services Coordinator or the
Administrative Analyst II positions become vacant, these positions would need to be
filled immediately.
The current staffing equates to a 40% cut of personnel as compared to 2008 levels.
Disaster Preparedness Program The Emergency Services Manager assigned to this
program was also identified in the City Council action of July 2, 2012, to be held vacant
through attrition. Administration and Fire Management anticipate this to occur prior to
the end of 2012 calendar year. Approximately 60% of this position is funded by grant
monies. At this time, Administration and Fire Management cannot estimate the savings
associated with this position. The loss of this position will require the duties and
responsibilities be reassigned to another City department as they are vitally important.
The loss of this position will severely limit our ability to prepare and respond to both
man-made and natural disasters, our ability to recoup our costs associated with providing
service during these incidents, leaving the City liable for the cost, and our ability to
apply for and manage grants that we currently rely on for equipment and training.
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Emergency Communications There are eleven personnel assigned to the Fire Dispatch
Center, including a Fire Communication Manager and ten Dispatcher II positions. The
Fire Departments Emergency Communications Center is located at the Police
Department Dispatch Center. This is the minimum number of staff needed to provide
for two dedicated fire dispatchers on duty 24 hours a day and supervision.
Over the past several years, out-sourcing fire dispatch services has been explored with
the dispatch center run by San Bernardino County, known as Comm Center. The result
has consistently been that out-sourcing will not provide a monetary savings to the City
nor increase efficiency of dispatch operations. This can be explored again as an option.
Fire Management has made some preliminary inquiries but would need to receive
further direction to pursue an official proposal.
There are several factors that could complicate this potential move. The City has a
contractual obligation to provide dispatch services for the San Manuel Band of Mission
Indians (SMBMI) Fire Department. The contract will expire in July 2017. This contract
has been paid in full by SMBMI and would have to be re-negotiated. Also, the City has
a contract with American Medical Response (AMR) which generates approximately
$320,000 annually in revenue to the City. This is accomplished through an agreement
with the Inland Counties Emergency Medical Agency (ICEMA) and AMR, enabling
AMR to reduce staffing based on our ability to arrive on scene and provide Advanced
Life Support (ALS) services. A percentage of their savings are passed on to the City,
based on the response times. These agreements would have to be re-evaluated to
determine what, if any, impact there may be if a change were made.
The Citys Dispatch Center also utilizes Emergency Medical Dispatching (EMD), which
is now becoming the industry standard. EMD allows the City to prioritize medical
emergency calls and send only an ambulance if appropriate. Comm Center is adopting
this program and this too will have to be evaluated to determine the impact to our
contracts and agreements.
Administration and Fire Management believe it would take several months, if not
longer, to evaluate and implement out-sourcing of our fire dispatch services, if it proved
to offer tangible benefits. At this time, there are no changes proposed to the Emergency
Communications Program for this fiscal year, however, it may be prudent to consider
out-sourcing in the foreseeable future.
The net result of the cuts currently in place is a total of 25 positions either vacated or
eliminated department wide. This includes the retirement of the FPO position on August
1, 2012, which will be held vacant. This is an approximate cut of 15%, department
wide, as compared to 2008 staffing levels.
Proposed Restructuring in the 2012-2013 Budget
As referenced above, on July 2, 2012, the City adopted the proposal for the Fire
Department Staffing Efficiencies presented by the City Council. The proposal identified
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reductions to areas of the Fire Department that were considered non-critical. The
implementation of this proposal was projected to provide $950,000 of cost savings in the
Fire Department for FY 2012-13.
In addition to this proposal, the Fire Department has reviewed the FY 2012-13
discretionary funds and submitted to the Director of Finance additional proposed
savings. The potential savings is $82,200 annually and is attributed to the reduction of
non-critical staffing and associated program areas. The combined total is an estimated
savings of $1,032,200 for FY 2012-13.
To achieve additional budget efficiencies, several measures are recommended.
Measure 1 - Eliminate seven vacant firefighter positions which are currently backfilled.
This will result in both truck companies and one single engine company being staffed as
three-person companies. This will affect both Truck 224 and Truck 221 on all shifts and
ME231-A Shift. These ladder trucks are housed in the north and south battalions
respectively and ME231 is located in the south end of the City on Vanderbilt Way.
These positions are currently vacant and there will be no lay-offs of personnel or backfill
required due to constant staffing following elimination. This will achieve an
approximate savings of $946,879 annually in salary and benefits.
Measure 2 - Unstaff one Engine Company. This will reduce the total number of engine
companies in the City from 12 to 11 and result in a loss of three Fire Captains, three Fire
Engineers, and three Paramedic/Firefighter positions. Unfortunately, there will be a total
of nine demotions as a result of this cut. Each of the individuals demoted will maintain
reinstatement rights for two years. With projected retirements, all but a few will be
reinstated by the end of this calendar year, and the remainder will be reinstated next
year.
There will not be any lay-offs as a result of this proposed cut. The demotions will be
absorbed by positions that are currently vacant and are backfilled each day. This cut
will achieve an approximate savings of $1,409,499 annually in salary and benefits.
There are alternative methods that can be used to facilitate the loss of the Engine
Company, none of which are desirable.
Rotate the closure among several stations throughout the City (Brown Out)
Close one single station in the City
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Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. After consulting with fire
department staff and surrounding fire departments that have had to implement similar
cuts, the Administration and Fire Management recommend the brown out option for
several reasons. This would allow the City to maintain optimal coverage in the core of
the City where the bulk of the call load occurs. It would have the least impact on overall
response times and provide reasonable coverage to all areas of the City. It would also
provide for the best station security and logistical management of staffing. Based on
these desired results, Fire Management proposes browning out the following stations:
Station 225 located near Kendall and University (5th Ward)
Station 228 located at Highland and Orange (4th Ward)
Station 229 located at 2nd and Meridian (3rd and 6th Ward)
Each fire station would be closed for 48 consecutive hours approximately once a week
for a total of ten days per month on average. The rotation would follow the shift
schedule, allowing for staff and fire personnel to adjust workloads, plan for staffing and
maintain station security. Coverage can be adjusted based on weather events, planned
events within the response district or any other issue that may arise.
Each of the stations selected averages four calls per 24-hour period; this would impact
the least number of calls per day and still maintain reasonable coverage to the City.
Station 232, located on Palm and Kendall, does average two calls per 24-hour period but
due to an extended response time into the district from surrounding fire stations and
other factors, this fire station was removed from the proposed brown out.
Fire Management remains concerned about the effects of these cuts and the impact they
will have on the following:
An increased risk to public and firefighter safety due to the inability to provide
sufficient management of incidents.
A possible increase in response times to both fires and medical emergencies. These
factors could result in an increased loss of life and property.
Potential loss of revenue from our AMR contract.
Fire Management has expressed deep concern about the cuts to staffing and the possible
effects these reductions could have on the departments operation. However, given the
financial health of the City, severe cuts from all departments, including public safety, are
necessary to solve this problem. The cost saving of Measures 1 and 2 outlined above
will reduce staffing on a daily basis from 48 on-duty suppression personnel to 43,
including Chief Officers. This will still allow for a reasonable fire safety response to the
citizens of San Bernardino and achieve the necessary savings.
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Fire Department Budget Reductions Summary
On June 27, 2012, the Fire Department accepted the 2011 SAFER grant in the amount of
$3,363,972. This will allow the City to retain 12 fire safety positions commencing FY
2012-13. The funding awarded is for a two-year performance period and is for the
retention of fire personnel and not intended for hiring. With the acceptance of the 2011
SAFER grant, the Finance Department is making the necessary adjustments to the Fire
Departments proposed budget for FY 2012-13. The net result, of the proposal the
Administration and Fire Management have presented would be an overall reduction of
23% of personnel from the Fire Department from 2008 staffing levels. Personnel cuts
and program savings will have been achieved from each division of the department
excluding the Emergency Communications Program.
Table 18 Proposed Fire Department Staffing Reductions
Description Positions Potential Savings
Staffing Efficiencies
(deleted Public Education Officer, reassign
Battalion Chiefs to 24 hour shifts, vacant
Deputy Chief & Fire Marshal)
3 $950,000
Reduction of Discretionary Funds N/A $82,200
Vacant-Fire Prevention Officer 1 $83,600
Option 1: Vacate Firefighter positions
(reduce 2 truck companies to 3 person staffing)
7 $946,879
Option 2: Vacate Engine Company
(3 Captains, 3 Engineers, 3 Paramedic/
Firefighters)
9 $1,409,499
Total Reduction 20 $3,472,178
Please note the projected savings amount will be reduced the later these cuts are adopted
in the fiscal year.
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2. Police Department
At the peak of staffing levels, the Police Department had an authorized sworn staffing
level of 356 officers and a civilian contingency of 180. Current actual staffing levels
are 289 sworn and 173 civilian. The current deployment model is based on staffing
levels of around 299 sworn and 180 civilian. Any staffing reductions beyond current
levels require reorganization and careful analysis of services provided and how those
services are administered.
The Police Department has been through several rounds of budget reductions in previous
years. Reductions of personnel have been accomplished almost entirely through
attrition. The remaining employees have had their compensation reduced through labor
agreements for the last three years. The Department currently operates essential or
first responder staff on a 24/7 schedule; a significant portion of civilian personnel
work a reduced workweek.
The Police Departments budget contains very few discretionary items outside of
personnel-related expenses. Over 80% of the budget is allocated to direct costs for
salary and benefits. The majority of the remaining budget includes items such as
building, fleet, technology and operating expenses.
Proposed cuts can be categorized into those achieved through non-personnel reductions,
personnel reductions through attrition, and personnel cuts through layoffs. The
categories also mirror the order in which the Administration and Police Management
went about determining proposed cuts. First, the Department went through the budget
line-by-line and reduced or eliminated costs within each category wherever possible.
Next, Police Management carefully analyzed retirement-eligible population of staff and
conservatively estimated which personnel will leave and when they will leave in order to
calculate anticipated savings through attrition. Based on those estimated savings, Police
Management looked, as a last resort, at what layoffs would have to be made to reach a
10% reduction goal.
Non-Personnel Reductions: Due to the spending cutbacks already made, there is little
room for further non-personnel reductions. The Police Department has, however,
identified another $265,000 in cuts. This includes severe limitations on overtime as well
as cuts to training, equipment, ammunition, supplies, and other expenses. Some of these
categories will be cut by 60%. Additional details are provided in the impacts section
later in this report.
It will be necessary to restore many of these cuts in future years. Some of the cuts, such
as ammunition, were made based on current inventories and minor changes to regular
training and operations. However, the cuts can only be temporary in nature and would
need to be restored later to meet long term needs.
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Personnel Cuts through Attrition - Some of the attrition projections are based on
commitments to retire while others are reasonable estimations based on employee
statements that are not binding. The table below is a summary of the reductions.
Table 19 Proposed Sworn Staffing Reductions
Attrition Reductions Positions Savings
Captain 1 $238,094
Lieutenant 1 $200,371
Sergeant 5 $840,485
Police Officer 11 $1,459,193
Totals 18 $2,738,143*
* Projected savings through sworn attrition $2,738,143
The captain position reduction is based on a tentative agreement for funding from the
Water Department. The funding would be for one year, after which the position would
be held vacant through anticipated attrition. An agreement is pending for the Water
Department to fund the position in exchange for work to be performed on Water
Department projects.
It is recommended that any positions vacated through attrition be frozen rather than
eliminated so it may be filled at a later time when the Citys economic situation
improves.
Personnel Cuts through Reduction in Force - At the start of the current fiscal crisis, the
Department accepted a Federal COPS grant which funded the hiring of thirteen police
officers. This grant expires at various times throughout Fiscal Year 2012-2013, based on
the hire dates of the officers. Elimination of these positions would not create any
General Fund savings and would create a liability to repay the grant of approximately
$3.9 million in part or in its entirety. The Departments civilian staff members are
tremendously valuable to the organization and the services they provide. However,
based on the COPS grant commitment, attrition rates, and essential service needs, the
necessary reduction of filled positions will center on civilian staff.
Civilian staff provides direct services to the public and support services to allow the
department to operate more efficiently. The range of these classifications is from cadet
(part time entry level positions) to division manager. The part time positions are
discussed in detail below by category. The full time position cuts are summarized below
and detailed in the table. The Administration and Police Management have carefully
evaluated every position in the organization for potential elimination. The positions
proposed were identified based on specific function and expense. The vast number of
positions proposed for elimination will require significant structural changes, some of
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which are outlined later in this report.
Part Time Filled Positions - The Department currently has seven stenographers who
produce reports from recordings made by officers and detectives. Three of the seven are
part time employees. The three part time positions are proposed for elimination. Under
this proposal, the backlog of reports would grow and officers and detectives would now
have to type more of their own reports instead of dictating them. The overall impact in
the short run would be more officer time spent on report writing. Long term impacts can
be mitigated with the implementation of new technology and training options to make it
more efficient for officers to type their own reports. The estimated annual savings is
$82,000.
The Department currently provides crossing guard services to several local school
districts within the City through various agreements. The cost for these part time
employees is typically shared with each school district. It is proposed the Department
terminate the crossing guard program. The contracts would have to be strategically
terminated depending upon the individual contract language. The impact is uncertain
because it is unknown if the districts would fund the program themselves. Although the
function of crossing guards is an essential service, continuing to have it provided by the
police department will have negative impacts in other areas of direct police services.
Assuming a quick decision and implementation, the annual net savings is $227,600.
The Department currently has an employee in the academy training to become a police
officer. The position is classified as part time for the purposes of payroll and budget. It
is recommended the position be eliminated. This person was previously a Community
Services Officer (CSO). If adopted, staff will work with the employee in an effort to get
him employed with another local agency upon graduation. A budget savings is not
anticipated as the position is funded through salary savings already.
The Cadet program currently has thirteen cadets and is grant-funded through February
2013. Barring identification of an unexpected funding source, it is recommended the
program be discontinued at the end of the funding cycle with all remaining cadets being
let go. Elimination of the program is a cost neutral measure. However, the Cadet
program provides valuable support services in many areas as well as a valuable
recruiting and development tool to attract and develop young local residents into full
time police employees. Future funding of the program is recommended when economic
conditions improve.
Full Time Filled Positions - The remaining reductions in force are from full time filled
positions. They are listed in the table below.
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Table 20 Proposed Non-Sworn Staffing Reductions
Position Title Current Positions Proposed

Reduction Annual Savings
Kennel Supervisor 1 0 1 $73,055
Executive Assistant 3 2 1 $70,857
Evidence Technician 3 2 1 $74,103
Forensic Technician 12 8 4 $324,456
Dispatch Manager 1 0 1 $104,220
Admin Analyst I 1 0 1 $45,343
CSO Supervisor 2 0 2 $182,106
CSO II 17 13 4 $259,288
CSO I 28 11 17 $966,529
Records Tech I/II 26 23 3 $163,287
Parking Officer 5 3 2 $113,674
P&T Manager 1 0 1 $99,603
P&T Coordinator 1 0 1 $74,103
P&T Technician 2 1 1 $70,857
Records Manager 1 0 1 $95,229
Totals 104 63 41 $2,326,078
Organizational Impact
The enormity of the cuts outlined above will undoubtedly diminish the quantity and
quality of services the Police Department is able to provide. The identified positions
have been carefully selected in an effort to minimize the impact to core services such as
patrol response. However, in order to implement these types of cuts, there will be a
significant reorganization and reprioritization of services provided.
A sizeable portion of the cuts will ultimately impact wait times for lower priority
services and availability of proactive resources (District Resource Officers, Gangs,
Narcotics, and others). Our priority during this difficult time will be to focus on staffing
at levels necessary to safely respond to emergency calls for service. Other priorities will
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follow and remaining resources will be allocated accordingly. The City recently entered
into an agreement with the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) to evaluate the
Department. Part of the analysis will include prioritization and allocation of resources.
Although the Department will focus on priority related call response times, the time
spent waiting for reports to be taken or for officers to respond to more minor matters
will undoubtedly increase. We will work toward changing the way these services are
delivered and make every effort to become more efficient and to utilize technology
wherever possible.
The non-personnel related cuts will also impact operations. Due to previous budget
reductions, the margin to cut from is very thin. The Departments aging technology
infrastructure is a major concern. Replacement equipment dollars have been reassigned
or cut completely in the last several budget years. Large-scale technology improvement
funding initiatives will be necessary in the near future.
The reductions will also take us backward in many respects to supervision, leadership
and accountability. The cuts significantly reduce the management and supervision ranks
of the organization. In comparison with other agencies for example, we already are low
on the number of lieutenants before the cuts. The long-term consequences of reducing
our supervisory and leadership positions could be significant.
The implications outlined above are the significant known impacts. There are other
areas that will be impacted not outlined herein; some are known and others are unknown
at this point.
Police Department Budget Reductions Summary
The net result, of the proposal the Administration and Police Management have
presented would be an overall reduction of 59 personnel from the Police Department.
Personnel cuts and program savings will have been achieved from each division of the
department excluding the Emergency Communications Program.
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Total estimated savings are listed in the table below:
Table 21 Total Estimated Savings
Budget Item Amount
Non-sworn savings via attrition $390,635
Sworn savings via attrition $2,738,143
Reduction in filled full time positions $2,326,078
Reduction in filled part time positions $309,600
Non-personnel related reductions $265,000
Total $6,029,456
D. Maintaining the Citys Investment in Infrastructure Through Service Delivery
Changes in Community Development, Public Works, and Parks, Recreations &
Community Services
1. Community Development
Over the past several years, the Community Development Department staffing has been
reduced significantly. However, the workload of the department has been impacted by
the recession. The number of permits and plan checks significantly declined as
investment in the City has dropped with the burst of the housing bubble. The City is
beginning to see an increase in development activity for industrial activity.
Additionally, the Successor Agency will soon begin the process of selling the EDA
properties, which could lead to substantial development activity and investment in the
City. Because of new growth opportunities, it is recommended that reductions be
balanced against the need to ensure staffing and resources are available to meet the
demands of developers and others interested in investing in San Bernardino.
Proposed Restructuring
Despite previous reductions in workforce, the Community Development Department has
options available to maintain basic and essential services while reducing costs. This is
possible through adjustments in services delivery; specifically, contracting out and
consolidation of duties.
It is recommended the City eliminate one Building Inspector Supervisor, one Building
Inspector, one Technician one Engineering Associate, one NPDES inspector, one
NPDES Coordinator, one Department Accounting Technician, one Administrative
Assistant, and one Customer Service Representative (admin). Most of these duties will
be handled by contractors. The Building Official would assume responsibility for
supervising the field personnel, which will impact the amount of time available for his
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other duties. With the elimination of the Building Inspector III position, the City will
return the responsibility for the mobile home park inspections to the State. The loss of
the Technician position, which currently provides customer service at the front counter,
will require moving the Assistant Planner to the front counter to assist customers, which
will have some impact on the Planners ability to write staff reports, prepare zoning
verification letters and complete other assignments. As direct customer service will
consume much of the time, some of the duties handled by the Planner will be reassigned
to the other Planner and the Manager.
Despite the reduction, it is anticipated that sufficient staff will remain in order to provide
proper oversight to contractors work.
2. Code Enforcement
There is no question that proactive enforcement of the Citys codes is needed throughout
the City. The City is dealing with significant number of foreclosures and a recessionary
economy which is making general maintenance of some properties less than desirable.
There are currently 3,083 open code enforcement cases within the CRM system as of
August 14, 2012. Moving forward, staff needs concentrate on clearing existing cases
and dealing effectively with repeat offenders.
As part of the restructuring, it is recommended that Code Enforcement be moved to the
Police Department. Despite the importance of code enforcement efforts and the impact
of the maintenance of the community on investment decisions, given the Citys financial
condition, reductions in code enforcement are necessary.
Proposed Restructuring
The code enforcement division currently consists of one Code Enforcement Manager,
three Supervising Code Enforcement Officers, two Senior Code Enforcement Officers,
23 Code Enforcement II positions, one Code Enforcement Officer I position, and one
Weed Abatement Coordinator. It is recommended the following positions be eliminated:
Five Code Enforcement II positions
One Supervising Code Enforcement Officer
Two Senior Code Enforcement Officers
One Weed Abatement Coordinator
One Code Enforcement Officer I
One Customer Service Representative
The annual savings related to these cuts is $937,194. Overall, it is anticipated there will
be a reduction in service and an increase in response times based on the proposed cuts.
Despite the cuts, 18 Code Enforcement Officer II positions, two Supervisors, and one
Code Enforcement Manager position would remain.
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3. Public Works
The Public Works Department staffing will be reduced by 45 positions. Of these, 34
positions are full time and 11 are part time. The percent deleted is 13% totaling $1.9
million for all funds. The total frozen is $608,000. These represent across the board
cuts as follows:
Administration
Administrative Division Manager These duties would be reassigned to the
Department Director; Annual savings $134,000
Environmental Projects Assistant There is insufficient projects to justify this
expense. All environmental projects will be assigned to one existing environmental
projects position; Annual savings $63,400
Executive Assistant There has been a reorganization of the division under the
director; Annual savings $72,000
Senior Office Assistant There has been a reorganization of the division under the
director. Elimination of this position will require the Administrative Services
Supervisor cover assigned duties; Annual savings $50,039
Departmental Accounting Technician Payment and processing of invoices for the
division will be assigned to the Senior Office Assistant. The total cost of this
position is $54,700.
Integrated Waste
Integrated Waste Operations Supervisor The total cost of this position is $84,500.
Reductions in revenue and increased operating expenditures require the department
eliminate a supervisor resulting in a savings of $84,500.
Senior Integrated Waste Operator The total cost of these 3 positions is $190,200.
Trucks will be rerouted and less vehicles will be used for trash pick-up. The cost of
3 leases for trucks is estimated at $150,000 resulting in a total savings of $340,200.
Integrated Waste Operator The total cost of three positions is $157,200. Trucks
will be rerouted and less vehicles will be used in the operation. The cost of
equipment is estimated at $150,000 resulting in a total savings of $307,200.
Integrated Waste Operations Manager The total cost of this position is listed as
vacant/unfunded. The division manager will address job duties.
Fleet Operations
Fleet Parts Technician The parts duties will be assigned to the Manager and
Supervisor resulting in a savings of $69,478.
Fleet Parts Storekeeper The total cost of this position is $57,996. The parts duties
will be assigned to the Manager and Supervisor resulting in a savings of $57,996.
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Fabricating Welder Welding will be contracted out. The total cost of this position
is $72,837. The cost of welding is estimated at $40,000 resulting in a savings of
$32,837.
Custodial Services
Custodial Maintenance Supervisor The total cost of this position is $61,600. Due
to lack of general funding available for custodial work, the supervision is eliminated
and lead personnel will be assigned job duties by the manager.
Supervising Custodian The total cost of this position is $63,600. Due to the lack of
general funding available for custodial work, the supervisor position is
recommended for elimination.
Custodian The total cost of 6 part time positions is $67,500. Assignments will be
made in common areas monthly.
Maintenance
Extra Relief Heavy Laborer The total cost of this part time position is $11,250.
The work will be completed by other laborers as assigned.
Maintenance Worker II The cost of the position is $57,200. Right of way and
graffiti response time will be reduced 30 percent.
Maintenance Worker II (Signs) The cost of this position is $60,600. There will be
a reduction in staffing of 33 percent in sign replacement. Savings: $60,600.
Heavy Equipment Operator The cost of this position is $72,800. There will be a
reduction in staffing of 33 percent in operating heavy equipment city wide.
Sewer Maintenance Worker Eliminate 2 positions. The cost of these positions is
$132,600. There will be a staff reduction of 20 percent in sewer ops.
Electrician I The cost of this position is $72,300. Street lighting operations will be
staffed less by 33 percent.
Extra Relief Heavy Labor Eliminate 2 positions. The cost of these two part time
positions is $22,500. The response time for right of way and maintenance in public
areas will be impacted and requests added to the City CRM system.
Traffic Signal Technician III The cost of this position is $86,300. The work will be
contracted out. The cost for contract work is estimated at $50,000 resulting in a
savings of $36,300.
Public Works
Construction Inspector II The total cost of the two positions is $174,956. The
work will be contracted out. The cost of contracted work is estimated at $70,000
resulting in a savings of $104,956.
Engineering Assistant III The total cost of this part time position is $30,650. New
capital projects have been deferred resulting in a savings of $30,650.
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Engineering Assistant II New capital projects have been deferred. The total cost of
this part time position is $27,970.
Positions that would be held vacant include:
Director of Public Works The total cost of the position is $245,368. It is
temporarily contracted out at a cost of $16,000 per month resulting in an annual
savings of $53,368.
Administrative Analyst II position (1) This position would be held vacant until
development activity improves. The total cost of this position is $97,500.
Traffic Operations Systems Analyst The total cost of this position is $106,800.
Traffic engineering has been contracted out to private firms. Estimated cost for
contract work is $75,000 resulting in a savings of $ 31,800.
Real Property Manager The total cost of this position is $104,200. The real
property work is being performed part time by a retired individual. Substantial
development or divesture of EDA properties will require adjustments to meet service
delivery. The estimated cost for contract work is $50,000 resulting in an annual
savings of $54,200.
Fleet Services Manager The total cost of this position is $137,700. The equipment
manager is currently handling the job duties of this position. The City is reviewing
proposals to outsource trash hauling that could affect fleet operations. Based on this,
it is recommended the position be held vacant at an annual savings of $137,700.
Senior Civil Engineer The total cost of this position is $138,807. The work can be
contracted out as capital project funding is identified. The Principal Engineer will
supervise capital plan development in house. Savings: $138,807.
Facilities Maintenance Supervisor The total cost of this position is $93,500. The
manager will oversee all work orders for all city buildings and facilities. Savings:
$93,500.
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Table 22 Proposed Public Works Staffing Reductions
Position Action Savings
Administrative Division Manager Eliminate $134,000
Environmental Projects Assistant Eliminate $63,400
Executive Assistant Eliminate $72,000
Senior Office Assistant Eliminate $50,039
Integrated Waste Operations Supervisor Eliminate $84,500
Construction Inspector II (2) Eliminate $104,956
Engineering Assistant III (PT) Eliminate $30,650
Engineering Assistant II (PT) Eliminate $27,970
Fleet Parts Technician Eliminate $69,478
Fleet Parts Storekeeper Eliminate $57,996
Fabricating Welder Eliminate $72,837
Accounting Technician Eliminate $54,700
Sr. Integrated Waste Operator (3) Eliminate $190,200
Integrated Waste Operator (3) Eliminate $157,200
Extra Relief Heavy Laborer (PT) Eliminate $11,250
Custodial Maintenance Supervisor Eliminate $61,600
Supervising Custodian Eliminate $63,600
Custodian (6 PT) Eliminate $67,500
Maintenance Worker II Eliminate $57,200
Maintenance Worker II (Signs) Eliminate $60,600
Sewer Maintenance Worker (2) Eliminate $132,600
Electrician I Eliminate $72,300
Extra Relief Heavy Labor (2) Eliminate $22,500
Traffic Signal Technician III Eliminate $36,300
Heavy Equipment Operator Eliminate $72,800
Technician Eliminate $69,478
Total Savings $1,897,645
The net result of the proposal the Public Works has presented would be an overall
reduction of 45 personnel from the Department. Personnel cuts and program savings
will have been achieved from each division of the department.
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Total estimated savings are:
Budget Item Amount
Savings via Reduction in Workforce $1,897,645
Savings via Vacancies $606,875
Total $2,504,529
4. Parks Recreation & Community Services
Since July 2008, the Parks, Recreation & Community Services Department has
experienced a 32% reduction in staffing and a significant decrease in resources available
for maintenance and operations. Given the limited areas in which to further reduce costs
and demand for service, the Administration and management have focused on
eliminating programs that had grant funding and identifying more cost efficient ways to
provide service.
Closure of the Operation Phoenix West and Operation Phoenix East Centers
The Operation Phoenix Program operates two centers including Operation Phoenix West
located at Anne Shirrells Park (Ward 6) and Operation Phoenix East at Speicher Park
(Ward 7). These centers are currently being funded by a Department of Justice (DOJ)
grant that was scheduled to run through FY 2012/2013. It is now anticipated that the
earmark will expire in September 2012. Given the fact that continued operation of the
two centers would require a General Fund commitment due to the expiration of the DOJ
funding, the Administration recommends closing both of the centers at an estimated
savings of $145,000, which represents the anticipated funding from July 1, 2012,
through September 1, 2012.
Impact: The Operation Phoenix West community center is dilapidated and requires
replacement as addressed during a recent site visit by the California State Parks
Department. With respect to the Operation Phoenix East, the recent partnership with the
Disabled Veterans Group/exploratory garden provides the framework for a continued
presence as the facility is a major hub for social, recreation and educational activity.
LMD, Parks and Tree Maintenance Programs
Contracting out for the maintenance of the Citys Landscape Maintenance Districts
(LMDs), parks maintenance and tree maintenance and reassignment of these
responsibilities to the Citys Public Works Department is recommended in an effort to
address park and landscape maintenance issues within the available resources. LMD
maintenance is addressed under separate cover.
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Impact: This action would result in the elimination of 31 positions. Five positions
including three landscape inspectors, one park maintenance supervisor and an arborist
would be retained to provide oversight of the contract services. Further, this would
eliminate the equipment challenges and increase service delivery while providing a more
consistent response in the event of emergency call outs. The estimated annual savings of
contracting the LMD, park and tree maintenance is $800,000.
Department Administration
Elimination of the Deputy Director position and downgrading of the Administrative
Services Manager position to a Management Analyst is recommended.
Impact: In FY 2009, the Department eliminated 2 administrative support positions as
part of the 32% personnel reductions. The office maintains one bi-lingual Administrative
Assistant and one Administrative Assistant assigned to the Main Office and the
Cemetery operations. Currently, staff work and departmental budgeting and analysis is
provided by the department head. The elimination of the Deputy Director position and
change in the Administrative Services Manager position to a Management Analyst will
impact the Departments ability to respond to requests for services. The change will
result in an annual savings of $230,000.
E. Implementing Service Efficiencies and Consolidation of Administrative Services
Functions
1. City Clerk
Over the past several budget cycles, the City Clerks Office has largely avoided
personnel cuts by eliminating training, and cutting supplies and other less critical
budgets. With those already cut to the bare minimum, it is clear that in order to
adequately respond to the citys current financial crisis and be a meaningful part of the
budget solution, the City Clerks office must make draconian cuts, and these cuts must
include personnel.
This situation is not ideal. The Clerks office can ill afford to lose staff in what is an
extremely busy and visible office. Nevertheless, we can continue to provide responsive
service to internal and external customers through this difficult time with a combination
of lay-offs, back-filling and temporary help for special projects. This is true for both the
Administrative Division and the Business Registration Division.
Specifically, the Clerks office proposes a 20 percent cut in its budget, or approximately
$432,000, to include $386,175 in staffing and $46,000 in operating costs. The decreased
staffing will be addressed with a reorganization of the office, cross training and
increased duties on the remaining staff, greater use of technological and online
resources, procedural changes in the agenda creation process and project-specific
temporary part-time hires.
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To address the increased workload issues in the City Clerks Office as well as the City
Attorneys office caused by the recent bankruptcy filing, the agenda review timeline will
be moved forward, so that documents to be placed on the agenda will be due to the City
Attorneys office on the Thursday 12 days prior the scheduled meeting, rather than the
Monday seven days prior. This allows the City Attorneys staff and the City Clerk staff
extra time for review of the documents being provided in the agenda back-up.
Deeper cuts than those proposed herein would lead to unacceptable consequences,
including being unable to adequately respond to the plethora of public records requests,
business registration calls, and claims filed specifically in response to news of the citys
financial crisis and pending bankruptcy.
Table 23 Proposed City Clerk Staffing Reductions
Position Action Savings
Customer Service Rep (2) Eliminate $121,114
Accounting Technician Eliminate $52,647
Business Registration Inspector Under Fill $42,407
Assistant City Clerk position Eliminate $105,626
Executive Assistant to the Director Freeze $64,381
Total Savings $386,175
2. Information Technology
The IT Department proposes staffing reductions of $668,900 from the departments
various funds. These reductions will result in an understaffed IT department that can
support only the most basic Information Technology systems and infrastructure.
This proposal completely eliminates the Telephone Support program. It also
recommends a reduction in IT Department supplies, outside training, computer
replacement funds, contractual services, and the elimination of seven positions, resulting
in a 30% cut in staffing.
The elimination of the Telephone fund will result in the less-critical Telephone
Coordinator duties being discontinued and others, such as telephone bill payment and
cell phone support, being absorbed by IT positions such as the Departmental Accounting
Technician and the Business Systems IT Analyst II position, respectively. Telephone
contract negotiations and vendor management will be absorbed by the Director of
Administrative Services. Telephone vendor costs will be moved to the IT Departments
operating budget and charged back via the departments current allocation system. City-
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provided cell phones will be restricted to public safety, code compliance, and various
facilities maintenance staff, resulting in a savings of approximately $60,000 per year.
Even with the proposed draconian reduction in staffing, support will continue for
network infrastructure, servers, and telephone equipment. Enterprise software system
support will also continue, including maintenance of the financial, payroll, email,
backup, GIS mapping, agenda management, fleet, fuel, public safety document
management, dispatch, content management, water billing, and customer relationship
(CRM) systems.
However, the proposed cuts will result in an overall service level reduction. Desktop
support turnaround times will be increased due to the loss of two desktop support
technicians. Web posting will have to be performed by City departments, due to the loss
of the Webmaster position. Network outages may take longer to resolve. Telephone
support turnaround times will increase. Project-related tasks, such as system upgrades,
will take longer to complete.
Any further staff or operating cuts would impact the IT Departments ability to continue
to offer core systems and infrastructure support. For example, further operating budget
cuts will result in the elimination of outside support agreements for critical systems,
resulting in systems going down and not being brought back up, software issues arising
without staff being able to get help from software vendors, or state and federally
mandated reporting requirements not being fulfilled due to lack of financial software
support. Mission-critical systems would eventually fail, and the IT Department would
not have the support contracts or staffing in place to recover from such failures. This
could result in an inability to pay employees, provide dispatch services for public safety,
provide mandated financial reporting, send and receive email, protect the Citys data
through backups, and more.
Table 24 Proposed Information Technology Staffing Reductions
Position Action Savings
IT Director Eliminate $214,200
Senior Network Specialist Eliminate $85,300
Telecommunications Coordinator Eliminate $72,000
IT Technician Eliminate $65,100
Senior IT Analyst (webmaster) Eliminate $126,500
IT Operations Supervisor Eliminate $105,800
Total Savings $668,900

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3. Human Resources
The Human Resources Department has three programs that impact the general Fund,
Administration, Employee Services and Workforce Planning and Retention, and two that
impact the internal service fund; Workers Compensation and Liability & Risk
Management. In the Budgetary Analysis and Recommendation for Budget
Sustainability Plan, it was proposed that the Human Resources Department merge with
the Finance Department eliminating the need for a Human Resources director resulting
in salary savings. However, additional staffing cuts would need to be made to comply
with the 30% requested deduction.
The following proposals are recommended with the least amount of impact for the
effective customer service and compliance with legal requirement (EEO, Workers
Compensation, FMLA, etc).
Elimination of the Human Resources Director Position - The Director position impacts
all five Human Resources programs and with the recommendation of the merger with
Finance, this will produce a salary savings of $198,397.
Elimination of the Executive Assistant Position - With the elimination of the Director
position, the need for the Executive Assistant position in unjustified. It is recommended
that this position be reclassified to a Human Resources Technician. Assuming the
reclassification is implemented, this recommendation will produce a savings of $17,680.
Elimination of the Human Resources Analyst - The duties of this position will fall to
the reclassified Human Resources Technician position recommended above. The
savings from this recommendation is $39,225.
Defer Filling the Workers Compensation Adjuster - The employee currently holding
this position has advised the City of his resignation effective August 31, 2012. Given
the opportunity to review the duties of this position, as well as the Citys legal
requirements under Workers Compensation, staff will evaluate the need to fill the
position or to seek outside contract assistance in an effort to reduce operational costs.
Over all, the recommendations above provide savings of approximately $412,683
annually. The table below provides details of the savings.
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Table 25 Proposed Human Resources Staffing Reductions
Position Action Savings
Human Resources Director Eliminate $198,397
Executive Assistant Eliminate $78,887
Human Resource Analyst Eliminate $100,432
Workers Compensation Adjuster Defer $96,174
Human Resources Technician Add $(61,207)
Total Savings $412,683
4. Finance
The Finance Department responsibilities have been expanded to include the oversight of
the Human Resources and Information Technology Departments. Essentially, the
oversight of the Departments will be consolidated under the Director of Finance,
eliminating the need for two Department Heads.
Additional cost saving measures includes the elimination of three Finance Department
positions: (1) Purchasing Manager, (2) Deputy Finance Director and (3) a Financial
Analyst. Designed to improve cost containment and fiscal accountability citywide, two
positions have been added to the Finance Department, Budget Officer and Fiscal Officer.
With the elimination of the three aforementioned positions and the additional
responsibilities of Human Resources Department oversight, the Budget Officer and
Fiscal Officer will provide the City with capacity and structure to improve fiscal
management and sustain basic finance-based services during this very challenging time.
Precisely, the Budget Officer will primarily focus on the implementation of new budget
policies and practices, annual operating budget, capital improvement budgets and
provide support on grant programs. The Fiscal Officer will provide the needed oversight
for debt management, revenue development and procurement of goods and services.
5. City Manager
The City Managers Office is responsible for implementing the policies of the Mayor
and Common Council as directed by the Mayor and implementing the Mayors policy
directives and insuring those directives are acted upon by all supervisors and employees
in the Manager-directed departments. The City Manager is also responsible for
administering the Manager-directed departments of the City; attending all meetings of
the Mayor and Common Council and council committee meetings and participating in
discussions without vote; ensuring all laws, ordinances, orders, resolutions, contracts,
and franchises are enforced and executed; preparing and submitting the annual budget
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and keeping the Mayor and Common Council apprised of the Citys financial condition;
and conferring with elected officials to obtain and consider advice and counsel.
A total of eleven executive, management, mid-management and clerical positions, five
call taker positions and one part-time position including the City Manager, Assistant
City Manager, Manager of Communications, Assistant to the City Manager, two
Management Analysts, Neighborhood Services Coordinator/Assistant to the City
Manager, Community Relations Supervisor/Assistant to the City Manager, Project
Manager/Assistant to the City Manager (CDBG), Executive Assistant to the City
Manager, Administrative Assistant to the City Manager, five call takers (including one
senior call taker), and one part-time Administrative Analyst that provide administrative
support to the entire department are assigned to the City Managers Office. While
reductions will impact the ability to continue efforts to improve organizational efficiency
and effectiveness; improve communication, both internally and externally; improve
customer service; and promote private and public investment in the community, drastic
cuts are needed for the long-term financial health, viability, and sustainability of the
City.
Proposed Restructuring in the 2012-13 Budget
A critical analysis of the City Managers Office resulted in the identification of non-
critical program areas and related staffing, which are recommended for elimination.
Specifically, the Beautification Partnership, Citizens Academy, and public information
and community education programs would be eliminated.
Through this restructuring, three positions and funding for one position in the City
Managers Office would be eliminated including the Neighborhood Services
Coordinator/Assistant to the City Manager, Manager of Communications, and one
Management Analyst. The Assistant City Manager position would remain in the budget,
however, funding would not be allocated at this time. It is further proposed that the
Project Manager (CDBG) position be reassigned to the Parks, Recreation & Community
Services Department to position the Department to pursue other funding opportunities
and partnerships and reduce the reliance on the Citys General Fund.
Despite the reduction in personnel assigned to the City Managers Office, through the
restructuring, the City Managers Office would assume responsibility for redevelopment
and economic development duties, which were previously handled by the Citys
Economic Development Agency. Remaining personnel would also assume
responsibility for administrative responsibilities related to neighborhood services and
environmental programs and projects that were previously handled by the Mayors
Office.
Continuing to improve communication and building trust with residents and business
leaders in the City would continue to be a high priority. Despite the staff reduction in
the City Managers Office, funding is included for the Call Center as an internal service
charge. Until the implementation of the Call Center in 2010, the community did not
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have a single point of contact into the City to obtain information, to report issues or
concerns, or to request service. Callers were expected to know which department
handled the specific issue. Departments had varying policies and procedures on
answering the telephone, and in many cases, calls are not answered by a human being,
which resulted in callers not receiving timely service or simply giving up. This system
provided little to no accountability to the public to ensure complaints were resolved. In
fact, because of the lack of follow through prior to the implementation of the Call
Center, Call Center staff members are in the process of reviewing service requests from
the last three years to ensure service was provided or accurate information is provided to
the reporting party as to the status of the complaint. This formalized system for handling
customer complaints holds Department Directors and staff accountable and makes
expectations related to customer service clear.
6. Library
Article XII of the City Charter establishes the free public library system, which is
governed by a Board of Trustees appointed by the Mayor subject to the approval of the
Common Council. The Board of Trustees is responsible for making rules related to the
administration of the library; prescribe the duties of the officers; determine the number
of subordinate employees; fix salaries; purchase books, journals, publications, and other
personal property; and do all that is necessary to carry into effect the provisions of the
Charter related to the library. The Charter also provides that, at the request of the Board
of Trustees, the Council may levy a tax for the maintenance of the library and for the
purchase of books, journals, and periodicals. The City does not currently levy a library
tax.
Based on the Citys financial condition and after consulting with the Board President and
Library Director, the Administration recommends the annual funding allocated to the
Library be reduced from $2.2 million to $1.6 million. While the Board of Trustees will
determine the manner in which the funds provided by the City would be allocated and
the specific impact on programs and services, it is anticipated the reduction in funding
will result in the closure of the three branch libraries. As a result of the closures,
extended hours and some additional services may be made available at the Feldhym
Library.
7. Office of the Mayor
In March 2006, the budget for the Mayors Office was $1,049,400 with ten full-time
positions. Given the fiscal crisis facing the City, the Mayor eliminated four positions
and reduced maintenance and operations costs. Some additional contract services will
be used to reduce the impact of the cuts at a cost of $90,000, resulting in a net savings in
FY 2012-13 of $331,901. The cuts will mean the Mayors Office will have only two
paid positions other than the Mayor including one clerical position and one analyst
position, which is a drastic reduction from the ten full-time positions that existed in
2006.
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68
F. Summary of Proposed Staffing Reductions
As addressed above, the Preliminary FY 2012-13 General Fund budget reflects $121.9 million
in revenues and $166.2 million in department proposed expenditures. The Preliminary FY
2012-13 General Fund budget represents a baseline budget, which is a continuation of the status
quo with projected increases in pension costs and other post-employment benefits, one time
equipment purchases, services and supplies needed to maintain the current level of service, as
well as the restoration of the employee concessions, many of which have expired, and does not
include Cost of Living Adjustments (COLA) or other compensation increases. As proposed, the
budget reflects a structural deficit of $45.8 million.
Through the development of the Pre-Pendency Plan, all non-essential programs and services
were evaluated. The Administration, working with the City departments, has attempted to
propose reductions in workforce or programs that have the lowest possible impact on basic
government services while beginning to take the steps needed to achieve financial solvency.
More than one hundred positions are recommended for elimination resulting in a savings of
$15.7 million. An additional savings of $6.7 million in operational savings have been
identified. While the cuts are significant, the cuts do not close the $45.8 million gap for this
fiscal year. Further, the cuts do not address the $18 million cash deficit in the last fiscal year
nor do the cuts position the City to build reserves or begin to fund the more than $300 million
in unfunded liabilities. Additional budget balancing and revenue enhancement strategies are
needed.
If the Council approves the $22.4 in measures proposed in the Pre-Pendency Plan, the deficit
for this fiscal year is projected at $16.4 million. To further close the gap, the Administration
recommends discussions with the Citys various bargaining groups continue in the interim and
though the Bankruptcy. Several of the Citys bargaining groups have agreed to continue the
10% concessions resulting in a cost savings of $1.5 million. The Administration recommends
seeking, or imposing if necessary, similar concessions from the bargaining groups that have not
voluntarily agreed to concessions as an interim measure, which would result in a cost savings
of $6.1 million. Further labor negotiations would occur through the Bankruptcy process. It is
also recommended elected offices, with the exception of the Mayors Office and the City
Clerks Office that are included in the reductions noted above, reduce the proposed budgets by
30%. This would result in a savings of $1.7 million. Given the need for increased internal
controls to protect City receipts, a reduction in the City Treasurers Office is not recommended
at this time. Overall, approval of the additional measures would result in a savings of $9.4
million and a Fiscal Year 2012-13 General Fund deficit of $7.1 million. Exhibit B summarizes
the impact of the various budget balancing measures.
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69
Implementation
If the Pre-Pendency Plan is approved by the Mayor and Common Council, the reduction in
force process pursuant to Civil Service Rule 511 would be immediately initiated. Layoff
notices giving at least 30 calendar days notice of separation would be issued to the affected
employees. Employees laid-off, transferred to an equivalent classification, or demoted to a
lower classification have the right pursuant to the Civil Service Rules to be reinstated to his or
her former classification upon the first vacancy in his or her department for two years.
Bumping and reinstatement rights are available only within the department.
An employee who is laid off may demote into any classification if he or she meets the
requirements outlined in the current job description, whether or not he or she has ever held a
position in the classification. An employee may laterally bump into a classification of equal
compensation if he or she has more total seniority in class than the employee currently
occupying the lateral position, provided he or she meets the requirements outlined in the
current job description. An employee may demote into a lower classification even if he or she
has less seniority than the employee occupying the lower position. However, an employee
demoting into the lowest classification in the department must have more total City seniority as
a regular employee to displace an employee occupying a position in the lowest class.
While the intent is to process the lay-offs as quickly as possible due to the Citys dire cash flow
issues, the lay-offs proposed as a result of contracting out services such as LMD maintenance,
tree trimming, park maintenance and custodial service would occur as soon as a contract for the
service is in place to ensure there is no disruption in service to the community.
Future Actions
While the Administration has attempted to close this years projected $45.8 million structural
deficit, the proposed cuts are not deep enough to achieve a balanced budget for FY 2012-13,
and additional measures are required. The following are additional budget reduction and
efficiency measures:
Contract with one or more private companies for plan check, engineering, collections, and
information technology services. The cost savings of contracting these services is currently
being evaluated and recommendations will be presented to the Mayor and Common Council.
Initiate a Request for Proposal process for the outsourcing the Citys Refuse Program. It is
proposed that a consultant be engaged to assist in valuing the Citys operation, identifying
expectations, developing a comprehensive request for proposal, evaluating the responses,
negotiating a franchise agreement, and implementing the Councils direction. It is
anticipated this process could be completed in early 2013. Alternatively, an agreement for
the sale of the Citys waste stream to a private company for recycling rather than disposing
of the trash at the County landfill could result in a source of revenue. This process could be
completed within two months.
Explore the opportunities to contract with a private company or another public agency for
the operation of the Citys public library system.
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70
Evaluate the closure of the three community centers Lytle Creek (Ward 3) Ruben Campos
(Ward 1), and Hernandez (Ward 1). The annual cost per center is approximately $132,850.
Each of the centers is heavily supported by volunteers. The Hernandez Center recently
reopened following the completion of a major construction project, and Ruben Campos is
scheduled for improvements funded by State and local grants in early 2013. The closure of
the Hernandez Center would result in the closure of the only in-door gymnasium located in a
City park as well as the aquatics program. With the proposed closure of the Ruben Campos
Center, State grant funds awarded for the construction of Pavilion, will be at risk. The
proposed closure of Lytle Creek would eliminate a center that provides significant support to
the surrounding community.
Evaluate the termination of the agreement with the Boys and Girls Club, which would result
in a cost savings of $85,000 per year, for the programming of the Delmann Heights Center.
Unlike the community centers that are solely operated by recreation staff, Delmann Heights
is open Monday through Friday. At its peak attendance, Delmann Heights averaged
approximately 1,400 participants per month. More recently, the Center averages
approximately 200 participants per month. The termination of the agreement and the
resulting closure of the City portion of the center may create safety and blight issues that
may also impact the County Head start program directly adjacent to the center. Further
partnership opportunities may exist that would allow for the continuation of operations at the
site, with revenue potential ranging from $35,000 to $70,000 annually. If that were to occur,
it is recommended that the Boys and Girls Club consolidate their operations at the 9th Street
location as they remain a viable community partner.
Evaluate the closure of the Verdemont Center (Ward 5). Like other centers, this center
provides significant support to the surrounding neighborhood.
Evaluate the closure of the Senior Centers 5th Street Senior Center (Ward 1) and the Perris
Hill Senior Center (Ward 2) - which provide congregate meals, the Retired Senior Volunteer
Program, Senior Companion Programs, and others. About $588,378 in grant revenue is
received by the City for these programs. There is also a General Fund obligation of
$251,400. Closure of the senior centers would result in the eliminate one Recreation
Coordinator position, one Recreation Program Supervisor, one Program Manager and
several part-time employees resulting an annual cost savings of $251,400. The closure
would have a significant impact to the seniors and may result in a loss of future grant
funding and a degradation of senior services, programs and activities.
Evaluate the closure of Pioneer Cemetery as the cemetery is reaching capacity and the
Cemetery fund faces declining revenues and an increasing General fund subsidy. Two
positions are funded by the Cemetery fund and any closure would result in the elimination of
the funding, resulting in a funding shift or elimination of the positions. Perpetual care is still
required of this facility, which will be linked to park maintenance. Total savings to the
Cemetery Fund as a result of the elimination of the two positions is $116,000 per year.
According to the Historical Society, the Pioneer Cemetery has never been maintained at a
higher level; however, without the ability to expand the current site, opportunities to sell the
site to a private operator are limited and confined to caretaking/servicing of pre-needs.
It is also recommended the Mayor and Common Council review and consider the various
revenue enhancement strategies, which have been presented previously, and identify strategies
EXHIBIT A PAGE 87
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71
for further consideration. While the implementation of new measures would not have an
immediate impact on the Citys financial condition, new sources of revenue are needed for the
Citys long-term fiscal health.
EXHIBIT A PAGE 88
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Exhibit A Page 75 of 94


APPENDIX A SUMMARY OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND
CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE (General Fund)





































EXHIBIT A PAGE 89
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Exhibit A Page 76 of 94
CITYOFSANBERNARDINO,CALIFORNIA
SummaryofRevenues,Expenditures,andChangesinFundBalance
GeneralFund
UNAUDITED PROPOSED
201011 YEAREND PRELIMINARY PREPENDENCY
Unaudited PROJECTIONS BUDGET PLANBUDGET
Actuals FY201112 FY201213 FY201213
Revenues:
PropertyTaxes 26,373,217 26,096,688 26,867,362 26,867,362 0.00%
OtherTaxes 58,462,657 60,737,290 62,908,081 62,908,081 0.00%
Licenses&Permits 7,910,202 9,172,900 9,441,900 9,441,900 0.00%
FinesandPenalties 2,283,426 1,811,800 2,104,300 2,104,300 0.00%
UseofMoney&Property 3,156,270 733,000 733,000 733,000 0.00%
Intergovernmental 13,481,247 10,583,888 7,297,722 8,797,722 1,500,000 20.55%
ChargesforServices 7,319,098 6,854,823 6,898,400 6,898,400 0.00%
Miscellaneous 4,627,935 4,101,750 4,173,400 4,173,400 0.00%
TotalRevenues 123,614,051 120,092,139 120,424,165 121,924,165 1,500,000 1.25%
Expenditures:
Mayor 644,437 819,900 931,715 599,815 (331,901) 35.62%
CommonCouncil 459,440 681,700 705,650 705,650 0 0.00%
CityClerk 1,507,051 2,497,815 1,720,468 1,135,333 (585,135) 34.01%
CityTreasurer 202,524 210,400 226,066 224,866 (1,200) 0.53%
CityAttorney 4,095,525 4,441,850 4,959,606 4,959,606 0 0.00%
GeneralGovernment 2,265,929 4,904,500 21,355,965 16,620,585 (4,735,380) 22.17%
CityManager 1,179,586 1,282,000 1,485,318 1,112,593 (372,725) 25.09%
CivilService 286,522 356,400 411,275 406,275 (5,000) 1.22%
HumanResources 508,371 614,300 778,433 521,524 (256,909) 33.00%
Finance 1,902,878 1,895,185 1,801,097 1,682,756 (118,341) 6.57%
CommunityDevelopment 6,275,707 5,474,300 7,951,225 5,951,626 (1,999,599) 25.15%
Fire 33,506,873 36,339,485 39,123,792 33,253,038 (5,870,754) 15.01%
Police 63,573,080 65,106,500 67,630,580 62,166,248 (5,464,332) 8.08%
Parks,Rec.&Com.Svc. 5,067,528 4,894,000 5,425,725 4,649,973 (775,752) 14.30%
DebtService 4,102,847 1,758,500 1,758,500 1,758,500 0.00%
PublicWorks 8,005,331 8,489,900 9,971,142 8,118,371 (1,852,771) 18.58%
TotalExpenditures 133,583,628 139,766,735 166,236,557 143,866,758 (22,369,799) 13.46%
ExcessofRevenuesOver
(Under)Expenditures (9,969,577) (19,674,596) (45,812,392) (21,942,593) 23,869,799
OperatingTransfersIn:
GasTaxFund 3,620,000 3,620,000 3,620,000
TrafficSafety 1,200,000 1,400,000 1,400,000
1/2CentSales/RoadTax 1,200,000 1,200,000 1,200,000
CulturalDevelopmentFund 357,000 357,000 357,000
StormDrainFund 132,700
RefuseFund 3,721,800
GeneralLiabilityFund 2,000,000
SewerLineMaint.&Constr.Fund 1,735,900 700,000 700,000
CFD1033FireStationFund 585,600 585,600 585,600
AirQualityFundAB2766 70,000 70,000 70,000
TotalOpTransIn 13,023,914 14,961,100 7,932,600 7,932,600
OperatingTransfers(Out):
AnimalControlFund (383,300) (816,000) (745,900) 70,100
LibraryFund (2,131,800) (2,221,958) (1,600,000) 621,958
LMD's (200,000)
RefuseFundStreetSweeping (65,000) (65,000) (65,000)
TotalOpTransOut (4,646,233) (2,780,100) (3,102,958) (2,410,900) 692,058
TotalNetOperatingTransfers
In/(Out) 8,377,681 12,181,000 4,829,642 5,521,700 692,058
ExcessofRevenuesOver
(Under)Expendituresand
OperatingTransfersIn/Out (1,591,896) (7,493,596) (40,982,750) (16,420,893) 24,561,857
EmployeesPayPERS 5,051,588
%
Inc/(Dec) $Inc/(Dec)
8/23/2012
1OF1 EXHIBIT A PAGE 90
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Exhibit A Page 77 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
Depar t ment : MAYOR
Sal ari es
5011 Salaries perm/ f ullt ime 353,241 424,500 514,400 225,861 ( 288,540) -56.1%
5013 Aut omobile allowance 1,650 6,900 6,900 6,900
5014 Salaries t emp/ part t ime 29,750 - - -
5015 Overt ime 665 - - -
Tot al : Sal ari es 385,306 431,400 521,300 232,761 ( 288,540) -66.9%
Benef i t s
5026 PERS ret irement 76,244 102,300 123,834 51,398 ( 72,436) -58.5%
5027 Healt h and lif e insurance 58,760 73,300 76,300 31,800 ( 44,500) -58.3%
5028 Unemployment insurance 910 1,400 1,500 600 ( 900) -60.0%
5029 Medicare 5,717 6,400 7,500 3,400 ( 4,100) -54.7%
Tot al : Benef i t s 141,632 183,400 209,134 87,198 ( 121,936) -66.5%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 526,938 614,800 730,434 319,959 ( 410,476) -66.8%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons
5031 MOU concession - - - -
5111 Mat erial and supplies 11,018 15,000 15,000 13,000 ( 2,000) -13.3%
5122 Dues and subscript ions 1,507 2,000 2,000 2,000
5131 Mileage 73 500 500 500
5132 Meet ings and conf erences 17,827 25,000 25,000 18,000 ( 7,000) -28.0%
5133 Educat ion and t raining 728 3,000 3,000 2,000 ( 1,000) -33.3%
5172 Equipment maint enance - 1,000 1,000 1,000
5174 Print ing charges 2,820 4,000 4,000 4,000
5175 Post age 6,164 5,000 5,000 5,000
5176 Copy machine charges 6,682 11,500 11,500 10,500 ( 1,000) -8.7%
5186 Civic and promot ional 1,468 10,000 10,000 9,575 ( 425) -4.3%
5193 Grant mat ch ( 50) 4,500 4,500 4,500
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 48,237 81,500 81,500 70,075 ( 11,425) -14.0%
Cont ract Servi ces
5502 Prof essional/ cont ract ual services 33,345 13,700 - 90,000 90,000 # DI V/ 0!
5505 Ot her prof essional services 117 - - -
Tot al : Cont ract ual Servi ces 33,462 13,700 - 90,000 90,000 # DI V/ 0!
I nt ernal Servi ce Charges
5601 Garage charges 2,000 1,300 200 200
5602 Workers compensat ion 6,500 4,600 7,225 7,225
5603 Liability 4,900 4,000 4,000 4,000
5604 I T charges in-house 16,900 65,800 73,062 73,062
5605 Telephone support 4,700 11,400 13,194 13,194
5606 Elect ric - 22,000 22,000 22,000
5612 Fleet charges - f uel 800 800 100 100
Tot al : I nt ernal Servi ce Charges 35,800 109,900 119,781 119,781 - 0.0%
Capi t al Out l ay
5703 Communicat ions equipment - - - -
Tot al : Capi t al Out l ay - - - - - # DI V/ 0!
Credi t / bi l l abl es
5910 Credit - federal and st at e program f undi - - - -
Tot al : Credi t / bi l l abl es - - - - - # DI V/ 0!
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 117,499 205,100 201,281 279,856 78,575 39.0%
Depart ment Tot al : Mayor 644,437 819,900 931,715 599,815 ( 331,901) -35.6%
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 91
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Exhibit A Page 78 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
Depart ment : COMMON COUNCI L

Sal ari es
5011 Salaries perm/ f ullt ime 193,202 223,100 292,300 292,300
5013 Aut omobile allowance 44,000 48,300 48,300 48,300
5014 Salaries t emp/ part t ime 17,668 26,200 26,200 26,200
Tot al : Sal ari es 254,870 297,600 366,800 366,800 - 0.0%
Benef i t s
5026 PERS ret irement 40,880 56,500 74,113 74,113 ( 0) 0.0%
5027 Healt h and lif e insurance 97,693 123,200 119,900 119,900
5028 Unemployment insurance 622 600 900 900
5029 Medicare 3,723 3,900 4,800 4,800
Tot al : Benef i t s 142,918 184,200 199,713 199,713 ( 0) 0.0%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 397,787 481,800 566,513 566,513 ( 0) 0.0%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons
5031 MOU concession - - - -
5111 Mat erial and supplies 6,621 15,372 7,600 7,600
5112 Small t ools and equipment - - - -
5122 Dues and subscript ions 202 200 200 200
5142 Meet ings and conf erences - Ward 1 952 4,890 3,700 3,700
5143 Meet ings and conf erences - Ward 2 2,245 16,439 3,700 3,700
5144 Meet ings and conf erences - Ward 3 275 20,107 3,700 3,700
5145 Meet ings and conf erences - Ward 4 328 10,657 3,700 3,700
5146 Meet ings and conf erences - Ward 5 4,071 6,442 3,700 3,700
5147 Meet ings and conf erences - Ward 6 2,136 16,806 3,700 3,700
5148 Meet ings and conf erences - Ward 7 60 8,487 3,700 3,700
5172 Equipment maint enance 71 400 400 400
5174 Print ing charges 250 1,000 1,000 1,000
5175 Post age 7,022 800 800 800
5176 Copy machine charges 8,715 6,200 6,200 6,200
5186 Civic and promot ional 599 1,100 1,100 1,100
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 33,546 108,900 43,200 43,200 - 0.0%
I nt ernal Servi ce Charges
5601 Garage charges 100 200 200 200
5602 Workers compensat ion 1,300 3,700 3,825 3,825
5603 Liability 7,800 7,800 7,800 7,800
5604 I T charges in-house 7,700 51,800 56,694 56,694
5605 Telephone support 8,400 9,500 9,418 9,418
5606 Elect ric - 17,600 17,600 17,600
5612 Fleet charges - f uel 500 400 400 400
Tot al : I nt ernal Servi ce Charges 25,800 91,000 95,937 95,937 - 0.0%
Capi t al Out l ay - -
5704 Miscellaneous equipment 2,306 - - -
Tot al : Capi t al Out l ay 2,306 - - - - # DI V/ 0!
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 61,652 199,900 139,137 139,137 - 0.0%
Depart ment Tot al : Common Counci l 459,440 681,700 705,650 705,650 ( 0) 0.0%
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 92
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Exhibit A Page 79 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
Depart ment : CI TY CLERK

Sal ari es
5011 Salaries perm/ f ullt ime 806,908 823,000 959,500 522,400 ( 437,100) -45.6%
5013 Aut omobile allowance 6,600 6,800 6,900 6,900
5014 Salaries t emp/ part t ime 33,371 36,900 36,900 36,900
Tot al : Sal ari es 846,879 866,700 1,003,300 566,200 ( 437,100) -43.6%
Benef i t s
5026 PERS ret irement 169,990 202,400 225,833 121,598 ( 104,235) -46.2%
5027 Healt h and lif e insurance 186,068 179,200 174,400 87,200 ( 87,200) -50.0%
5028 Unemployment insurance 2,165 2,300 2,900 1,600 ( 1,300) -44.8%
5029 Medicare 10,559 12,000 14,100 7,800 ( 6,300) -44.7%
Tot al : Benef i t s 368,782 395,900 417,233 218,198 ( 199,035) -47.7%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 1,215,661 1,262,600 1,420,533 784,398 ( 636,135) -44.8%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons
5030 PERS credit - - - -
5031 MOU concession - - - -
5111 Mat erial and supplies 5,858 9,200 8,200 8,200
5112 Small t ools and equipment 380 2,400 1,500 1,500
5121 Advert ising 4,259 4,900 4,400 4,400
5122 Dues and subscript ions 1,128 1,815 1,500 1,500
5132 Meet ings and conf erences 1,760 2,600 3,500 3,500
5133 Educat ion and t raining - 620 1,000 1,000
5171 Rent als - - - -
5172 Equipment maint enance - - - -
5174 Print ing charges 10,926 15,930 15,750 15,750
5175 Post age 41,438 46,450 46,550 36,550 ( 10,000) -21.5%
5176 Copy machine charges 6,081 8,800 8,800 8,800
5181 Ot her operat ing expenses 4,117 5,100 5,000 5,000
5183 Management allowance - 200 200 200
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 75,948 98,015 96,400 86,400 ( 10,000) -10.2%
Cont ract Servi ces -
5502 Prof essional/ cont ract ual services 63,786 935,900 3,600 100,600 97,000 2694.4%
5505 Ot her prof essional services 46,476 62,000 62,000 26,000 ( 36,000) -58.1%
Tot al : Cont ract ual Servi ces 110,262 997,900 65,600 126,600 61,000 6.1%
I nt ernal Servi ce Charges -
5601 Garage charges 400 200 300 300
5602 Workers compensat ion 7,900 6,100 9,300 9,300
5603 Liability 3,100 3,000 3,100 3,100
5604 I T charges in-house 90,200 100,100 96,220 96,220
5605 Telephone support 2,700 6,600 6,715 6,715
5606 Elect ric - 22,100 22,100 22,100
5612 Fleet charges - f uel 500 500 200 200
Tot al : I nt ernal Servi ce Charges 104,800 138,600 137,935 137,935 - 0.0%
Capi t al Out l ay
5702 Comput er equipment 380 700
Tot al : Capi t al Out l ay 380 700 - - - 100.0%
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 291,390 1,235,215 299,935 350,935 51,000 4.1%
Depart ment Tot al : Ci t y Cl erk 1,507,051 2,497,815 1,720,468 1,135,333 ( 585,135) -23.4%
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 93
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-1 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit A Page 80 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
Depart ment : CI TY TREASURER

Sal ari es
5011 Salaries perm/ f ullt ime 112,506 110,100 124,100 124,666 566 0.5%
5013 Aut omobile allowance 6,600 6,900 6,900 6,900
Tot al : Sal ari es 119,106 117,000 131,000 131,566 566 0.5%
Benef i t s
5026 PERS ret irement 24,030 27,900 30,900 30,900
5027 Healt h and lif e insurance 39,200 33,600 32,700 32,700
5028 Unemployment insurance 266 400 400 400
5029 Medicare 959 1,700 1,900 1,900
Tot al : Benef i t s 64,455 63,600 65,900 65,900 - 0.0%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 183,561 180,600 196,900 197,466 566 0.3%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons -
5031 MOU concession - - - -
5111 Mat erial and supplies 995 1,100 1,100 1,100
5112 Small t ools and equipment - 300 300 300
5122 Dues and subscript ions 756 1,300 1,300 1,000 ( 300) -23.1%
5132 Meet ings and conf erences 1,273 2,700 2,700 2,700
5171 Rent als - - - -
5172 Equipment maint enance 4,155 4,500 5,066 4,000 ( 1,066) -21.0%
5174 Print ing charges 39 300 300 300
5175 Post age 35 200 200 200
5176 Copy machine charges 1,092 900 900 900
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 8,345 11,300 11,866 10,500 ( 1,366) -12.1%
Cont ract Servi ces -
5502 Prof essional/ cont ract ual services 3,119 4,400 4,400 4,000 ( 400) -9.1%
Tot al : Cont ract ual Servi ces 3,119 4,400 4,400 4,000 ( 400) -9.1%
I nt ernal Servi ce Charges - -
5602 Workers compensat ion 1,400 2,100 900 900
5603 Liability 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
5604 I T charges in-house 5,000 - - -
5605 Telephone support 100 - - -
5606 Elect ric - 11,000 11,000 11,000
Tot al : I nt ernal Servi ce Charges 7,500 14,100 12,900 12,900 - 0.0%
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 18,963 29,800 29,166 27,400 ( 1,766) -5.9%
Depart ment Tot al : Ci t y Treasurer 202,524 210,400 226,066 224,866 ( 1,200) -0.6%
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 94
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-1 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit A Page 81 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
Depart ment : CI TY ATTORNEY

Sal ari es
5011 Salaries perm/ f ullt ime 1,884,727 1,776,200 1,933,400 1,933,400
5013 Aut omobile allowance 6,600 6,900 6,900 6,900
5014 Salaries t emp/ part t ime 173,558 173,000 265,160 265,160
5015 Overt ime 6,554 7,100 7,100 7,100
Tot al : Sal ari es 2,071,439 1,963,200 2,212,560 2,212,560 - 0.0%
Benef i t s
5026 PERS ret irement 339,343 447,500 456,430 456,430
5027 Healt h and lif e insurance 215,288 229,400 207,100 207,100
5028 Unemployment insurance 5,728 5,100 6,100 6,100
5029 Medicare 30,225 26,000 28,200 28,200
Tot al : Benef i t s 590,583 708,000 697,830 697,830 - 0.0%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 2,662,022 2,671,200 2,910,390 2,910,390 - 0.0%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons
5031 MOU concession - - - -
5111 Mat erial and supplies 17,321 12,907 16,000 16,000
5112 Small t ools and equipment 6,768 3,007 4,400 4,400
5121 Advert ising 2,485 5,800 4,300 4,300
5122 Dues and subscript ions 11,576 6,863 14,000 14,000
5123 Library books 70,769 66,976 75,000 75,000
5131 Mileage - 1,000 300 300
5132 Meet ings and conf erences 1,469 3,600 3,000 3,000
5133 Educat ion and t raining 1,185 7,272 10,500 10,500
5152 Gas charges - - - -
5171 Rent als 8,490 8,318 6,300 6,300
5172 Equipment maint enance 4,106 3,457 9,000 9,000
5174 Print ing charges ( 351) 4,666 6,000 6,000
5175 Post age 8,566 6,882 7,100 7,100
5176 Copy machine charges 8,060 7,134 11,100 11,100
5177 Lit igat ion expenses 262,890 475,329 421,376 421,376
5183 Management allowance 474 593 600 600
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 403,808 613,804 588,976 588,976 - 0.0%
Cont ract Servi ces -
5502 Prof essional/ cont ract ual services 5,539 18,927 25,727 25,727
5503 Lit igat ion - out side at t orneys 982,137 1,048,165 1,345,376 1,345,376
5505 Ot her prof essional services 420 454 454 454
Tot al : Cont ract ual Servi ces 988,095 1,067,546 1,371,557 1,371,557 - 0.0%
I nt ernal Servi ce Charges - -
5601 Garage charges 2,200 5,100 5,253 5,253
5602 Workers compensat ion 12,400 11,500 11,845 11,845
5603 Liability 9,900 9,800 10,094 10,094
5604 I T charges in-house 7,400 23,700 24,411 24,411
5605 Telephone support 4,700 8,400 8,652 8,652
5606 Elect ric - 22,100 22,763 22,763
5612 Fleet charges - f uel 5,000 5,500 5,665 5,665
Tot al : I nt ernal Servi ce Charges 41,600 86,100 88,683 88,683 - 0.0%
Capi t al Out l ay
5702 Comput er equipment - 2,500 - -
5704 Miscellaneous equipment - 700 - -
Tot al : Capi t al Out l ay - 3,200 - - - 0.0%
Debt Servi ce - -
5803 Lease payment s - - - -
Tot al : Debt Servi ce - - - - - # DI V/ 0!
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 1,433,503 1,770,650 2,049,216 2,049,216 - 0.0%
Depart ment Tot al : Ci t y At t orney 4,095,525 4,441,850 4,959,606 4,959,606 - 0.0%
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 95
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-1 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit A Page 82 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
Depart ment : GENERAL GOVERNMENT & DEBT SERVI CE
Personnel
Sal ari es
5xxx PARS 31,991 160,800 500,000 500,000
5015 Overt ime 30,819 - - -
Tot al : Sal ari es 62,809 160,800 500,000 500,000 - 0.0%
Ot her
5024 PERS ret irees healt h 448,906 600,000 6,658,000 625,000 ( 6,033,000) -90.6%
WORK COPM WORKERS' COMP UNFUNDED PORTI ON 249 - 3,269,239 3,269,239
GEN LI ABI LI TY GEN LI ABI LI TY CLAI MS 2,735 - 4,920,071 4,920,071
CASHOUTS CASHOUTS - HI STORI CAL AVERAGE 576 - 3,453,175 3,453,175
Ot her - - - -
Tot al : Ot her 452,466 600,000 18,300,485 12,267,485 ( 6,033,000) -1005.5%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 515,275 760,800 18,800,485 12,767,485 ( 6,033,000) -793.0%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons
5030 PERS credit - - - -
5031 MOU concession - - - -
5032 Reimbursed nonhealt h benef it ( 24,885) - - -
5111 Mat erial and supplies 8,983 5,000 5,000 2,500 ( 2,500) -50.0%
5122 Dues and subscript ions 124,861 125,000 125,000 115,000 ( 10,000) -8.0%
5133 Educat ion and t raining 3,245 - - -
5174 Print ing charges 4,349 7,000 7,000 5,000 ( 2,000) -28.6%
5175 Post age 1,157 - - -
5184 Low income rebat es 836 1,000 1,000 1,000
5185 Fine art f unding 133,500 133,500 133,500 133,500
5186 Civic and promot ional 166,462 223,500 223,500 100,000 ( 123,500) -55.3%
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 418,508 495,000 495,000 357,000 ( 138,000) -27.9%
Cont ract Servi ces
5502 Prof essional/ cont ract ual services 1,129,446 3,448,700 1,296,100 1,296,100
various Phone swit ch and net work inf rast ruct ure - - 564,380 - ( 564,380) -100.0%
5505 Ot her prof essional services 202,700 200,000 200,000 2,200,000 2,000,000 1000.0%
Tot al : Cont ract ual Servi ces 1,332,146 3,648,700 2,060,480 3,496,100 1,435,620 39.3%
Debt Servi ce
5803 Lease payment s 2,071,832 1,758,500 1,758,500 1,758,500
Tot al : Debt Servi ce 2,071,832 1,758,500 1,758,500 1,758,500 - 0.0%
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 1,750,654 4,143,700 2,555,480 3,853,100 1,297,620 31.3%
Depart ment Tot al : General Government 2,265,929 4,904,500 21,355,965 16,620,585 ( 4,735,380) -96.6%
Depart ment Tot al : Debt Servi ce 4,102,847 1,758,500 1,758,500 1,758,500 - 0.0%
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 96
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-1 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit A Page 83 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
Depart ment : CI TY MANAGER

Personnel
Sal ari es
5011 Salaries perm/ f ullt ime 825,992 848,000 1,002,986 735,971 ( 267,015) -26.6%
5012 Special salaries - ( 53,600) 11,040 11,040
5013 Aut omobile allowance 17,370 19,600 18,555 13,455 ( 5,100) -27.5%
5018 Vacat ion pay 13,882 - - -
Tot al : Sal ari es 857,245 814,000 1,032,581 760,466 ( 272,115) -33.4%
Benef i t s
5024 PERS ret irees healt h - - - -
5026 PERS ret irement 156,977 217,100 200,123 151,113 ( 49,010) -24.5%
5027 Healt h and lif e insurance 81,239 89,600 91,233 58,533 ( 32,700) -35.8%
5028 Unemployment insurance 2,462 2,600 2,973 2,173 ( 800) -26.9%
5029 Medicare 11,938 12,800 14,865 10,765 ( 4,100) -27.6%
Tot al : Benef i t s 252,616 322,100 309,194 222,584 ( 86,610) -26.9%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 1,109,861 1,136,100 1,341,775 983,050 ( 358,725) -31.6%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons - -
5111 Mat erial and supplies 4,370 4,500 4,500 3,500 ( 1,000) -22.2%
5121 Advert ising - - - -
5122 Dues and subscript ions 4,377 6,000 6,000 3,000 ( 3,000) -50.0%
5132 Meet ings and conf erences 13,393 10,500 10,500 7,500 ( 3,000) -28.6%
5133 Educat ion and t raining 392 500 500 500
5174 Print ing charges 5,345 5,000 5,000 4,000 ( 1,000) -20.0%
5175 Post age 633 500 500 500
5176 Copy machine charges 3,914 6,000 6,000 6,000
5181 Ot her operat ing expenses 3,741 1,000 1,000 1,000
5182 Bad debt s/ uncollect ible account s - - - -
5183 Management allowance - 600 600 600
5184 Low income rebat es - - - -
5199 Depreciat ion expense - - - -
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 36,165 34,600 34,600 26,600 ( 8,000) -23.1%
Cont ract Servi ces - -
5502 Prof essional/ cont ract ual services 2,560 6,000 6,000 - ( 6,000) -100.0%
Tot al : Cont ract ual Servi ces 2,560 6,000 6,000 - ( 6,000) -100.0%
I nt ernal Servi ce Charges - -
5601 Garage charges 400 - - -
5602 Workers compensat ion 3,800 4,700 7,625 7,625
5603 Liability 7,300 7,300 7,300 7,300
5604 I T charges in-house 16,800 65,700 61,254 61,254
5605 Telephone support 2,600 5,600 4,764 4,764
5606 Elect ric - 22,000 22,000 22,000
5612 Fleet charges - f uel 100 - - -
Tot al : I nt ernal Servi ce Charges 31,000 105,300 102,943 102,943 - 0.0%
7451 Transf ers out - - - -
Tot al : Transf ers Out - - - - - # DI V/ 0!
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 69,725 145,900 143,543 129,543 ( 14,000) -9.6%
Depart ment Tot al : Ci t y Manager 1,179,586 1,282,000 1,485,318 1,112,593 ( 372,725) -29.1%
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 97
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-1 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit A Page 84 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
Depart ment : HUMAN RESOURCES

Personnel
Sal ari es
5011 Salaries perm/ f ullt ime 303,119 308,200 433,250 268,940 ( 164,310) -37.9%
5012 Special salaries - - - -
5013 Aut omobile allowance 3,960 4,200 4,140 - ( 4,140) -100.0%
5014 Salaries t emp/ part t ime 32,757 20,000 20,000 20,000
5015 Overt ime 24 - - -
5016 Force account labor - - - -
5018 Vacat ion pay - - - -
Tot al : Sal ari es 339,860 332,400 457,390 288,940 ( 168,450) -50.7%
Benef i t s
5024 PERS ret irees healt h - - - -
5026 PERS ret irement 64,680 77,800 105,865 64,136 ( 41,729) -39.4%
5027 Healt h and lif e insurance 40,106 47,000 52,270 33,240 ( 19,030) -36.4%
5028 Unemployment insurance 1,021 1,000 1,220 660 ( 560) -45.9%
5029 Medicare 3,810 4,600 6,360 3,920 ( 2,440) -38.4%
Tot al : Benef i t s 109,618 130,400 165,715 101,956 ( 63,759) -48.9%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 449,478 462,800 623,105 390,896 ( 232,209) -50.2%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons -
5030 PERS credit - - - -
5031 MOU concession - - - -
5032 Reimbursed nonhealt h benef it - - - -
5111 Mat erial and supplies 2,965 3,800 4,300 2,800 ( 1,500) -34.9%
5112 Small t ools and equipment - - - -
5113 Mot or f uel and lubricant s - - - -
5114 Raw f oods - - - -
5120 Media expense - - - -
5121 Advert ising 200 8,000 7,000 3,500 ( 3,500) -50.0%
5122 Dues and subscript ions 2,281 2,900 3,700 3,000 ( 700) -18.9%
5123 Library books - - - -
5129 St reet sweepers LP - - - -
5131 Mileage - - - -
5132 Meet ings and conf erences - 2,400 2,400 1,200 ( 1,200) -50.0%
5133 Educat ion and t raining 2,489 3,800 3,700 2,000 ( 1,700) -45.9%
5172 Equipment maint enance 128 500 500 500
5173 Out side vehicle maint enance - - - -
5174 Print ing charges 1,654 6,200 6,000 2,000 ( 4,000) -66.7%
5175 Post age 1,129 2,000 2,000 1,000 ( 1,000) -50.0%
5176 Copy machine charges 1,773 2,500 2,500 2,000 ( 500) -20.0%
5183 Management allowance 103 600 600 - ( 600) -100.0%
5199 Depreciat ion expense - - - -
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 12,722 32,700 32,700 18,000 ( 14,700) -45.0%
Cont ract Servi ces - -
5505 Ot her prof essional services 19,970 10,000 10,000 - ( 10,000) -100.0%
5506 Landscape cont ract s - - - -
5507 Facilit ies services - - - -
Tot al : Cont ract ual Servi ces 19,970 10,000 10,000 - ( 10,000) -100.0%
I nt ernal Servi ce Charges - -
5601 Garage charges - - - -
5602 Workers compensat ion 3,000 5,200 2,585 2,585
5603 Liability 9,000 7,100 7,100 7,100
5604 I T charges in-house 9,000 64,800 71,865 71,865
5605 Telephone support 5,200 9,700 9,078 9,078
5606 Elect ric - 22,000 22,000 22,000
Tot al : I nt ernal Servi ce Charges 26,200 108,800 112,628 112,628 - 0.0%
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 58,893 151,500 155,328 130,628 ( 24,700) -16.3%
Depart ment Tot al : Human Resources 508,371 614,300 778,433 521,524 ( 256,909) -41.8%
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 98
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-1 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit A Page 85 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
Depart ment : FI NANCE

Personnel
Sal ari es
5011 Salaries perm/ f ullt ime 950,192 1,039,900 1,097,151 1,019,189 ( 77,962) -7.1%
5012 Special salaries 1,800 1,800 1,740 1,680 ( 60) -3.4%
5013 Aut omobile allowance 10,698 12,100 11,643 6,543 ( 5,100) -43.8%
5014 Salaries t emp/ part t ime 29,820 50,000 - -
5015 Overt ime 1,471 500 - -
5016 Force account labor - - - -
5018 Vacat ion pay 3,766 - - -
Tot al : Sal ari es 997,746 1,104,300 1,110,534 1,027,412 ( 83,122) -7.5%
Benef i t s
5024 PERS ret irees healt h - - - -
5026 PERS ret irement 203,414 257,000 252,668 229,702 ( 22,966) -9.1%
5027 Healt h and lif e insurance 126,990 145,300 139,129 127,639 ( 11,490) -8.3%
5028 Unemployment insurance 2,997 3,200 3,372 3,397 25 0.7%
5029 Medicare 11,357 15,200 16,349 15,561 ( 788) -4.8%
Tot al : Benef i t s 344,758 420,700 411,518 376,299 ( 35,219) -8.4%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 1,342,504 1,525,000 1,522,052 1,403,711 ( 118,341) -7.8%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons
5111 Mat erial and supplies 9,326 9,600 9,600 9,600
5112 Small t ools and equipment 285 2,000 2,000 2,000
5121 Advert ising 2,897 2,600 2,600 2,600
5122 Dues and subscript ions 2,329 2,300 2,300 2,300
5132 Meet ings and conf erences 1,808 5,800 5,800 5,800
5133 Educat ion and t raining - 200 200 200
5171 Rent als - - - -
5172 Equipment maint enance 472 600 600 600
5173 Out side vehicle maint enance - - - -
5174 Print ing charges 2,580 9,400 9,400 9,400
5175 Post age 6,006 8,185 8,200 8,200
5176 Copy machine charges 4,521 4,500 4,500 4,500
5181 Ot her operat ing expenses - - - -
5182 Bad debt s/ uncollect ible account s - - - -
5199 Depreciat ion expense - - - -
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 30,225 45,185 45,200 45,200 - 0.0%
Cont ract Servi ces
5502 Prof essional/ cont ract ual services - 1,000 1,000 1,000
5503 Lit igat ion - out side at t orneys - - - -
5504 Const ruct ion - - - -
5505 Ot her prof essional services 3,349 13,100 1,000 1,000
5506 Landscape cont ract s - - - -
5507 Facilit ies services - - - -
Tot al : Cont ract ual Servi ces 3,349 14,100 2,000 2,000 - 0.0%
I nt ernal Servi ce Charges
5601 Garage charges - - - -
5602 Workers compensat ion 12,000 8,700 12,700 12,700
5603 Liability 9,000 9,000 9,000 9,000
5604 I T charges in-house 504,600 264,900 181,660 181,660
5605 Telephone support 1,200 5,600 6,485 6,485
5606 Elect ric - 22,000 22,000 22,000
5611 Fleet charges - lease payment s - - - -
5612 Fleet charges - f uel - - - -
Tot al : I nt ernal Servi ce Charges 526,800 310,200 231,845 231,845 - 0.0%
Capi t al Out l ay
5702 Comput er equipment - 700 - -
5720 Land - - - -
Tot al : Capi t al Out l ay - 700 - - - 0.0%
7451 Transf ers out - -
Tot al : Transf ers Out - - - -
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 560,374 370,185 279,045 279,045 - 0.0%
Depart ment Tot al : Fi nance 1,902,878 1,895,185 1,801,097 1,682,756 ( 118,341) -6.2%
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 99
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-1 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit A Page 86 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
Depart ment : CI VI L SERVI CE

Personnel
Sal ari es
5011 Salaries perm/ f ullt ime 198,773 199,100 233,870 233,870
5012 Special salaries - - - -
5013 Aut omobile allowance 6,600 6,900 6,900 6,900
5014 Salaries t emp/ part t ime - - - -
5015 Overt ime - - - -
5016 Force account labor - - - -
5018 Vacat ion pay - - - -
Tot al : Sal ari es 205,373 206,000 240,770 240,770 - 0.0%
Benef i t s -
5024 PERS ret irees healt h - - - -
5026 PERS ret irement 42,431 50,200 55,900 55,900
5027 Healt h and lif e insurance 20,288 28,500 27,700 27,700
5028 Unemployment insurance 616 600 600 600
5029 Medicare 2,118 3,100 3,400 3,400
Tot al : Benef i t s 65,453 82,400 87,600 87,600 - 0.0%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 270,826 288,400 328,370 328,370 - 0.0%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons - -
5030 PERS credit - - - -
5031 MOU concession - - - -
5032 Reimbursed nonhealt h benef it - - - -
5111 Mat erial and supplies 302 2,600 1,250 1,250
5112 Small t ools and equipment 1,670 400 200 200
5122 Dues and subscript ions - - 1,850 1,850
5132 Meet ings and conf erences - 150 - -
5172 Equipment maint enance 174 200 200 200
5173 Out side vehicle maint enance - - - -
5174 Print ing charges 22 100 100 100
5175 Post age 466 640 400 400
5176 Copy machine charges 2,063 2,110 2,200 2,200
5177 Lit igat ion expenses - - - -
5199 Depreciat ion expense - - - -
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 4,696 6,200 6,200 6,200 - 0.0%
Cont ract Servi ces -
5502 Prof essional/ cont ract ual services - - - -
Tot al : Cont ract ual Servi ces - - - - - # DI V/ 0!
I nt ernal Servi ce Charges - -
5601 Garage charges - - - -
5602 Workers compensat ion 2,000 1,100 1,875 1,875
5603 Liability 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000
5604 I T charges in-house 6,800 55,200 60,286 55,286 ( 5,000) -8.3%
5605 Telephone support 200 1,500 1,544 1,544
5606 Elect ric - 11,000 11,000 11,000
Tot al : I nt ernal Servi ce Charges 11,000 70,800 76,705 71,705 ( 5,000) -7.1%
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 15,696 77,000 82,905 77,905 ( 5,000) -6.5%
Depart ment Tot al : Ci vi l Servi ce 286,523 365,400 411,275 406,275 ( 5,000) -1.4%
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 100
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-1 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit A Page 87 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
Depart ment : COMMUNI TY DEVELOPMENT

Personnel
Sal ari es
5011 Salaries perm/ f ullt ime 3,564,995 2,681,100 4,202,100 2,993,900 ( 1,208,200) -28.8%
5012 Special salaries 8,750 5,400 9,600 7,200 ( 2,400) -25.0%
5013 Aut omobile allowance 24,788 10,600 6,825 6,825 - 0.0%
5014 Salaries t emp/ part t ime 70,816 73,000 66,000 - ( 66,000) -100.0%
5015 Overt ime 12,301 5,000 18,000 - ( 18,000) -100.0%
5016 Force account labor - - - - - # DI V/ 0!
5018 Vacat ion pay 10,108 - - - - # DI V/ 0!
Tot al : Sal ari es 3,691,757 2,775,100 4,302,525 3,007,925 ( 1,294,600) -46.7%
Benef i t s # DI V/ 0!
5024 PERS ret irees healt h - - - - - # DI V/ 0!
5026 PERS ret irement 712,361 672,900 1,048,237 750,601 ( 297,636) -28.4%
5027 Healt h and lif e insurance 402,174 338,600 441,800 316,500 ( 125,300) -28.4%
5028 Unemployment insurance 11,091 8,400 13,000 9,500 ( 3,500) -26.9%
5029 Medicare 47,085 39,100 60,825 43,325 ( 17,500) -28.8%
Tot al : Benef i t s 1,172,710 1,059,000 1,563,862 1,119,926 ( 443,936) -41.9%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 4,864,468 3,834,100 5,866,387 4,127,851 ( 1,738,536) -45.3%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons
5111 Mat erial and supplies 56,703 50,000 84,000 47,300 ( 36,700) -43.7%
5112 Small t ools and equipment 237 16,600 16,600 3,300 ( 13,300) -80.1%
5121 Advert ising 15,210 14,000 27,600 13,500 ( 14,100) -51.1%
5122 Dues and subscript ions 4,816 7,500 18,200 500 ( 17,700) -97.3%
5131 Mileage - 500 3,500 - ( 3,500) -100.0%
5132 Meet ings and conf erences 313 5,000 25,500 - ( 25,500) -100.0%
5133 Educat ion and t raining 5,999 15,000 42,400 500 ( 41,900) -98.8%
5165 SI R deduct ible - - - -
5171 Rent als 82 - 2,100 200 ( 1,900) -90.5%
5172 Equipment maint enance 1,195 1,500 8,000 1,900 ( 6,100) -76.3%
5173 Out side vehicle maint enance - - - -
5174 Print ing charges 11,812 16,000 53,500 16,500 ( 37,000) -69.2%
5175 Post age 52,509 60,000 75,400 55,700 ( 19,700) -26.1%
5176 Copy machine charges 9,263 6,000 20,600 15,600 ( 5,000) -24.3%
5181 Ot her operat ing expenses 30 7,500 21,800 8,500 ( 13,300) -61.0%
5183 Management allowance 136 600 600 600
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 158,304 200,200 399,800 164,100 ( 235,700) -117.7%
Cont ract Servi ces
5502 Prof essional/ cont ract ual services 303,065 343,400 343,400 340,000 ( 3,400) -1.0%
5503 Lit igat ion - out side at t orneys - - - -
5504 Const ruct ion - - - -
5505 Ot her prof essional services 211,395 259,400 259,063 237,100 ( 21,963) -8.5%
5506 Landscape cont ract s 109,775 29,200 53,000 53,000
5507 Facilit ies services - - - -
Tot al : Cont ract ual Servi ces 624,235 632,000 655,463 630,100 ( 25,363) -4.0%
I nt ernal Servi ce Charges
5601 Garage charges 49,200 55,200 43,700 43,700
5602 Workers compensat ion 116,800 23,800 96,600 96,600
5603 Liability 170,200 280,000 280,000 280,000
5604 I T charges in-house 187,900 244,200 378,486 378,486
5605 Telephone support 66,000 118,700 151,189 151,189
5606 Elect ric - 33,000 33,000 33,000
5612 Fleet charges - f uel 38,600 41,100 46,600 46,600
Tot al : I nt ernal Servi ce Charges 628,700 796,000 1,029,575 1,029,575 - 0.0%
Capi t al Out l ay
5702 Comput er equipment - 8,000 - -
5703 Communicat ions equipment - - - -
5704 Miscellaneous equipment - 4,000 - -
Tot al : Capi t al Out l ay - 12,000 - - - # DI V/ 0!
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 1,411,239 1,640,200 2,084,838 1,823,775 ( 261,063) -12.5%
Depart ment : Communi t y Devel opment 6,275,707 5,474,300 7,951,225 5,951,626 ( 1,999,599) -25.1%
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 101
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-1 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit A Page 88 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
Depart ment : FI RE DEPARTMENT
1,999,599
Personnel
Sal ari es
5011 Salaries perm/ f ullt ime 17,359,660 18,100,000 18,411,241 16,243,505 ( 2,167,736) -11.8%
5012 Special salaries 307,511 303,600 293,075 97,979 ( 195,096) -66.6%
5013 Aut omobile allowance 3,850 - 6,900 6,900
5014 Salaries t emp/ part t ime 20,065 15,000 117,400 117,400
5015 Overt ime 6,631,957 6,300,000 6,184,090 5,584,090 ( 600,000) -9.7%
5018 Vacat ion pay 361,359 390,000 - -
Tot al : Sal ari es 24,684,402 25,108,600 25,012,706 22,049,874 ( 2,962,832) -11.8%
Benef i t s
5024 PERS ret irees healt h - - - -
5026 PERS ret irement 4,038,510 4,744,400 5,550,200 4,837,159 ( 713,041) -12.8%
5027 Healt h and lif e insurance 1,802,542 1,725,000 2,014,053 1,741,217 ( 272,836) -13.5%
5028 Unemployment insurance 73,441 75,000 57,415 50,537 ( 6,878) -12.0%
5029 Medicare 271,246 275,000 273,749 239,358 ( 34,391) -12.6%
Tot al : Benef i t s 6,185,739 6,819,400 7,895,417 6,868,271 ( 1,027,146) -15.1%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 30,870,141 31,928,000 32,908,123 28,918,145 ( 3,989,978) -12.5%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons
5032 Reimbursed nonhealt h benef it ( 19,355) - - -
5111 Mat erial and supplies 291,061 415,900 450,700 415,900 ( 34,800) -7.7%
5112 Small t ools and equipment 80,407 97,500 85,300 85,300
5113 Mot or f uel and lubricant s 10,971 19,100 19,100 19,100
5121 Advert ising 21,782 20,000 20,000 20,000
5122 Dues and subscript ions 3,387 4,900 4,700 4,700
5129 St reet sweepers LP 1,197 - - -
5131 Mileage - 500 500 500
5132 Meet ings and conf erences 697 2,500 4,200 2,500 ( 1,700) -40.5%
5133 Educat ion and t raining 27,094 33,700 45,200 34,000 ( 11,200) -24.8%
5171 Rent als 7,627 12,000 12,000 12,000
5172 Equipment maint enance 29,917 75,000 100,500 100,500
5173 Out side vehicle maint enance 23,673 80,000 110,000 80,000 ( 30,000) -27.3%
5174 Print ing charges 7,289 12,000 16,500 12,000 ( 4,500) -27.3%
5175 Post age 14,664 11,000 14,700 14,700
5176 Copy machine charges 10,925 11,500 15,100 15,100
5179 Dump/ wast e f ees 1,871 2,000 2,200 2,200
5181 Ot her operat ing expenses 20,060 15,000 20,000 20,000
5183 Management allowance 9 600 600 600
5193 Grant mat ch 14,861 9,800 - -
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 548,136 823,000 921,300 839,100 ( 82,200) -10.0%
Cont ract Servi ces -
5505 Ot her prof essional services 161,231 195,000 240,300 240,300
5507 Facilit ies services 7,866 13,500 77,500 77,500
Tot al : Cont ract ual Servi ces 169,097 208,500 317,800 317,800 - 0.0%
I nt ernal Servi ce Charges
5601 Garage charges - - - -
5602 Workers compensat ion 598,930 808,100 834,050 834,050
5603 Liability 156,600 230,000 230,000 230,000
5604 I T charges in-house 564,500 654,200 570,753 570,753
5605 Telephone support 68,600 97,900 91,566 91,566
5606 Elect ric 141,900 149,000 149,000 149,000
5612 Fleet charges - f uel 149,400 106,200 167,400 167,400
Tot al : I nt ernal Servi ce Charges 1,720,430 2,045,400 2,042,769 2,042,769 - 0.0%
Capi t al Out l ay
5703 Communicat ions equipment - - 60,000 - ( 60,000) -100.0%
5704 Miscellaneous equipment - 21,500 - -
5706 Alt erat ions and renovat ions 2,500 - - -
5715 Asset s acquired - Three Fire Engines 196,570 98,285 1,650,000 - ( 1,650,000) -100.0%
Tot al : Capi t al Out l ay 199,069 119,785 1,710,000 - ( 1,710,000) -1427.6%
Debt Servi ce
5803 Debt Payment s - Pension Bonds - 1,214,800 1,223,800 1,135,224 ( 88,576) -7.2%
Tot al : Debt Servi ce - 1,214,800 1,223,800 1,135,224 ( 88,576) -7.3%
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 2,636,732 4,411,485 6,215,669 4,334,893 ( 1,880,776) -42.6%
Depart ment Tot al : Fi re 33,506,873 36,339,485 39,123,792 33,253,038 ( 5,870,754) -16.2%
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 102
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-1 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit A Page 89 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
Depart ment : POLI CE DEPARTMENT
Personnel
Sal ari es
5011 Salaries perm/ f ullt ime 38,754,880 36,824,200 38,079,345 34,290,363 ( 3,788,982) -10.0%
5012 Special salaries 757,915 723,600 723,600 666,000 ( 57,600) -8.0%
5013 Aut omobile allowance 4,675 6,900 6,900 6,900
5014 Salaries t emp/ part t ime 922,498 988,000 938,000 763,000 ( 175,000) -18.7%
5015 Overt ime 2,537,262 2,136,600 2,136,600 2,136,600
5018 Vacat ion pay 82,156 - - -
Tot al : Sal ari es 43,059,385 40,679,300 41,884,445 37,862,863 ( 4,021,582) -9.9%
Benef i t s -
5024 PERS ret irees healt h - - - -
5026 PERS ret irement 9,249,979 10,371,100 11,342,800 10,334,950 ( 1,007,850) -8.9%
5027 Healt h and lif e insurance 2,930,464 2,735,800 2,620,700 2,277,150 ( 343,550) -13.1%
5028 Unemployment insurance 129,390 113,300 118,700 107,200 ( 11,500) -9.7%
5029 Medicare 529,209 596,500 536,900 482,050 ( 54,850) -10.2%
Tot al : Benef i t s 12,839,043 13,816,700 14,619,100 13,201,350 ( 1,417,750) -10.3%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 55,898,428 54,496,000 56,503,545 51,064,213 ( 5,439,332) -10.0%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons
5032 Reimbursed nonhealt h benef it - - - -
5111 Mat erial and supplies 366,010 460,000 429,000 429,000
5112 Small t ools and equipment 66,655 45,000 132,600 132,600
5113 Mot or f uel and lubricant s 306 300 300 300
5121 Advert ising 50 1,900 1,900 1,900
5122 Dues and subscript ions 17,369 48,500 41,700 41,700
5132 Meet ings and conf erences 10,051 15,000 23,700 23,700
5133 Educat ion and t raining 14,041 31,500 53,500 53,500
5134 Training - post reimburseable 88,847 150,000 205,000 205,000
5155 Cellular service 1,487 1,500 1,500 1,500
5171 Rent als 2,292 20,000 46,400 46,400
5172 Equipment maint enance 31,862 100,000 154,500 154,500
5173 Out side vehicle maint enance 45,503 53,500 53,500 53,500
5174 Print ing charges 24,831 20,000 32,800 32,800
5175 Post age 23,808 26,000 40,500 40,500
5176 Copy machine charges 40,371 47,000 52,200 52,200
5181 Ot her operat ing expenses 6,453 15,000 12,500 12,500
5183 Management allowance 190 600 600 600
5187 Police reserves 13,133 17,000 20,400 20,400
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 753,260 1,052,800 1,302,600 1,302,600 - 0.0%
Cont ract Servi ces - -
5502 Prof essional/ cont ract ual services 59,594 45,000 60,000 60,000
5505 Ot her prof essional services 458,584 600,000 619,400 619,400
Tot al : Cont ract ual Servi ces 518,178 645,000 679,400 679,400 - 0.0%
I nt ernal Servi ce Charges
5601 Garage charges 492,300 893,300 763,800 763,800
5602 Workers compensat ion 1,635,200 1,574,000 1,796,475 1,796,475
5603 Liability 806,900 1,042,700 1,042,700 1,042,700
5604 I T charges in-house 1,489,200 1,416,800 1,442,424 1,442,424
5605 Telephone support 168,900 352,600 234,136 234,136
5606 Elect ric 291,600 - - -
5607 Gas 36,000 - - -
5608 Wat er, sewer, geot hermal 6,000 - - -
5610 Communicat ions - - - -
5611 Fleet charges - lease payment s 844,679 881,200 881,200 881,200
5612 Fleet charges - f uel 597,700 485,000 755,600 755,600
Tot al : I nt ernal Servi ce Charges 6,368,479 6,645,600 6,916,335 6,916,335 - 0.0%
Capi t al Out l ay
5702 Comput er equipment 27,752 5,700 - -
5703 Communicat ions equipment - - - -
5704 Miscellaneous equipment 6,983 39,000 - -
5705 Depart ment comput er equipment - - - -
5706 Alt erat ions and renovat ions - 50,000 25,000 - ( 25,000) -100.0%
Tot al : Capi t al Out l ay 34,735 94,700 25,000 - ( 25,000) -26.4%
Debt Servi ce
5803 Pension Bond payment - 2,172,400 2,203,700 2,203,700
Tot al : Debt Servi ce - 2,172,400 2,203,700 2,203,700 - 0.0%
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 7,674,652 10,610,500 11,127,035 11,102,035 ( 25,000) -0.2%
Depart ment Tot al : Pol i ce 63,573,080 65,106,500 67,630,580 62,166,248 ( 5,464,332) -8.4%
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 103
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-1 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit A Page 90 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
Depart ment : PARKS & COMMUNI TY SERVI CES

Personnel
Sal ari es
5011 Salaries perm/ f ullt ime 1,783,641 1,392,520 1,824,130 922,400 ( 901,730) -49.4%
5012 Special salaries 1,025 - - -
5013 Aut omobile allowance 12,840 13,600 13,530 8,430 ( 5,100) -37.7%
5014 Salaries t emp/ part t ime 417,701 440,000 278,300 278,300
5015 Overt ime 48,565 43,000 38,900 38,900
5018 Vacat ion pay 11,218 - - -
Tot al : Sal ari es 2,274,990 1,889,120 2,154,860 1,248,030 ( 906,830) -48.0%
Benef i t s
5024 PERS ret irees healt h - - - -
5026 PERS ret irement 350,270 345,000 452,818 230,776 ( 222,042) -49.0%
5027 Healt h and lif e insurance 253,338 212,300 209,770 93,300 ( 116,470) -55.5%
5028 Unemployment insurance 6,839 5,300 5,020 2,790 ( 2,230) -44.4%
5029 Medicare 27,970 26,500 26,420 13,240 ( 13,180) -49.9%
Tot al : Benef i t s 638,417 589,100 694,028 340,106 ( 353,922) -60.1%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 2,913,406 2,478,220 2,848,888 1,588,136 ( 1,260,752) -50.9%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons - -
5111 Mat erial and supplies 256,681 293,700 316,000 306,000 ( 10,000) -3.2%
5112 Small t ools and equipment 23,944 5,700 8,965 8,965
5114 Raw f oods - - - -
5121 Advert ising 7,800 7,500 17,500 12,500 ( 5,000) -28.6%
5122 Dues and subscript ions 2,185 4,000 4,600 4,600
5131 Mileage 1,669 3,500 4,900 4,900
5132 Meet ings and conf erences 325 3,000 5,600 5,600
5133 Educat ion and t raining - 80 4,400 4,400
5161 I nsurance premiums 11,475 7,500 14,235 14,235
5171 Rent als 9,461 7,500 13,400 13,400
5172 Equipment maint enance 81 300 300 300
5173 Out side vehicle maint enance - - - -
5174 Print ing charges 3,426 4,000 9,800 9,800
5175 Post age 4,129 4,500 5,300 5,300
5176 Copy machine charges 8,368 7,500 7,500 7,500
5181 Ot her operat ing expenses 42,553 38,000 - -
5193 Grant mat ch 369 - 85,400 85,400
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 372,465 386,780 497,900 482,900 ( 15,000) -3.9%
Cont ract Servi ces
5502 Prof essional/ cont ract ual services 376,994 371,800 371,800 871,800 500,000 134.5%
5505 Ot her prof essional services 93,550 100,100 124,800 124,800
5506 Landscape cont ract s 50,542 73,000 54,900 54,900
5507 Facilit ies services 18,534 26,000 37,200 37,200
Tot al : Cont ract ual Servi ces 539,619 570,900 588,700 1,088,700 500,000 87.6%
I nt ernal Servi ce Charges - -
5601 Garage charges 82,200 134,400 175,500 175,500
5602 Workers compensat ion 88,200 168,900 209,665 209,665
5603 Liability 70,000 87,500 87,500 87,500
5604 I T charges in-house 63,000 116,700 99,972 99,972
5605 Telephone support 65,900 113,600 71,700 71,700
5606 Elect ric 613,600 752,700 752,700 752,700
5607 Gas 41,000 - - -
5608 Wat er, sewer, geot hermal 119,000 - - -
5612 Fleet charges - f uel 60,500 84,300 93,200 93,200
Tot al : I nt ernal Servi ce Charges 1,203,400 1,458,100 1,490,237 1,490,237 - 0.0%
Capi t al Out l ay - -
5704 Miscellaneous equipment 23,637 - - -
5706 Alt erat ions and renovat ions 15,000 - - -
Tot al : Capi t al Out l ay 38,637 - - - - # DI V/ 0!
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 2,154,122 2,415,780 2,576,837 3,061,837 485,000 20.1%
Depart ment Tot al : Parks Recreat i on & Communi t y 5,067,528 4,894,000 5,425,725 4,649,973 ( 775,752) -15.9%
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 104
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-1 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit A Page 91 of 94
Account Number Descri pt i on
2011 Act ual
Amount
2012 Proj ect ed
Endi ng Budget
FY2012-13
PRELI MI NARY
OPERATI NG
BUDGET
FY2012-13
PROPOSED PRE-
PENDENCY PLAN $ I nc/ ( Dec)
% I nc/
( Dec)
CI TY OF SAN BERNARDI NO, CALI FORNI A
FY2012-13 PROPOSED PRE-PENDENCY PLAN BUDGET
GENERAL FUND - 001
Depart ment : PUBLI C WORKS

Personnel
Sal ari es
5011 Salaries perm/ f ullt ime 1,903,789 2,000,000 3,227,650 2,267,355 ( 960,295) -29.8%
5012 Special salaries - - - -
5013 Aut omobile allowance 2,100 3,000 4,275 2,550 ( 1,725) -40.4%
5014 Salaries t emp/ part t ime 392,223 481,600 475,600 315,730 ( 159,870) -33.6%
5015 Overt ime 107,563 115,000 60,900 60,900
5018 Vacat ion pay 27,251 - - -
Tot al : Sal ari es 2,432,926 2,599,600 3,768,425 2,646,535 ( 1,121,890) -43.2%
Benef i t s -
5024 PERS ret irees healt h - - - -
5026 PERS ret irement 421,659 495,000 780,843 553,672 ( 227,171) -29.1%
5027 Healt h and lif e insurance 295,914 300,000 374,465 265,435 ( 109,030) -29.1%
5028 Unemployment insurance 7,307 8,300 9,935 6,950 ( 2,985) -30.0%
5029 Medicare 27,843 41,100 46,655 32,810 ( 13,845) -29.7%
Tot al : Benef i t s 752,723 844,400 1,211,898 858,867 ( 353,031) -41.8%
Tot al : Sal ari es & benef i t s 3,185,649 3,444,000 4,980,323 3,505,402 ( 1,474,921) -42.8%
Mai nt enance and Operat i ons
5111 Mat erial and supplies 763,880 780,300 1,012,000 826,800 ( 185,200) -18.3%
5112 Small t ools and equipment 4,486 10,000 14,500 7,500 ( 7,000) -48.3%
5121 Advert ising 1,554 1,000 1,000 1,000
5122 Dues and subscript ions 4,293 5,500 5,900 3,900 ( 2,000) -33.9%
5132 Meet ings and conf erences 1,465 2,500 4,000 - ( 4,000) -100.0%
5133 Educat ion and t raining 2,798 2,000 8,800 2,000 ( 6,800) -77.3%
5171 Rent als 33,338 42,000 31,600 31,600
5172 Equipment maint enance 8,511 19,900 8,000 6,200 ( 1,800) -22.5%
5173 Out side vehicle maint enance - - - -
5174 Print ing charges 772 1,000 1,400 650 ( 750) -53.6%
5175 Post age 340 1,500 1,500 1,500
5176 Copy machine charges 6,760 20,500 9,100 5,600 ( 3,500) -38.5%
5181 Ot her operat ing expenses - 10,000 40,500 - ( 40,500) -100.0%
5183 Management allowance - 300 300 - ( 300) -100.0%
Tot al : Mai nt enance and Operat i ons 828,197 896,500 1,138,600 886,750 ( 251,850) -28.1%
Cont ract Servi ces - -
5502 Prof essional/ cont ract ual services 390,549 514,100 512,200 421,200 ( 91,000) -17.8%
5505 Ot her prof essional services 266,498 390,700 354,400 354,400
5507 Facilit ies services 367,337 320,000 281,400 261,400 ( 20,000) -7.1%
Tot al : Cont ract ual Servi ces 1,024,384 1,224,800 1,148,000 1,037,000 ( 111,000) -9.1%
I nt ernal Servi ce Charges - -
5601 Garage charges 198,000 174,400 180,000 180,000
5602 Workers compensat ion 216,900 135,000 137,730 137,730
5603 Liability 270,700 141,000 141,000 141,000
5604 I T charges in-house 134,800 306,200 148,522 148,522
5605 Telephone support 43,500 181,500 74,867 74,867
5606 Elect ric 1,934,600 1,899,200 1,899,200 1,899,200
5607 Gas 9,800 - - -
5608 Wat er, sewer, geot hermal 39,200 - - -
5612 Fleet charges - f uel 104,900 87,300 107,900 107,900
Tot al : I nt ernal Servi ce Charges 2,952,400 2,924,600 2,689,219 2,689,219 - 0.0%
Capi t al Out l ay -
5703 Communicat ions equipment - - - -
5704 Miscellaneous equipment 13,034 - 15,000 - ( 15,000) -100.0%
Tot al : Capi t al Out l ay 13,034 - 15,000 - ( 15,000) 100.0%
Credi t / bi l l abl es -
5949 Billable t o Wat er depart ment 1,668 - - -
Tot al : Credi t / bi l l abl es 1,668 - - - - # DI V/ 0!
Tot al : Non-Personnel Expenses 4,819,682 5,045,900 4,990,819 4,612,969 ( 377,850) -7.5%
Depart ment Tot al : Publ i c Works 8,005,331 8,489,900 9,971,142 8,118,371 ( 1,852,771) -21.8%
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 105
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Exhibit A Page 92 of 94


APPENDIX B FISCAL YEAR 2012-2013 PRE-PENDENCY PLAN






































EXHIBIT A PAGE 106
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Exhibit A Page 93 of 94
FY201213PreliminaryOperatingBudget:
Revenues 120,424,165 $
Expenditures 166,236,557
Netrevenues/(deficit) (45,812,392)
RevenueBudgetMeasures:
RevenueSAFERGrantAwardforFY201213 1,500,000 1,500,000 (w)
CostReductionMeasures:
ProposedWorkforceandServiceReductions 15,659,404
MaintenanceandOperationslineitemreductions 767,675
ContractualServiceReductions 152,763
Miscellaneous 93,576
CostReductionOffsets:
Outsourcingservices (651,000)
Financialandrestructuringcosts (2,000,000)
FundingDeferrals:
DeferralofRetireeHealthContribution(ARC) 6,033,000
EquipmentReplacementDeferrals:
Phoneswitchandnetworkinfrastructure 564,380
FireTruckReplacement(3Engines) 1,710,000
Equipment(PoliceandPublicWorks) 40,000
CostReduction/(offset)Measures 22,369,798 (x)
NetFY201213StructuralExcess/(Deficit)beforetransfers (21,942,594)
NetTransfersIn/Out 5,521,700
NetFY201213StructuralExcess/ (Deficit) (16,420,894) (y)
AdditionalMeasures:
30%ofCommonCouncil 211,695
0%ofCityTreasurer'sOffice(c)
30%ofCityAttorney'soffice 1,487,882 1,699,577
Concessions(b):
Voluntary10%Concessions(AllDeptsexceptSafety) 1,497,900
10%ConcessionsbyFireandFireManagement(a) 2,176,999
10%ConcessionsbyPolice(a) 3,990,579
PotentialAdjustedNetFY201213StructuralExcess/(Deficit) ($7,055,839)
Notes:
(a)InterimMeasure;tobeaddressedmorefullyinmediation/bargaining
(b)the10%calculationisafterProposedWorkforceandServiceReductions
(c)Internalcontrolprocedures,nofurtherreductionstotheCityTreasurer'sareadvised
CITYOFSANBERNARDINO,CALIFORNIA
FY201213PrePendencyPlan
8/23/2012 EXHIBIT A PAGE 107
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Exhibit A Page 94 of 94

Exhibit B
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-2 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit B Page 1 of 7
EXHIBIT B PAGE 108
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-2 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit B Page 2 of 7
TO:
FROM:
CITY OF SAN BERNARDINO, CALIFORNIA
TRANSMITTAL MEMORANDUM
Mayor and Common Council
Andrea Travis-Miller, Acting City M J g ~ y /
Jason Simpson, Director of Finance
DATE: October 8, 2012
SUBJECT: City of San Bernardino's Cash Flow Position- Report on Selected Analysis
BACKGROUND- CASH POSITION DAY BEFORE FILING BANKRUPTCY
On July 31, 2012, the day before the City declared bankruptcy, the City had approximately a $6 million
in Cash on the City's ledger. This amount is deceptive, however, because it is the net amount of the
four categories below, as follows:
General Fund $ (18,946,180)
Discretionary Funds (3,741, 023)
Board Assigned/Committed 1,616,815
Restricted 27,077,679
$ 6,007,291
In essence, as of 7/31/12, the General Fund has borrowed $18.9 million from Restricted Funds and
Board Assigned/Committed funds to pay for General Fund and Discretionary Fund expenditures. The
main reason for this borrowing is the structural deficit that exists in the City, which put quite simply, is
that expenditures exceed revenues. Absent immediate actions to reduce the structural deficit, the
excess of expenses over revenues are projected to continue each month.
CURRENT CASH POSITION -OCTOBER 8, 2012
On October 8, 2012, the City's overall cash {including restricted funds) was $14,552,811 and the
General Fund' s negative cash balance was ($17,106,323); representing an increase in cash of
$8,545,520 from July 31, 2012. The increase in cash is primarily due to deferral of currently due
obligations totaling ($23,578,368} including payments due to bond holders, CaiPERS, trade payables,
prior litigation costs, and employee leave bank cashouts. As shown on Exhibit A, the City's net cash
deficit is a negative ($7,925,557) {See Exhibit A) .
The deferral of expenses has been necessary to continue to meet payroll obligations and other critical
obligations necessary to provide basic level services. As estimated by staff in July, this would not have
been possible without the deferral of the expenses listed above. The City would have run out of cash
at the September 15th payroll.
EXHIBIT B PAGE 109
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Exhibit B Page 3 of 7
As implemented, the deferral of expenses is intended to be short-term in nature (i.e., through
September). In order to continue to provide essential services, the City must complete
implementation of the restructuring approved in the Pre-Pendency Plan and continue with certain
deferrals until the next phase of the Pendency Plan can be developed and approved by the Mayor and
Common Council. Continued reductions in expenses, including those approved in the Pre-Pendency
Plan, are necessary to ensure the City can continue to provide services, pay its obligations for services
and materials necessary for staff to perform assigned tasks, pay deferred obligations, balance the
budget, and to build operating capital and reserves.
CITYWIDE FUND STRUCTURE/CATEGORIES
Funds, which are used to account for specific activities, fall into one of four categories:
A. The General Fund. This fund accounts for the majority of activity of the City's general operations
like Police, Fire, Public Works, and other services. In any City Government, there is only one General
Fund.
B. Discretionary Funds represent funds that are Special Revenue Funds or Internal Service Funds that
do not have legal or Board restrictions. They are simply utilized to track and also spread costs to the
overall organization.
C. Board Assigned/Committed Funds represent funds that the Board has made a formal or informal
action to assign or commit to specific purposes.
D. Restricted Funds are funds restricted by external entities such as grantors, assessment districts,
Measure I sales tax proceeds, and other legal restrictions such as Proposition 218 restrictions.
2 1Page
EXHIBIT B PAGE 110
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-2 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit B Page 4 of 7
EXHIBIT A
EXHIBIT B PAGE 111
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-2 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit B Page 5 of 7
CITY OF SAN BERNARDINO, CALIFORNIA
SELECTED ANALYSIS OF CITY CASH (unaudited)
Cash per City's books as of 10/8/2012
General Fund
Discretionary Funds
Board Assigned/Committed
Restricted
Net Cosh - Citywide (including restricted) @ 10/8/2012
City's Obligations:
Unpaid City Obligations since 7/31/12:
Due Dote Obligation
7/25/2012 Pension Obligation Bonds- Bond Payment
7/31/2012 City lawsuits -litigation
7/31/2012 CaiPERS/PARS- Payperiod ending 7/31
8/15/2012 CaiPERS/PARS- Payperiod ending 8/15
8/31/2012 CaiPERS/PARS - Payperiod ending 8/31
9/15/2012 CaiPERS/PARS- Payperiod ending 9/15
9/30/2012 CaiPERS/PARS- Payperiod ending 9/30
New City Obligations 10/1/12 - 10/8/12:
Due Date Obligation
10/8/2012 Cashouts to Separated Employees (unpaid)
10/8/2012 Sell Back Time (unpaid)
10/8/2012 Trade payables
CASH PER CITY
BOOKS*
$ (17,106,323)
(3,447,273)
6,573,673
28,532,733
(3,338, 739)
(1,461,100)
(1,066,504)
(1,068,065)
(1,040,500)
(1,042,950)
(1,036,077)
(443,075)
(185,994)
(8, 150,364)
CALCUATION OF
CASH SHORTAGE
$ 14,552,811
(10,053,935)
(8,779,433)
Estimated Net Cash Deficit (Citywide) on 10/8/2012 including City Obligations $ (4,280,557)
10/15/2012 Payroll - PPE 10/15/2012 (Fund on 10/12/2012)
10/15/2012 CaiPERS/PARS - Payperiod ending 10/15
this week Anticipated Receipts- 10/9 to 10/12
(3,710,000)
(1,035,000) $ (4,745,000)
1,100,000
Adjusted Estimated Net Cash Deficit (Citywide) on 10/13/2012 including City Obligations =$ ===(7=,9 =2=5=,5=5=7=)
*Please note that the City's financial records hove not been closed for FY 12; accordingly, there may be some adjustments to these
amounts as we finalize reconciliations and adjustment to the accounting ledgers for FY 2011-12.
EXHIBIT B PAGE 112
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Exhibit B Page 6 of 7
CITY OF SAN BERNARDINO
Estimated Cash balances as of 10/8/12 (unaudited) A 8 c D
OTHER
GENERAL DISCRETION ASSIGNED
FUND 1Ql!H2Qt2 FUND ARY COMMITTED RESTRICTED
A General Fund available
B Other Discretionary Funds
c Assigned/Committed by Council
D Legally Restricted (External or Charter)
AMOUNTS CATEGORY SPREAD
001 GENERAL FUND A (16,501,195) (16,501, 195) 0 0 0
004 OLD FIRE D (532,819) 0 0 0 (532,819)
105 LIBRARY FUND D (298,510) 0 0 0 (298,510)
106 CEMETERY FUND D 14,146 0 0 0 14, 146
108 ASSET FORFEITURE FUND D 1,228,968 0 0 0 1,228,968
111 AB2744 AIR QUALITY - AL T TRANS D 47,969 0 0 0 47,969
116 EMERGENCY SOLUTIONS GRANT D 0 0 0 0 0
117 HOME IMPROVEMENT PART PROGRAM D (399,095) 0 0 0 (399,095)
118 GANG & DRUG ASSET FORFETURE D 127,752 0 0 0 127,752
119 CDBG A (605,128) (605,128) 0 0 0
120 NEIGHBORHOOD STABILIZATION PROGRAM D (896,135) 0 0 0 (896,135)
121 SBETA D 2,068,572 0 0 0 2,068,572
123 FEDERAL & STATE PROGRAM D (2,467,838) 0 0 0 (2,467,838)
124 ANIMAL CONTROL FUND c 169,680 0 0 169,680 0
126 GAS TAX FUND D 192,476 0 0 0 192,476
128 TRAFFIC SAFETY FUND D (738,130) 0 0 0 (738,130)
129 1/2 CENT SALES & ROAD D 4,190,363 0 0 0 4,190,363
132 SEWER LINE MAINTENANCE D 1,685,253 0 0 0 1,68S,253
133 BASEBALL STADIUM c (55,792) 0 0 (55,792) 0
134 SOCCER FIELD c 643,517 0 0 643,517 0
135 AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGESTION D (33,597) 0 0 0 (33,597)
137 CFD 1033- FIRE STATION D 333,300 0 0 0 333,300
208 VERDEMONT CAPITAL PROJECT c 248,608 0 0 248,608 0
211 FIRE EQUIP ACQUISITION c 95,971 0 0 95,971 0
240 CIEDB STREET CONSTRUCTION c (9,049) 0 0 (9,049) 0
241 PARK EXTENSION FUND c 4,519 0 0 4,519 0
242 STREET CONSTRUCTION FUND c (1,366,153) 0 0 (1,366,153) 0
243 PARK CONSTRUCTION FUND c 268,825 0 0 268,825 0
244 CEMETERY CONSTRUCTION D 52,519 0 0 0 52,519
245 SEWER LINE CONSTRUCTION c 2,255,086 0 0 2,255,086 0
246 PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT FUND c 1,079,024 0 0 1,079,024 0
247 CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT CONSTRUCTION c 484,837 0 0 484,837 0
248 STORM DRAIN CONSTRUCTION c 2,754,600 0 0 2,754,600 0
250 TRAFFIC SYSTEMS CONSTRUCTION B (10,750) 0 Q9,750) 0 0
251 SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS FUND D (2,025,723) 0 0 0 (2,025,723)
254 ASSESSMENT DISTRICT FUND D 1,992,034 0 0 0 1,992,034
256 ASSESSMENT DISTRICT 1015 D 33,779 0 0 0 33,779
257 STREET LIGHTING/SWEEPING D 226 0 0 0 226
258 PROP 1B - LOCAL STREET D 2,353,706 0 0 0 2,353,706
261 LAW ENFORCEMENT FACILITY D 87,250 0 0 0 87,250
262 FIRE SUPRESSION/MEDIC D 148,179 0 0 0 148,179
263 LOCAL REGIONAL CIRCULA D 516,811 0 0 0 516,811
264 REGIONAL CIRCULATION S D 6,106,117 0 0 0 6,106,117
265 LIBRARY FACILITIES D (9,998) 0 0 0 (9,998)
266 PUBLIC USE FACILITIES D 379,297 0 0 0 379,297
267 AQUATICS FACILITIES D 115,303 0 0 0 115,303
268 AB 1600 PARKLAND D 1,529,897 0 0 0 1,529,897
269 QUIMBY ACT PARKLAND D 241,344 0 0 0 241,344
305 AD#985 DEBT SERVICE FUND D 68,457 0 0 0 68,457
306 AD#987 DEBT SERVICE FUND D 19,020 0 0 0 19,020
356 AD939 NEW PINE DEBT D 25,474 0 0 0 25,474
527 INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT B 2,102,018 0 0 0 2,102,018
621 CENTRAL SERVICES FUND B (98,739) 0 (98,739) 0 0
629 LIABILITY INSURANCE FUND B 482,979 0 482,979 0 0
630 TELEPHONE SUPPORT FUND B 106,242 0 106,242 0 0
631 UTILITY FUND B (921,929) 0 (921,929) 0 0
635 FLEET SERVICES FUND B (1,803,104) 0 (1,803,104) 0 0
677 UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE B (9S,418) 0 (95,418) 0 0
678 WORKERS COMPENSATION FUND B (1,576,479) 0 (1,576,479) 0 0
679 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY B 469,926 0 ~ 9 2 6 0 0
701 AD 961 TRUST AND AGENCY D 369,598 0 0 0 369,598
703 AD977A TRUST & AGENCY D 62,145 0 0 0 62,145
704 AD977B TRUST & AGENCY D 26,718 0 0 0 26,718
EXHIBIT B PAGE 113
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Exhibit B Page 7 of 7
FUND
A General Fund available
B Other Discretionary Funds
C Assigned/Committed by Council
D Legally Restricted (External or Charter)
758 AD906 TRUST & AGENCY D
772 SPECIAL DEPOSITS FUND D
775 CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE D
784 PAYROLL TRUST FUND D
TOTAL
SUMMARY
Genera I Fund A
Discretionary Funds (General Fund eligible) B
Board assigned/committed C
Restricted - Prop 218 Funds D
Restricted D
TOTAL
10/8/2012
AMOUNTS
57,687
4,361,349
206,426
5,190,424
$ 14,552,811
$ (17,106,323)
(3,447,273)
6,573,673
962,715
27,570.018
14 552 811
I
*
GENERAL
FUND
0
0
0
0
(17,106,323)
OTHER
DISCRETION
ARY
ASSIGNED
COMMITTED
CATEGORY SPREAD
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
(3,447,273) 6,573,673
RESTRICTED
57,687
4,361,349
206,426
5,190,424
28,532,733
*Please note that the Oty's financial records have not been closed for FY 12; accordingly, there may be some acfjustments to these amounts as we finalize
reconciliations and acfjustment to the accounting ledgers for FY 2011-12.
2
I

Exhibit C
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-3 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit C Page 1 of 7
EXHIBIT C PAGE 114
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-3 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit C Page 2 of 7
CITY OF SAN BERNARDINO, CALIFORNIA
TRANSMITTAL MEMORANDUM
TO: Andrea Travis-Miller, Acting City Manager
FROM: Jason Simpson, Director of Finance r ~
DATE: September 4, 2012
SUBJECT: City of San Bernardino's Cash Flow Position - Report on Selected Analysis
Funds, which are used to account for specific activities, fall into one of four categories:
A. The General Fund. This fund accounts for the majority of activity of the City's general operations
like Police, Fire, Public Works, and other services. In any City Government, there is only one
General Fund.
B. Discretionary Funds represent funds that are Special Revenue Funds or Internal Service Funds
that do not have legal or Board restrictions. They are simply utilized to track and also spread costs
to the overall organization.
C. Board Assigned/Committed Funds represent funds that the Board has made a formal or informal
action to assign or commit to specific purposes.
D. Restricted Funds are funds restricted by external entities such as grantors, assessment districts,
Measure I sales tax proceeds, and other legal restrictions such as Proposition 218 restrictions.
On July 31, 2012, the day before the City declared bankruptcy, the City had approximately $6 million in
Cash in the City Books. This amount is deceptive, however, because it is the net amount of the four
categories above, as follows:
General Fund $ {18,946, 180)
Discretionary Funds (3, 741,023)
Board Assigned/Committed 1, 616,815
Restricted 27,077,679
$ 6,007, 291
In essence, as of 7/31/12 the General Fund has borrowed $18.9 million from Restricted Funds and Board
Assigned/Committed funds to pay for General Fund and Discretionary Fund expenditures. The main reason
for this borrowing is the structural deficit that exists in the City, which put quite simply, is that expenditures
exceed revenues. Absent immediate actions to reduce the structural deficit, the excess of expenses over
revenues are projected to continue each month. The following table which is labeled Exhibit A illustrates the
complex and challenging part of managing the City's cash flow.
EXHIBIT C PAGE 115
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Exhibit C Page 3 of 7
Exhibit A
CITY OF SAN BERNARDINO, CALIFORNIA
SELECTED ANALYSIS OF CITY CASH (unaudited)
CASH PER CITY
BOOKS
Cash per City's books as of 7/31/2012
General Fund
Discretionary Funds
Board Assigned/Committed
Restricted
Net Cash- Citywide (including restricted)@ 7/31/2012
City's Obligations:
Due Date Obligation
7/25/2012 Pension Obligation Bonds- Bond Payment
7/31/2012 Trade payables
7/31/2012 Citywide payroll- Payperiod ending 7/31
7/31/2012 CaiPERS/PARS- Payperiod ending 7/31
7/31/2012 Citywide health insurance for the month of August
7/31/2012 City lawsuits- litigation
7/31/2012 Debt service - State Infrastructure Bank
Amounts due through August 1, 2012
$
Estimated Net Cash Deficit (Citywide) on 8/1/2012 including City Obligations
(18,946,180)
(3,741,023)
1,616,815
27,077,679
(3,338,739)
(5,054,206)
(4,806,325)
(1,066,504)
(750,000)
(1, 461,000)
(1,300,971)
CALCUA TION OF
CASH SHORTAGE
$ 6,007,291
(17, 777,745)
$ (11,770,454)
As can be shown from Exhibit A, the City's cash balance was a negative $18,946,180 and overall positive
cash citywide of $6,007,31 5, in the General Fund and All Funds Combined, respectively.
This chart shows that the $6 million on hand is not enough to fund all the cunent obligations due and
payable immediately totaling approximately $17,777,7 45.
Please note this chart does not factor nor does it project new revenues or new expenditures, and as we
are aware expenditures out pace revenues through a cunent $45.8 million deficit.
e In short, the City was unable to pay all its debts as they become due and, in fact, the City was short
$11.7 million.
The City has chosen to defer the Pension Obligation Bond Payments of $3.3 million; defer funding
CalPERS Pension retirement payments; and cutting back by only payment for goods and services that
are directly required to keep the basic level city functions operating.
2 /Page
EXHIBIT C PAGE 116
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Exhibit C Page 4 of 7
CITY OF SAN BERNARDINO, CALIFORNIA
SELECTED ANALYSIS OF CITY CASH (unaudited)
Net Cash- Citywide (including restricted)@ 7/31/2012
Cash Activity- August 1 t o August 29, 2012
Cash inflows
Cash out f low
Net increase in cash (8/1 to 8/26)
Cash Available to Pay All Obligations as of August 26, 2012
!unpai d City's Obligations from 7/31/ 12:
Due Date Obligation
7/25/2012 Pension Obligation Bonds- Bond Payment
7/31/2012 CaiPERS/PARS- Payperiod ending 7/31
7/31/2012 City lawsuits -lit igation
!New City Obligations 8/1/12-8/ 26/12 :
Due Dote Obligation
8/15/2012 CaiPERS/PARS - Payperiod ending 8/15
8/31/2012 Trade payables
8/31/2012 Cashouts to Separated Employees (unpaid)
8/31/2012 Sell Back Time (unpaid)
8/31/2012 Payroll- Payperiod ending August 31, 2012
8/31/2012 CaiPERS/PARS- Payperiod ending 8/31
$ 11,989,023
(10,197,828)
(3,338,739)
(1,066,504)
(1,461,000)
(1,068,065)
(6,737,807)
(787,865)
(185,994)
(3,900,000)
(1,066,000)
$ 6,007,291
1,791,195
7,798,486
(4,405,243)
8/31/2012 Citywide healt h insurance for the month of September ___ _ (14,495,731)
Projected Net Cash Deficit (Citywide)- August 31, 2012 $ (11,102,488)
*Please note that the City's financial records have not been closed for FY 12; accordingly, there may be some adjustments to
these amounts os we finalize reconciliotions and adjustment to the accounting ledgers for FY 2011-12.
3 1Page
EXHIBIT C PAGE 117
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Exhibit C Page 5 of 7
Exhibit A ~ Detailed
Detail Cash By Fund
As of July 31, 2012
EXHIBIT C PAGE 118
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Exhibit C Page 6 of 7
CITY OF SAN BERNARDINO, CALIFORNIA
Estimated Cash balance as of 7/31/12 (unaudited)
..fU.f'ill..
A General Fund available
B Other Discretionary Funds
c
Assigned/Committed by Council
0
Legally Restricted (External or Charter)
001 GENERAL FUND A
004 OLD FIRE B
105 liBRARY FUND D
106 CEMETERY FUND D
108 ASSET FORFEITURE FUND c
111 AB2744 AIR QUALITY - ALT TRANS D
116 EMERGENCY SOLUTIONS GRANT D
117 HOME IMPROVEMENT PART PROGRAM D
118 GANG & DRUG ASSET FORFETIJRE c
119 CDBG D
120 NEIGHBORHOOD STABILIZATION PROGRAM D
121 SBETA D
123 FEDERAL & STATE PROGRAM D
124 ANIMAL CONTROL FUND D
126 GAS TAX FUND D
128 TRAFFIC SAFETY FUND B
129 1/2 CENT SALES & ROAD D
132 SEWER LINE MAINTENANCE D
133 BASEBALL STADIUM c
134 SOCCER FIELD c
135 AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGESTION B
137 CFD 1033 - FIRE STATION D
208 VERDEMONT CAPITAL PROJEXT D
211 FIRE EQUIP ACQUISmON c
240 CIEDB STREET CONSTRUCTION B
241 PARK EXTENSION FUND c
242 STREET CONSTRUCTION FUND D
243 PARK CONSTRUCTION FUND D
244 CEMETERY CONSTRUCTION D
245 SEWER LINE CONSTRUCTION D
246 PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT FUND D
247 CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT CONSTRUCTION B
248 STORM DRAIN CONSTRUCTION D
250 TRAFFIC SYSTEMS CONSTRUCTlON B
251 SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS FUND D
254 ASSESSMENT DISTRICT FUND D
256 ASSESSMENT DISTRICT 1015 D
257 STREET LIGHTING/SWEEPING D
258 PROP 1B- LOCAL STREET D
261 LAW ENFORCEMENT FACILITY D
262 FIRE SUPRESSION/MEDJC D
263 LOCAL REGIONAL CIRCULA D
264 REGIONAl CIRCULATION S D
265 liBRARY FACiliTIES D
266 PUBLIC USE FACiliTIES D
267 AQUATICS FACiliTIES D
268 AB 1600 PARKLAND D
269 QUIMBY ACT PARKLAND D
305 AD#985 DEBT SERVICE FUND D
306 AD#987 DEBT SERVICE FUND D
356 AD939 NEW PINE DEBT D
527 INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT B
621 CENTRAL SERVICES FUND B
629 liABILITY INSURANCE FI,JND B
630 TELEPHONE SUPPORT FUND B
631 UTILITY FUND B
635 FLEET SERVICES FUND B
677 UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE B
678 WORKERS COMPENSATION FUND B
679 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY B
Z/31/2012
$ (18,570,509)
(490,561)
(46,299)
35,519
1,042,617
(8,236)
0
(222,960)
115,680
(375,671)
(491,576)
1,941,756
(2,851,921)
37,511
135,184
(905,426)
4,081,673
1,494,060
(40,751)
359,767
(33,847)
333,300
248,608
97,471
(9,049)
4,519
(2,342,320)
268,822
52,519
2,593,059
1,079,021
446,483
2,845,971
( 10,750)
(2,025,723)
2,161,388
33,779
226
2,371,458
185,702
275,226
523, 529
6,098,297
(10,636)
378,207
114,977
1,461,193
241,344
68,457
19,020
47,704
(633,477)
(84,924)
306,720
108,690
20,034
(1,463,044)
(101,416)
( 1,404, 153)
513,697
A B c 0
I RESTRICTED I
~ T E G O R Y SPREAD
$ (18,570,509) $ $ $
0 (490,561) 0 0
0 0 0 (46,299)
0 0 0 35,519
0 0 1,042,617 0
0 0 0 (8,236)
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 (222,960)
0 0 115,680 0
(375,671) 0 0 0
0 0 0 (491,576)
0 0 0 1,941,756
0 0 0 (2,851,921)
0 0 37,511 0
0 0 0 135, 184
0 (905,426) 0 0
0 0 0 4,081,673
0 0 0 1,494,060
0 0 (40,751 ) 0
0 0 359,767 0
0 (33,847) 0 0
0 0 0 333,300
0 0 0 248,608
0 0 97,471 0
0 (9,049) 0 0
0 0 4,519 0
0 0 0 (2,342,320)
0 0 0 268,822
0 0 0 52,519
0 0 0 2, 593,059
0 0 0 1,079,021
0 446,483 0 0
0 0 0 2,845,971
0 (10, 750) 0 0
0 0 0 (2,025,723)
0 0 0 2, 161,388
0 0 0 33,779
0 0 0 226
0 0 0 2,371,458
0 0 0 185,702
0 0 0 275,226
0 0 0 523,529
0 0 0 6,098,297
0 0 0 (10,636)
0 0 0 378,207
0 0 0 114,977
0 0 0 1,461, 193
0 0 0 241,344
0 0 0 68,457
0 0 0 19,020
0 0 0 47,704
0 (633,477) 0 0
0 (84,924) 0 0
0 306,720 0 0
0 108,690 0 0
0 20,034 0 0
0 (1,463,044) 0 0
0 (101,416) 0 0
0 (1,404,153) 0 0
0 513,697 0 0
EXHIBIT C PAGE 119
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-3 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit C Page 7 of 7
..fU.ND_
A General Fund available
B Other Discretionary Funds
C Assigned/Committed by Council
D Legally Restricted (External or Charter)
701 AD 961 TRUST AND AGENCY
703 AD9'i7A TRUST,& AGENCY
704 AD9778 TRUST & AGENG:Y
758 AD906 &.AqENcY
772 SPEGAL DEPOSITS FUND
775 CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE
784 PAYROLL TRUST FUND
{)
0
D
D
0
D
D
7/31/2012
369,598

26,7f!i
:5?.,6j37
4,098,195
206,366
1,166,641
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
CATEGORY SPREAD
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
369,598
62,145
26,718
57,687
4,098,195
206,366
1,166,641
TOTAL
$ 6,007,291 * (18,946,180) (3,741,023) 1,6Ui,815 27,077,679
SUMMARY
General Fund A
Discretionary Funds (General Fund eligible B
Board assigned/committed C
Restricted- Prop 218 Funds D
Restricted D
TOTAL
$ (18,946,180)
(3,741,023 )
1,616,815
1,154,299
25.923.319
$ 6,007,291
note that the City's financial records have not been closed for FY 12; accordingly, there may be some adjustments to these amounts as we finalize
reconciliations and adjustment to the accounting ledgers for FY 201112.
2

Exhibit D
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-4 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit D Page 1 of 8

California Public Employees Retirement System
External Affairs Branch Office of Public Affairs
400 Q Street, Sacramento, CA 95811
(916) 795-3991 phone (916) 795-3507 fax
www.calpers.ca.gov
FACTS AT A GLANCE: GENERAL
JUNE 2012
Facts at a Glance is a monthly compilation of information of interest to Board Members, staff, and the general public.
Information is current as of May 31, 2012, unless otherwise noted. Every effort has been made to verify the accuracy of
the information, which is intended for general use only. Please direct any questions and comments to the Public Affairs
Office at (916) 795-3991.
VISION STATEMENT
Pride in our service; providing confidence for your future.
MISSION
Our mission is to advance the financial and health security for all who participate in the System. We
will fulfill this mission by creating and maintaining an environment that produces responsiveness to
all those we serve.
CORE VALUES
Quality, Integrity, Openness, Accountability, Respect, Balance
BACKGROUND
The California Public Employees Retirement System manages retirement benefits for more than
1.6 million California public employees, retirees, and their families. As of June 30, 2011, we provided
pension benefits to 1,103,426 active and inactive members and 536,234 retirees, beneficiaries, and
survivors. CalPERS membership is divided approximately in thirds among current and retired
employees of the state, schools, and participating public agencies.
CalPERS is a defined benefit retirement plan. It provides benefits based on a members years of
service, age, and highest average compensation. In addition, benefits are provided for disability and
death, with payments in some cases going to survivors or beneficiaries of eligible members.
Approximately half of our members pay into Social Security.
CalPERS manages health benefits for more than 1.3 million members and their families. It offers
members and contracting employers three health maintenance organization (HMO) plans, three
preferred provider organization (PPO) plans, and three special plans for members who belong to
specific employee associations.
EXHIBIT D PAGE 120
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Exhibit D Page 2 of 8
FACTS AT A GLANCE: GENERAL
June 2012
Page 2

CalPERS was established by state law in 1932 to provide retirement benefits for state employees. In
1939, public agency and classified school employees were allowed to participate. In 1962, state law
authorized CalPERS to provide health benefits to state employees. The health benefits program was
expanded in 1967 to include public agency and school employees. In 1995, CalPERS began offering a
supplemental deferred compensation retirement savings plan to members of public agencies that
contract for it, and long-term care insurance on a not-for-profit basis.
INCOME TOTALS OVER THE PAST 20 FISCAL YEARS
YEAR
MEMBER
CONTRIBUTIONS
EMPLOYER
CONTRIBUTIONS
INVESTMENT AND
OTHER INCOME
2010-2011 $3,600,089,338 $7,465,397,498 $43,907,435,683
2009-2010 $3,378,866,892 $6,955,049,078 $25,577,529,796
2008-09 $3,882,355,341 $6,912,376,563 -$57,363,897,989
200708

$3,512,074,936 $7,242,802,001

-$12,492,908,035

200607

$3,262,699,076

$6,442,383,868

$40,757,380,692

200506

$3,080,878,521

$6,095,029,424

$22,041,265,666

200405

$3,176,780,369

$5,774,120,281

$21,894,201,526

200304

$2,266,445,429

$4,261,347,422

$24,272,573,281

200203

$1,887,925,497

$1,925,043,858

$5,482,731,568

200102

$2,154,742,532

$800,964,553

-$9,699,792,798

200001

$1,766,256,113

$321,618,826

-$12,248,341,399

199900

$1,751,290,172

$362,614,344

$16,582,657,910

1998-99 $1,522,507,527 $1,598,316,666 $17,622,526,922
1997-98 $1,443,232,566 $2,289,526,403 $23,518,904,869
1996-97 $1,379,743,571 $1,986,282,287 $20,455,866,430
1995-96 $1,338,044,978 $1,850,103,438 $13,137,202,083
1994-95 $1,290,624,208 $1,578,933,781 $12,504,528,262
1993-94 $1,229,162,593 $1,518,539,347 $1,490,282,575
1992-93 $1,187,174,852 $1,810,996,606 $9,665,319,064
1991-92 $1,174,155,118 $1,938,803,787 $5,713,443,775
1990-91 $1,131,577,838 $1,409,848,310 $4,420,898,516
EXHIBIT D PAGE 121
Case 6:12-bk-28006-MJ Doc 207-4 Filed 10/24/12 Entered 10/24/12 17:50:03 Desc
Exhibit D Page 3 of 8
FACTS AT A GLANCE: GENERAL
June 2012
Page 3


NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES
2,366 (budgeted positions as of July 1, 2011)

LENGTH OF SERVICE AT CalPERS
(Quarter ending September 30, 2011)
Years of CalPERS
Specific Service



Number of
Employees
35+

7
30 34 48
25 29 40
20 24 85
15 19 153
10 14 420
5 9 627
0 5 1078

TOTAL CalPERS ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES
200607 (actual)

$395,353,207

200708 (actual)

$530,550,190

2008-09 (actual) $566,913,372
2009-10 (actual) $427,149,512
2010-11 (actual) $306,379,733
2011-12 (budgeted) $334,196,000
EXHIBIT D PAGE 122
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Exhibit D Page 4 of 8
FACTS AT A GLANCE: GENERAL
June 2012
Page 4






BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION 13 MEMBERS


*6 Members Elected By: All Terms Expire in January of Specified Year
Active school members Rob Feckner, President (2015)
Active state members George Diehr, Vice President (2015)
Active public agency members Priya Sara Mathur (2015)
Retired members Henry Jones (2016)
All members Michael Bilbrey (2014)
All members JJ Jelincic (2014)
*3 Appointed Members:
Governor appointee Dan Dunmoyer (2013)
Governor appointee Vacant
Speaker & Senate Rules
Committee appointee
Vacant
4 Statutory-Designated Members:
State Treasurer Bill Lockyer
State Controller John Chiang
Acting Director of Dept. of Personnel
Administration
Julie Chapman
Member designated by
the State Personnel Board
Richard Costigan



EXHIBIT D PAGE 123
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Exhibit D Page 5 of 8
FACTS AT A GLANCE: GENERAL
June 2012
Page 5

CALIFORNIA EMPLOYERS RETIREE BENEFIT TRUST FUND
The California Employers Retiree Benefit Trust Fund was established by CalPERS in March 2007 to
provide California public agencies with a cost-efficient, professionally managed investment vehicle for
prefunding other post-employment benefits (OPEB) such as retiree health benefits. Prefunding
reduces an agencys long-term OPEB liability. Participating agencies can use investment earnings to
pay future OPEB liabilities, similar to the CalPERS pension fund in which three out of four dollars
paid in retirement benefits come from investment earnings.
Assets under management in trust fund (as of May 31, 2012): $1.92 billion
Participating public agencies: 332

Nine agencies joined the CERBT in May:
Alameda County Water District
Castroville Community Services District
City of Carson
Kaweah Delta Water Conservation District
Orchard Dale Water District
San Joaquin County Mosquito and Vector Control District
Shasta County Schools
Shasta Lake Fire Protection District
Town of Truckee

ACTUARIAL INFORMATION
Each year CalPERS actuaries calculate a funded ratiothe ratio of market value of assets in the fund to
the liabilities for each retirement plan. The funded ratios vary from year to year.
Funded Status of Retirement Plans by Member Category
Member Category 6/30/05 6/30/06 6/30/07 6/30/08 6/30/09 6/30/10
State 85.5% 88.6% 96.6% 84.9% 58.4% 62.8%
School 96.2% 98.7% 107.8% 93.8% 65.0% 69.5%
Public Agency 90.2% 92.7% 102.0% 89.6% 60.0% 65.8%
Notes
The funded ratios are based on the Market Value of Assets.
There were five plans in the state category with funded ratios between 57 percent and 69 percent
as of June 30, 2010. The funded ratio for the state is an aggregate of all five plans.
EXHIBIT D PAGE 124
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Exhibit D Page 6 of 8
FACTS AT A GLANCE: GENERAL
June 2012
Page 6

As of June 30, 2009, there were 2,039 plans with active members in the public agency category.
There were 1,590 plans in one of nine risk pools and 449 public agencies in non-pooled plans.
For non-pooled plans: about 98 percent of the plans were below 75 percent funded; about
2 percent of the plans was between 75 and 100 percent funded; and 0 percent
of the plans were 100 percent funded or better. All risk pools were between 57 percent and
70 percent funded.
CalPERS eSUBSCRIPTIONS
CalPERS offers a number of eSubscriptions for press releases and other CalPERS news services.
You can sign up for these online services at the eSubcriptions page of CalPERS On-Line
at www.calpers.ca.gov.
CalPERS CHRONOLOGY
1932 CalPERS established by State legislation
1932 Became operational for retirement benefits for State employees
1939 Public agencies and classified school employees allowed to contract for retirement benefits
1962 Public Employees Medical & Hospital Care Act allowed CalPERS to provide health insurance
benefits for State employees
1967 Health Program expanded to include local public employees on a contract basis
1984 CalPERS initiated corporate governance reform program
1984 Proposition 21 approved by voters; allowed CalPERS to invest more than 25 percent of fund
portfolio in stocks
1985 CalPERS becomes a founding member of the Council of Institutional Investors
1986 CalPERS breaks ground on its headquarters building Lincoln Plaza
1990 Long-Term Care Act allowed CalPERS to offer LTC insurance to CalPERS, STRS, and County
Employees Retirement Law of 1937 members
1992 Proposition 162 approved by voters; CalPERS Board given absolute and exclusive authority
over the administration and investment of pension funds
1995 Long-Term Care Program created and offered to all California public employees and retirees
1996 CalPERS pension fund reached $100 billion on May 14, 1996
1996 CalPERS launched International Corporate Governance Program
1997 CalPERS launched CalPERS On-Line
1997 CalPERS adopted corporate governance principles for United Kingdom
1997 CalPERS increased public disclosure of decision making
1998 CalPERS adopted U.S. corporate governance standards
1998 CalPERS adopted strategy for private equity investments
1998 CalPERS Board sponsored retirement equity legislation
1999 CalPERS launched corporate governance website; draws worldwide interest
EXHIBIT D PAGE 125
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Exhibit D Page 7 of 8
FACTS AT A GLANCE: GENERAL
June 2012
Page 7

2000 CalPERS designated May Retirement Planning Month
2001 CalPERS earmarked $457 million to 11 California private equity firms; investments intended
to target Californias under-served markets
2001 CalPERS broke ground on Headquarters Expansion Project
2002 CalPERS launched financial market reform initiative with principles and action plan to
prevent future Enron-type accounting abuses
2003 CalPERS called on expatriate firms to return to U.S.
2003 CalPERS adopted plan to crack down on executive compensation abuses
2003 CalPERS launched eNews service; also adds Press Room to website
2003 CalPERS sued NYSE for trading specialist abuses that hurt investors
2004 CalPERS launched new improved CalPERS On-Line website on March 27
2004 CalPERS initiated Environmental Technology Investment Program
2004 CalPERS adopted reduced hospital network, regional health plan pricing
2004 CalPERS received AAA rating from Fitch Ratings
2005 CalPERS reaches $200 billion in assets, maintaining its place as the largest public pension fund
in the nation
2005 CalPERS headquarters expansion completed in October
2005 CalPERS pension fund reached $200 billion milestone on November 21
2007 CalPERS launched retiree health benefit (OPEB) prefunding plan on March 1
2007 CalPERS celebrated 75th anniversary
2007 CalPERS launched my|CalPERS website for members
2008 CalPERS created new inflation-linked asset class to invest in commodities, forestland,
inflation-linked bonds, and infrastructure
2008 CalPERS launched online member education classes
2009 CalPERS adopted policy on disclosure of placement agent fees
2009 CalPERS altered asset allocation given extraordinary market conditions, raised private equity,
cash allocation targets
2009 CalPERS adopted special employer smoothing process for public agency and school
employers in light of the extraordinary market downturn during the great recession
2009 CalPERS launched CalPERSResponds.com
2009 CalPERS launched social media presence on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube
2009 CalPERS adopted policy on greater placement agent disclosure
2010 CalPERS backed federal financial market reform
2011 CalPERS reorganizes to better serve members, employers and stakeholders; adds CFO
position
2011 CalPERS legal analysis says pension promises are a vested right
2012 CalPERS releases cost analysis on creation of hybrid pension plan

EXHIBIT D PAGE 126
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Exhibit D Page 8 of 8