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IBM Business Process Manager, Version 7.

5, All platforms > Authoring with IBM Business Process Manager > Authoring services in Integration Designer > Developing business processes > Building BPEL processes > Creating a BPEL process > BPEL process editor

Details tab: BPEL process editor


This topic includes a description of each of the fields on the Details tab of the Properties view.

Assign activity Case element, link, repeat until loop and while loop Catch element Compensate activity Empty action For Each activity Human task activity Invoke activity, onEvent and receive case elements Process level Receive activity Receive Choice activity Scope activity Snippet activity Throw activity Variables Wait activity and Timeout element

Assign activity

Use the fields on this page to assign a value from one process element to another. For more information on how to configure this window, refer to Using assign.

Case element, link, repeat until loop and while loop

When you first click the Details tab for the case element, link, repeat until loop or while loop, you will see a properties page like the one shown directly above. When you choose No Expression as the Expression language, you can click Create a New Condition to bring up the expression builder and compose a condition yourself. The other choices in the drop down menu are very similar to those options described in the Expiration tab: BPEL process editor topic.

Keep in mind that, although the properties page may look similar, the conditions might be different because of the context:

in a case, the activities inside this case element will be commenced if the condition evaluates to true. in a while loop, the condition specifies that the activities inside the while loop are performed repeatedly until the condition evaluates to false. in a repeat until loop, the condition specifies that the activities inside the repeat until loop are performed repeatedly until the condition evaluates to false, but at least once. on a link, the condition specifies whether the link should be taken or not. If it evaluates to false, the subsequent activity/activities might be skipped.

Catch element

Use the fields on this page to specify the fault that this catch element will intercept. You can catch a built-in fault type, or define one yourself. If you define it yourself, you will be able to give it a name and associate it with either a data type or interface variable.

Compensate activity
Target Activity Use this field to specify the activity whose compensation handler or compensation operation will initiate should this compensation activity be invoked. This field will only list targets that are "downstream" from this activity (in other words scopes that are nested, and so therefore can be called). The field can be left empty, then all enclosing successfully completed activities are compensated should this compensation activity be invoked. For more information, see Compensating activities in a long-running process.

Empty action

Use the fields on this page to change the empty action into a different activity. You can choose a different category of activities from the drop down list, or hover over one of the icons to see a description of its associated activity. Once you have made your choice, simply click the appropriate icon and the empty action will change accordingly in your business process.

For Each activity

Execution of iterations: You can choose from the following:


Sequential Choose this to have the iterations run one after the other. Parallel Choose this to have the iterations run simultaneously. In other words, the scope that is enclosed in this For Each will get n copies (where n is the number of iterations), and each scope will get access to the variables that were there in the beginning.

An example of when to use sequential and parallel would be in a document review process. In some instances you will want to have certain people review the document before others, for example, you may want your technical reviewer to complete their review before the request goes out to the approver. This example calls for sequential execution. In other cases you may just need a group of people to review, for example this is a first draft of a document and the order of their reviews is not important. This situation calls for parallel execution. Index-Variable Name: Use this field to specify a name for the index variable. Inside every For Each activity there is a BPEL variable of type xsd:unsignedInt that holds the actual number of processed iterations. During each iteration the value of this variable is increased by one. Tip: You may not be able to pass an indexed variable in an invoke when you have multiple processes is running in parallel in a ForEach loop on an array. When you are running parallel processes, the variable may change between the time of the assignment and the time of the invoke. You must use local variables, scoped more tightly than the ForEach level, to prevent variables from being modified by different parallel threads. Refer to the sample located at Dynamic number of parallel branches for information. Iteration Use the Iteration section to specify the start and end points of your iteration. The Start value will be assigned to the Index-Variable before the first iteration starts, and iteration will stop when the value of the Index-Variable has reached the End value. The definition of these values can be made in one of the three following ways:

Array (dynamic bounds) This is an simple and dynamic way to define the values for start and end. When selecting an array the value for Start will be set to one, and the value for End will be evaluated in the runtime environment, and will be set to the size of the selected array. If you use XPath in a snippet within the For Each activity (getItemAtIndex()), keep in mind that XPath indexing is 1-based, so you will have subtract 1 when accessing the same array using a Java snippet since the index in Java is 0 based.

Integer (static bounds) When you select Integer, two text fields will appear into which you enter the Start and End values of the iteration. Expression Choose this to launch a separate inline visual snippet editor for the Start and End expressions, and graphically compose the Java or XPath code for those expressions yourself. In the runtime environment, the expression is only evaluated once: on the first hit of the For Each activity.

Early Exit Criterion Use this to determine if and when the For Each activity should be prematurely aborted. The For Each activity will stop its iterations when the value of the Index-Variable has reached the value of the early exit criterion. Naturally if you provide an early exit criterion which is greater than the End value that you assigned then the activity will terminate when the End value is reached. There are two early exit criterion possibilities:

Integer Use Integer, to enter the number of iterations that will be performed no matter what End value was entered in the Iteration area. Expression Choose this to launch a separate inline visual snippet editor, and graphically compose the Java or XPath code for those expressions yourself. The expression must yield an unsigned integer value, that, when reached, will terminate the loop. None Choose this to let the loop iterate as configured.

An example of when to use the early exit condition would be the document approval process. Using parallel execution the document was sent out to ten reviewers, but the document author needs only three completed reviews before sending out the next draft. The user sets the early exit criterion to be an Integer with a value of 3. Count successful iterations only When you select this option, only the iterations that complete successfully will be considered in the evaluation of the Early Exit Criterion. Again using the document approval process, we may have given the reviewers the option to respond that they cannot review at this time. Hence we would select the Count successful iterations only in conjunction with the early exit criterion to ensure that the subsequent review is sent out only when three completed (successful) reviews have been received.

Note: If you create a For Each activity that iterates through an array and increments a value and then call this value using a get item at index visual snippet, you will get an IndexOutOfBoundsException error when you deploy it to a runtime environment. This exception happens because the Java arrays start at '0', and you can fix it by decreasing the array by '1' in the Java Snippet.

Human task activity

The fields on this page show the human task that the business process' human task activity will implement. If there is no existing human task associated, click New to launch the human task editor to configure one. If there is a human task associated, then click Open to launch the human task editor to make any needed modifications to it, or click Remove to clear the association. If you want to use data type variables, select one from the list, or clear the check box and browse to the appropriate request and response variables.

Invoke activity, onEvent and receive case elements

Use the fields on this page to configure the implementation of this activity or element. You can choose a reference partner, and then choose an appropriate operation from the interface that is displayed. The table below the Use data type variables mapping check box displays all of the inputs and outputs of the selected operation. If you want to use data type variables, select one from the list, or clear the check box and browse to the appropriate request and response variables.

Process level
Automatically delete the process after completion This setting is only relevant with long-running processes, and determines how the runtime environment will deal with the process instance that is used by the process once it has run its course. You have the following options:

Yes Choose this to delete the data associated with this instance of the process once it has completed. This setting will remove the process instance, whether or not the process completed successfully.

On successful completion In this case, the data will remain in the database when the process fails so that the problem can be traced and the process may be restarted by the process administrator, if required. No Choose this to not delete the data associated with this process once it has completed.

Keep the following in mind:

If this process should fail when the auto-delete option is enabled, it will not appear as a failed event in the BPEL process Choreographer Explorer. To make sure that it does appear should it fail, chose the No option. Setting the value to No means that the process instance will not be removed. Disabling this flag requires that an administrative strategy for removing finished processes from the runtime environment is in place, see Deleting process instances.

Compensation Sphere These settings apply only to microflows, and specify how the compensation service will behave in a runtime environment. Choose from one of the following options:

Supports Use this setting when a compensation service has been configured for this microflow, but it can run without one. Required Use this setting when a compensation service has been configured and the microflow cannot run without it.

Bind the life cycle to the invoking BPEL process Used with long-running processes. When one process is invoked by another, this setting determines the autonomy of the invoked process. If the check box is selected, the invoked process is a child of the invoking process. If the check box is cleared the invoked process is a peer of the invoking process.

Peer The invoked process is considered to be a peer of the primary process. In this case, both processes run concurrently and happen to have a point where they intersect. Child The invoked process is considered to be a child, and the primary process its parent. As such, the child is tied to the life cycle and compensation sphere of the parent.

Select date (UTC) when the process becomes valid Toggle this switch to enable or disable the Valid from: fields. Valid from: Use these fields to specify the start date and time of the process (if you disable the option, then the date and time of the deployment is used instead). This means that before this date and time, the runtime engine cannot create instances of this process. Calendar values are represented in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). Valid from dates are most commonly used for versioning your process.

Receive activity
Use the fields on this page to configure the implementation of this activity or element. You can choose the interface partner, and then choose an appropriate operation from the interface that is displayed. The table below the Use data type variables mappingcheck box displays all of the inputs of the selected operation. If you want to use data type variables, select one from the list, or clear the check box and browse to the appropriate request and response variable. Create a new process instance if one does not already exist Use this setting to determine how to proceed in cases where an instance of this process has not yet been created in the runtime environment. Enable it to allow the creation of a new instance of the process, and clear it to deny such authority. There must be one receive-type activity or element in the process that has this set, usually it is the first receive of the process.

Reply activity

When configuring a Reply activity, you can implement a normal or fault reply. When you configure a fault reply, your process is indicating the reply is returning a fault. A fault indicates an error has occurred. This option displays in the properties view only when the reply is to contain one or more faults. To configure a fault reply, enable the Fault radio button next to Reply Type. The table below the Use data type variables mapping check box displays all of the inputs of the selected operation. If you want to use data type variables, select one from the list, or clear the check box and browse to the appropriate request and response variable. See Raising faults for more detail.

Receive Choice activity


Create a new Process instance if one does not already exist When used with the Receive choice activity, this setting determines how to proceed in cases where an instance of this process has not yet been created in the runtime

environment. Enable it to authorize the creation of a new instance of the process, and clear it to deny such authority.

Scope activity
Isolated Choose isolated when you want to control simultaneous access to shared variables. Compensable Choose compensable if you want to allow compensation related activities on this scope. If this check box is clear, then this scope will be transparent to all compensation logic.

Snippet activity
Visual Choose Visual to use the visual snippet editor to graphically compose Java code. Java Choose Java to write a Java expression yourself in a text editor. Pressing CTRL + Space gives you a code assist that provides easy access to methods and code completion.

Throw activity

Use the fields on this page to assign a name to the fault that this activity will throw, as well as browse to an appropriate fault variable to store the data.

Variables

Use the fields to set an initial value for a variable as soon as it is created. Select Initialize this variable to define an initial value, and use Initial value to specify an appropriate value or expression for this type of variable. You can initialize the variable using the value of another variable, but the latter variable must be defined in advance. Only previously initialized variables will be listed. For variables that are not simple-type, the XML Literal Builder is a very convenient choice. Select XML Literal for the Initial value field, this brings up the XML Literal Builder. Select

Value Editor to use the simple interface to assign values to your complex variables. If you are comfortable with XML you can use the XML Editor to review or modify the generated XML code. Another useful choice is the XPath expression, see related topics for more information.

Wait activity and Timeout element

When you first click the Details tab for the wait activity and timeout element, you will see a properties page like the one shown directly above. The configuration options are identical to the Expiration tab: BPEL process editor. Parent topic: BPEL process editor Parent topic: Adding an activity to a BPEL process Related concepts Versioning business state machines Working with XPath in the BPEL process editor Related tasks Working with basic activities Related reference Description tab: business state machine editor Authorization tab: BPEL process editor Related information Customizing behavior with visual snippets