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n Look inside!
Special sales
events from ...
Chief, Menards,
Rural King
Around
Paulding
County
Girls Only at
Cooper Library
OAKWOOD Girls
Only will be held at the
Cooper Community
Library, branch of the
Paulding County Carnegie
Library from 9:30 a.m.-1
p.m. Saturday, March 9.
This event has been
planned for girls in sixth
grade through high school.
Registration is required for
this event.
So crawl out of bed and
just leave your pajamas on
if you would like and head
on over to the branch.
Breakfast will be waiting
for you. We will be doing
nails, so bring your own
fingernail polish. A beauti-
cian is also coming. This
event has been planned by
the T.A.B. (Teen Advisory
Board) members.
Countdown
The countdown has
begun! Its now 21 days
until spring.
Thanks to you ...
Wed like to thank
Donald Hubbard of
Grover Hill for subscrib-
ing to the Progress!
P
P
AULDING
AULDING
C
C
OUNTY
OUNTY
By JIM LANGHAM
Feature Writer
National Weather Service (NWS) officials
issued a report a few days ago indicating that a
self-study review of their handling of the June
29, 2012 derecho event that felled trees, dam-
aged buildings and left widespread power out-
ages across northeast Indiana and northwest
Ohio may have had some flaws.
The report, which was issued by the local
NWS in North Webster, stated that although
weather officials did a good job of issuing
warnings, the warnings did not communicate
the eminent danger of the severe storm to much
of the public.
The self-evaluation review noted that al-
though the local agency carried out its respon-
sibilities on a short-term basis, there was no
warning given of possible conditions that could
create such a storm 24 hours in advance, as is
often the case with anticipated tornado and se-
vere weather outbreaks.
Paulding County EMA director Randy
Shaffer said that while his office received the
information properly, the public had never been
educated about what to expect from a storm of
that nature.
Most people had never even heard of such
a storm. There wasnt enough time to bring
them up to speed about what they needed to re-
alize about such damage, said Shaffer.
Here in Paulding County, we had the ad-
vantage of seeing the damage left by the storm
as it moved across Indiana, continued Shaffer.
I was able to broadcast the potential wide-
spread danger that could be encountered as the
storm moved into our area.
Shaffer said it was a big help when NWS of-
ficials issued a tornado warning for the county
because residents could relate to the potential
damage of the storm then. There were in fact,
he said, several funnels aloft southwest of
Payne as the storm approached.
If such a storm were to happen this year, the
public would be better prepared and better un-
derstand what was coming, Shaffer said. It
was a unique storm, one that we dont see
around here that often. It came up like a torna-
do but it packed hurricane force winds with it.
Michael Lewis, warning coordinator for the
National Weather Service in northern Indiana,
said that the rare storm formed over northern
Illinois with winds of 60 mph, but by the time
it reached Columbia City, Ind., the winds had
increased to 75 miles per hour.
However, wind gusts at the Fort Wayne
International Airport were reported to be 91
miles per hour, the wind strength of category
one hurricane.
Weather specialist Rick McCoy agreed that
the weather assessment indicated that there
were some things to be ironed out about re-
porting such a storm and noted that the rarity of
such an event made reporting difficult for both
VOL. 138 NO. 27 PAULDING, OHIO 419-399-4015 www.progressnewspaper.org WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013 ONE DOLLAR USPS 423620
P
P
ROGRESS
ROGRESS
club established in 1948.
Virginia is survived by her
three children and daughters-
in-law, Jim and Anada Cooper,
Dianne Cooper and Gary and
Cheri Cooper, all of Oakwood.
She also has 13 grandchil-
dren, 18 great-grandchildren,
three step-great-grandchildren
and two step-great-great-
grandchildren, Greg and
Suzanne Cooper (Arlyn,
Tianna and Royce), Dawn and
Mike Price (Peyton), Darcy
Cooper, Athena and Steve
Brown (Nicholas, Lindsey and
Jake Roose [Jackson],
Christopher Brown and Allison
Brown [Riley]), Kendra and
Byron Keeler (Maggie, Aaron
and Joseph), Eric and Sandy
Ludwig (Brittany and Reid
Linder, Holly, Andrew, Blair
and Brooke), Matthew and
Amy Ludwig (Wes), Jennifer
and Mark VanCleve (Jacob,
Jade and Malayna), Heather
Cooper (Avery), Tara Cooper,
Luke Cooper, Kacy and Brett
Wagner, and Cole and Vanessa
Cooper.
In lieu of flowers and gifts,
the family asks that contribu-
tions be made to the Cooper
Community Library, 206
North First Street, Oakwood,
Ohio 45873, or Twin Oaks
United Methodist Church, 201
East Harmon Street, Oakwood,
Ohio 45873.
For her full obituary, please
see Page 3A inside.
facebook.com/pauldingpaper
twitter.com/pauldingpaper
www.progressnewspaper.org
The historic wind storm last June that tore through 10 states, including Ohio, causing severe
damages and power outages, was evaluated by National Weather Service. The report, released
last week, determined that although the public received warnings, they were surprised by the
intensity of the winds.
Report: Public didnt
understand severity of
June 2012 storm event
From staff reports
PAULDING Tuesday
morning, a hearing was con-
ducted on a motion to seek re-
lief filed last week by an at-
torney representing Vancrest
of Antwerp LLC.
The three-page motion,
filed Feb. 19, requested three
things of the court:
to require the current
tangible personal property lo-
cated at 204 Archer Drive and
305 Woodcox Drive,
Antwerp, Ohio to remain at
said location until the issue of
title and liens can be re-
solved;
to allow Vancrest access
to use said personalty for the
benefit of the existing resi-
dents until title issues are re-
solved with the requirement
that Vancrest pay a fair and
reasonable month rental for
said personalty; and
to direct Vancrest as to
whom the monthly rental for
the personalty should be
paid.
Results of the hearing were
not available at press time
Tuesday.
Mark White, president of
the Vancrest Management
Corp., which is headquartered
in Van Wert, said, Vancrest is
excited about the opportunity
to serve the residents of the
Antwerp area and we look
forward to being part of the
community.
This lawsuit pertains to
the furniture and equipment
and who has the right to trans-
fer its ownership interest,
White continued. The finan-
cial situation for the Manor
House has been an unfortu-
nate situation and we feel that
court guidance is appropriate
given the number of parties
involved, however, I believe
everyone has the staff and res-
idents best interests at heart.
In addition to the Vancrest
motion, attorney Joe Burkard
who is the receiver for Manor
House Assisted Living, Ltd.
and Essen House Restaurant
Ltd., filed several documents
with the court last week.
One of those was a motion
asking for an order from the
Court that the property in
question in the Vancrest ac-
tion be sold to that corpora-
tion.
It indicated that the own-
ers of the property have
reached an agreement to sell
the personal property for the
sum of $44,390 to Vancrest of
See DERECHO, page 2A
Vancrest of Antwerp seeks court
orders regarding Manor House
1-800-596-3808
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PEVS hires new
superintendent
By AMBER GEBERS
Correspondent
PAULDING The
Paulding Exempted School
Board met in a special meet-
ing on Monday, Feb. 25 to
discuss and vote on a new su-
perintendent for the school
district.
That evening it was
brought to the board to offer
William Hanak a three-year
limited administrative con-
tract as superintendent. The
vote was unanimous in favor.
His contract will begin on
Aug. 1 2013, and will contin-
ue through July 31, 2016. He
will also be allowed up to 20
days prior to Aug. 1.
Hanak, of Wauseon, is cur-
rently principal of Wauseon
High School, a position he
has held since 2008.
Previously, he was assistant
principal at Wauseon and also
worked for Patrick Henry
Schools, Northwest Nine
Mentorship Program and
South-Western City Schools.
He received a bachelor of
science degree from
Muskingum College, master
of education and educational
specialist degree from the
University of Toledo.
1 dead, 1 injured
in US 24 crash
CECIL The Ohio State
Highway Patrols Van Wert
Post is investigating a fatal
two-vehicle crash that oc-
curred Thursday evening on
US 24 near Cecil.
Dead is Kayla A. Bidlack,
30, of Cecil.
According to troopers, the
crash occurred at about 5:28
p.m. Feb. 21 on US 24 at Road
87 in Crane Township. This is
the second fatality at this inter-
section in less than three
weeks.
Tiffini E. Aldrich, 21, of
Cecil, was driving a 1996
GEO Prism northbound on
Road 87. Roy Pierre, age 44,
of Quebec, Canada, was driv-
ing a 2010 Peterbilt 387 truck
with trailer, hauling miscella-
neous freight westbound on
US 24. Troopers said Aldrich
attempted to cross US 24 and
was struck by the westbound
truck.
Bidlack, a passenger in
Aldrichs car, was pronounced
dead at the scene by the
Paulding County coroner.
Aldrich, reportedly six
months pregnant, was flown to
Parkview Hospital for treat-
ment of life-threatening in-
juries. No condition reports
have been available.
All were wearing their safe-
ty belts at the time of the crash.
Alcohol is not believed to be a
factor in the crash, which re-
mains under investigation.
The patrol was assisted on
scene by Paulding County
Sheriffs Department, Cecil
Fire Department, and Antwerp
fire and EMS.
On Feb. 5, a Paulding
woman was killed in a crash at
the same intersection. That in-
cident involved 14 vehicles
and resulted in the highway
being closed for more than a
day and a half.
See VANCREST, page 2A
Cooper Farms founder dies at age 91
OAKWOOD On Monday,
the Cooper Family shared
news that Virginia June
(Rockey) Cooper, the last liv-
ing company founder, passed
away Sunday evening at her
home in Oakwood.
Mrs. Cooper was born June
21, 1921, to the late Edgar Ray
and Helene (Eastman) Rockey
in Putnam County. She attend-
ed a one-room schoolhouse
until fourth grade, when she
began attending Continental
Schools, from which she grad-
uated in 1939.
On April 21, 1939 she mar-
ried Virgil Homer Cooper, and
in 1941 they moved north of
Oakwood, where she lived
until her passing. She and
Virgil later built their turkey
hatchery and offices next door
to their home, allowing her to
watch the growth of the com-
pany over the years.
Known as the matriarch and
co-founder of Cooper Farms,
Virginia worked on the turkey
farm and in the hatchery during
the early years of the company.
During those days, the compa-
ny was much smaller and
turkeys were still raised in
fields. This provided for plenty
of fun stories and memories
which were shared with the
later generations.
Those that knew her were
well aware that Virginia had a
passion for crocheting and
would regularly be found mak-
ing blankets and other items for
friends and family.
She greatly enjoyed spend-
ing time with her many grand-
children and was known as the
birthday card lady, who not
only sent each family member
a card, but also all the local
children until they were 18
years old.
She was a member of the
Ladies Aid Society, Pollyanna
Club and the Oakwood
Methodist Womens Group
and the Twin Oaks United
Methodist Church, Sunday
School secretary/treasurer and
a member of the Everwilling
Club, a home demonstration
VIRGINIA COOPER
2A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, February 27, 2013
By JOE SHOUSE
Correspondent
ANTWERP The Antwerp Village Council
met in regular session on Monday, Feb. 25.
The first utility bill for the new depot was a
hot topic among the council and drew atten-
tion from most board members. Progress with
the new Dollar General continues and
Antwerp clean-up day has been scheduled at
the meeting.
A recent utility bill from AEP in the amount
of $4,112 for heating the depot had several
council members questioning if the village
can continue to operate the depot.
We are a small village and we will go
broke with this kind of bill each month. We
cant do this, said Board President Jan Reeb.
Village administrator Sara Keeran said its
not right and she has set up a meeting with the
engineering firm who determined the kind of
system that is in place. Right now we are not
sure what the bill covers as far as time. It
could be a bill for the last six months, Keeran
said.
Mayor Tom VanVlerah was surprised about
the total, but wants to continue to investigate
what its all about and to see if there is a mis-
take of some kind and then fix it.
We will talk to those who know and we
will ask questions and continue our investiga-
tion, he said.
Some of the board was shocked to the point
of suggesting that maybe the depot will not be
used in the future and the offices currently
housed there may need to be moved back to
city hall.
Keeran reported to council concerning the
Dollar General store and working though the
various aspects of the project step by step.
There is a property owner and a church in-
volved in the land where the store will be lo-
cated and where an access road would be
built.
Right now plans call for the store to face
S.R. 49 and the entrance to the store parking
lot will come off of an access road and not
S.R. 49. Dollar General is actively working
towards the project and has requested a vari-
ance for a parking lot that will accommodate
31 parking spaces, said Keeran.
Land surveys need to be completed, land
donation agreements and land transfers yet
need to be done in order for the village to file
for state funding, hopefully sometime in
March.
Several ordinances were read and passed,
including:
The third reading of Ordinance 2012-027
for the street extension named East Woodcox
and will be designated as a one-way street
with designated angle parking on the south
side.
Ordinance 2013-05 authorizing Fiscal
Officer Loretta Barker to transfer $27,500
from the general fund to the police fund.
Ordinance 2013-06 authorizing Fiscal
Officer Loretta Barker to transfer $8,000 from
the general fund to the street lighting fund.
Ordinance 2013-07 authorizing Fiscal
Officer Loretta Barker to transfer funds from
the water reserve fund in the amount of
$23,707.00 to the water fund and to eliminate
the water reserve fund since it is no longer
necessary for the purpose for which it was es-
tablished.
Ordinance 2013-08 authorizing the fiscal
officer to transfer funds from the sewer re-
serve fund in the amount of $63,000 to the
sewer fund and to eliminate the sewer reserve
fund since it is no longer necessary for the
purpose for which it was established.
Ordinance 2013-09 authorizing the
mayor to enter into a loan and display agree-
ment with the VFW Post 5087.
The first reading of Resolution 2013-01
requesting the county auditor to certify to the
Village of Antwerp the total current tax valu-
ation and the dollar amount of revenue that
would be generated by 2 mills for a renewal
levy for police protection for a five year peri-
od commencing in 2014.
Resolution 2013-02 authorizing Mayor
VanVlerah to enter into a contract with the
State of Ohio, Department of Transportation,
for the project identified as Pau-Antwerp side-
walks. This is part of the safe routes to school
program and will consist of constructing 922
feet of sidewalk on Canal Road west of Kroos
Drive and a connector to the existing school
walkway to the south, including curbs, signs
and crosswalk markings, within the village.
This project will be funded 100 percent by the
Ohio Department of Transportation.
In other business:
Antwerp clean-up day is scheduled for
Saturday, June 22.
EMS made 52 runs in January and
February.
Police Chief George Clemens and his de-
partment made 133 calls so far during 2013.
Traffic tickets are down due to less traffic be-
cause of the new U.S. 24.
A new village website should be up and
running in late March.
The village should recover approximate-
ly $42,000 for pre-engineering work from the
depot project.
Mayors court: $2,901 received with
$246.50 sent to the state, $2,626 sent to the
village and $100 given to the computer fund.
$200 will be given to the Ball
Association.
The next meeting will be held at 5:30 p.m.
Monday, March 18.
n VANCREST
Continued from Page 1A
n DERECHO
Continued from Page 1A
Follow the Progress on:
copyright 2012 Published weekly by
The Paulding County Progress, Inc. P.O.
Box 180, 113 S. Williams St., Paulding,
Ohio 45879 Phone 419-399-4015
Fax: 419-399-4030;
website: www.progressnewspaper.org
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Advertising - dnutter@progressnewspaper.org
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Advertising Deadline is March 19, 2013
P PAULDING AULDING C COUNTY OUNTY
P.O. Box 180, 113 S. Williams St., Paulding, OH 45879
Phone 419-399-4015 Fax 419-399-4030
EMAIL:
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Editorial: progress@progressnewspaper.org
By JOE SHOUSE
Correspondent
PAYNE The Payne
Village Council met in regu-
lar session Monday evening,
Feb. 25. The announcement
of a new EMS chief begin-
ning in 2014 was made, two
new EMTs were accepted
pending the passing of the
mandatory physical exams
and drug testing, and bids for
garbage collection will be
open in March.
Current EMS coordinator
Greg Bollenbacher intro-
duced to the council
Assistant Chief Joe Garmyn.
Council unanimously ap-
proved a motion to accept
Garmyn as the EMS coordi-
nator beginning in 2014.
Bollenbacher will be step-
ping down from his position
at the end of this year.
Individual applications
from Duane and Tammy
Price were submitted to the
council by Bollenbacher, in-
dicating the couples desire
to rejoin the EMS team.
Duane is also a fireman and
both have served the com-
munity of Payne prior to
moving away. They will join
the force pending the pas-
sage of their physicals and
drug test.
The new garbage contract
will go in effect on May 1
with bids opening mid
March.
The plan is to have all the
bids at our first meeting in
April and then award the bid
at our April 21 meeting,
said Mayor Terry Smith.
Several ordinances were
presented to council, includ-
ing:
The third reading of
Ordinance 2013-05 known
as the insecure building ordi-
nance for the Village of
Payne.
A motion to suspend the
rule as an emergency was
granted for Ordinance 2013-
07 authorizing annexation of
certain territory owned by
the village. The motions to
suspend the rules passed fol-
lowed by a unanimous vote
to accept the ordinance. The
land to be annexed is one-
half acre near the retention
pond.
The rules were suspend-
ed and a resolution authoriz-
ing the fiscal officer to obtain
credit cards on behalf of
major administration depart-
ments was unanimously
passed. The credit card limit
increased from $1,500 to
$2,000 per card.
The passage of
Resolution 2013-D to amend
appropriations and to realign
all line items unanimously
passed.
In other business:
Zoning inspector Tom
Sinn reported one permit was
issued for construction of a
fence.
Council approved the
route for the Wayne Trace
National Honor Society 5K
run on April 6 at 6 p.m.
The updates for the new
village website has started
with a rough draft expected
in a couple of weeks.
Finance committee will
meet March 5 at 7:30 p.m.
Fire committee meeting
scheduled for April 2 at 7:30
p.m.
The next meeting will be
at 7 p.m. March 10.
weather service officials and
the general public, who didnt
know how to interpret what
was coming.
Another big factor in the
confused reporting, said
McCoy, was the fact that the
area had been under several
weeks of severe drought con-
ditions. During that time,
storms had formed over north-
ern Illinois and moved toward
the local area, hit the dry air
from the drought, and died out
before they reached the Fort
Wayne area.
Weather service officials
knew that they were taking a
chance either way, but they
were speculating that the pat-
tern that had been established
might also apply to this event.
Quite obviously, the derecho
storm defied all speculation
and became its own weather-
maker, said McCoy.
In spite of all of the dam-
age, for many areas, the rain
associated with the storm had
been the first that had fallen in
weeks, said McCoy. In most
cases, however, the storm was
moving across the area so fast
that it didnt have the time to
drop large amounts of rain.
McCoy said that not only
did the pattern in place from
the drought confuse weather
officials, local residents had
become so used to watching
storms form to the west and
then dry up, they assumed that
the same would happen again,
so they didnt take weather
alerts real seriously.
As it turned out, the storm
traveled 700 miles over 12
hours, racing from northern
Indiana to the southern Mid-
Atlantic coast. More than 600
damage reports were received
by NOAAs Storm Prediction
Center.
The storm held its violent
nature together so much that
an 81 mph wind gust was still
reported at Tuckertown, N.J.,
the next morning.
Weather service officials
said that the rare storm had
been caused by a ripple in the
jet stream fueled by the in-
tense heat wave settled over
the eastern half of the nation at
time.
McCoy added that it is too
early to tell, but the lack of
moisture this winter would
seemingly indicate that
drought conditions could con-
tinue this summer. He noted
that severe drought remains
through much of the countrys
midsection and could expand
into the Midwest again this
summer.
For the full NWS report,
v i s i t
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os
/ assessment s/ pdfs/ dere-
cho12.pdf
Antwerp, LLC...
This amount would cover a
lien held by The Richland
Bank in the sum of
$42,170.50 plus a receiver fee
of $2,219.50.
An attached exhibit listed
property in question from
both Manor House and Essen
House. Five pages of items
were listed from the Manor
House and totaled $31,940 of
the amount. Property from
Essen House was confined to
one page with value of
$12,450.
Burkard also filed a first ac-
count and report as receiver
of the properties, for the time
period Oct. 26, 2012 through
Feb. 15.
Six items, totaling nearly
$58,000, were listed as being
paid without Receiver ap-
proval.
These included $30,000 to
Louis Lengacher, $5,697 to
Carter Lumber, $7,500 to
A&E Partners, $7,800 to
Sebench, $4,999.05 to
Schmucker Construction and
$2,000 to Hawk/Gutman
Attorneys.
The report showed a net
balance on hand of
$29,470.20, but it also noted
real estate taxes for 2012 had
yet to be paid as did Receiver
fees for January and
February.
An outstanding water and
sewer bill for more than
$3,000 was also mentioned.
Another pending matter
was a faulty fire alarm system
at the site, with quotes for re-
pair or replacement.
Receipts for January and
February, paid two months in
arrears, are anticipated in an
amount over $89,000 total in
March and April.
At press time, attempts to
reach Joe Burkard were un-
successful.
An affidavit of Receiver,
also filed by Burkard, indicat-
ed he has been working with
Vancrest of Antwerp LLC, a
corporation currently seeking
licenses to take over the oper-
ation of both the Manor
House and Essen House busi-
nesses. The intended date of
takeover was listed as March
1, 2013.
To see more newsphotos
from our photographers go to
www.progressnewspaper.org.
You can order prints and photo gifts
of your favorite photos there too.
Oakwood may get fire truck a month early
By BILL SHERRY
Correspondent
OAKWOOD Oakwood Village
Council met Monday. Feb. 25.
Highlighting the agenda were dis-
cussions about a replacement fire
truck and water and sewer rates.
Fire Chief Kenny Thomas told
council that the final arrangements
have been worked out for the re-
placement fire truck. The truck
should be ready for delivery about
mid-May.
Thomas also told council that the
overhead doors at the fire station
are being worked on by Overhead
Door.
Mayor Erhard Bud Henke is
still working on water and sewer
rates. Revenue investigations for
water and sewer are still not done
and the mayor will continue to
work on new rates once revenue is
fully defined.
Council President Todd Dangler
commented, If water and sewer
rates have to change, we need to do
it a little at a time.
Fiscal Officer Susan Barron told
council that the auditor has been
here once and is doing most of the
audit from his home office. Barron
asked council to complete the audi-
tors questionnaire.
The Central Collection Agency
Tax advisors will be in the area
again this year to assist with village
tax problems. They will be avail-
able March 11 in Paulding and
March 18 in Oakwood.
Assistant EMS coordinator Mark
Figert told council that new EMS
Coordinator Chad Brown is still
getting a handle on things.
Councilwoman Melissa Figert stat-
ed that he was spending a lot of
time at the station.
Village administrator John Keyes
told council that the cleaning of
water filter one is done and it is
flowing like new at 125 gpm. Keyes
noted that before the filter was
cleaned, it was only flowing at 100
gpm.
The wage and salary schedule is
still being worked on and for the
present it is being kept exactly as is.
Council unanimously passed
Resolution 13-R-02, which is a
statement against House Bill 601.
HB 601, if passed, would allow the
State of Ohio to collect municipal
income tax and then forward the
monies collected to the municipali-
ties.
Police Chief Mark Figert report-
ed the following calls received and
cleared for the month of January:
unruly juvenile (1), keys locked in
vehicle (1), prowler (1), assault (1),
welfare check (1), criminal mis-
chief (1), assist EMS (1), civil dis-
pute (2), keep the peace (4), custody
dispute (3),dog complaint (1),men-
acing (1), telephone harassment (1)
and miscellaneous (2). Twenty-one
complaints were reported and
cleared for the month.
The next regular meeting will be
at 6:30 p.m. on March 11.
Initial depot utility bill
heats up Antwerp Council
Payne Council approves
new EMS chief for 2014
KAYLA BIDLACK
1982-2013
CECIL Kayla Ann Bid-
lack, age 30, died Thursday,
Feb. 21 from injuries sus-
tained in an auto accident.
She was
born Nov.
20, 1982
in Defi-
ance, the
daught er
of David
O. and
Sharon K.
(Fockler) Bidlack Sr. She was
a self-employed caregiver.
She is survived by her par-
ents, a son, Carson Alexander
Hodges, and a brother, David
(Stacy) Bidlack Jr., all of
Cecil; a sister, Sherry
(Randy) Richards, Antwerp;
maternal grandmother, Eve-
lyn Fockler, Defiance; and
many nieces, nephews, and
cousins.
She was preceded in death
by her grandparents, Carl
Fockler and Olan and Myrtle
(Relyea) Bidlack.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday, Feb. 26 at Den
Herder Funeral Home, Pauld-
ing, with Pastor George Alley
officiating. Burial was in
Rochester Cemetery, Cecil.
In lieu of flowers the fam-
ily requests memorials made
to Carson Alexander Hodges.
Online condolences may be
sent to
www.denherderfh.com.
MARGIE HILL
1934-2013
PAULDING Margie A.
Hill, age 79, died Tuesday,
Feb. 19 at Defiance Inpatient
Hospice.
She was born Jan. 4, 1934
in Defiance, the daughter of
Wendell and Eva (Rhoades)
Funkhouser. On June 8, 1952,
she married Paul H. Hill, who
survives. She was employed
as Paulding Township clerk,
retiring in 2000. She was a
member of Paulding United
Methodist Church, Paulding;
John Paulding Historical So-
ciety; and the Township
Clerks Association. She was
co-owner and operator of
Hills Carpet Service, Pauld-
ing.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Paul Hill, Paulding;
four daughters, Brenda
(Jerry) Smith, Paulding, Terri
(John) Coulon, Archbold,
Kim (Ron) Garrity, Paulding,
and Laurie Hill, Hamilton,
Ind.; a brother, Phillip (Sue)
Funkhouser, West Unity; a
sister, Linda Donaldson, Hav-
iland; 10 grandchildren,
Bradley Hanenkratt, Lisa
Stevens, Brion Hanenkratt,
Victoria Gray, Jaclyn Colley,
Christopher Britt, Samantha
Colley, Brittany Barnes,
Kelly Colley and Megan Gar-
rity; and eight great-grand-
children, Zachary, Cyrah,
Zander, Braylynn, Presley,
Savannah, Kolton and Jayde.
She was preceded in death
by her parents; a daughter,
Wava J. Colley; and an infant
brother.
Funeral services were held
Monday, Feb. 25 at Den
Herder Funeral Home, Pauld-
ing, with the Rev. Ben Lowell
officiating. Burial was in St.
Paul Cemetery, Paulding.
Donations may be made to
Community Health Profes-
sionals/Hospice or Fresenius
Dialysis Center.
Online condolences may be
sent to
www.denherderfh.com.
RUSSELL
ROSS
1922-2013
DEFIANCE Russell A.
Ross, 90, of Defiance, passed
away Saturday, Feb. 23 at his
home.
He was born March 4,
1922 in Paulding County, the
son of the Madison and Hazel
(Hauschlater) Ross. Russell
was a graduate of Paulding
High School, an Army vet-
eran of World War II, a life
member of
Def i ance
VFW Post
#3360, a
member of
the DAV
C h a p t e r
#36, a
member of
the Masons
Tuendawie
Lodge #195 and a member of
the First Presbyterian Church.
He had worked as a dental lab
technician.
He was preceded in death
by his wife, Fleta I. Colwell,
who died Oct. 1, 1994; his
son, Jerry, who died Sept. 10,
2006; his first wife, Edna
May Linn; and his parents.
Surviving are nieces, Linda
Reinhart of Paulding and
Marcia (Morris) Brune of
Paulding, a nephew; Lanny
Ross of Coconut Grove, Fla.;
great-nephews, Scott (Laura)
Brune of Fort Wayne and
Greg (Ann) Reinhart of
Paulding; and a special
friend, Julia Hart of Paulding.
Services will be held at 11
a.m. today, Feb. 27 at Law-
son-Roessner Funeral Home,
Defiance, with the Rev. Eric
Peltz officiating. Burial will
be in Riverside Cemetery
where VFW Post #3360 will
conduct honorary military
graveside rites.
Visitation is one hour be-
fore services Wednesday.
Suggested memorials are to
the American Heart Associa-
tion or First Presbyterian
Church.
Condolences may be
shared at www.defiancefu-
neralhome.com.
NELLIE WILHELM
1921-2013
PAULDING Nellie
Leona Wilhelm, age 91, died
Monday, Feb. 18 at her resi-
dence.
She was born Aug. 15,
1921 in Paulding County, the
daughter of Raymond and
Vira (Shrider) Smalley. On
June 27, 1944, she married
Theodore Wilhelm, who pre-
ceded her in death on Jan. 13,
1986. She was a member of
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish
where she was principal and
taught CCD. She was a mem-
ber of the Altar & Rosary So-
ciety and the Little Flower
Study Club.
She is survived by four
sons, T. Gary (Ann) Wilhelm,
Michael Wilhelm, David
(Vicki) Wilhelm, all of Pauld-
ing, and Dan (Laurie) Wil-
helm of Oakwood; three
daughters, Rita (John) Daeger
and Barbara (Howard) Baska,
both of Paulding, and
Jeanette (Terry) Prisk of
Highland, Mich.; two broth-
ers, Paul (Betty) Smalley and
Bob Smalley, both of
Antwerp; two sisters, Helen
Beck and Lodena Brown,
both of Paulding; 20 grand-
children; and 12 great-grand-
children.
She was preceded in death
by her parents; husband; two
sons, Anthony Wilhelm and
K. Paul Wilhelm; a grandson,
Alex Doster; and a brother,
Bill Smalley.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was held Friday, Feb. 22 at
Divine Mercy Catholic
Parish, Paulding, with Rev.
G. Allan Fillman officiating.
Burial was in St. Paul Ceme-
tery, Paulding. Den Herder
Funeral Home, Paulding, was
in charge of arrangements.
Donations may be made to
Masses.
Online condolences may be
sent to
www.denherderfh.com.
DONALD
SCHADE
1943-2013
PAULDING Donald D.
Schade, 69, of Paulding,
passed away Thursday, Feb.
21, at Parkview Regional
Medical Center in Fort
Wayne.
DOROTHY POTTS
1933-2013
PAULIDNG Dorothy
Eileen Potts, age 79, died
Monday, Feb. 25 at St. Ritas
Medical Center, Lima.
She was born March 8,
1933 in Williams County, the
daughter of Corwin and
Kathryn (Baur) Smith. On
Oct. 15, 1954, she married
William Joseph Potts, who
preceded her in death on Oct.
6, 1982. She was formerly
empl oyed
b y
St okel ys
c a n n i n g
plant.
She is
survived by
t h r e e
daughters,
F r a n c e s
Russell of Grover Hill, Bar-
bara (LeRoy) Gillett of
Bryan, and Rose Shepard,
Oakwood; a brother, Donald
(Patricia) Smith, Edon; a sis-
ter, Viola (Phillip) Lupien,
Bryan; a daughter-in-law,
Cathy Potts, Sherwood; many
grandchildren; many great
grandchildren; many great-
great grandchildren.
She was preceded in death
by her parents; husband; son,
Bill Potts; son-in-law, Pat
Shepard; and a sister, Mar-
garet Ann Hoover.
Funeral services will be
held at 11 a.m. Thursday, Feb.
28 at Den Herder Funeral
Home with the Rev. C.
Joseph Fifer officiating. Bur-
ial will follow in Bowholtz
Cemetery, Paulding County.
Visitation will be from 2-8
p.m. today, Feb. 27, and one
hour prior to services on
Thursday.
Donations may be made in
memory of Dorothy Potts to
her family.
Online condolences may be
sent to
www.denherderfh.com.
VIRGINIA COOPER
1921-2013
OAKWOOD Virginia
June Cooper, 91, of Oak-
wood, died Sunday, Feb. 24
at her home, surrounded by
her family.
She was born June 21,
1921, in Putnam County, the
daughter of Edgar Ray and
Helene Elizabeth (Eastman)
Rockey. Virginia attended a
one-room schoolhouse until
fourth grade, when she began
attending Continental
Schools from which she grad-
uated in 1939. She married
Virgil Homer Cooper on
April 21, 1939, and in 1941
they moved to a house north
of Oakwood where she lived
until her death. Virgil died
Sept. 28, 1984.
Known as the matriarch
and co-founder of Cooper
Farms, Virginia worked on
the turkey farm and in the
hatchery during the early
years of the company. She
had a passion for crocheting
and would regularly be found
making blankets and other
items for friends and family.
Virginia was a member Twin
Oaks United Methodist
Church in Oakwood, the
Ladies Aid Society,
Pollyanna Club and the Oak-
Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 3A
Obituaries
Updated weekdays at www.progressnewspaper.org
The Amish Cook
By: Lovina Eicher
brother Amos and Nancys
house. Amos is recovering
from bronchitis.
In the van accident on Jan.
9, he had badly bruised lungs.
That seems to make it harder
to get rid of his cough. He
hasnt been back to work
since the accident, but wants
to go soon. It is difficult for
Amos not to be able to go to
work.
The results for the 23-year-
old boy who was in the acci-
dent are better than they first
thought. He does have some
feeling in his feet and one of
his thighs. He is doing better
than the doctors thought he
would. We hope and pray he
continues to improve with
therapy.
After we left Amoss
house, we stopped to see sis-
ter Leah and Paul. Paul had
been in scheduled to have
hernia surgery last week. The
doctor didnt do the surgery
due to Pauls blood pressure
being high and signs of weak-
ness in his heart. He will need
to have some tests done on
his heart. Hopefully every-
thing will work out and good
health will be restored.
Last week daughter Susan
made monster cookies to take
along to the family gathering.
Seeing the bag of M&Ms
brought back a lot of memo-
ries from my Grandpa
Coblentz. When we were lit-
tle children every time he
came to visit he would bring
us a bag of M&Ms to share.
We would be so excited
and evenly count them into
piles. We tried to make our
pile last as long as we could
The school will have Fri-
day and Monday off for a
mid-winter break. Today is
Valentines Day, so the ele-
mentary classes are having
their party. Last night, Joseph,
10, Lovina, 8, and Kevin, 7,
signed all their cards to their
classmates. This is Josephs
last year in elementary
school, so this is his last
Valentines party.
We headed out for the two-
hour trip to Berne, Ind. on
Saturday at around 7:15 a.m.
We have set our hired van
driver to be here around 6:30
a.m. He got out of his van and
somehow left his keys locked
inside. His son brought a
spare pair and we were on our
way 45 minutes later.
Nine out of the 12 siblings
were at Joes sisters house
for the late family Christmas
gathering. There was more
than enough food for the
10:30 a.m. carry-in brunch.
Snacks were served later on
in the day. After we left the
gathering on Saturday we
drove in to the place we used
to live before we moved to
Michigan almost nine years
ago.
From there we stopped in
at the homeplace where I
lived until after daughters
Elizabeth and Susan were
born. The family that lives
there now was kind enough to
offer us to go inside the
house. We were running short
on time, so we decided not to.
The three oldest daughters
seem to remember most of
the place.
It brought back a lot of
memories, but the saying
proves true that home is
where the heart is.
We stopped in for a short
visit with sister, Liz and Levi.
From there we headed to
savoring each morsel. Not
once do I see or taste M&Ms
without thinking of Grandpa
Coblentz.
We recently had Loretta to
the childrens hospital where
she had surgery on her feet
last fall. The doctors were re-
ally pleased at how well she
was doing.
She can go six months
without her braces to see how
she does. Also she is doing all
of her therapy here at home
now. We pray her strength
will keep getting stronger, but
we need to accept whatever
Gods will is.
I want to thank everyone
for prayers and encourage-
ment. It helps to know others
care. Gods blessings to all.
Daughter Verena made this
pudding last night as a treat
for us all. Sister Emma al-
ways prepared this pudding a
lot and our family always en-
joys it.
DIRT PUDDING
1 12-ounce package of Oreo
cookies
2 3-ounce boxes of instant
vanilla pudding
1 16-ounce Cool Whip
1 8-ounce package cream
cheese
1 stick margarine, melted
3 cups milk
Crush cookies with a
rolling pin. Place all except
one cup of crumbs in the bot-
tom of a 9x13-inch pan. Pour
margarine over crumbs in the
pan. Mix milk and cream
cheese. Add pudding and mix
well. Pour over crumbs and
then top with Cool Whip.
Sprinkle with leftover crumbs
and chill.
Thank you
The family of Thelma Hill would like to express our deep
thanks and appreciation to those who sent cards, flowers, gifts
and food; also those who visited and had prayer with us.
Many thanks to Inpatient Hospice Care, Dr. Halachanova
and Den Herder Funeral Home.
We can not begin to show our gratitude to our wonderful
and caring Paulding United Methodist Church family; the
delicious dinner they prepared for us, the many visits Pastor
Ben Lowell had with our mother, the beautiful music by
Martha Strahley and Judy Lowell and the very touching and
meaningful service by Pastor Ben.
God Bless You All! Russell and Paul Hill
Louella Thomas 27p1
Bring In Your W2s
and Drive Out Today.
The Areas Newest Buy Here Pay Here Dealership
EASY AUTO CREDIT
906 W. Main Street, Van Wert, Ohio 419-238-5255
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wood Methodist Womens
Group.
She is survived by her three
children, James Robert
(Anada) Cooper, Dianne
Lynn Cooper and Gary Alan
(Cheri) Cooper, all of Oak-
wood; 13 grandchildren; 18
great-grandchildren, three
great-stepgrandchildren; two
step great-great-grandchil-
dren; a sister, Phyllis May
Lloyd of Continental; and
three brothers, Richard
Rockey of Defiance, Marvin
Rockey of Texas, and Randall
Rockey of New Mexico.
She also was preceded in
death by a great-grandson,
Brandon Andrew Ludwig; a
sister, Carol Alma Shirey; and
two brothers, Delbert Ray
Rockey and Royal John
Rockey.
Funeral services will be
held at 11 a.m. Thursday, Feb.
28 at Twin Oaks United
Methodist Church, Oakwood
with the Rev. Eric Dailey of-
ficiating. Burial will follow in
Sherman Cemetery, Oak-
wood.
Visitation will be from 2-8
p.m. today, Feb. 27 at Heit-
meyer Funeral Home, Oak-
wood, and one hour prior to
services on Thursday at the
church.
In lieu of flowers and gifts,
the family asks that contribu-
tions be made to the Cooper
Community Library, 206
North First Street, Oakwood,
Ohio 45873, or Twin Oaks
United Methodist Church,
201 East Harmon Street,
Oakwood, Ohio 45873.
Condolences may be ex-
pressed at www.heitmeyerfu-
neralhome.com.
For the Record
It is the policy of the Pauld-
ing County Progress to pub-
lish public records as they are
reported or released by various
agencies. Names appearing in
For the Record are pub-
lished without exception, to
preserve the fairness and im-
partiality of the Progress and
as a news service to our read-
ers.
HEITMEYER
FUNERAL HOME
610 Walnut Street
Oakwood, Ohio
419-594-3660
Monument Display on Site
Pre-Arrangement Specialists
27c1
The
Church Corner
Tuesday, March 5
Community Lenten
services
MELROSE Com-
munity Lenten services will
be held at the Auglaize
Chapel Church of God on
Tuesday, March 5. Pastor
Terry Porter will be the
speaker. Services begin at 7
p.m.
Saturday, March 9
Pancake-sausage
breakfast
MELROSE There
will be a sausage and pancake
breakfast from 8-11 a.m.,Sat-
urday, March 9, at the Mel-
rose United methodist
Church. The menu includes
sausage, pancakes, fruit, or-
ange juice and coffee. Pro-
ceeds will go toward the
Handicap Ramp Fund. The
United Methodist Women
will also have baked goods
available.
Church Corner
listings are free. If your
church is having any special
services or programs, please
call the Paulding County
Progress at 419-399-4015 or
email us your information at
progress@progressnewspa-
per.org
Lions Club to meet
PAULDING Members of the Paulding Lions Club will
meet the second and fourth Thursday of the month, unless it
is a holiday.
They gather at 7 p.m. in the Paulding Eagles. Meetings are
open to the public.
Free access
Are you a subscriber to the Paulding County Progress?
Then access to the Progress e-Edition and all website articles
is included free. Call 419-399-4015 or email
subscription@progressnewspaper.org to get your username
and password. Find out what youre missing!
Sherwood Banc
Corp. announces
share dividends
SHERWOOD The Board
of Directors of Sherwood
Banc Corporation, parent
company of The Sherwood
State Bank, announced a divi-
dend of $0.30 per share for
shareholders of record. This
dividend is a $0.05 increase of
the January 2012 dividend.
Earnings per share in 2012
were $1.72 per share, an in-
crease from $0.94 per share in
2011.
The Sherwood State Bank
operates banking offices in
Sherwood, Defiance and
Ridgeville Corners. For more
information, visit www.sher-
woodstatebank.com.
Obituaries are
posted daily
The Paulding County
Progress posts obituaries
daily as we receive them.
Check our Web site at
www.progressnewspaper.org and
click on Obituaries.
Paulding Mayors Court
4A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, February 27, 2013
These cases are listed as they are paid in full.
Wade R. Bissell, Defiance, failure to control; $110 fine and
costs.
Wayne L. Black, Paulding, assured clear distance; $110 fine
and costs.
Justin M. Deeds, Avilla, Ind., improper backing; $110 fine
and costs.
Ventsislav P. Kosev, Des Plaines, Ill., improper backing;
transferred to County Court.
Janice L. Lipp, Paulding, disobeyed traffic sign; $115 fine
and costs.
Jessica M. Manson, Paulding, speed; $110 fine and costs.
Keegan M. Olwin, Payne, failure to control; $110 fine and
costs.
Marvin J. Smallwood, Van Wert, failure to yield at an inter-
section; $115 fine and costs.
Gordon B. Stauffer, Continental, disobeyed traffic light;
$115 fine and costs.
Sheriffs Report
Weather report weekly summary as recorded at Paulding Villages water treat-
ment plant
Observations recorded for the 24 hours ending at 7:30 a.m. on the morning of:
PRECIPITATION
24-HOUR AMOUNTS Snow/Ice on
DATE HIGH LOW Rain-Melted snow Snow-Ice the ground
Feb. 19 53 21 0.05 -0- -0-
Feb. 20 27 15 0.01 0.3 -0-
Feb. 21 23 14 -0- -0- -0-
Feb. 22 28 20 0.17 1.0 1
Feb. 23 34 23 0.03 0.5 1
Feb. 24 31 25 -0- -0- 1
Feb. 25 37 22 -0- -0- -0-
Andy Stoller (center) was the speaker at Paulding Kiwanis Club. He and brother Alex and their
dad, Jim (left), have a new business, A Plus Propane, located approximately three miles south of
Paulding. Norm Cook was program chairman.
FORUM Readers Opinion
Express your opinion
The Paulding County Progress provides
a public forum through FORUM Reader
Opinion Letters to the Editor for area res-
idents to express their opinions and ex-
change ideas on any topic of public
interest.
All letters submitted are subject to the
Publishers approval, and MUST include an
original signature and daytime telephone
number for verification. We wont print un-
signed letters.
Letters should be brief and concise.
Letters must also conform to libel law and
be in good taste. Please limit letters to no
more than 500 words. We reserve the right
to edit and to correct grammatical errors.
We also reserve the right to verify state-
ments or facts presented in the letters.
The opinions stated are those of the
writer, and do not necessarily reflect that
of the newspaper.
Where to write: Letters to the Editor,
Paulding County Progress, P.O. Box 180,
Paulding OH 45879; or drop them off at
the office, 113 S. Williams St. The deadline
is noon Thursday the week prior to publi-
cation.
Fund-raising
letter authorized
by sheriff
Dear Editor,
The residents of Paulding
County will be receiving a
letter in the mail signed by
me very soon. Some citizens
might have already received
this letter over this past
weekend. This request is
from the Buckeye State
Sheriffs Association
(BSSA) in attempt to seek
new associate members. I
am a proud member of this
association.
I feel it is imperative to
communicate with our citi-
zens and let you all know
this is not a scam. The
BSSA will only request for
membership using this sys-
tem, and only with my ap-
proval. The association does
not contact prospective
members by telephone.
The funds collected by the
BSSA using this member-
ship drive directly affect my
office. Our association will
continue to have the re-
sources necessary through
education to advance my of-
fice into the ever-changing
world we all live in. I urge
you all to consider becoming
an associate member of this
fabulous organization.
My office is committed to
making our neighborhoods a
safe place to live. It is im-
perative that we seek
progress to reduce the nega-
tive influences that crime
has on our children and to
help safeguard the elderly.
Through your financial con-
tribution to this associate
member program, my office
will continue to receive the
training and guidance neces-
sary to move forward.
If you have any questions
in regards to this program,
please contact the associa-
tion at 800-589-2772 or by
mail at 1103 Schrock Road,
Suite 401, Columbus, Ohio
43229. As always, you can
contact my office and ask
for me directly.
Jason K. Landers, Sheriff
419-399-3766
Paulding www.Integrityford.net
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ACCIDENT REPORTS:
Wednesday, Feb. 13
10 p.m. Jason M. Dircksen,
34, of Antwerp was hurt in a
motorcycle accident on Road
192 west of Ohio 49 in Car-
ryall Township. Reports say
he was driving a 1995 Honda
Shadow when it veered off the
left side of the road. He was
taken to a hospital for treat-
ment. His bike was towed.
INCIDENT REPORTS:
Thursday, Feb. 14
1:40 p.m. A truck was re-
ported stuck on Road 214 off
Ohio 49 in Carryall Township.
5:23 p.m. Theft from a barn
was reported from Road 230
in Carryall Township.
6:48 p.m. Deputies were
called to assist Post 81 at Mile
Post 7 on US 24.
5:05 p.m. Assistance was
provided to Antwerp police on
a domestic complaint.
10:06 p.m. Deputies re-
sponded to a domestic distur-
bance on Road 122 in Brown
Township. The Oakwood
EMS was called to the scene,
but made no transport.
Friday, Feb. 15
6:42 a.m. A car/deer colli-
sion was handled on Ohio 49
in Benton Township.
1:08 p.m. Deputies were
told a vehicle was stuck on the
mud section of Road 117 in
Jackson Township.
1:25 p.m. A subject came on
station to report the misuse of
a credit card.
8:36 p.m. Break-in at a
house in Grover Hill was in-
vestigated.
8:53 p.m. Two Auglaize
Township fire units were on
the scene of a fire on Road
1038 for ten minutes.
9:05 p.m. Deputies assisted
Paulding police by delivering
a message on Road 146.
9:56 p.m. Four deputies
tracked down a driver report-
edly going east in the west
bound lane of US 24 in Crane
Township.
10:36 p.m. Two Paulding
fire units spent about five min-
utes at the scene of a car fire on
Road 103 in Paulding Town-
ship.
Saturday, Feb. 16
1:16 a.m. Deputies delivered
a message on Road 111 in
Paulding Township.
10:06 p.m. Assistance was
given Paulding police by
checking for a vehicle on Road
191 in Brown Township.
3:01 p.m. In Grover Hill a
caller saw a girl attacked by
three dogs.
8:46 p.m. Deputies docu-
mented a car/deer on Ohio 637
at Road 18 in Latty Township.
10:52 p.m. Threats were re-
ported from Melrose.
10:59 p.m. Telephone ha-
rassment was the complaint
from Ohio 66 in Auglaize
Township.
Sunday, Feb. 17
12:07 a.m. Shots were heard
on Road 151 in Jackson Town-
ship.
12:08 a.m. A 15-year-old
male was reported missing
from US 127 in Crane Town-
ship.
6:34 a.m. Three Oakwood
and three Grover Hill fire units
plus their EMS units re-
sponded to a house fire in
Grover Hill. Some were there
over 90 minutes.
9:21 a.m. Suspicious activ-
ity complaint was lodged from
Road 230 in Crane Township.
2:34 p.m. Vandalism to a
shed on Road 171 in Auglaize
Township was investigated.
11:12 p.m. Theft report was
made from Road 133 in Emer-
ald Township.
Monday, Feb. 18
7:24 a.m. Criminal damage
complaint was investigated on
Road 31 in Carryall Township.
10:13 a.m. Theft of a check
was reported from Road 171 in
Brown Township.
4:38 p.m. Four-wheelers op-
erating on the road were seen
on Road 117 in Jackson Town-
ship.
7:20 p.m. Possible child
neglect was noted in Melrose.
8:22 p.m. Deputies handled
a car/deer accident on Ohio 66
at Road 196 in Auglaize Town-
ship.
9:02 p.m. Report of a
hit/skip accident earlier in the
evening along Road 171 in
Auglaize Township was re-
ported. A vehicle was side-
swiped while north of Road
156 around 8:43 p.m.
11:35 p.m. Domestic dis-
pute was investigated on Road
171 in Brown Township.
Tuesday, Feb. 19
12:15 a.m. Deputies assisted
Hicksville Police Department
by transporting a juvenile to
Road 63 in Crane Township.
12:40 a.m. An unwanted
subject was reportedly in a
driveway along Ohio 613 in
Jackson Township.
8:32 p.m. Report of a miss-
ing adult came in from Road
133 in Emerald Township.
Wednesday, Feb. 20
12:55 a.m. Prowler com-
plaint was investigated on
Ohio 637 in Auglaize Town-
ship.
3:51 a.m. Breaking and en-
tering was handled on Road 24
in Benton Township.
7:15 p.m. Car/deer mishap
on Ohio 613 was documented
in Brown Township.
9:36 p.m. Possible child
abuse was reported from Mel-
rose.
Thursday, Feb. 21
12:48 a.m. Breaking and en-
tering on Road 230 in Carryall
Township was investigated.
1:04 a.m. A deputy reported
seeing a suspicious vehicle on
Road 73 at 192 in Crane
Township.
7:29 a.m. Unwanted person
complaint was handled along
Ohio 114 in Washington
Township.
Police Report
4 gauge wire was reported
missing from the Paulding
water treatment plant project.
8:45 p.m. Inappropriate tex-
ting between minors was in-
vestigated. The pair was
warned to stop.
10:40 p.m. Officers pro-
vided traffic control on Road
103 during a vehicle fire.
Saturday, Feb. 16
8:50 a.m. Report of a male
living on the fairgrounds was
looked into. One subject told
officers he had stayed a night
or two, but was not living
there.
Sunday, Feb. 17
1:28 a.m. Suspicious activ-
ACCIDENT REPORTS
None.
INCIDENT REPORTS
Thursday, Feb. 14
7:25 a.m. A deputy advised
of a possible fight at the
school.
11:52 a.m. A possible child
neglect case and a possible
child abuse case were both
called in.
2:10 p.m. Possible sex
abuse case was investigated
and deemed unfounded.
6:52 p.m. Threats were re-
ported from East Wayne
Street.
Friday, Feb. 15
10 a.m. A 1,000-foot roll of
ity was called in from North
Main Street.
12:19 p.m. A backing
mishap on West Perry Street
was documented.
5:38 p.m. Two juveniles
were cited for no operators li-
cense and operating four-
wheelers on the street after a
call from Emerald Acres.
6 p.m. An open door of a
building on the fairgrounds
was investigated. Nothing
seemed disturbed.
9:30 p.m. A car/deer colli-
sion was handled on West
Wayne Street.
Monday, Feb. 18
12:10 a.m. A Van Wert city
resident requested charges
against a local resident.
10 a.m. Problems with a
loose dog were called in from
North Main Street.
3:15 p.m. Neighbor prob-
lems involving parking issues
were handled on West Jackson
Street.
3:37 p.m. Investigation of a
break-in complaint on Fla-
trock Drive revealed the
owner on the property.
4:49 p.m. An intoxicated
male on a bicycle was seen
near the corner of Miles and
Main streets. Officers were
unable to locate him.
10 p.m. A stray dog getting
into trash along North Main
Street was called in.
Tuesday, Feb. 19
9:08 a.m. Parking problems
were again reported from
West Jackson Street.
Wednesday, Feb. 20
8:08 a.m. Officers were
called to the softball parking
area on Emerald Road for a
suspicious person in a vehi-
cle. When officers arrived, the
vehicle was there but the
driver was not.
5:45 p.m. Damage to a
trailer on North Main Street
was documented.
Thursday, Feb. 21
Midnight. Neighbor prob-
lems involving loud music
were handled on West Wayne
Street.
7:15 a.m. Dogs running
loose was the complaint from
South Coupland Street.
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Be a Facebook fan
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book page as a way for readers
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ton.
The family of Lance Corp.
Jeremy Johnson would like to
invite the community to join us
in welcoming home and thank-
ing him for his service on
deployment. Jeremy served in
the US Marine 6th ESB Bravo
Company in Helmand Provi-
dence, Afghanistan.
An Open House will be held at the Paulding VFW,
March 2 from 6-9 p.m. in the reception area.
Come and welcome him home.
The Bill Johnson Family
27p1
Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 5A
Property Transfers
Common Pleas
County Court
In My Opinion
There is still some
joy to be found
There have been times for me after the Christmas and New
Years candlelit services, Christmas hymn sings, and year
end/beginning celebrations that the joy sort of drained out of
my life. There is always that back-to-work and/or school
schedule to keep, decorations to take down and store for an-
other year and beginning a new year with things like tax
preparation in the immediate future.
This year was much like last year, but one thing stood out
that I think may be the sign of some good times ahead of me.
The second day of the New
Year, I had a meeting sched-
uled at the Paulding County
Senior Center. I was invited
to have lunch prior to the
meeting and I found some
real joy in this activity.
How, you may ask could
you find joy in a lunch at the
senior center. The story goes like this.
I came to the center about 45 minutes early because I was
not sure about the details. I was warmly welcomed and of-
fered my first cup of coffee and invited to sit anywhere I
liked. There were several tables with all the places taken so I
chose to sit at a table that had four friendly looking guys and
three empty seats. I took one of the empty seats and the con-
versation began with Do you know...? Do you remem-
ber...? Where are you from? and Why havent we seen
you before? There was constant conversation and before I
knew what was happening, lunch was being served.
Lunch was another joyful experience as we were served
creamed peas, a pork cutlet, baked potato with sour cream,
cheese and minced onions, followed by diced peaches for
dessert. I chose to keep my lunch light because I had several
things to look after in the afternoon, but the others at my
table dug into hefty second helpings. The two tables of ladies
next to us were telling jokes and the laughter was heart-
warming. There was joy in the lunch time conversation
around all the tables.
My opinion is that I had a wonderful, joyful experience in
joining other senior citizens for lunch at the Paulding County
Senior Center and in my opinion we all need to eat a good
healthy lunch and enjoy fellowship with other people. I
would like to invite each of you who have not experienced a
good joyful time at the senior center to come and join you
friends and neighbors for a lunchtime experience. I can tell
you from my experience that it was a good time.
I realize that this good time I had at the Paulding County
Senior Center has little to do with Sunday but, nevertheless, I
hope to see you in church this Sunday; we might have some-
thing in common.
William W. Sherry is a correspondent for the Paulding
County Progress.
The opinions stated are those of the writer, and do not nec-
essarily reflect that of the newspaper.
In My
Opinion
Bill
Sherry
CONCLUDED CASES
Civil Dockets:
William S. Bricker DDS,
Inc., Antwerp vs. Elizabeth
Murray, Paulding. Money
only, satisfied.
General Portland Employ-
ees Federal Credit Union,
Paulding vs. Sandra Thomas,
Latty. Money only, satisfied.
Credit Adjustments Inc.,
Defiance vs. Jacob M. Perl,
Paulding. Small claims, satis-
fied.
Michael M. Mott, DDS,
Ltd., Paulding vs. Lewis
Belcher, Cecil and Mary L.
Belcher, Cecil. Other action,
satisfied.
Paulding County Board of
Health, Paulding vs. Dustin
Elston, Cloverdale. Other ac-
tion, dismissed.
Midland Funding LLC, San
Diego vs. Theresa Hibbard,
Paulding. Other action, dis-
missed.
Credit Adjustments Inc.,
Defiance vs. Jason M.
Roberts, Grover Hill. Small
claims, judgment for the plain-
tiff in the sum of $1,988.28.
Credit Adjustments Inc.,
Defiance vs. Rebecca A.
Short, Payne. Small claims,
judgment for the plaintiff in
the sum of $744.52.
Credit Adjustments Inc.,
Defiance vs. Bradley J. Pef-
fley, Antwerp. Small claims,
judgment for the plaintiff in
the sum of $693.80.
Tri-County Roofing Inc.,
Paulding vs. Wendall Thomas,
Paulding. Small claims, dis-
missed.
Criminal Dockets:
Holly B. May, Melrose,
theft; $200 fine, $95 costs, pay
$50 monthly, pay all by March
29 or appear in court, make
restitution to victim, 180 days
jail suspended; no contact
with victim.
John J. Dyer Sr., Antwerp,
domestic violence; $150 fine,
$87 costs, 180 days jail sus-
pended; probation ordered, no
unlawful contact with victim,
10 hours community service
within 60 days, complete
counseling, stay med compli-
ant.
Tobias A. Bassler, Paulding,
attempted vandalism; $200
fine, $87 costs, pay or appear
date June 12, 180 days jail
suspended; 20 hours commu-
nity service within 60 days,
complete Thinking for a
Change program.
Benjamin D. Leach, Lima,
passing bad checks; dismissed
per State.
Tess N. VanVlerah, Defi-
ance, trespassing; dismissed
per State.
Kayleen K. Justinger, Oak-
wood, domestic violence; dis-
missed per State.
Traffic Dockets:
Megan L. Hart, Prospect,
Ky., 87/65 speed; $43 fine,
$77 costs.
Edward A. Hipsher, Spring-
boro, OVI suspension; $500
fine, $115 costs, pay all by
March 13 or appear, three
days jail, three-month license
suspension, 177 days jail re-
served.
Edward A. Hipsher, Spring-
boro, 66/55 speed; dismissed
at States request.
Edward A. Hipsher, Spring-
boro, seat belt; dismissed at
States request.
Stephanie L. Ball, Chu-
rubusco, Ind., no operators li-
cense; $250 fine, $87 costs,
pay $50 monthly, pay all by
Aug. 14 or appear.
Alvin R. Henry, Payne,
OVI/under influence; $375
fine, $120 costs, pay $100
monthly, pay all by June 12 or
appear, three days jail, six-
month license suspension;
may attend DIP program in
lieu of jail, ALS terminated,
community control ordered,
10 hours community service,
evaluation at Westwood, 87
days jail reserved.
Alvin R. Henry, Payne, left
of center; dismissed per State.
John D. Martinez, Defiance,
OVI suspension; $250 fine,
$132 costs, pay all by April 10
or appear, three days jail, six-
month license suspension;
community control ordered,
20 hours community service,
secure a valid license, proof of
financial responsibility pro-
vided, 177 days jail reserved.
John D. Martinez, Defiance,
102/55 speed; $100 fine, pay
by April 10 or appear.
Misael Granados, Fort
Wayne, 78/65 speed; $33 fine,
$77 costs.
Benjamin F. Miller, Lyn,
Ont., seat belt; $30 fine, $47
costs.
Lisa A. Ross, Paulding, fail-
ure to control; $68 fine, $77
costs.
David J. Anderson, Lima,
86/65 speed; $43 fine, $77
costs.
Casey L. Dowler, Convoy,
68/55 speed; $33 fine, $77
costs.
Cade Brian Mansfield, De-
fiance, 65/55 speed; $48 fine,
$77 costs.
Virginia K. Coker, Bryan,
65/55 speed; $33 fine, $77
costs.
Joshua Ryan Sherry, Oak-
wood, 65/55 speed; $33 fine,
$77 costs.
Renee Marie Boyd, Fort
Wayne, 80/65 speed; $43 fine,
$80 costs.
Kenneth G. Cole, Toledo,
76/65 speed; $33 fine, $77
costs.
Nancy Louis Damer, War-
saw, Ind., 81/65 speed; $43
fine, $77 costs.
Alexandra Leigh Thoma-
son, Belmont, Mich., 87/65
speed; $43 fine, $77 costs.
Brent A. Waggoner, Payne,
failure to control; $68 fine,
$77 costs.
Eva E. Gonzalez, Archbold,
FR suspension; $75 fine, $100
costs; warrant and warrant
block rescinded.
Eva E. Gonzalez, Archbold,
53/35 speed; $30 fine.
Ray A. Powell II, Continen-
tal, stop sign; $53 fine, $82
costs.
Arthur L. Talley, Chester-
field, Mich., seat belt; $20
fine, $55 costs.
John Lee Shamburger,
Burlington, N.C., seat belt;
$30 fine, $47 costs.
Ethan A. Mezuk, Convoy,
78/55 speed; $43 fine, $77
costs.
Kaleb D. Plotts, Paulding,
66/55 speed; $33 fine, $77
costs.
Alyssa N. Pollock, Van
Wert, seat belt; $20 fine, $47
costs.
George D. Simmons Jr.,
Valleyview, assured clear dis-
tance; $68 fine, $80 costs.
Todd A. Koelsch, Tiffin,
70/55 speed; $43 fine, $77
costs.
Todd E. Praul, Haviland,
65/55 speed; $33 fine, $77
costs.
Cheryl K. Blunier, Grabill,
68/55 speed; $33 fine, $77
costs.
Larry W. Wiley, Fort
Wayne, 82/65 speed; $43 fine,
$77 costs.
Dennis E. Carlisle, Pauld-
ing, 65/55 speed; $33 fine,
$77 costs.
Daniel J. Miller, Harlan,
Ind., 70/55 speed; $43 fine,
$77 costs.
Gregory D. Schafer, Defi-
ance, 65/55 speed; $33 fine,
$77 costs.
Mary J. Kupfersmith, Cecil,
66/55 speed; $33 fine, $77
costs.
Jane A. Sharp, Oakwood,
48/35 speed; $33 fine, $77
costs.
Lucas Allen Hyre, 21, of
Paulding, had a breaking and
entering (F5) charge against
him dismissed without preju-
dice Feb. 19 after a Grand Jury
failed to return an indictment
against him. Costs were
waived.
Justin M. Woodruff, 23, of
Cecil, had a domestic violence
(F4) charge against him dis-
missed without prejudice Feb.
19 after a Grand Jury failed to
return an indictment against
him. Costs were waived.
Robert W. Berry, 32, ad-
dress unavailable, had a war-
rant on indictment and an alert
for his arrest issued following
his indictment for felonious
assault (F2).
Jared L. Schibley, 23, ad-
dress unavailable, was ar-
raigned Feb. 20 for aggravated
robbery (F1). A not guilty plea
was entered and court dates
were set for a March 7 pretrial
conference and an April 9 jury
trial. His bond was set at
$75,000 with no 10 percent
privilege.
Kaz K. Shenfield, 23, ad-
dress unavailable, had a war-
rant and an alert for his arrest
issued following an indict-
ment for aggravated robbery
(F1).
Gary A. Hoschak, 59, of
Paulding, had court dates set
for his rape (F1) case. A pre-
trial conference will be April 8
with a June 20 jury trial.
Joshua K. Clark, 27, address
unavailable, had a warrant on
indictment and alert for his ar-
rest issued following indict-
ment for theft (F4) recently.
Kevin L. Clay, 27, of Van
Wert, was set for a Feb. 28 ar-
raignment. The court ordered
that he be released to the local
sheriffs office from the Van
Wert County Sheriffs office
for the appearance and then be
returned.
Civil Docket
The term et al. refers to and oth-
ers; et vir., and husband; et ux.,
and wife.
Michele L. Yantiss, Pauld-
ing vs. Michael A. Yantiss,
Paulding. Divorce.
The State Bank and Trust
Company, Defiance vs. Patri-
cia A. Mosier and her un-
known spouse if any, Grover
Hill and Vicki Lautzenheiser,
Grover Hill and Paulding
County Treasurer, Paulding.
Foreclosures.
Benjamin T. Mathews,
Paulding vs. Sarah D. Math-
ews, Baytown, Texas. Di-
vorce.
Evelyn L. Schneider,
Antwerp vs. Michael L.
Schneider, Philo. Divorce.
Bank of America, N.A.,
Plano, Texas vs. Jeni Lynn
Kennedy, Payne and Michael
L. Kennedy, Payne and Ohio
Department of Taxation,
Columbus. Foreclosures.
Administration Docket
In the Estate of Richard J.
Windsor, application to ad-
minister file.
In the Estate of Oscar F. Pe-
ters, application to administer
file.
Criminal Docket
Jennifer L. Thomas, 39, of
Paulding, will be in Court Feb.
28 for a hearing on a change
of plea for nonsupport of de-
pendents (F5).
Tobias A. Bassler, 25, of
Paulding, had a vandalism
(F5) case against him dis-
missed without prejudice on
Feb. 19 upon a motion of the
State. The parties agreed to
settle this matter in Paulding
County Court.
Amber Vance, 23, of Pauld-
ing, will be sentenced March
25 following a Feb. 19 pretrial
conference. She was indicted
last month on charges of ag-
gravated robbery (F1).
The term et al. refers to and others; et vir., and husband; et ux., and
wife.
Auglaize Township
Leon R. and Angela L. Froelich, trustees to Michael L. and
Karin J. Weible, trustees; Sec. 34, 1.523 acres. Warranty deed.
Benton Township
Warren H. Bissell Jr. and Diane M. to James F. and Jamie L.
Welch; Sec. 10, 0.83 acre. Warranty deed.
Dorothy A. Sitcler, trustee, dec. to Mary Kay Martin, trustee;
Sec. 11, 40 acres. Affidavit.
Brown Township
Ryan P. Cunningham, trustee to Jon Hahn; Sec. 8, 5.18 acres.
Warranty deed.
Emerald Township
Louise Paschall to Louise Paschall Life Estate and Robert
Brinck; Sec. 4, 19.077 acres. Warranty deed.
Rex A. Hasch to Rex A. Hasch Life Estate and Six Mile
Creek LLC; Sec. 10, 40 acres; Sec. 15, 160 acres; Sec. 22, 147
acres and Sec. 22, Lot 32, Proxmires Canalview Subdivision,
0.482 acre. Quit claim.
Latty Township
Ronny Lejeune Crone and Pamela Ann to Ronnie Lejuene
Crone and Pamela Ann; Sec. 21, 60 acres. Quit claim.
Paulding Township
Desiree Lyn Dunbar, fka Desiree Lyn McDaniel, et ux. to
Donald Charles Dunbar III and Desiree Lyn; Sec. 16, Lot 9,
Nonemans Melody Acres Allotment #2, 0.413 acre. Affidavit.
Dorothy A. Sitcler, trustee, dec. to Mary Kay Martin, trustee;
Sec. 31, 232.68 acres. Affidavit.
Richard J. Windsor, dec. to Florence E. Windsor; Sec. 14, 3
acres. Affidavit.
Melrose Village
Stevie K. and Linda Lambert to Gregory E. Landers; Lot
166, Original Plat, 0.172 acre. Quit claim.
Payne Village
James F. and Jamie L. Welch to Britni Sharp; Lot 19, Prox-
mires Payne Allotment, 0.27 acre. Warranty deed.
Dorothy A. Sitcler, trustee, dec. to Mary Kay Martin, trustee;
Lot 54, Original Plat, 0.2 acre. Affidavit.
Scott Village
Mildred L. Rhinehalt, dec. to Joy Mae Hartmier and Lou
Anne Matthews; Lots 1 and 3, Outlots, 0.295 acre. Affidavit.
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Antwerp board
sets 2014
graduation date
By JOE SHOUSE
Correspondent
ANTWERP The Antwerp
Local School board met in
regular session on Thursday,
Feb. 21.
Brief reports were received
from superintendent Pat Ross,
middle school/high school
principa, Mike Bute, elemen-
tary principal Travis Lichty
and treasurer Kristine Stuart.
The following information
was presented at the meeting:
There were no bullying re-
ported for the first semester.
Student of the month for
January was Shawn Dooley
and for February Cameron
Huss.
Derek Reeb will partici-
pate in regional spelling bee at
IPFW on March 9.
2014 graduation date will
be Sunday, May 25.
In the business portion of
the meeting, the following
items were approved:
Pat Miesle as assistant
high school track coach for the
2012-13 school year.
Matt Lovell as elementary
music program director for
second and fifth grades for the
2012-13 school year.
Mary Smith as elementary
music program director for
kindergarten, first, third and
fourth grades for the 2012-13
school year.
After-Prom at the Crazy
Pins in Fort Wayne on April
27.
an overnight trip for the
high school softball team
to Camp Lakota on March 22.
the Antwerp Local School
districts participation in
the Community Reinvestment
Area (CRA) agreement with
the village.
The board went into execu-
tive session at 7:10 p.m. to
consider an investigation of
charges/complaint against a
public employee, official, li-
cense, or regulated individual
and to consider compensation
of a public employee or offi-
cial. The board came out of
executive session at 8:10 p.m.
The next regular meeting
will be held at 6 p.m. Thurs-
day, March 21.
6A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Anniversaries
Birthdays
March 2 Kenneth and
Delores Greutman, Dana and
Flora Jean Welch.
March 3 Paul and Mari-
lyn Adams, Mark and Robin
Gonzales.
March 4 Ned and Linda
Sporinger.
March 6 Tony and Sheryl
Garza, Marquis and Tonya
Goings.
March 7 John and Dessie
Ganger Jr.
(The Paulding Progress main-
tains a file of birthdays and anniver-
saries. To make any changes,
please call our office at 419-399-
4015 during business hours, email
to progress@progress -
newspaper.org, or drop us a note to
P.O. Box 180, Paulding.)
March 2 Molly Clark,
Angie Colwell, Frank Eck,
Greg Hicks, Brooke Howell,
Esther Morrow.
March 3 Chad Bear,
Denny Coburn, Eathon
Coughlin, Sally Davis,
JoAnne Klopfenstein, Zaine
McMichael, Lonnie Miller,
Glen Plotts, Wendy
Roughton, Alice Wenninger,
Helen Williams, Misty Zizel-
man.
March 4 Addison Adams,
Tammy Ball, Brooklyn Gen-
ero, Dan Goyings, Lyndsey
Miller, Marilyn Ordway, An-
thony Perelez, Kiana Eliza-
beth Recker, Braxton H.
Ricker, Russell Ross, Amelia
Wannemacher, Andrew
Wharry.
March 5 Ethan Arend,
Amanda Ger schutz, Debbie
Graf, Georgia Tsaftarides,
Dorothy Vogel.
March 6 Alicia Adkins,
Kate Densmore, Helen Gun-
derman, Tom Krick, Thomas
Lantow, Andy Smiley, Ruby
Thornton.
March 7 Marty Evans,
Doug Habern, Rae
McMichael, Jessie Miler,
Ryan Noggle, Sandra Parrish,
Jason Daniel Rios, Ruby Tin-
ker, Natalie A. Webb.
March 8 Landen Bennett,
Amy Brewer, Joyce Cheek,
Terry Hurlburt, Duke Miler,
Shanna L. Reinhart, Rita
Shininger, Kris Stallkamp,
James Stanton, Jude Stoller,
Emily Thrasher, Moses
Wilder.
In The
Garden
By
Kylee Baumle
Gardening with Grandma
I went to visit my grandma
the other day. At 98, shes a
treasure and a pretty amazing
person. Though shes in good
health, she lives in an assisted
living facility now. Shes
done her fair share of garden-
ing in her day and several
years ago, I sat down to talk
with her about it. I was curi-
ous as to how much or how
little things had changed over
the years.
She was a young girl in the
1920s and thats a long time
ago by anyones standards,
even hers. But some things
never change, especially
when it comes to the affairs
of Mother Nature. Seeds get
planted, they germinate, and
they grow.
At the time we talked, I
was starting some seeds in-
side in a spare bedroom that
had a south window to make
the best use of available light.
Her mother used to do the
same thing, she said, sowing
things like tomatoes and cab-
bage in dishpans. She grew
geraniums in tin cans on the
windowsills in the winter,
too.
When she could work the
ground outside, Grandmas
mom grew peas, green beans,
carrots, lettuce, onions and
Late Dutch cabbage. She
liked to make big crocks of
sauerkraut out of that cab-
bage. Shed put the ten-gallon
up-ground cellar.
I remember Grandma and
Grandpa having one of those
themselves and I loved to
play in that cool place as a lit-
tle girl.
Grandma said her dad had
a truck patch, which was
where they grew the big
stuff like potatoes and buck-
wheat. At harvest time, theyd
take the buckwheat to nearby
Ottoville, where the canal
went through and at Lock 16
there was a mill, where it
would be ground into flour.
While they grew fruits and
vegetables to eat, they also
had plenty of pretty flowers.
Grandma remembers cosmos,
marigolds, snapdragons,
asters, and zinnias all heir-
looms. Theyd grow nastur-
tiums with the cucumber
vines, too, because they were
supposed to keep the beetles
away.
When Grandma got mar-
ried and had a home and gar-
den of her own, she had a
cold frame made of two-by-
fours at the side of the garage.
Theyd work the ground,
get a wheelbarrow load of
other soil and add manure.
Then theyd mix it all up with
a hoe and plant the seeds. It
would get covered with an
old house window, with a
block of wood stuck in there
to keep it open just enough
for ventilation. When the
seedlings reached the glass,
the window would come off.
Theres much to learn from
the older and wiser members
of our family. The more
things change, the more some
things stay the same, and
thank goodness. They experi-
enced the same trials and
tribulations that we do in our
gardens today. And theres
wonderful value in it, learn-
ing from their experience.
Read more at Kylees blog,
Our Little Acre, at
www.ourlittleacre.com and
on Facebook at www.face-
book. com/OurLittleAcre.
Contact her at PauldingPro-
gressGardener@gmail.com.
crock on the porch, fill it with
layers of cabbage shredded
with the kraut cutter and salt,
mix it up really well, then lay
a cutting board on top and
weigh it down with a rock.
Some weeks later, stirring
occasionally in the meantime,
it was sauerkraut. In the win-
ter, theyd go out and get a
scoop of kraut from the crock
for eating. It never froze
solid, she said, because of the
high salt content.
Grandmas family had a
small orchard, where they
grew seven varieties of
peaches. In Ohio. The best,
she said, were the white free-
stone. They also had apples,
cherries, strawberries and
wild blackberries, as well as
a grape arbor. Oh, they had
gooseberry and currant
bushes, too.
There were seventeen kids
in that Wistner family, so
what they grew helped feed
them, as was the case for
nearly every farm family
back then.
They canned tomatoes in
tin cans, using red wax to seal
the lids around the edges.
Grandma remembers helping
make ketchup, taking her turn
stirring it on the wood stove.
It required hours of stirring
before it would be thick
enough.
They made apple butter on
the wood stove too, and
canned it using the cold-pack
method. There was jam to be
made from the strawberries
and blackberries and every-
thing canned was kept in an
Anniversary
MR. and MRS.
LOUIS PRACHT
PAULDING Louis and Carol
Pracht will be celebrating their 55th
wedding anniversary.
The couple was united in marriage
on March 1, 1958 in the Paulding
Church of the Nazarene by the Rev.
Donald Teegarden.
They are the parents of two chil-
dren, Deborah (Tim) Ryan of Swanton
and David (Kelly) Pracht of Paulding.
They also have four grandchildren,
Elisha, Emillee, Mesa and Dayton,
and two great-grandchildren, Silas and
Nehemiah (with the third on the way).
Louis and Carol are both retired and
delight in spending time with their
grandchildren, also attending their
various sports and music activities at
school and church.
The family will be dining out to-
gether to celebrate this special occa-
sion.
Paulding resident presents
concerns to village council
1250 S. Washington
Van Wert, OH
419.238.8618 VanWertHospital.org
FREE PARENTING WORKSHOP
SIX WEEK SERIES
BEGINS MARCH 7TH
Van Wert County Hospital will offer 1,2,3,4 Parents! A
free workshop for parents of children ages 2-5. The six-
session video and discussion program will be held on
Thursday evenings. Beginning March 7th, each session
will be held in the hospitals conference room B&C from
5:30-7:30 p.m. Register today by calling 419.238.8618.
Waters Insurance LLC
Bruce Ivan
20c8
AUTO HOME
COMMERCIAL BUSINESS
FARM
1007 N. Williams St.
Paulding, OH 45879
419-399-3586
600 South Main St.
Payne, OH 45880
419-263-2127
1st Saturday of each month.
Paulding County Fairgrounds 9-12
Cecil Fire Department 9-12
If you have questions
call ERIERECYCLING at 419-258-2345
COMMUNITY RECYCLING
27c1
Now Accepting
computer equipment, cell
phones, VCRs and batteries
(no TVs)
By BILL SHERRY
Correspondent
PAULDING The Paulding
Village Council met Feb. 19
with all council members
present. Attending the meeting
was resident Jack Vance, who
presented council with various
concerns.
Vance told council that
Maple Street was full of pot
holes and requested the prob-
lem be addressed. Village ad-
ministrator Harry Wiebe
stated that the area has been
discussed and possibly chip
and seal would be used to cor-
rect the problem.
Vance also reported that the
catch basins in his area need
cleaned out as his yard floods
due to them being full. Wiebe
noted he will have the utility
department look into the prob-
lem.
Vance also voiced his con-
cerns regarding vehicles
speeding down his street. He
reported a white Pontiac
Grand Prix frequents the area
driving between 50-60 mphh.
His main concern is for the
children in the area.
Vance asked if additional
speed limit signs could be
posted. Mayor Greg White
told Vance that he would
speak to the police department
about patrolling the area more
frequently.
Vance also asked for an ex-
planation of the $5 monthly
SCI charge recently added to
utility bills. It was noted the
charge is to pay the debt serv-
ice payment on the sewer sep-
aration project. Vance stated
that he believes this charge
should be assessed to the peo-
ple it is affecting and not the
entire community. White
replied that due to the finan-
cial impact of this project, it is
necessary for the community
to incur the cost together.
The recreation committee
reported and council unani-
mously approved the follow-
ing:
Kellie Gaston will review
pool applications and conduct
interviews.
a three-tub sink is to be in-
stalled in the concession area
in order to comply with the
health departments food han-
dling regulations.
the purchase of a Level 3
license for the pool this year as
required by the health depart-
ment. The cost for this license
is $353.
Councilman Randy Daeger
asked about the feasibility of
installing a boat ramp at the
Paulding Reservoir. Council
members authorized the build-
ings and grounds committee to
work with Daeger on the proj-
ect. Daeger noted he will be
meeting with a representative
of ODNR.
Wiebe provided council
with a copy of a complaint
form provided by Jones &
Henry Engineers for the sewer
separation project. The com-
plaint forms will be forwarded
to the resident inspector, Jeff
Kusmit. Kusmit will address
all problems and/or concerns
with the complaining party.
Wiebe also reported that the
village had been involved in a
class action lawsuit regarding
the chemical Atrazine and has
received a check for approxi-
mately $70,000. The check
has been cashed and it will be
determined at a later date how
the money is to be spent.
Wiebe also made council
members aware of the sewer
contractors interest in possi-
bly storing stone on the old
Certified lot while they work
on the sewer separation proj-
ect. Village solicitor Mike
Jones advised council that the
Paulding Chamber is currently
leasing the property, so it is ul-
timately their decision as to
whether or not the lot is used.
Mayor White suggested the
contractor utilize the property
owned by the village located
just east of the Jackson Street
bridge. It was also suggested
that the contractor could po-
tentially store stone near the
old water tower site.
White advised that he,
Wiebe and council president
Roger Sierer met with repre-
sentatives of Paulding schools
and ODOT to discuss the
Safe Routes to School pro-
gram.
The first phase of the proj-
ect will cost approximately
$898,000 for the installation
of a 5-foot-wide sidewalk
along Emerald Road. ODOT
will be in control of this proj-
ect and intends to start next
spring. Jones will contact Lori
Brinkman to discuss the vil-
lage financial responsibility.
At 10:15 a.m. March 7, the
Hotel Barnes property on
South Williams Street will be
sold at the Paulding County
Courthouse.
The next regularly sched-
uled meeting will be held at
6:30 p.m. Monday, March 4.
OPEN HOUSE SET The
family of Lance Corporal Je-
remy Johnson would like to in-
vite the community to join them
in welcoming him home and
thanking him for his service on
deployment. An open house
will be held from 6-9 p.m. on
March 2 at the Paulding VFW
Posts reception area. Jeremy
served in the US Marine 6th
ESB Bravo Company in Hel-
mand Providence, Afghanistan.
He is the son of Bill and Angie
Johnson, Paulding.
Trees: Plant for the future
By Mark Holtsberry
Education specialist
Paulding SWCD
What has a tree done for you
lately?
Those short and tall, woody
stemmed plants with leaves for
needles are true wonders of na-
ture. From the air we breathe, to
a 2x4 in your homes wall, the
tree has proven to be human
kinds best friend.
How many of us built a tree
house, hung a rope for a swing,
watched the nest of birds finally
leave this is what we all need
to protect.
Foresters around the globe
are trying to manage the
worlds forest so they are
healthier, more plentiful and at
the same time provide the many
products we all need to survive.
Please take a moment to re-
alize just how many things in
your everyday life can be attrib-
uted to trees:
Produce oxygen
Provide cooling shade
Reduce soil erosion
Look beautiful
Create privacy
Improve our energy effi-
ciency
Provide wood for construc-
tion
Buffer noise pollution
Creates homes for various
wildlife
Provides heat in your home
during winter
The Paulding Soil and Water
tree sale is going on now
through March 1. Stop in at the
office at 503 Fairground Drive
or call 419-399-4771 for more
information.
Plan to plant for the future.
Paulding Co. Fish &
Game Club located
1
1
2 miles south of
Paulding on U.S. 127.
Course Dates & Times
Saturday, March 30th 8:30 am to 5:30 pm
Students ten years of age or younger
must be with an adult.
Call Ohio Division of Wildlife at 1-800-945-3543
or wildohio.com
27c5
Hunter Education Course at
Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 7A
The Progress ...
is Paulding Countys
newspaper of record.
A Penny For
Your Thoughts....
By: Nancy Whitaker
IN THE TRUNK
I am the first to admit it, I
know nothing about the me-
chanics of a car. My main ex-
pertise is to put the key in it,
press on the gas, shift the
gears and go.
I am sure there are a lot of
women who can check the
oil, pump up the tires and put
water in wherever it goes. I
envy these ladies, because I
am not even sure I would
know how to get the hood up
on a car. In other words, I am
saying that if I had any car
trouble, my only alternative
would be to call someone
who knew something about
the internal and external
workings of a vehicle. In
other words, a repairman.
Now, in no way does that
mean I dont know how to
drive. I think I am a good
driver, at least I feel safe rid-
ing with myself. My husband
and kids would probably beg
to differ, but hey, their driving
scares me, too.
A couple of years ago, I
bought a cute little red con-
vertible. I am really proud of
it and call it my baby. How-
ever, as with any different ve-
hicle, you need to get used to
knowing where all the differ-
ent features are located.
I had no trouble in learning
how to put the top up and
down, however, I did have a
few problems finding out
about the idiosyncrasies of
how the windshield wipers
worked. I finally mastered
that and the headlights.
Those that know me know
that I am short, actually only
about 4-foot10! Naturally
when I drive a car, I need the
seat pulled way up and the
steering wheel tipped as far
down as it will go just to get
close enough to drive.
I did notice that after driv-
ing my car different places
that people would say,
Nancy, the trunk on your car
is open. Did you forget to put
it down?
I wondered why in the
world is my trunk up? I knew
I had not opened it or put any-
thing in it.
This kept happening to me
over and over. Each time I
drove someplace someone
would tell me my trunk was
up. I thought and thought, but
could not figure out why it
was always coming open.
Well, little did I know that
you could get in the trunk
with more than just keys.
Now, I knew that down on
the seat on the drivers side,
there was like a lever.
Ooops.... silly me. I thought it
was a seat adjuster. I had been
moving that lever almost
every time I drove the car.
One day my husband told
me when I was getting in the
car to open up the trunk. I
said, You are out there. You
open it. Dont you have a
key?
He said, See that lever
down there? That is to open
the trunk without a key. You
just slide it back.
I said, No, it isnt. That
lever is to adjust the seat.
So I proceeded to show
him how it worked and what
do you know? Up went the
trunk.
So, all that time, I was
opening up the trunk instead
of adjusting the seat.
The trunk would open part
ways and when I went down
the road I did not realize it
was open. I do know that it
seemed whenever I got to
work or wherever I was
going, someone would say,
Your trunk is open.
I finally know why the
trunk was always open and I
now know what that lever is
for.
Like I said, I am not really
mechanically inclined, but it
was nice to find out how that
trunk works. I can handle that
much mechanic ability.
I do wish I knew a little
more about cars and what
makes them run, but for now,
I am content to know how to
start it, drive and get in my
trunk. (I mean it doesnt take
a rocket scientist.)
Do you think you have to
be mechanically inclined to
drive a car? Do you know
how to check the oil and the
air in the tires? Have you ever
opened the trunk when you
thought you were adjusting
the seat? Let me know and
Ill give you a Penny for Your
Thoughts.
By Jim Lopshire
OSU Extension educator
Biosecurity at the farm
level is a management tool to
help prevent the movement of
disease-causing agents onto
and off of farm operations.
Biosecurity therefore in-
volves many aspects of farm
management, such as disease
control and prevention, nutri-
ent management and visitor
control. Although controlling
and limiting the movement of
livestock is recognized as the
most important biosecurity
measure for most diseases,
many important hazards can
be carried on contaminated
clothing, footwear, equip-
ment and vehicles.
All visitors need to under-
stand the possible risk they
present when entering a farm,
what a farmer expects from
them, and what precautions
need to be taken between
farms that are visited.
This applies to anyone en-
tering or leaving the premises
who may be visiting other
livestock operations, and not
just those of the same species
or commodity type.
Visitors can unknowingly
bring harmful agents onto a
farm via contaminated cloth-
ing, footwear, equipment and
vehicles. Equipment used to
repair buildings and machin-
ery, to treat or handle animals
and to carry out testing or
procedures are all potential
sources of contamination.
The risk is increased with
visitors who regularly go
from farm to farm as part of
their employment or routine.
Such individuals, businesses
and organizations are encour-
aged to develop and follow a
biosecurity plan.
All visitors, farm owners,
and their employees have a
shared responsibility in biose-
curity. Visitors need to be
aware of that farms level of
biosecurity and follow their
recommendations.
Visitors must be prepared
to accept all reasonable direc-
tives from the farmer when
visiting his or her operation.
In many swine operations, for
example, showering in and
out of facilities is a require-
ment.
Farmers and their employ-
ees also have a responsibility
to prevent hazards from leav-
ing the premises. Wear clean
clothing and footwear when
leaving the farm, particularly
if visiting other farms, feed
supply agencies, veterinary
facilities or auction markets.
All visitors to a livestock
facility should make an ap-
pointment so that all parties
are aware of the biosecurity
protocol and any special
measures that must be taken.
As the primary producers
of food, farmers and all in-
volved in agriculture are ex-
pected to do their part, using
new knowledge and technol-
ogy to continuously improve
food supply safety and main-
tain and improve animal
health. Biosecurity can play a
key role for the entire food
production chain.
Visitors to farms should
be aware of biosecurity
Have you been diagnosed with
SLEEP APNEA?
Our respiratory department is
ready to assist you in all your
CPap and BiPap needs.
0
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0
5
6
7
4
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The Paulding County Area Foundation has granted $3,000 to
four organizations in Paulding County for the year ending 2012.
Their purpose is to receive, grow and distribute gifts for the ben-
efit of the people of Paulding County. Antwerp Community Fel-
lowship and Care Campus was awarded $750 to be used for
basketball board and rims for boys and girls ages kindergarten
through second grade. Pictured are PCAF executive director
Lisa McClure and project director Tim Copsey.
PP
HOME&GARDENSHOW
The Fort Wayne
February 28 - March 3 Allen County Memorial Coliseum www.home-gardenshow.com
Presented by
Save
$
2
The Home & Garden
Show is all about living
better and saving
money, and with this
coupon you can save
$2 before you even
walk in the door!
This coupon is worth $2 off one adult ticket. No cash value. Good for 2013 show only.
HOME&GARDENSHOW
The Fort Wayne
Presented by
Sponsored by
Official Insurance
provider of the show
Show Hours: Thurs, Fri: 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sun. 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Tickets: Advanced tickets available through Coliseum ticket office or by phone 483-1111.
Admission at door Adults $10, Senior Citizens (62 and older) $6 every day, Under 15 admitted FREE!
Thursday & Friday only, get an additional $1 off with your canned food donation.
Proceeds will go to Community Harvest Food Bank.
Chef Jyll Everman
A finalist in Food Network's Next Food Network Star
in New York last summer,
Everman also has been a
guest on the Rachel Ray
Morning Show and several national
radio stations. She was a private chef for
six years before opening Jyllicious Bites,
a catering company devoted to gourmet
finger foods. She is a part-time culinary
specialist at Williams-Sonoma.
Horticulturist and author
Erica Glasener
Erica hosted "A Gardener's Diary" on Home
and Garden Television (HGTV) for fourteen
years. In her role as host, she interviewed gardeners from
all walks of life across the United States. Her curiosity
about the impulse that drives people to garden, as well as
her enthusiasm about plants, makes her a natural at
facilitating the stories gardeners want to share.
You could win
$
100to spend
at the HOME&GARDENSHOW
Every hour we will randomly give away $100 in
BIG Show Bucks to spend at the show!
Visit our website www.home-gardenshow.com
for the latest list of participating businesses and
complete rules and regulations.
Garden Gallery
Featuring
The Mole Hunter
Prevent mole
hills from
becoming
mountains of
trouble for your
lawn, better
come to the
show and catch
him while you
can! Appearing daily in Garden Gallery.
Master Gardeners
The Mushroom Guy appearing daily!
Visit our web site for an updated list of
Master Gardeners daily seminars.
Family Fun and
Activity Place!
Sponsored by FUN 101.7 WLDE
See and pet live farm animals at
Old McDonalds Farm. Plus, an area
dedicated to kids, full of creative
activities. Face painting, pottery, craft
activities, martial arts demonstrations
and lots of fun things to do.
February 28 - March 3, 2013
Presented by
HOME&GARDENSHOW
The Fort Wayne
For more information and events, visit www.home-gardenshow.com
Relay for Life Fundraiser

Mom - 2 - Mom Sale

Saturday, March 2nd

9:00am - 1:00pm

Paulding Eagles

For more information call:
Julie Wirts ~ 419-399-9362
Carols
Main Street
Makeovers
105 N. Main, Payne
419-263-2030
27c1
Well Help You Get Home
Call me today for a
FREE Pre-Approval!
Karen A. Varner
Mortgage Loan Ofcer
Paulding Banking Center
419.399.5270
www.thebank-sbt.com
Member FDIC z Equal Housing Lender
Ohio fishing, hunting and
trapping licenses on sale
COLUMBUS 2013-14
fishing, hunting and trapping
licenses are now available for
purchase, according to the
Ohio Department of Natural
Resources (ODNR).
The 2013-2014 licenses will
be valid immediately upon
purchase through Feb. 28,
2014. The 2012-2013 licenses
are valid through Feb. 28.
White-tailed deer and fall wild
turkey hunting permits will go
on sale June 1.
New this year, the 2013-
2014 licenses include a trans-
action receipt and effective
dates that match the fishing,
hunting or trapping season.
Licenses and permits pur-
chased online or at retail out-
lets are printed on plain white
paper that is not waterproof.
Licenses and permits will be
printed along with additional
information relevant to the li-
cense or permit purchased.
Licenses and permits can be
purchased online at
wildohio.com and at hundreds
of agent outlets throughout the
state. A complete list of partic-
ipating license sales agents
can be found at wildohio.com.
Each license buyer must
have a Social Security Num-
ber (SSN) recorded in the sys-
tem. However, people who
purchased licenses last year
can now use their customer ID
number in place of a SSN.
SSNs are required to pur-
chase a recreational license,
regardless of age, for the pur-
pose of child support collec-
tion enforcement under
Federal Statute 42. As a recre-
ational license provider, the
ODNR Division of Wildlife is
obligated to comply with this
law and cannot issue a license
or permit without the SSN of
the purchaser. A proper secu-
rity system is in place to pro-
tect SSNs and any databases
that contain them.
Winning the Battle for a Generation
By Rick Jones
exec. director, Defiance
Area Youth for Christ
When is enough, enough?
One of the consequences of
living in a culture of affluence
has to do with an insatiable ap-
petite for more, where one can
never have enough.
Nancy Ortberg illustrates
this truth when she tells the
story about how their family
dog, a golden retriever named
Baxter, would get covered
with ticks. So, after doing
some research about ticks,
heres what she discovered.
They actually call ticks the
overeaters of the insect
world. For those of you who
are really technical in your bi-
ology, theyre of the arachnoid
family; theyre not really in-
sects.
Ticks have the disease of
more, and when they latch
on they cant stop. Before a
tick lands on its host its not
very attractive, but it is very
flat. Then a tick drops onto,
because they do not have the
capacity to jump from a bush
or a thicket, onto their host,
looking for a warm-blooded
creature. Once they engorge
themselves with the hosts
blood, they balloon up to 7-10
times their normal size.
Theyre utterly transformed.
The fascinating thing is
once a tick has bloated up it
automatically drops off the
host and then cant move. All
of the energy in its body is di-
rected to digesting what its
just eaten.
For the next few hours it is
at the mercy of predators, be-
cause it has eaten so much that
it cant move.
Nancy Ortberg claims there
can be a parallel with our spir-
itual lives. She says, I have to
admit that when I consider
what I learned about ticks,
theres a little bit of a tick in
me. I can be sometimes a pic-
ture of excess, not knowing
when to say enough, not
knowing when to stop and al-
ways wanting more.
To curb and even cure our
appetite for the material things
of this world we read in the
scripture Matthew 6:33 (NIV)
But seek first his kingdom
and his righteousness. From
this scripture we would al-
ways do well to remember to
keep, first things first.
For more information about
the work of Youth for Christ,
you may contact Youth for
Christ at 419-782-0656, P.O.
Box 111, 210 Clinton Street,
Defiance, Ohio 43512, or
email to: defyfc@embarq-
mail.com
Announcement
Attorney Glenn H. Troth
is relocating his practice on March 8th, 2013.
Troth Law Office, LLC
125 North Water Street
Paulding, Ohio 45879
Phone:(419)399-2224 Fax:(419)399-2210
Email: gtroth@trothlawoffice.com
Website: www.trothlawoffice.com
27p1
Poll results
Results from last weeks
poll question on our website
www.progressnewspaper.org:
Did you get a flu shot this
year?
75% No
25% Yes
Visit our website and cast
your vote in this weeks poll
question.
8A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, February 27, 2013
David A. & Harvey D.
Hyman and Families
Compliments of
Baughman
Tile Company
Ohio Gas
Company
1-800-331-7396
The Antwerp
Exchange
Bank Company
Stabler Steam Carpet
Cleaning Service
Payne 419-263-2211
Den Herder Funeral
Home
1-800-399-3522
(419) 399-2866
Red Angel Pizza
740 Emerald Rd, Paulding,
OH 419-399-2295
Scott Variety Shop
Variety is our middlename
419-622-3014
If you would be interested in helping to sponsor our
church directory, please call us at the
Paulding County Progress at 419-399-4015. This
directory is made possible by our advertisers!
Mara Mart
Paulding
Member FDIC
The Church Directory Is Proudly Sponsored By The Following Businesses:
Paulding County Church Directory
6:00pm. Our church office is located at 308 N. Main St.
Pentecostal Church of God, 601 W. Caroline St., Paulding, Elder
George Robinson, Sunday school at 10 a.m., worship service at noon,
prayer services Monday at 6 p.m. and Thursday at noon, Bible study
at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Pioneer Christian Ministries, County Road 108 and Ohio 637, Paulding,
Rev. Chuck Oliver, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30
a.m., and Wednesday evening at 7:00 p.m. including a youth service on at
least three Wednesday evenings.
Rose Hill Church of God, corner of SR 637 and Charloe Trail, Paulding,
399-3113, Pastor Ron Hofacker, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday wor-
ship at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday service from 7-8 p.m. with childrens hour.
St. John Lutheran ChurchELCA, 7611 Road 87, Briceton, Pastor
Karen Stetins, church telephone number is 419-399-4962 or 419-399-2320.
Sunday worship at 8:30 a.m., Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.
St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church, 601 Flat Rock Drive (P.O. Box
156), Paulding, Pastor Kare Stetins, church telephone number is 399-2320,
Sunday Worship at 10:15 a.m., Sunday school at 9 a.m.
PAYNE AND OUTLYING AREAS
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 203 W. Townline, Payne, 399-2576, Pas-
tor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Saturday at 4:00 p.m.
Edgerton Wesleyan Church, 1717 Bertha St., Woodburn, (Edgerton)
Ind. 46797, Pastor Dave Dignal, church telephone number is 260-632-
4008, Sunday school at 9 a.m., childrens church at 10 a.m., worship at 10
a.m., home groups at 6 p.m., Wednesday evening services at 6:30 p.m.
(Indiana time).
Living Water Ministries, Contemporary worship service Sunday nights
at 10 a.m. & 6:30 p.m., The Well church for kids, Sunday mornings from
10-11:30 a.m. The church is currently in the process of relocating. For lo-
cation information, contact Pastor Rich Phelan, 419-263-2728.
Payne Church of Christ, 220 West Merrin Street, Payne, Minister Dan
Staifer. Sunday worship at 9:30 am. 419-263-2092.
Payne Church of the Nazarene, 509 E. Orchard St. (Ohio 500) Payne,
Pastor Mike Harper, 263-2422, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday wor-
ship at 10:30 a.m. Sunday night service at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday prayer
meeting at 7:30 p.m.
St. Jacob United Church of Christ, southwest corner of Oak and Hyman
streets, Payne, Rev. Jim Langham, 263-2763. Sunday School-9:00 am,
Church service-10:00 am.
St. James Lutheran Church NALC, West Townline Street (P.O. Box
42), Payne, 263-2129, Pastor Fred Meuter, 260-492-2581. Sunday School
at 9:00 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:00 a.m.
St. Paul United Methodist Church, (P.O. Box 154) 312 South Main
Street, Payne, Rev. David Rohrer, church telephone number is 263-2418,
parsonage telephone number is 263-2017, Sunday school at 9 a.m., Sun-
day worship at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.
Editors Note: If your church doesnt have service times listed, please
contact the Paulding County Progress office to notify of Sunday service
times.
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m., evening worship
at 6 p.m., Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m.
PAULDING AND OUTLYING
Bethel United Methodist, Forders Bridge, Cecil, Pastor Kevin Doseck
(419) 899-4153, worship service at 10:30 a.m., Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.
Bethlehem Temple Pentecostal, 818 West Jackson Street, Paulding,
399-3770, Rev. Burpo, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at 12
p.m.
Calvary Bible Church, Ohio 111 West across from Paulding County Hos-
pital, 399-4919, elders John Mohr, 260-632-4356, Bob Fessel 419-399-
3398, Brad Sisson 419-263-3108, Don Baer 419-399-5805. Sunday school
at 9 a.m., morning worship at 10:15 a.m., Bible Study at 7 p.m. Wed.
Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main St., Cecil. Pastor Ted Ramey.
Sun. school 10:00 am, Worship service 11:00 am, Sun. eve. 6:00 pm,
Wed. eve. 6:00 pm.
Cecil First Presbyterian Church, Main Street, Cecil, Sunday worship
at 8 a.m., Sunday school at 9 a.m.
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 417 N. Main, Paulding, 399-2576,
Pastor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Saturday at 6 p.m.; Sunday
at 10:30 a.m.
Emmanuel Baptist Church, 1275 Emerald Road, Paulding, 419-399-
5061, Sunday School at 9:30 a.m., worship services at 10:45 a.m. and
6 p.m. Sunday and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Pastor Drew Gardner.
First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 1233 Emerald Road,
Paulding, Rev. Gregory Bibler, 419-399-4576, Sunday school 9:00 a.m.,
Worship service 10:00 a.m.
First Presbyterian Church, 114 West Caroline Street, Paulding, 399-
2438, Rev. David Meriwether, 9:00am Sunday school, 10:15 a.m. praise
singing, 10:30 a.m. Sunday worship.
House of Love Ministries, 220 N. Williams St., Paulding. Pastor Pre-
dest (Dwayne) Richardson or Sister Brenda Richardson, 419-399-9205
or 419-796-8718, Sunday worship at 3:00 p.m. Jail Ministry, Food Min-
istry, Outreach Ministry. Overcomer Outreach - a Christian 12-steap
meeting, Sundays at 5:00 p.m.
New Beginnings Church (Church of God), Cecil, Pastor Roy Burk,
399-5041, Sunday worship at 11 a.m.
Paulding Church of Christ, East Perry Street, Paulding, Minister
Christopher Reno, 419-399-4761. Bible school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday
worship at 10:30 a.m.
Paulding Church of the Nazarene, 210 Dooley Dr., Paulding, 399-
3932, Revs. Kim and Cindy Semran, Sunday school at 9:15 a.m., Sun-
day worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday evening at 6:00 p.m.: Kids Summer
Jam (ages 4-4th grade), Preteen class (5th-6th grade), Teen group (7th-
12th grade), and adult service. Wednesday at 7:00 p.m.: Teen group
(7th-12th grade), adult bible study and prayer. Nursery available for all
services.
Paulding Family Worship Center, 501 West Perry Street, Paulding,
399-3525, Rev. Monte Moore, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
Paulding United Methodist Church, 321 North Williams Street, Pauld-
ing, church telephone number is 399-3591, Rev. Ben Lowell, Worship
service at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday School, 11:15 a.m.; Wed. worship at
Grover Hill Church of the Nazarene, Maple and East Jackson streets,
Pastor Jonathan L. Hoagland, 587-3376, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Morn-
ing worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday evening gospel hour at 6 p.m., Wednes-
day evening service at 7 p.m.
Grover Hill Zion United Methodist Church, corner of First and Harrison,
587-3941; Pastor Mike Waldron, 419-238-1493 or 419-233-2241 (cell). Sun-
day school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:20 a.m., nursery available
during all services.
Mandale Church of Christ in Christian Union, Ohio 66, Pastor Justin
Sterrett, 419-786-9878, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m., Wednesday prayer meeting at 7 p.m.
Middle Creek United Methodist Church, County Road 24, Grover Hill,
Pastor William Sherry, Sunday worship at 9 a.m., Sunday school at 10:15
a.m., Sunday evening Bible study at 7 p.m.
Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, Grover Hill, County Road 151, Sun-
day school at 9:30 a.m., Pastor David Prior, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.,
Wednesday evening prayer meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Roselms Christian Church, Ohio 114, Pastor Gary Church, 594-2445,
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
HAVILAND/LATTY/SCOTT
Apostolic Christian Church, 12867 Road 82, Haviland, 399-5220, wor-
ship service at 10:30 a.m.
Country Chapel United Methodist Church, Haviland, 419-622-5746,
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:15 a.m.
Latty Zion Baptist Church, Latty, Pastor Levi Collins Jr., 399-2748, Sun-
day school at 10 a.m., worship service at 11:15 a.m.
Harvest Field Pentecostal Church of God, 13625 Road 12, Scott, Pastor
Terry Martin, 419-622-2026, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday morning
worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday Evening worship at 6:00 pm, Wednesday
evening worship at 7:00 pm, Wednesday Youth Group at 7:00 pm.
Friends United Methodist Church, Latty, Pastor Ron Johnson. Sunday
worship at 9 a.m., Wednesday Bible Study at 7 p.m.
OAKWOOD/MELROSE AREAS
Auglaize Chapel Church of God, rural Oakwood, 3 miles south and half
mile west on County Road 60, Pastor Stan Harmon, 594-2248, Sunday
worship at 9:00 a.m. Sunday school at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday services for
children, youth and adults at 7:00 p.m.
Melrose United Methodist Church, Melrose, 594-2076, Pastor Eileen
Kochensparger 399-5818; Sunday school 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m., Wednesday Bible study and prayer at 7:00 p.m.
Twin Oaks United Methodist Church, corner of Harmon and Second
streets, Oakwood, Pastor Eric Dailey. 419-594-2992. Sunday worship at
9:30 a.m., Sunday school at 10:45 a.m., Bible Study Wednesdays at 10:00
a.m.
Prairie Chapel Bible Church, one mile east and a half-mile north of Oak-
wood on the corner of roads 104 and 209, Pastor Earl Chapman, 594-2057,
ANTWERP AND SURROUNDING
Antwerp Community Church, 704 S. Erie St., SR 49, Antwerp; Pastor
Ricky L. Grimes 419-258-2069. Bible Study Fellowship 9:30 am; Contem-
porary Worship 10:30 am, Wednesday Discipleship Study, 7:00 pm
Antwerp United Methodist Church, East River Street, Rev. Pastor Mike
Schneider, church telephone number is 258-4901, Comtemporaty service
Sunday 8:30a.m., Sunday school 9:30a.m., Traditional Service 10:30a.m.
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 303 S. Monroe, Antwerp. Office: 417 N.
Main, Paulding, 399-2576, Pastor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Sun-
day at 8:30am.
First Baptist Church, 5482 CR 424, Pastor Todd Murray, 258-2056, Sun-
day school at 9 a.m., Sunday worship 10 a.m.; evening service 6 p.m.,
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
First Presbyterian Church, 126 W. River St., Pastor Mike Pennington,
258-2864, Sunday school at 9:15 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:35 a.m.
Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses, 2937 US 24, 258-2290. Public
talk 10 a.m. Sunday, Congregation Bible Study, Theocratic Ministry School
& Service Meeting, Theocratic school 7:30 p.m. Thursday.
Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, Pastor Robert Becker. Sunday school at
9 a.m., Sunday worship at 10 a.m.
Riverside Christian Church, 15413 St. Rt. 49, (corner Ohio 49 and Road
192), Antwerp. 258-3895, Pastor Regan Clem.
ARTHUR/FIVE SPAN AREA
Apostolic Christian Church, 13562 Road 147, Defiance (Junction), 399-
3121, William Schlatter, Elder, Sunday services at 10:15 a.m. and 12:30
p.m., Sunday school at 1 p.m., Wednesday services at 8 p.m.
Bethel Christian Church, Ohio 66, Defiance (Arthur), Pastor Christopher
Baker, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
Church of Christ, corner of County Roads 166 and 191, Evangelist Lon-
nie Lambert, 399-5022, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Bible
study at 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Junction Bible Christian Church, County Road 111, Defiance (Junction),
393-2671 or JunctionBible@copper.net, Rev. C. Joseph Fifer, Sunday
school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship follows at 10:30 a.m & Bible Study on
Wed. at 7pm.
Pleasantview Missionary Baptist Church, County Road 180, Defiance
(Junction), Rev. Alan Ray Newsome, Sunday worship at 11 a.m., evening
service at 6 p.m.; Wednesday evening services at 7 p.m.
Rock Church, SR 637, Five Span-Arthur area, Pastor Bobby Branham
393-2924, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:45 a.m., Sunday
evening worship at 7 p.m., Wednesday evening worship at 7 p.m., Youth
Service Wednesday at 7 p.m.
GROVER HILL AND OUTLYING
Bible Baptist Church, corner of Cleveland and Perry streets, Grover Hill,
Pastor Pat Holt, 587-4021, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at
11 a.m., Sunday evening worship at 6 p.m.; Wednesday prayer meeting at
7 p.m.
C &Y Oil
Company
Payne
The Paulding Progress &
Weekly Reminder
www.progressnewspaper.org
QUESTION: I have been
dating my boyfriend for al-
most a year and our rela-
tionship is going very well.
The issue is with his mom.
She is very controlling; its
her way or the highway.
Weve talked about getting
married in the future, and
we dont want her control-
ling our marriage. How can
we confront her in a loving
way?
JIM: Youre absolutely cor-
rect. You dont want your
mother-in-law controlling
your marriage! And while it
might be tempting to give her
the benefit of the doubt and
believe that shell back off
once you actually tie the knot,
based on what youve de-
scribed, that doesnt seem
likely.
Our counseling team has
dealt with this question in the
past and suggests that it is
your boyfriends responsibil-
ity to take the lead on this
issue. If hes afraid to con-
front her or simply doesnt
want to rock the boat, we sug-
gest that you make a date
with him and then patiently
explain that you can no
longer tolerate his moms at-
tempts to control your rela-
tionship. Then work on
setting some firm boundaries
for her.
Once youre on the same
page, the two of you should
sit down with his mom and
share your concerns. Your
boyfriend should take the
lead in this conversation. He
should make it clear as lov-
ingly and gently as possible,
that you are adults and that
you expect to be treated as
such. Hopefully, she will see
the error of her ways and
learn to loosen up a bit.
As a part of this process,
you might also want to read
Boundaries (Zondervan,
2002), an excellent book by
Dr. Henry Cloud and Dr. John
Townsend. It contains a
wealth of helpful material for
setting healthy boundaries in
a variety of relationships.
QUESTION: My husband
left me six months ago. He
said he just couldnt be
married any longer. I have
tried many times to recon-
cile with him, but he is un-
willing to go to counseling
or to even try to work on
the marriage. I dont want
to get a divorce. I am will-
ing to try anything to re-
build our marriage. Do you
know of any programs or
resources that would help
us?
DR. GREG SMALLEY, ex-
ecutive director of Mar-
riage and Family
Formation: Im very sorry to
learn of the difficult state of
your marriage. There are pro-
grams that can help, such as
intensive couples counseling,
but your husband needs to be
willing to attend.
Until hes open to doing so,
and until he desires to work
on the marriage, your options
are limited. If youve been
continuously urging him to
attend counseling for the past
six months or more, its time
to give him some space. Just
a little bit of breathing room
may help him make the deci-
sion for himself. You cant
make it for him.
In the meantime, consider
working on your own heart. I
dont know the details of your
separation, but in general,
when a separation or divorce
occurs, its easy to focus on
the other persons issues
rather than confronting our
own.
In other words, your hus-
bands refusal to take part in
counseling shouldnt prevent
you from pursuing counsel-
ing on your own.
You might consider seek-
ing out a support group in
your church that could help
you grapple with this difficult
period in your marriage.
Talking one-on-one with a
counselor may also be helpful
to you as you hope and pray
for the day when your hus-
band decides to work on the
marriage.
Contact Focus on the Fam-
ily for a referral. God bless
you.
By Jim Daly
Scott Wagner
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and a drive-up window to pick up orders. Red Angel is open for lunch 11 a.m.-1 p.m. weekdays, and every day at 4 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 3:45 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Call 419-399-2295. Red Angel staff includes, from left Angie Wiswell,
general manager Ethel Jewell, Brittany Farquhar, Shawn Dempsey, Alexandra Durfey, Deb Heck and Steve Clark. Not pictured:
Tara Schooley, Nikki Dangler, Joe Wiswell and Mandy Briner.
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Funds going toward Handicap Ramp Fund.
Also UM Women will have baked goods available
PANCAKE & SAUSAGE BREAKFAST
27c1
Business News
The Progress ...
is Paulding Countys
newspaper of record.
NOCAC offers heating assistance
Northwestern Ohio Com-
munity Action Commission
(NOCAC) continues to offer
help with heating assistance.
The Home Energy Assis-
tance Program provides a
one time credit to your main
heating source. Applications
will be accepted until May 31.
The Winter Crisis Pro-
gram provides assistance to
customers who are threatened
with disconnection, have al-
ready been disconnected, need
to establish new service or are
in need of propane, fuel oil or
any other bulk fuel. The Win-
ter Crisis Program will con-
tinue until March 31. Income
guidelines for these two pro-
grams is at 200% of the Fed-
eral Poverty Guideline.
Pipp Plus is a payment plan
offered to consumers of regu-
lated utilities companies. This
plan offers a set monthly pay-
ment based on a percentage of
your monthly gross income.
The income guideline for this
program is up to 150% of the
Federal Poverty Guideline.
Please contact NOCAC to
set up an appointment for one
or all of these programs. Re-
quired documentation for all
household members includes:
proof of 90-day income (three
months), birthdates, Social Se-
curity cards, electric bill, and
gas bill. If disabled, you will
need to bring proof of disabil-
ity.
In Paulding County, phone
419-399-3650.
Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 9A
www.progressnewspaper.org
Want to see
more photos
of your
favorite
story?
HOMESPUN
By
JIM LANGHAM
Its cheaper and still works
save them in a container like
my parents did. Around our
house, we never ran out of
rubber bands; they were kept
in otherwise discarded medi-
cine bottles and kept in the
top drawer beside the sink in
the kitchen.
There, we would also find
paper clips that had been re-
trieved, pencils, ball point
pens and other retrievable
goodies that would save pur-
chases that would add up to
enough to purchase a tank of
gas in the long run.
People just look at me
these days when I talk about
the old retrievables around
our house such as onion skins
placed on our chest to open
up stuffy noses during the
night, flour placed in a cloth
to draw bee stings and an aloe
vera plant in the kitchen to
doctor burns obtained while
cooking.
The principle in all of this
was pride in saving and utiliz-
Years ago, an old trick of
the trade passed on by my fa-
ther taught me that there is al-
ways one more picture left in
a camera.
I have taken more than a
few pictures with my camera
over the years and gradually,
the points where the batteries
are located have become been
worn and tattered. Conse-
quently, there is not always a
good connection when I put
the batteries in the camera.
So heres how to keep it
going. This is what my father
told me years ago. You are to
moisten the batteries before
putting them in the camera.
Dont ask me what it does,
but it works. Its a good way
to stretch the batteries and get
at least one more picture out
of a worn camera.
But thats just the begin-
ning of how we saved and
stretched money in the Indi-
ana home where I was raised.
Never waste a rubber band,
especially those wrapped
around newspapers when
they are tossed at your door.
In fact, legend has it that if
we dont waste things placed
literally at our footsteps, di-
vine good will come to re-
ward us for preserving and
stretching usables tossed by
the wayside.
Thats why I pick up every
rubber band I see on the side-
walk, gather the ones
wrapped around papers and
ing special discoveries in a
big game of life that always
kept us looking for ways to
retrieve paybacks from the
world around us.
Creativity was part of it.
My grandma and I would sit
by the hour and cut pictures
out of catalogs and create sto-
rybooks that I would then
read to my parents; the begin-
ning of authoring stories to be
read to others.
One thing my buddy, Mert,
and I never overlooked were
coins laying on the street, by
phone booths or sundry other
places. We did this so much
that we learned the strategy of
retrieving lost coins with the
same diligence presented by
our Lord in the parable in the
Bible.
Always look at the slant in
a parking lot, especially at
service stations, coins that fall
out of pockets when people
pull their car keys out of their
pocket tend to run with the
contour of the parking lots.
Coins retrieved in such
silly games are then placed
in a dish on my bedroom
dresser and eventually cashed
in as needed or when the
bowl overflows. My last
cash in brought $88.15,
worth bending over for in the
world that I live in.
So, I always carry with me
a virtue from our family
where we were probably very
poor, but didnt know it.
Theres always one more.
There is always one more pic-
ture, one more rubber band,
one more nail (retrieved from
the floor of my dads shop),
one more coin and one more
idea for salvaging things of-
fered up by the good world
around us.
When I sat down to write this
column, I must admit that I
wasnt quite sure what I was
going to write about. But, as
I learned from my family, in
principle, there is always one
more. There is even one more
story left in my writing cre-
ativity.
FIVE GENERATIONS Hannah Elizabeth DeCraene was born on Sept. 26, 2012, to Jenna
(Baumle) DeCraene and her husband, Joe. Also pictured are grandmother Kylee Baumle, great-
grandmother Louise Hartwig, and great-great-grandmother Virginia Gudakunst, age 98.
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26c15
By Lisa McClure
Paulding County Area
Foundation
One of the best kept secrets in Pauld-
ing County is the Black Swamp Nature
Center. The Black Swamp Nature Center
contains 51 acres, consisting of 24
acres woodland, 15 acres of
wetland and 6 acres of old
meadow.
A boat launch allows easy
access to Flat Rock Creek, while trails wander
around the top banks of the three ponds and
past the old sugar beet dam.
The Paulding County Fairgrounds border
the Nature Center with two trails allowing
easy access. The old meadow and wetland
area provide an excellent habitat for many
species of birds and plant life.
The Black Swamp Nature Center provides
a wonderful area to observe bird life. Approx-
imately 190 species of birds have been seen.
Most recently, a pair of bald eagles has been
spotted.
The Black Swamp Nature Center has served
many community based interest groups. The
broad use of the building has served for edu-
cational seminars, 4-H and school activi-
ties, cross-country meets and other
organizational meetings.
Mark Holtsberry, Educational Spe-
cialist, with the Paulding
S.W.C.D. is requesting finan-
cial support to assist in a
driveway paving project at
the Black Swamp Nature
Center.
The Paulding County Area Foundation is
granting $200 toward the driveway paving
project. To contribute to Marks project, you
may contact either Mark Holtsberry at Pauld-
ing S.W.C.D. or Lisa McClure at Paulding
County Area Foundation, 419-399-8296.
With the support of the residents of Pauld-
ing County, improvements to the Black
Swamp Nature Center can continue to main-
tain well-managed grounds while providing
the public with acres of beautiful land, repre-
senting our countys heritage.
Support the Black
Swamp Nature Center
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10A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Campus Notes
Nicolas Flint of Paulding
was named to the Trine Uni-
versity Presidents List for the
fall 2012 semester. To be
named to the presidents list, a
student must have at least a
3.75 grade-point average.
Flint is a sophomore majoring
in mechanical engineering.

The following local students
were named to Trine Univer-
sitys Deans List for the fall
2012 semester: Adam Yenser
of Cecil, who is a freshman
majoring in business adminis-
tration; Kassandra Hammon
of Oakwood, who is a sopho-
more majoring in mechanical
engineering; and Joseph
Buchman of Paulding, a soph-
omore majoring in electrical
engineering.

The 2012 fall semester
Deans List for full-time stu-
dents at Rhodes State College
includes Megan Meeks of
Haviland.
The 2012 fall semester
Deans List for part-time stu-
dents includes Derrick Pease
of Paulding and Katie King of
Payne.

Approximately 168 students
graduated from The Univer-
sity of Findlay in December.
Chelsea Holtsberry, Paulding,
received a master of occupa-
tional therapy degree.

Defiance College has an-
nounced its Deans List and
school Honors List. The Hon-
ors List is for students achiev-
ing a grade point average of
3.5 or higher and enrolled in
6-11 semester hours. Students
who have achieved a GPA of
3.5 or higher and are enrolled
in 12 or more semester hours
are named to the Deans List.
Local students on the
Deans List are Brock Bell and
Kelsea Burns, Antwerp; Erica
Noggle, Haviland; and Dale
Ladd, Oakwood.
Honors List: Nittaya Major,
Antwerp; Taylor Dangler,
Cecil; Amy Campbell, Grover
Hill; Jacquelin Mosier, Havi-
land; Austin Miller and
Tiffany Spangler, Oakwood;
Kelsi Manz, Paulding; Nicole
Gross, Payne.

Scott Spitnale, son of Patri-
cia Spitnale, Oakwood, and
Daniel Spitnale, Defiance, has
been named to the Ohio
Northern University Deans
List for the fall semester. He
is a sixth year majoring in
pharmacy.
Joseph Sponseller, son of
James and Lori Sponseller,
Payne, has been named to the
Ohio Northern University
Deans List for the fall semes-
ter. He is a sophomore major-
ing in social studies.
Seth Wenninger, son of
Larry and Joyce Wenninger,
Haviland, has been named to
the Ohio Northern University
Deans List for the fall semes-
ter. He is a sixth year major-
ing in pharmacy.

A total of 2,180 Ohio stu-
dents at Wright State Univer-
sity earned Deans List honors
during the fall 2012 semester.
Local students included Elise
Hartzell, Oakwood; Rachel
Banks and Ann Reinhart, both
of Antwerp.

The University of North-
western Ohio is proud to ac-
knowledge its Deans List for
November Session 2012 for
students in the College of Ap-
plied Technologies. Included
was Michael Richards of
Antwerp.

Logan Timothy Steele of
Paulding is one of 1,224 stu-
dents to earn Presidents List
honors for the fall semester at
Eastern Kentucky University.
Steele graduated summa
cum laude with a BS degree
in police studies and was rec-
ognized at commencement
ceremonies Dec. 15.

Marcie McDougle of
Paulding was named to the
Deans List at Huntington
University for the fall semes-
ter. McDougle is a junior psy-
chology major.

The following local resi-
dents were among more than
800 students from The Uni-
versity of Toledo who made
the fall Presidents List for
their outstanding academic
accomplishments: Derek
Shrider, a chemical engineer-
ing major and resident of
Paulding; Jessica Wenninger,
a exercise science major and
resident of Haviland; and Kari
Myers, a Speech language
pathology major and resident
of Payne. The Presidents List
recognizes full-time under-
graduate students who earn a
4.0 GPA for the semester.

The following local resi-
dents were among the 3,000
students from The University
of Toledo who were named to
the fall Deans List for their
academic accomplishments:
Jazmine Smith, an accounting
major, and Amanda Miller, a
psychology major, both of
Payne; Spencer Wilhelm, a
multi-age education major
and resident of Oakwood;
Ryan Jewell, a computer sci-
ence and engineering major
and resident of Grover Hill;
and Amanda Riebersal, an
adolescent and young adult
education major and resident
of Paulding, James Myers, a
law major, Jane Woodring, a
nursing major, and William
Wilhelm, a pharmacy admin-
istration major, all of Pauld-
ing.

Bluffton University has an-
nounced its Deans List for
the fall term. Students with a
GPA of 3.6 or higher are eligi-
ble for the Deans List. In-
cluded were Derrick Baksa,
Kristin Beck, Joseph Grant
and Beth Ross, all of Pauld-
ing.
RECEIVES SCHOLARSHIP Jared Fortman, a 2012 industrial mechanics Vantage graduate
from Kalida, has been awarded the 2012 Robert Brandt Scholarship in the amount of $1,000.
Jared is continuing his education at Northwest State Community College, majoring in industrial
maintenance. Here, Fortman accepting his scholarship from Marilyn Brandt. They are flanked by
Lisa McClure (left), executive director of the Paulding County Area Foundation and Staci Kaufman,
Vantage superintendent. The Robert Brandt Scholarship was established by the family of Robert
Brandt, the founding superintendent of Vantage Career Center. Brandt was responsible for the
beginning the Vantage, including the construction of the original facility. The Robert Brandt Schol-
arship is maintained by the Paulding County Area Foundation.
FARMER WINS $5,000 FOR TWO AGENCIES Bill Young of Payne has been selected as a win-
ner in Americans Farmers Grow Communities, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund. Each year,
farmers are given the opportunity to win $2,500 donation for their favorite local nonprofit organ-
izations. Double donations were available locally because Paulding County was declared a dis-
aster area by the USDA due to drought conditions. Young had the opportunity to make two $2,500
donations. His selections were the Paulding County 4-H Advisory Council and the Payne Volunteer
Fire Department. He received the checks in a special ceremony Monday, Feb. 25 at the Paulding
County Extension Office. Present for the fire departments donation (above) were, from left Jeff
Hunker from Monsantos Findlay office, Gary Gasser from the Payne Fire Department and Young.
The fire department intends to purchase new bunker gear. At the 4-H councils presentation
(below) were, from left Staci Hiler, 4-H program assistant; Hunker, senior 4-Hers Maggie Wilhelm,
Emma Schmidt and Kara Burak; and Young. Plans for the 4-H donations include camp scholar-
ships, a livestock clinic, and materials for a school enrichment program. Americas Farmers Grow
Communities is sponsored by the Monsanto Fund to highlight the important contributions farmers
make every day to society and to help them positively impact their communities.
Be a Facebook fan
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book page as a way for readers
to get more information from
its community newspaper. Go
to facebook.com/pauldingpaper
then click the Like button.
Wayne Trace musicians
conditioned for spring contest
By JIM LANGHAM
Feature Writer
It had all the earmarks of a
major music contest. The
judges were set and prepared
to evaluate presentations by
the Wayne Trace Concert
Band and Wayne Trace Con-
cert Choir.
A crowd of fans was present
to support the hometown fa-
vorite musicians in prepara-
tion for spring musical
contests.
The set-up was in the same
format as upcoming spring
concerts in order to give local
students the feel of contest
presentations.
The purpose behind this
concert is to allow the public
to listen and enjoy the music
these two ensembles have
been preparing before taking
them to the contest level in
two weeks, observed Wayne
Trace band and choir director
Robbie Lucas.
The Ohio Music Education
Association Adjudicated
Event for Ohio large groups is
one of the most demanding
and rigorous performance op-
portunities that any high
school music student can go
through in this state and pos-
sibly the nation, Lucas ex-
plained.
Those acknowledged for
their assistance in the superim-
posed setting include Miss
Sharon Spinner, Grover Hill
Elementary music; Mrs. Marie
Moore, Payne Elementary
music; Robert Sloan, Van Wert
High School band director;
Don Clark, Paulding High
School band director; Jim
Oberhaus, Bluffton area direc-
tor; Dale Laukhuff, retired
Lima band director; Stephen
Hodge, University of Toledo
director of choral activities;
and Joni Wenninger, choral
accompanist.
Lucas explained that musi-
cians are rated as a group from
I to V, with I considered a su-
perior performance, II rated as
an unusual performance, III,
an acceptable performance,
IV, a poor performance and V
as a very poor performance.
There are three adjudica-
tors listening to our prepared
selections and a single adjudi-
cator listening to our sight
reading performance, Lucas
observed. These four scores
are averaged together to make
our final score.
One of the hardest portions
of this event is called the sight
reading room, noted Lucas.
After each group performs
their three prepared pieces,
they are rushed off stage to
perform a piece in a com-
pletely different room for one
judge.
The concert band performed
St. Petersburg March, The
Great Locomotive Chase and
Spirit of the Winds. Concert
choir numbers included Glo-
ria, Song of the River, On
My Way to Jordan and a spe-
cial sight reading.
The contest date is set for
Friday and Saturday, March 8-
9, at the Van Wert High School
and Niswonger Performing
Arts Center. The choir will
perform at 8 p.m. Friday,
March 8, and the band will
perform at 9 a.m. on Saturday.
Members of the Wayne Trace Concert Band performed in a large group adjudicated events con-
cert on Sunday afternoon.
Members of the Wayne Trace Concert Choir, directed by Rob-
bie Lucas and accompanied by Mrs. Joni Wenninger, performed
in front of large crowd on Sunday afternoon at Wayne Trace High
School gym.

NOW THRU APRIL 15
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Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 11A
School Menus
Menus are subject to change
ANTWERP LOCAL SCHOOLS
Week of March 4
MONDAY Cheeseburger on
bun, pickles, sweet potato fries,
mixed fruit, milk. Plus: Salad bar.
TUESDAY BBQ rib on bun,
green beans, pears, milk. Plus:
Salad bar.
WEDNESDAY Taco, black bean
dip, Scoops, pineapple, milk. Plus:
Salad bar.
THURSDAY Taco omelet, hash
browns, o.j., peaches, milk. Plus:
Salad bar.
FRIDAY Cheese pizza, chicken
salad sandwich, salad, applesauce,
milk.
PAULDING HIGH SCHOOL
Week of March 4
MONDAY Breakfast: Breakfast
pizza, juice, fruit, milk. Lunch: Mac
and cheese, chicken dippers, veg
blend or salad bar with breadstick,
fruit, milk.
TUESDAY Breakfast: Sausage
links, tator tots with cheese, juice,
fruit, milk. Lunch: Chicken chunk
salad, pretzel breadstick or sandwich
with bun, oven fries, fruit, milk.
WEDNESDAY Breakfast:
Sausage biscuit, tator tots, juice,
fruit, milk. Lunch: Pizza, corn, fresh
vegetable or top your burrito, fruit,
milk.
THURSDAY Breakfast: Link
sausage, waffles, juice, fruit, milk.
Lunch: Veg pack, cheese breadstick,
chili soup with crackers or honey
mustard tenders, summer blend veg-
etables, roll, assorted fruit, milk.
FRIDAY Breakfast: Sausage
gravy with biscuits, juice, fruit, milk.
Lunch: Salad bar with breadstick, or
cheeseburger or BBQ with bun, oven
potatoes, pickle spears, fruit, milk.
OAKWOOD ELEMENTARY
Week of March 4
Packed lunch A: Peanut butter
and jelly sandwich, vegetable,
Gogurt, crackers, fruit, milk.
MONDAY Breakfast: Mini pan-
cakes, fruit, juice, milk. Lunch: Ham-
burger with bun, lettuce, tomato,
oven potatoes, fruit, milk.
TUESDAY Breakfast: Sausage
biscuit, fruit, milk. Lunch: Chicken
strip wrap, lettuce, corn, fruit, milk.
WEDNESDAY Breakfast:
Breakfast pizza, fruit, milk. Lunch:
Sloppy Joe with bun, celery, baked
Lays, California blend, fruit, milk.
THURSDAY Breakfast: Break-
fast burrito, fruit, milk. Lunch: Taco in
a bag, lettuce, refried beans, fruit,
milk.
FRIDAY Breakfast: Assorted ce-
reals, crackers, fruit, milk. Lunch:
Cheese cup, whole grain chips,
green beans, carrot sticks, fruit, milk.
PAULDING ELEMENTARY
Week of March 4
Alternative lunch: Peanut but-
ter and jelly sandwich, Gogurt,
crackers, vegetable, fruit, milk.
MONDAY Breakfast: Yogurt,
Goldfish crackers, fruit, juice, milk.
Lunch: Chicken on whole wheat bun,
carrots, veg choice, fruit, milk.
TUESDAY Breakfast: Pan-
cakes, fruit, juice, milk. Lunch: Hot
dog with whole grain bun, baked
beans, vegetable choice, fruit snack,
fruit, milk.
WEDNESDAY Breakfast:
Breakfast burrito, juice, fruit, milk.
Lunch: Egg cheese omelet, tator
tots, tomato juice, muffin, fruit, milk.
THURSDAY Breakfast: Muffin,
string cheese, fruit, juice, milk.
Lunch: Sloppy Joe with whole grain
bun, tator tots, green beans, fruit,
milk.
FRIDAY Breakfast: Assorted ce-
reals or cereal bar, juice, fruit, milk.
Lunch: Pizza, romaine salad, veg-
etable choice, sherbet, fruit, milk.
WAYNE TRACE SCHOOLS
Week of March 4
MONDAY Breakfast: Sausage
pizza. Lunch: Meatball sub with mari-
nara sauce, California blend veg,
fruit, milk.
TUESDAY Breakfast: Egg
cheese muffin. Lunch: Mini corn
dogs, sweet potato fries, fruit, milk.
WEDNESDAY Breakfast: Mini
pancakes and sausage. Lunch:
Chicken Alfredo, broccoli, fruit, milk.
THURSDAY Breakfast: Cheese
omelet, toast, juice, milk. Lunch:
Turkey hot dog with bun, baked
beans, baked chips, fruit, milk.
FRIDAY Breakfast: Fruit
turnover, fruit, milk. Lunch: Que-
sadilla, corn, carrot, celery sticks,
fruit, milk.
DIVINE MERCY SCHOOL
Week of March 4
Same menu as Wayne Trace; no
breakfast served.
Dear Friends of the Paulding Exempted
Village Schools,
I have been Interim Superintendent at Pauld-
ing Exempted Schools now for almost two
months and I would like to take this oppor-
tunity to share my insights into Paulding
Schools from an outsiders perspective. Our
school district is blessed with great students,
strong family and community support, and
dedicated teachers and staff. This combina-
tion of ingredients produces a school atmos-
phere where high standards and hard work
come together to produce high achievement.
This achievement has recently been docu-
mented with the release of Pauldings 2011
2012 Local Report Card by the Ohio De-
partment of Education which ranked us as
Excellent with Distinction, which is the
highest rating available.
March is a very busy month for our students.
Winter sports are winding down and the stu-
dents participating in spring sports are gear-
ing up for a new season. Our seniors are
busy planning for their future by finalizing
plans for college, work, or the military as
they begin the last quarter of their high
school career. The sophomores will be
taking the Ohio Graduation Tests beginning
March 11, 2013. I am confident that our
staff has prepared the students well for these
high stake tests. If you would like more
information about preparing for these tests,
check out this great Ohio Department of Ed-
ucation website at http://portal.success-ode-
state-oh-us.info, and click on OGT.
The Honeywell

Instant Alert System has


been very helpful for keeping families
informed of delays, cancellations, and event
changes. Please keep your contact informa-
tion up to date in the system. I encourage
everyone to make sure the box in your ac-
count is checked to receive High Importance
alerts. This is the method of communication
we will use if there is an emergency at
school. If you have a child in our school dis-
trict and are not receiving Instant Alert mes-
sages, please contact Cindy Kauser at 419-
399-4656, extension 1512.
As always, I invite you to become an active
part of our school district and to get involved
in the lives of our young people by attending
as many of the student activities as your
schedule allows. Please feel free to visit me
at my office in the Paulding Administration
building, call me at 419-399-4656 or e-mail
me at j_basinger@pauldingschools.org at
your convenience if you have any questions
about our school district or anything in this
community newsletter.
John Basinger, Superintendent
Paulding Elementary- Stephanie Tear
Hello to all in Paulding! I would like to
thank all the parents who came for Parent/
Teacher Conferences in February. It is so
great to see the parent involvement and sup-
port in our school. I believe teachers and
parents working together can be proud of the
work accomplished by their child.
The after-school program for many third,
fourth and fifth graders, began at the end of
January. These students are focusing on
reading and math intervention. They have an
opportunity to get help with homework and
strengthen skills. They also have the oppor-
tunity to engage in extra activities such as;
exercise, cooking, crafts, and science experi-
ments. We are thrilled to offer this benefit to
our students.
Our Spring Fund Raiser of selling Cookie
Dough is underway as of February 21! The
proceeds will be going to continuing to
improve the playground. The next idea is a
walking trail of some sort around the play
ground field. There are so many ideas we
could implement with a walking trail, so this
will be our next step of improvement. With
over 500 children in Paulding Elementary,
we need more room to play. This will be an
opportunity for the children to help make our
playground a safer area for all children while
earning fun prizes for themselves! The fund-
raiser ends March 5
th
.
Keep your eyes open for an evening in
March for our Kindergarten Round Up!! This
will be a fun time for parents and their child,
who will be five years old before August 1,
2013. It will assist your child to get familiar
with the teachers and the school. A parent
information meeting will take place, and fun
activities are planned for the future Kinder-
garteners. You will not need to bring any
paperwork. This is an exciting time for your
child, as well as us, to get to know you! We
look forward to a wonderful evening
together.
The students in grades 3, 4 & 5 continue to
get ready for the Ohio Achievement Assess-
ment at the end of April. Mrs. Tear hosted
the third grade parents in January and shared
a PowerPoint of information on student pro-
gress within the grade levels based on stu-
dent data. Student ownership is a big part of
success to test-taking, so expectations are set
and students are working to their potential.
March will be a terrific month with exciting
events being planned by the PTO. They have
the Book Fair coming in the week of March
18-22 and Family Night March 19
th
. These
are great family night opportunities and we
look forward to spending them together with
you. As you can see, Paulding Elementary is
an exciting place to be!

Oakwood Elementary-Jennifer Manz
Hello from Oakwood Elementary! I am writ-
ing this March message in the middle of Feb-
ruary; but with a long weekend coming up
and meetings on several days after that, it is
now or late. Well, the fact that I am always
ready to rush winter along and usher in
spring might have a little to do with my inter-
est in working on something for March.
Please remember, as we anticipate nicer
weather in the next month or so, coats are
worn outside for recess until it is at least 60
o
.
We completed our Spring Parent/Teacher
Conferences in early February, and we want
to thank all of the parents who attended. We
appreciate your questions, concerns, and sup-
port; and we hope you will stay in close con-
tact with us through the remainder of the
year. When communication lines between
home and school are open and direct, a stu-
dent has the support system in place to be
successful. Please continue to encourage
your child to stretch and grow to master the
concepts set for each grade level by the State
of Ohio.
As we end the third quarter and get a good
start on the final quarter of the 2012-2013
school year, we know the Ohio Achievement
Assessments are rapidly approaching for our
3
rd
, 4
th
, 5
th
, and 6
th
graders. These students
will be taking the Reading OAA on April
25
th
and the Math OAA on April 30
th
. The
fifth graders will also take a Science OAA on
May 1
st
. All year, our students have been
tracking their progress as they learn new con-
cepts; and we know they will be prepared to
give their very best effort on these State as-
sessments. (We ask that parents and family
members please write these dates on your
calendars and make every effort to avoid
scheduling appointments or making commit-
ments that will require your child to be out of
school during OAA testing.)
March is Music in our Schools Month. We
will be celebrating this with a special choir
concert on Friday, March 8
th
. Our 5
th
and 6
th

Grade Choir has been preparing for this con-
cert under the direction of Mrs. Nancy Wehr-
kamp. At the same time, the 5
th
Grade Choir
at Paulding Elementary is preparing for the
same concert with their choir director, Mrs.
Dawn Sloan. On March 8
th
, both choirs will
practice together for about 30 minutes; and
then, they will perform for both elementary
schools. It is amazing to hear the quality of
sound and to see the choreography when the
two groups blend together. You would not
guess they had never worked together until
the day of the performance!
Oakwood Elementary is hosting Kindergar-
ten Camp, a Kindergarten pre-screening
event for 2013-2014 kindergartners, on Tues-
day, March 26
th
, from 6:30 to 7:30. If you
have or know a child in the Oakwood Ele-
mentary school district who will be five be-
fore August 1
st
, please bring him/her to visit
us on March 26
th
to see the school and meet
the people he/she will be working with dur-
ing kindergarten screening on April 19
th
.
(Screening appointments may be made at the
Camp on March 26
th
or by calling the school
office after March 26
th
.) Watch for more
details in the newspaper in a couple of
weeks.
Thank you for your continued support of our
school!

Middle School-David Stallkamp
Hello from Paulding Middle School!
Congratulations go out to the JH wrestlers
for a nice season. Special congratulations go
out to the following wrestlers placing in the
conference tournament: Logan Mudel-1
st
,
Jordan Weidenhamer -5
th
, Robbie Bowers-
1
st
, and Kori Wolfrum 1
st
place. The Pan-
thers placed fifth overall in the conference.
Cedar Point money and forms, for any 8
th

grader wishing to participate in this years
annual class trip, will be due on March 22
nd
.
Call me at school if you are thinking of go-
ing. Cost is $25 per student, and $35 per
chaperone.
Please make sure to have your student return
or locate their overdue library books. The
fines and cost of any lost book or overdue
book will be added to their workbook fees if
these are not paid. The list at this point is
quite long.
THANK YOU to all that attended Parent-
Teacher Conferences. These are always very
beneficial to the student, parent, and staff
member. We all need to be on the same page
to be able to provide a great education for
our kids.
Mrs. Langhals, Mr. Foster, and I will be
meeting soon with all grade levels to sched-
ule the kids for classes for the 2013-2014
school year .
Congratulations to Hannah Farr. Hannah
won our Paulding Middle School Spelling
Bee and also did a fine job of representing
our school in the Paulding County Spelling
Bee by finishing in Third Place.
Our winter sports seasons are now over and
we look forward to track this spring which
will be starting soon. Thank you to everyone
that participated in our winter sports pro-
grams and to all coaches, fans, and support-
ers of our teams. It is truly appreciated.
The Ohio Achievement Tests will be given
on the following dates: April 25- 6
th
- 8
th

Grade READING, April 30 - 6
th
-8
th
Grade
MATH, May 2 8
th
Grade SCIENCE.
Terra Nova testing will also be taking
place during the weeks of April 25-May 3.
PLEASE schedule vacations, appointments
etc., around these dates so we can have great
attendance for these testing dates, and also
help us with these tests by stressing the im-
portance of them to your children. Paulding
Middle School is working very hard to
receive the EXCELLENT status from the
State of Ohio this year. We can reach this
goal with your help. Students often say that
these tests do not mean anything. Research
indicates that student achievement scores
soar when parents get involved in learning.
Students score higher on tests, turn in better
projects, and participate more if they know
their parents care. YES, these tests DO
mean something. They are critically
important to the students and to the district.
We must have that inner PRIDE!!!
Our 6
th
grade Battle of the Books compe-
tition has been set for Thursday, April 11th
th
.
Our 6
th
grade winner will then battle the 5
th

grade winner from Paulding Elementary for
the right to go to the county competition later
in the year.
Congratulations go out to all 6
th
graders that
met their Reading Is a Sport goal.
Students must read a required number of
minutes to meet their goal. It is quite a large
number of minutes and these kids did a fan-
tastic job. They each received a free pass to
a varsity sporting event and were recognized
at the game. They also received free items
from the concession stand. This is a very
wonderful program for our kids. I thank the
varsity teams for their part in helping out our
kids.
Our annual Science Fair was held on Friday,
February 22nd. Congratulations to all par-
ticipants and a big THANK YOU to 7
th

Grade Science teacher, LeeAnn Favorito for
coordinating this years fair. I will get out a
list of all students qualifying for the District
Science Day at ONU in a later newsletter.
SPRING PICTURES will be taken on
March 22nd. These will be on a pre-pay
basis.
Thank you for your continued support of
Paulding Middle School.

High School-Todd Harmon
Thanks to all the parents who stopped in to
see how their child was doing during confer-
ences. Our friendly and helpful staff takes
pride in working with your child and to pro-
vide the education that will help them be a
success for job training, college, and life. If
you were unable to meet with your child's
teachers and you still have any questions or
concerns, please call in to the high school
office so we can assist you in making
arrangements to get your questions
answered.
Recently, the Principals representing the
schools that are partnered with Vantage
Career Center, had the opportunity to see
their students in the labs in the brand new
building. The new facility offers a 21
st
cen-
tury approach to job training with updated
facilities and new equipment, which students
will enjoy training with. Paulding students
who attend Vantage were doing a tremen-
dous job with their job training.
The Drama Department has been preparing
for their rendition of "Spamalot" which is a
comedic presentation similar to the Monty
Python film rendition. The sets and hard
work by the students and the directors over
the last couple of months is greatly
appreciated and will no doubt be entertaining
to the community on March 22
nd
and 23
rd
.
Also, thanks to Chris Etzler and Jon Snod-
grass for once again doing all the organizing
involved to host the Girls and Boys OHSAA
tournaments here at the PHS facility. It is an
honor to be selected as a tournament site and
thanks to the efforts made and those that give
of their time and resources to make it a
positive experience.
A reminder to students and parents that
March 11th through the 15th will be the
administration of the OGT 10 required for all
10th graders and those that still may have
sections to pass. Juniors and Seniors (that
have passed all OGT sections) will be operat-
ing on a 2 hour delay schedule with 9th and
10th graders coming in regular time
(freshman will be taking the practice
test). Please make sure your child gets
adequate sleep and meals to help them con-
centrate on these very important tests. We
want our students to be successful on all five
tests on all five days. There will be a sum-
mer administration of the OGT and if your
child needs to test again in any of the 5 sub-
jects, we will contact you for the opportunity
to schedule for the testing and tutoring
required.
Looking ahead, the "Music of the Night" per-
formance and dinner will be hosted by the
High School Band on April 13th. This is an
excellent opportunity for a night out and
entertainment, while having the chance to
participate in an auction and win some neat
prizes.
Thank you, on behalf of the Paulding High
School, to our community for your ongoing
support.

FREE PRESCHOOL SCREENING
A countywide preschool screening will be
held March 15 at St. Paul Lutheran Church in
Paulding from 12-4:00 p.m. Snow date
March 22. Please call 1-877-473-8166 to
pre-register.

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME
Fall backwards; spring forward. Daylight
savings time begins on March 10, 2013 at
2:00 a.m. this year. Remember to turn your
clocks ahead one hour.

GUIDANCE OFFICE
Scholarships are available for Seniors on the
website at pauldingschools.org, High School
Guidance page.

HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL
This years musical Spamalot, directed by
Beth Kelly and Sandy Dobbelaere, will be
performed March 22 & 23 at 7:30pm in the
Auditeria. Presale tickets will be available in
the high school office from March 14-22 at a
cost of $5.00 for students and $6.00 for
adults. All tickets at the door will be $8.00.

KNOWIT NOW
KnowItNow is an online reference source
available at www.knowitnow.org. Students
may have a live chat with a librarian who
provides authoritative resources to your
screen. Contact Ellen Williams at the High
School Media Center if you have any ques-
tions or visit the Media Center website .

AFTER PROM MEETINGS
Donations are being collected to sponsor
After Prom. If you have not been contacted
and would be interested in donating, please
contact Amy Simon at 419-399-2171. Prom
is scheduled for May 4.
Boys JV Baseball
Mar. 21 Montpelier Scrimmage-H 5:00
Boys Varsity Baseball
Mar. 21 Montpelier Scrimmage-T 5:00
Mar. 28 Ottoville Scrimmage-T 5:00
Mar. 30 Alumni Game TBA
Girls Varsity Softball
Mar. 26 Wauseon Scrimmage-H 5:00
Mar. 28 Continental Scrimmage-T 5:00
Mar. 1 NO SCHOOL-Waiver Day
Mar. 1 Boys Div IV Sectional Tournament
Mar. 3 Girls Div II District Tournament
Mar. 4 Band Booster Meeting 7:00p
Mar. 5 OE Kdg Family Game Night 6:30p
Mar. 6 Athletic Booster Meeting 7:00p
Mar. 8 ACT Registration Deadline
Mar. 8 OE Student/Month Lunch
Mar. 8 & 9 Band/Choir OMEA Dist Contest
Mar. 11 FFA Chapter Meeting Ag Rm 3:00p
Mar. 11-15 OGT Testing
Mar. 14 OE Title I Family Night
Mar. 15 Presch Screen St. Paul Luth 12-4:00p
Mar. 15 End of 3rd nine weeks
Mar. 18 OE Spring Pictures
Mar. 18-22 PE PTO Book Fair
Mar. 19 PE PTO Family Fun Night
Mar. 19 Board Meeting-Adm. Bldg. 7:00p
Mar. 21 Mandatory Senior Meeting 8:00a
Mar. 22 MS Spring Pictures
Mar. 22 OE Kdg Family Reading Day 2:30p
Mar. 22 & 23 Spring Musical- Auditeria 7:30p
Mar. 23 Sci. Olympiad Regionals-Defiance
Mar. 26 OE Kdg Camp 6:30p
Mar. 29 NO SCHOOL Good Friday

PAULDING EXEMPTED VILLAGE SCHOOLS
MARCH 2013 NEWSLETTER
SUPERINTENDENTS MESSAGE
NOTES FROM THE PRINCIPALS
ATHLETIC CALENDAR EVENTS
DISTRICT CALENDAR EVENTS
Lifetime
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washes w/ any
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The Paulding County
Progress
12A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, February 27, 2013
THE PAULDING COUNTY PROGRESS GOES TO FLORIDA The Laudick family took Grandma
Scarbrough to Disney World for a Christmas vacation. The Christmas lights and decorations were
beautiful and everyone enjoyed the delicious food and sunshine. Pictured are the happy people,
from left Brian and Kerry Laudick, Grandma Linda and Lauren, Grant and Laine Laudick. Their
source for exclusive Paulding County news? The Paulding County Progress! Are you headed to
some distant, exotic destination? Take the Progress along with your camera and send a photo
and a little information about your trip to progress@progressnewspaper.org.
FIVE GENERATIONS The family of Harold Phlipot recently gathered for a five generation pic-
ture. Pictured are, from left Harold Phlipot, great-great-grandfather; Karen Bortel, daughter of
Harold, great-grandmother; Stephanie Dockery, daughter of Karen, grandmother; Austin Bortel,
son of Stephanie, father, holding his son, Ayden.
Boy Scout Troop #64 had a two-day retreat at the Wilderness Camp. Attending were, front row
from left Jordon Offerle, Cole Mabis, Anthony Baxter; second row Alex Long, James Weaver,
Caleb Mead; back row Walter Long, Hank Sinn, Isaiah Ross, Michael Davis and Harold Ross,
troop leader.
Progress posting news items daily
Check the Progress web site at www.progressnewspaper.org and read Todays News Briefs.
We are posting selected short news items each weekday before they are published in the next
Progress.
Current Progress subscribers are entitled to a free online subscription; call 419-399-4015 or
email subscription@progressnewspaper.org to obtain your user name and password.
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Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 1B
Sports
Serving 12,900 members in
PAULDING PUTNAM VAN WERT DEFIANCE COUNTIES
IN OHIO AND ALLEN COUNTY IN INDIANA
- Sponsored By -
Touchstone Energy Power
PLAYER OF THE WEEK
WAYNE TRACE
SENIOR
Go Raiders!
Paulding-Putnam Electric
SAWYER TEMPLE
27c1
Congratulations
G
eorge C
lem
ens
D
ustin T
aylor
S
awyer T
em
ple
Best of Luck
at State!
From Wayne Trace Athletic Boosters
Varsity
Games
of the
Week
Girls basketball
DIV. III SECTIONALS
Delta................64
Paulding...........48
LCC..................49
Wayne Trace......46
DIV. IV SECTIONALS
Antwerp............41
Hicksville..........31
Edgerton ..........47
Antwerp............14
Boys basketball
Wayne Trace......63
Parkway............49
Antwerp............56
Woodlan...........50
Spencerville .....67
Paulding...........55
Wayne Trace......55
Ottoville............50
Wrestling
At Bowling Green:
DIV. III DISTRICTS
Paulding 16th ..34
Antwerp 51st.... 0
At Kettering:
DIV. III DISTRICTS
Wayne Trace 9th....61
(tie with LCC)
Sports schedule
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 27
Boys Basketball: DIV. IV SEC-
TIONALS Antwerp vs. Miller City
at 8 p.m., played at Paulding
FRIDAY, MARCH 1
Boys Basketball: DIV. III SEC-
TIONALS Paulding/Tinora winner
vs. Wayne Trace at 8 p.m., played
at Defiance; DIV. IV SECTIONALS
Antwerp/Miller City winner vs.
Holgate/Continental winner at 8
p.m., played at Paulding
FEB. 28 & MARCH 1-2
Wrestling: State tournament in
Columbus
4 wrestlers headed to the Schott
Every wrestler in Ohio has
the same dream: make it to
the Schott. The OHSAA
wrestling championships are
held every year at the Schot-
tenstein Center on the Ohio
State University. Four Pauld-
ing County wrestlers have
achieved that dream and are
heading to Columbus: Wayne
Traces George Clemens,
Dustin Taylor and Sawyer
Temple, and Pauldings Tyler
Ash.
DIV. III KETTERING
A dozen grapplers com-
peted last weekend at Div. III
districts. Paulding and
Antwerp were at Bowling
Green and Wayne Trace was
at Kettering Fairmont.
Six Wayne Trace wrestlers
traveled to Kettering Fair-
mont to compete from a pool
of 53 sectional schools in the
district tournament. This dis-
trict is heralded as one of the
tougher in the state with 10
projected state champions
coming from here in the 14
weight classes.
George Clemens (106)
started the action for Wayne
Trace on Friday night. He
earned a victory over a Preble
wrestler.
Dustin Taylor (113) fol-
lowed with another win over
McCarthy from Purcell. Fac-
ing the sectional champion
from Troy Christian, Matt
Baxter (120) dropped his first
match.
Aaron Miller (132)
dropped his opening round
match to Mayabb of Troy
Christian, however, Tyler
Showalter (138) and Sawyer
Temple (160) notched open-
ing round wins for the Raider
team.
In the quarterfinals, the red,
white, and blue would not
fare as well. Only Clemens
and Temple came out on top
in this round. Clemens over
Davie from Troy Christian
and Temple over Day from
Reading.
Baxter was knocked out of
the tournament by McIntyre
from Blanchester. Dayton
Christians Clary, upended
Taylor, but Miller advanced
over a Madison wrestler in
the consi round. Showalter
then fell to projected state
champ Reece of Mechanics-
burg.
Heading into Saturday, the
Raiders only lost one
wrestler.
Clemens faced Hunter
Bray in the semis and fell
short. This sent him into the
consolations in the go to
match. Temple found him-
self in the same situation as
he also fell to projected state
champ Sandlin of Carlisle.
Miller dropped his next
match in the consis to Cincin-
nati Christians Cummings
and was knocked out.
Taylor and Showalter both
battled back through the consi
rounds. Taylor garnered wins
over Amheiser of Miami East
and Fenwicks Fessler.
Showalter upended
Spencervilles Binkley and
Jeffersons Vermule.
Wayne Trace had four
wrestlers wrestling in the go
to match. Not the most it has
ever had, but three of these
wrestlers are underclassmen,
and the only senior is Temple.
Typically, this match is laden
with upperclassmen or sen-
iors.
Clemens started off with a
dominating win over Keysor
of Columbus Grove. Taylor,
who had a stunning overtime
victory in the consis just to
get to this match, easily han-
dled his next opponent.
Showalter then faced off
against sectional champion
Cory Hawk of Dixie and
missed going to the state
tournament by losing the
match in the closing seconds
by one point.
Temple followed up that
loss with a win for the red,
white, and blue and make
himself a two-time state qual-
ifier.
Wayne Trace placed four
wrestlers at districts:
Clemens third, Taylor and
Temple fourth, and Showalter
sixth.
What a roller coaster!
commented Coach Clemens.
So many highs, and then
some lows. You are so ex-
cited for the ones that made
it, and then devastated by the
ones that fell short. I am so
proud of all the guys down
here. They all wrestled phe-
nomenal.
As a team, the Raiders
ended the tournament tied for
ninth place.
Most people dont realize,
when you are wrestling in
that go to match, there are
only 24 Div. III wrestlers in
the entire state still
wrestling, commented
Coach Stabler. Overall, I am
very proud and excited for
these guys.
Wayne Trace has never
sent three wrestlers to state,
and, for only the second time,
it is sending a two-time state
qualifier. Last year, two-time
state qualifier Kameran
Clemens and Sawyer Temple
made the trip.
DIV. III BOWLING GREEN
Antwerp sent one wrestler
to districts: sophomore Jarett
Bute (285). Bute fell to Care-
less of St. Paul then lost a 3-
1 decision to Gibson of Ot-
tawa-Glandorf.
Paulding took five to dis-
tricts, three of whom are un-
derclassmen. Only one
Tyler Ash will make the trip
to Columbus.
I think all of our guys per-
formed well. Even the guys
who didnt stand on the
podium at the end of the day
still had a good day of
wrestling, said coach Josh
Neilson.
Freshman Kage Seals (106)
went 2-2 and was one win
away from placing. Adam
Deatrick went 1-2, and
Dakota Valdez went 0-2.
Even though Dakota went
0-2 I think he showed a great
deal of improvement. Dakota
is a sophomore and he had
some close matches against
some good kids, Neilson
said. Dakota is a kid who I
am very interested to see de-
velop his skills over the sum-
mer.
Taylor Deatrick took fifth
place and senior Tyler Ash,
who qualified for state last
year, took fourth.
Unfortunately, Taylor lost
a close 6-5 match to go to
state. He lost to Wes Fritz of
St. Paul. Taylor has beaten
Fritz twice already this year,
once in the first round of dis-
tricts; however, to beat a kid
of that quality three times in
a row is a hard feat to accom-
plish, Neilson said. Ash
lost to the district champ 5-4
in triple overtime, but he bat-
tled back well and won his
spot in Columbus this week-
end.
Ash will have a tough
draw. Getting fourth at dis-
tricts you know you are going
to draw one of the best kids
off the bat, Neilson added.
However, everyone is so
close down there anyone can
beat anyone on any given
day, so if we come to wrestle,
I think he has podium poten-
tial.
Tom Morris/Delphos Herald
George Clemens decisions Zachary Favie (Troy Christian) 7-1 for third place and earned a trip
to Columbus.
Tom Morris/Delphos Herald
Dustin Taylor defeats Matthew Amheiser (Miami East) and would place fourth overall.
Tom Morris/Delphos Herald
Sawyer Temple decisions Cameron Luther (Catholic Central) 14-10 in the consolation semifinal.
Temple finished fourth overall.
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Tyler Ash (top) took fourth place, qualifying him for state for the second year in a row.
2B - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Sports
Scoreboard
Raiders end regular
season with 20th win
By KEVIN
WANNEMACHER
Sportswriter
HAVILAND Four Wayne
Trace seniors concluded their
home careers Friday night
with a victory as the Raiders
held off visiting Ottoville 55-
50 at the Palace.
Wayne Trace seniors Grady
Gudakunst, Dalton Sinn, Nick
McClain and Ryan Kortokrax
walked off the game floor for
the final time after leading
Wayne Trace to its 20th vic-
tory of the season in 22 games.
Sinn led the red, white and
blue with 18 points, seven re-
bounds and three assists with
Gudakunst chipping in eight
markers and a pair of assists.
Kortokrax added nine points
as well as McClain chipping
in two points, six boards and
two assists.
Wayne Trace held a slim 11-
10 advantage after one quarter
before taking a 28-26 advan-
tage at the intermission. The
Raider lead was still at two en-
tering the final period with the
red, white and blue on top 41-
39.
Wayne Trace took its
biggest lead of the contest
midway through the fourth
quarter when a Speice 3-point
play made it 48-41 Raiders.
Ryan Honigford answered
for the Big Green with a trey
to get Ottoville within 48-44
before a Speice basket made it
50-44.
Following a free throw by
Ottovilles Luke Schim-
moeller, Gudakunst connected
on a pair of foul shots to make
it 52-45 at the 1:14 mark.
Gudakunst would add an-
other free throw and McClain
hit two charity tosses with 15
seconds left to seal the 55-50
Raider win.
Speice chipped in a dozen
points for Wayne Trace while
also dishing out three assists.
Linder recorded six markers to
go along with three assists and
three steals.
Roby paced the Big Green
with 15 points, coming on five
treys, while Ryan Honigford
added 14. Luke Schimmoeller
and Austin Honigford
recorded seven and six re-
bounds, respectively. Ottoville
finishes the regular season at
8-14.
The Raider junior varsity
played only two quarters
against Ottoville due to the
Big Greens lack of numbers.
Raider coach Craig Miller
showed just how sportsman-
ship should be exemplified in
an example given to the play-
ers and fans of both teams.
When the Big Green lineup
went to four players due to an
injury, Miller pulled one of the
Raider players off the court to
make the game a four-on-four
contest rather than Wayne
Trace having a five-on-four
advantage. It was a move that
made sense, and one Miller
should be recognized for.
Wayne Traces junior var-
sity finished 17-4 on the sea-
son.
Wayne Trace also recorded
a 63-49 win over Parkway last
Thursday as Dalton Sinn
scored 18 points and Grady
Gudakunst chipped in 14.
Corbin Linder and Ryan
Kortokrax chipped in nine and
eight markers, respectively.
Devin Wenzlick recorded
eight boards for the red, white
and blue with Sinn posting
three assists and five steals.
The Raider junior varsity
closed their season with a 57-
20 victory over the Panthers.
Brock Worden scored 11
points to pace the red, white
and blue and Hank Sinn
chipped in 10 markers. Jake
Gerber added nine points and
four steals and David Sinn
dished out four assists and
recorded three steals. T.J.
Blackmore and Worden each
grabbed six boards.
Wayne Trace will open Di-
vision III sectional action at
Defiance on Friday against ei-
ther county rival Paulding or
Green Meadows Conference
rival Tinora.
Regardless of who we
play, we have to come out
ready to play and play well,
noted Raider head coach Jim
Linder. They each present
different problems and either
of them will be prepared for
us.
PAULDING
Seventh Grade Girls Basketball
Paulding wrapped up its season with
a record of 5-10 overall and 1-7 in
the Northwest Conference after falling
to Lincolnview, 38-23. The Lady
Lancers led 11-2 after one quarter
before Paulding rallied to pull within
17-13 at the intermission. The blue
and gold was on top 25-17 at the
end of three periods. Audrey Manz
had 21 points to pace the maroon
and white while Breanna Gorrell
picked up the other two markers.
Archers win border clash
By JOE SHOUSE
Sportswriter
WOODBURN Clutch free
throw shooting in the fourth
quarter and a key 3-pointer
from Kaden Brumett kept the
Antwerp Archers in control of
a tightly contested season fi-
nale of the regular season.
The blue and white traveled
across the state line to battle
Woodlan and after connecting
on 13-of-16 free throws in the
final five minutes of play the
Archers squeaked out a 56-50
win.
With the injuries we have
had this year, to finish the reg-
ular season 13-9 is great for
these kids, said head coach
Scott McMichael.
When it comes to injuries,
the Archers were bitten again
last Tuesday in practice when
starting guard Derek Smalley
rolled his ankle and did not
play. It is doubtful he will be
ready for the Miller City tour-
nament game.
Antwerp never trailed in the
contest and enjoyed its largest
lead in the second quarter at
33-17. Entering the fourth pe-
riod with a 36-29 advantage,
the Archers turned the ball
over on its first three posses-
sions and then misfired on its
first three shots. The Warriors
managed to pull to within one
at 36-35 when the parade to
the foul line started for
Antwerp.
Senior Braeden Hormann
connected on two free throws
followed by 1-of-2 from Noah
Ganger to widen the Archer
lead to 39-35. Both teams ex-
changed 2-point baskets fol-
lowed by a bucket from War-
rior Shawn McGettigan to
make it a 41-39 Archers lead
with just under three minutes
remaining.
Antwerp answered with a
trey from Brumett and the
Archers were on top, 44-39.
Hormann was again perfect at
the line on two attempts with
2:30 remaining and Coach
McMichaels crew stretching
their lead to 46-40.
Jaylin Bennett, just a junior
in the middle for the Warriors,
helped bring his team to
within three with a put back in
the paint. Bennett led Wood-
lan with 15 points. On
Antwerps next possession,
Sam Williamson was fouled,
sending the freshman to the
line and the Archers in the
double bonus for the rest of
the game. The freshman was
solid at the line, canning both
attempts with 1:18 showing on
the clock.
I was really pleased with
the way Sam stepped up at the
line and hit his free throws
tonight, commented
McMichael.
Woodlan was unable to take
advantage on their next pos-
session when the official
called an Antwerp foul and the
outside official was standing
near midcourt and whistled a
travel on Woodlan before the
foul. Following a brief discus-
sion, the refs turned the ball
back over to Antwerp with
1:09 remaining and holding a
48-43 margin.
Greg White cranked up a 3-
pointer from the deep corner
to keep the Warriors alive,
trailing 49-46. Following a
free throw miss by Hormann,
it was Ganger who skied for
the offensive rebound to keep
it in the Archers hands. A few
seconds later the senior was
fouled and was 1-of-2 at the
line. Ganger finished with 26
with 21 coming in the first
half while Brumett totaled 15
for the winners.
The Warriors (9-12) would-
nt go away and with 48 sec-
onds remaining, McGettigan
was perfect on two free throws
and Woodlan trailed by just
two at 50-48. Brumett sank a
10-footer from the left side
followed by two more free
throws from McGettigen.
Holding a 52-50 advantage,
the Archers finished it out in
the final 30 seconds on two
free throws from Hormann
and junior Colton Stout iced it
with two throws with 0.7 sec-
onds remaining.
After playing really well in
the first half they (Woodlan)
switched up their defense and
starting trapping in the second
half and we got out our
rhythm, McMichael said.
Antwerp 16 17 3 2056
Woodlan 9 14 6 21-50
Antwerp 56: Brumett 2 3 2-2 15,
Hormann 0 0 6-8, Coleman 1 0 0-0
2, Copsey 1 0 0-0 2, Stout 0 0 2-2,
Krick 0 0 0-0 0, Ganger 7 2 6-9 26,
Jones 0 0 0-0 0, Williamson 0 0 3-4
3. Totals: 11 5 19-25 56. Fouls: 18.
Woodlan 50: White 0 3 0-0 9, Lortie
2 1 1-2 8, McGettigan 3 0 5-5 11,
Williams 1 0 0-1, Mendenhall 1 0 1-
3 2, Stieglitz 1 0 0-0 2, Bennett 6 0
3-5 15. Totals: 14 4 10-16 50. Fouls:
21.
Paulding girls bow out of
sectional game at Defiance
By JIM LANGHAM
Sportswriter
DEFIANCE For many, it
was like the old David and
Goliath story when Paulding
took on a mighty Delta team at
the Girls Division III Sec-
tional in Defiance last week,
but the local squad played
some of the best basketball of
the season to challenge the
other Panthers before bow-
ing out, 64-48.
Sophomore Brooke Combs
stepped up to the plate once
again to lead all scorers for the
game with 22 points while
junior Abby Pease added 11
points to the Paulding cause.
Brigan Wymer, also a soph-
omore, led Delta with 21
points followed by Victoria
Burde with 16 points and Bri
Raab with 11 points.
In spite of the loss, Paulding
head coach Lyndsi Schultz
was more than pleased with
her girls performance.
We had been working on a
new zone for three days to
counter their offense, said
Schultz. It was new, plain and
simple, but we didnt have that
much time to work on it. I
thought our girls took up re-
ally well on it. I was proud of
them.
Schultz said that one of the
biggest problems encountered
by her offense was the fact
that it didnt get off enough
shots. Even though the Pan-
thers shot an impressive 64
percent from the field, they
only got off 25 shots, hardly
enough to muster up the points
needed for a win.
Overall, Paulding played a
clean game and took care of
the ball well, with just 14
turnovers compared to 10
turnovers for Delta.
Delta roared out on the floor
to jump into a 20-8 advantage
at the first stop and 29-16 at
the halfway mark.
Early in the fourth quarter
Paulding chopped the lead to
50-41 when Combs dropped
in a 3-pointer, but Delta even-
tually pulled away for the win.
Brooke Combs played a
great game for us, said
Schultz.
We came out flat at the be-
ginning and dug a 12-point
hole that we could seemingly
never dig out of, continued
Schultz. But our kids hung in
there. Im proud of the way
that they played.
Schultz had major praise for
the likes of seniors Abbey Ed-
wards, Katie Radel, Sarah
Nardone and Samantha Mar-
tinez for their effort as well as
their hardworking contribu-
tion to the girls program over
the past four years.
If you have to go out, this
is the way to go out, said
Schultz. We played one of
our best games against a team
much quicker than we were. It
was a trend of continuing im-
provement that the girls had
shown us in the last several
games. I was glad that we
could play all of the people.
Next year, its going to be
tough without Abbey and
Sarah bringing the ball down,
but weve got a lot of promis-
ing young players coming up.
Hopefully the leadership dis-
played by our seniors will rub
off on them as they continue
our program, added Schultz.
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Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Jake Gerber #5 plays defense against Ottoville last Friday in
the Palace.
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Wayne Traces Dalton Sinn #32 drops in a 2-pointer for the
Raiders last Friday night against Ottoville.
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
The Raiders Colby Speice #20 drives the baseline against Ot-
toville last Friday night.
Ball association to host clinic,
take registration
PAULDING Registration for Paulding Youth Ball Asso-
ciations 2013 season will be accepted 9:30-11:30 a.m. March
2 at the Paulding Kiwanis Building. Registration forms are
available for download at www.pauldingball.com. Forms and
payment also can be mailed to Paulding Youth Ball, P.O. Box
281, Paulding OH 45879.
The association also is sponsoring a free pitchers and catch-
ers clinic for ages 9 and up on Saturdays, March 2, 9, 16 and
23 at the Kiwanis building. For hours and more information
and a registration form, visit the association website.
NWC girls squads
are announced
Northwest Conference
coaches met to select the all-
league teams. Paulding junior
Abby Pease received Honor-
able Mention.
Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 3B
Spencerville seals
NWC title with win
at Paulding
By JIM LANGHAM
Sportswriter
PAULDING It was senior
night at Paulding High School
on Friday night. Basketball
players Kaleb Hernandez,
Logan Doster, Lance Foor,
Neil Roehrig, Steve Strayer
and Trey Schroeder were hon-
ored for their part in the bas-
ketball programs success.
Before a packed gym, the
local Panthers fought hard be-
fore finally falling back to
drop a 67-55 contest to a Bob-
cat team that finished 8-1 in
the Northwest Conference and
finished the season with a 13-
7 record.
Spencerville jumped out to
a 9-4 advantage early, but the
Panthers quickly responded to
tie the game at 9-9. But the
visitors claimed six of the next
eight points to jump out to a
15-11 advantage at the end of
the first quarter.
Early in the second quarter,
the Panthers went on a 13-2
run to jump into a 24-17 lead
following a 3-point score by
Kyle Kauser. But back-to-
back treys by Spencerville al-
lowed the Bobcats to get back
in the game before a basket by
Pauldings Guy Harder
vaulted the local squad into a
26-23 advantage at the
halfway mark.
The guys came out and
played well in the first half,
said Paulding head coach
Shawn Brewer. In the second
half, it got real physical. We
didnt do what we had to do.
One key factor was at the
charity stripe where the Pan-
thers connected on 5-9 free
throws while Spencerville
shot 30 times and connected
on 24 free throws.
The second half opened
with Spencervilles Derek
Goecke connecting on a free
throw and Dominick Corso
tying the contest, 26-26.
Kauser fired in one from be-
hind the arc to give the local
squad a 29-26 lead, but
Spencervilles Ben Bowers re-
taliated with a trey to tie the
game at 29-29.
Spencerville grabbed the
lead 31-29 on a basket by
Greg Miller, but Pauldings
Lance Foor scored a 2-pointer
to tie the score at 31-31.
The squads deadlocked
again at 33-33, but
Spencerville ran off nine
straight unanswered points to
grab a 42-33 advantage before
two quick Paulding buckets
left the score at 42-37 in favor
of Spencerville going into the
final stanza.
Spencerville dominated the
final eight minutes, 25-18, to
win going away.
Paulding finished the regu-
lar season with an overall
record of 16-6 and 5-4 in the
NWC.
Im very proud of the way
our guys played, said Brewer.
Im sorry that the seniors had
to go out with a loss, but Im
very proud of them. They had
great careers.
Foor scored 22 points for
Paulding and Bowers tallied
22 points for Spencerville to
tie for game honors. In addi-
tion, Neil Roehrig scored 12
points for Paulding.
Lady Raiders come up just short against LCC
By KEVIN
WANNEMACHER
Sportswriter
LIMA Just over five
weeks prior to meeting Lima
Central Catholics girls bas-
ketball team in sectional
semifinal action, the Wayne
Trace girls basketball team
was outplayed in every facet
of a 50-33 loss to the Thun-
derbirds in Allen County.
Returning to Allen County
for the first time since, Wayne
Trace nearly pulled off the
upset of the favored T-Birds
as Wayne Trace hung tough
and led in the fourth quarter
but eventually fell to LCC 49-
46 Wednesday night at Lima
Bath High School.
The Raiders, who close the
year with a record of 6-17,
showed their best effort of the
season in the season finale.
Wayne Trace gave Lima Cen-
tral Catholic all it could handle
in the Division III sectional
semifinal.
The girls came out and did
a lot of positive things and
showed they can play well,
commented Wayne Trace head
coach Greg Davis. I am just
so proud of the way these girls
played tonight.
Wayne Trace led 11-5 after
one quarter and overcame a
horrible start to the second
quarter. Lima Central Catholic
scored the first 11 points of the
second stanza in grabbing a
16-11 advantage but the Lady
Raiders would claw their way
back.
Buckets by Krystal Wan-
nemacher, Shayna Temple and
Erin Mohr got the red, white
and blue within 23-17 at the
midway point.
We got off to a good start
but then we had a stretch there
in the second quarter where
we didnt play as well, noted
Davis. The thing we did
tonight though is we contin-
ued to battle and we worked
hard all night long. We played
for 32 minutes tonight and we
didnt give up.
Wayne Trace opened the
third quarter with consecutive
buckets by Wannemacher and
Mohr to get within 23-21.
After consecutive treys from
the Thunderbirds Sydney
Santaguida pushed the margin
to 29-21, the red, white and
blue again responded.
Two Mohr baskets, a Wan-
nemacher two-pointer and a
Sylvia Young free throw
helped Wayne Trace pull
within 29-28 with four min-
utes left in the third quarter.
The Raiders didnt stop
there, though. Buckets by
Young and Mohr gave the red,
white and blue a 32-31 lead
with 46 seconds left in the
stanza.
Lima Central Catholic ral-
lied as Meredith Shepherd
connected on a long distance
shot just before the end of the
period to put the Thunderbirds
on top 34-32 entering the final
period.
Santaguida opened the scor-
ing in the fourth quarter with
a trey for the T-Birds, giving
LCC a 37-32 advantage. After
a free throw by the T-Birds
Elizabeth Kidd, baskets from
Wayne Traces Tanya Sinn and
Mohr brought the Raiders
within 38-36.
The two teams traded buck-
ets before another Santaguida
bomb widened the LCC lead
to 43-38 with 2:27 remaining.
Wayne Trace again an-
swered though. Baskets by
Wannemacher, Karena Egnor
and Taylor Grant quickly got
the Lady Raiders within 45-
44.
Following a T-Bird basket
by Elizabeth Tafflinger,
Wayne Trace closed within
47-46 with 6.9 seconds left on
a Rylee Zartman bucket.
Shepherd was immediately
fouled on the inbounds pass,
stopping the clock with 5.9
ticks remaining.
Although the T-Bird junior
was unable to convert the foul
shot, she was able to get the
offensive rebound to get a sec-
ond chance at the foul line.
The junior guard then con-
verted both free throw at-
tempts to make it 49-46.
Mohr had a last second at-
tempt to tie the contest for
Wayne Trace that was off the
mark and wrapped up the ca-
reers of six Raider seniors.
The seniors should be
proud of their efforts tonight,
Davis concluded. They
played their hearts out and that
is all we can ask. All of the
girls did. It was good team ef-
fort but we came up just a little
short.
Six Raider seniors put the
uniform on for the final time.
Wannemacher finished with
10 points and nine rebounds
while Zartman chipped in four
markers, five boards and three
steals. Egnor also had seven
points and three assists with
Grant and Sinn each posting
two markers. Natalie Sinn also
wrapped up her Raider career.
Mohr led the red, white and
blue with 14 points while
adding six caroms and four as-
sists.
Shepherd led the Thunder-
birds with 21 points while
Santaguida added 10. Shep-
herd also recorded four assists,
four steals and nine rebounds.
Sydney Mohler posted 14 re-
bounds for the Thunderbirds.
Lima Central Catholic won
the boards on the night 40-32
and committed fewer
turnovers, 15-23. The Thun-
derbirds were 16 of 62 from
the field (26 percent) com-
pared to Wayne Traces 22 of
42 (51 percent). At the charity
stripe, the T-Birds were 7 of
16 (43 percent) while the
Raiders were one of two (50
percent).
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Pauldings Steven Strayer #42 hits a first half deuce for the
Panthers against NWC foe Spencerville last Friday night.
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Lance Foor #24 drives for a layup against Spencerville last Fri-
day night.
Dennis Saam/Paulding County Progress
Rylee Zartman #4 shoots from the side against LCC in sec-
tional action last Wednesday.
Dennis Saam/Paulding County Progress
Shayna Temple #10 works the ball around the LCC defense in
first round sectional action last week.
Dennis Saam/Paulding County Progress
Sylvia Young #33 gets a rebound and puts the ball back up for
two points. Despite having one of their best games of the sea-
son, the Lady Raiders fell just short of a win against LCC.
25c3
The Paulding Youth Ball
Association is sponsoring:
Free Pitchers and Catchers Clinic
for ages 9 and up at Kiwanis
Saturday, March 2nd, 9th, 16th, 23rd
Boys (ages 9 and up) 9:30 am -10:30 am
Girls (ages 9 and up) 10:30 am- 11:30 am
For more information or to obtain a registration form,
go to www.pauldingball.com
2013 REGISTRATION
Registrations for 2013 season are now
being accepted!
Registrations will be accepted at the Kiwanis building on
February 23rd and March 2nd
Registrations will ONLY be accepted at open registration Feb. 23
and March 2 at the Kiwanis building from 9:30-11:30 am
OR send your registration and money to
Paulding Youth Ball P.O. Box 281, Paulding, OH 45879
Registration forms are available to download at
www.pauldingball.com
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
The Panthers Neil Roehrig #34 takes a determined path to the
basket last Friday night against Spencerville.
4B - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Antwerps Kaiya Jemison #35 gets inside for a critical second
half bucket against Hicksville last Tuesday night.
Lady Archers close out
season to Edgerton
By JOE SHOUSE
Sportswriter
BRYAN Two familiar
teams took to the floor on Sat-
urday night at Bryan as con-
ference opponents Edgerton
and Antwerp tipped it off in
girls sectional play at Bryan
High School. Antwerp played
their way into the finals with a
win over Hicksville earlier in
the week while Edgerton was
seeded first with their 19-4
record.
Antwerp was unable to
match the superior play of the
Bulldogs, who put the game
away early as they coasted to
a 47-14 win.
Edgerton set the stage early
with defense, holding the
Archers to just one-of-five
from the floor in the first quar-
ter while turning the ball over
six times. Their lone field goal
came with 47.8 seconds re-
maining on a long 2-pointer
from senior Avrial Sawyer.
Trailing 14-4 heading into
the second period, the Archers
settled down and played much
better, although their shooting
woes continued. Edgerton
outscored the Archers 9-7 to
take a 12-point lead to the
locker room at intermission
23-11.
In the first half Antwerp was
shooting just under 10 percent
from the field while the Bull-
dogs were shooting at a 42
percent clip. As it would turn
out, the poor Antwerp shoot-
ing would continue in the sec-
ond half.
The Bulldogs erased any
doubt that Antwerp would
make a run as Edgerton
outscored the Archers 15-2 in
the third. Antwerps two
points came with 27 seconds
on the clock when Kaiya
Jemison scored in the paint.
The fourth period had the
Archers scoring just one point
on a three throw from fresh-
man Audrie Longardner. The
Archers managed just three
points in the second half on 1-
15 shooting while collecting
21 turnovers in the contest.
Jones and Sawyer close out
their career as an Antwerp
Lady Archer with each scoring
five points. Also graduating
for the Lady Archers is Chay
Jackson.
For the game, Antwerp fin-
ished 4-of-47 shooting from
the floor for 8.5 percent with
Edgerton hitting on 19-of-44
for 43 percent. The Lady Bull-
dogs will move on in tourna-
ment play at Archbold where
they will tangle with Pet-
tisville on Thursday night.
Antwerp 4 7 2 1-14
Edgerton 14 9 15 947
Antwerp 14: Jones 1 0 3-4 5, Miller-Sweet
0 0 1-2 1, Sawyer 1 1 0-1 5, Longardner
0 0 1-1 1, Cline 0 0 0-1 0, Jemison 1 0
0-1 2. Totals: 3 1 5-10 14. Fouls: 14
Edgerton 47: Sack 0 0 0-2 0, Stark 3 0
3-4 9, Newman 0 0 3-4 3, Schraeder 1 0
0-0 2, Wheeler 1 0 0-0 2, Flower 5 1 1-2
14, Griffin 6 0 0-0 12, Landel 2 0 1-3 5,
Walker 0 0 0-1 0. Totals: 18 1 8-16 47.
Fouls: 13.
Last Tuesday, Antwerp was
paired against the Lady Aces
from Hicksville, whom they
had defeated twice during the
regular season. The old adage
you cant beat a team three
times in the same season did
not hold as the Lady Archers
defeated Hicksville by 10
points, 41-31.
Hicksville closed out their
season with a dismal 1-21 sea-
son with their one win coming
against Fairview in mid-Janu-
ary.
Antwerp had lost their pre-
vious 11 games and had not
won since Jan. 4 at Hicksville
when they dealt the Lady Aces
a 38-24 setback. Previously,
the Archers were victorious in
their first match up with
Hicksville in the Route 49
Classic when they picked up
an 18-point, win 59-26.
Alexis Jones paced the
Lady Archers with 22 of her
teams 41 points. Entering the
fourth quarter Antwerp was
holding to a slim 26-23 advan-
tage, but outscored the Aces
down the stretch to 15-8 to se-
cure the 10-point tournament
win.
In the final period, Jones
was perfect from the free
throw line on 6-of-6 and fin-
ished with hitting 8-of-10
from the line.
Antwerp 7 10 9 1541
Hicksville 9 8 6 831
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
The Lady Archers Alexis Jones #3 tries to work through a
tough Hicksville defense last Tuesday night in sectional play.
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Annie Miesle #12 fights for control of the ball against Hicksville
in first round sectional play last Tuesday at Bryan.
Senior Spotlight
Dooley is a valuable team
member for the Archers
By JOE SHOUSE
Sportswriter
When attending a basketball
or football game, even a vol-
leyball match at Antwerp High
School, most fans are sitting in
the bleachers watching the ac-
tion on the court or field.
Many fans have little under-
standing as to what goes on
behind the scenes in order for
a team to progress and get bet-
ter throughout the season.
They simply enjoy going to
the game, watching their fa-
vorite Archer play, and when
the final horn sounds hope-
fully the blue and white are
winners and everyone leaves
feeling good.
However, for the coaches,
they sit on the sidelines and
obviously watch the game
from a different perspective.
Sure, they want to win; every
coach does. But part of win-
ning and being successful is
through teaching and instruct-
ing, while getting the most out
of their team.
The after-school practices
on the gym floor or on the
field is the coachs classroom.
Its the place where practice
and instruction takes place and
where players work to become
better individuals that will
produce a better team. But
how do they become a better
team?
Again, its the hours spent
behind the scene when
coaches and their staff are in
the class room so to speak
breaking down game film.
From the film they can watch
their teams performance and
determine what they need to
work on in practice to become
better.
Thats when Antwerp senior
Shawn Dooley goes to work.
You will not find Shawn on
the court shooting 3-pointers
or trying to throw a 40-yard
touchdown pass. You will see
him at the game and he is al-
most like an assistant coach
but again you will not see him
sitting on the bench next to
Coach McMichael or Coach
Taylor.
You see, Dooley is the be-
hind-the-scene guy who is re-
sponsible for filming the
game. When Shawn does his
part then coaches will have
their homework following
the game and before the next
practice.
Shawn is a super kid. Hes
been filming for me during
his four years here at Antwerp
and is a valuable part to the
coaching staff and to the
team, said boys varsity head
coach Scott McMichael.
During the basketball sea-
son, Dooley arrives at the
gym early in order to set up
his equipment. He sits at
press row located at the cen-
ter of the gym at the top row
of bleachers.
Ive been doing this since
my freshman year. In about
20 minutes, I can have the
computer and the monitor
along with the cables in place
and after going through some
troubleshooting, its ready to
go.
When asked why he does
the filming Shawn said with a
grin, Well, after Mitch
Buchan graduated they
needed someone to take his
place and I showed an interest
and the next thing I knew it
was my job.
After the game is over,
Shawn takes the CD and la-
bels it and places it in the of-
fice of the athletic director
where it will be duplicated
several times over and made
available to the coaches.
Shawn is a reliable young
man and very trustworthy. He
always comes through on
anything I have asked him to
do, said McMichael.
Shawn, son of Shawn and
Michelle Dooley, has a
younger sibling Matthew,
who, is an eighth grader.
Shawn will graduate from
Antwerp in the spring and
plans to attend Ohio Northern
University in Ada, where he
plans to major in computer
science.
Originally from Philadel-
phia, Shawn shares an inter-
esting story about his parents
being fans of the Philadelphia
Flyers hockey team. I guess
you could say the Flyers are
my favorite team. I do all this
filming and none of it is
hockey, he said with a laugh.
A straight-A student, the
senior admits that basketball
is probably the reason for
going to Ohio Northern. He
tells the story of how
Matthew was going to basket-
ball camp one summer at
ONU and Shawn more or less
went along for the ride.
While on campus we took
a tour and I liked what I saw,
plus Ohio Northern has one of
the top computer science pro-
grams in the state.
Dooley hopes to secure his
degree and eventually do
something with creating soft-
ware and program develop-
ment. Once I get to college I
would like to find a college
internship with a company
and work as a software de-
signer.
Dooley, who ranks first in a
graduating class of 49 stu-
dents, feels Antwerp High
School has given him a solid
education that will prepare
him for the rigors of college.
As he finishes up, he is taking
advanced placement classes
in statistics, English and psy-
chology. Several of the
classes he is taking will qual-
ify him for college credit that
will transfer to Ohio North-
ern.
I believe I am ready for
college and I am looking for-
ward to a change, concluded
the National Honor Society
member.
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Antwerp senior Shawn Dooley monitors filming a recent Archer basketball game. Since he was
a freshman, he has been filming athletic events to help the coaching staff and players improve
team performances.
Player of the Year recipients
Since 2000, the Paulding County Progress has honored the
countys top basketball players by naming boys and girls
Player of the Year, First Team and Honorable Mention players.
Past Player of the Year recipients include:
Year Boys/School Girls/School
2012 Justin Bute AHS Jessica Farr PHS
2011 Devan Bermejo PHS Kacee Hockenberry WT
2010 TJ Short AHS Kacee Hockenberry WT
2009 TJ Short AHS Renee Bidlack WT
2008 Aaron Hockenberry WT Bryn Schlatter AHS
2007 Aaron Hockenberry WT Bryn Schlatter AHS
2006 None (First Team only) Ashley Clark PHS
2005 Aaron Taylor AHS Bethany Hughes WT
2004 Nathan Overmyer WT Ashleigh Stallkamp PHS
2003 Nathan Overmyer WT Tanya Rickenberg PHS
2002 Andrew Estle PHS Natalie Davis WT
2001 Chris Shepherd WT Natalie Davis WT
2000 Gabe Denning WT Debbie Koenn AHS
www.progressnewspaper.org
Want to
see more
photos of
your
favorite
story?
Wednesday, February 27, 2013 - Paulding County Progress - 5B
Baughman Tile Co., Inc.
Paulding Maramart
&
Payne Maramart
PROUD SPONSOR OF
PAULDING COUNTYS
SCHOOL ZONE
A
B
C
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F
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The Following Paulding County Businesses are proud to present
Paulding County School Zone
School Zone
Mrs. Heather Barnhouse, Antwerp Elementary library aide, constructed this nearly six-foot-tall milk jug igloo that is on dis-
play in the school district library. Mrs. Barnhouse found the idea online but expanded it to make the igloo even larger than
planned. Before Christmas break, students and school employees donated nearly 600 milk jugs for the project. Mrs.
Barnhouse, her son Ashton, and Madison Ruen (all pictured above), as well as Mrs. Barnhouses husband Toby, then spent over
16 hours hot gluing the jugs together. Over the next few weeks, elementary classes will enjoy reading inside the igloo, where
an entire class can sit at one time and see the colorful array of milk jug caps. Over the next few weeks while the igloo is in the
library, Mrs. Barnhouse will be teaching students about arctic locations, weather, people, and animals. Reading really is cool
in this amazing milk jug igloo.
As part of their study of ancient South American civilization, Miss Martz's
6B Social Studies class made Incan masks.
At Antwerp Elementary before Christmas break, who should appear?It was
Santa!Here, KA students share their Christmas wishes with Santa before they
enjoy their classroom holiday parties.
The bookmobile from the Paulding County Library visited the preschoolers at Paulding
Elementary.The students enjoyed meeting Miss Kathy and Miss Tawyna on their really cool
bus. The bookmobile will visit the preschoolers once each month and do special activities
with them. Pictured are students from Mrs. Kohart's afternoon preschool class.
Mrs. Stuckey's second grade class at Grover Hill Elementary School recently worked very
hard to write a story on a snowy day. It could have been either true or made up. Then, they had
to type it up too. They did a great job! Shown in the picture are: left to right - Kobe Cutlip, Brielle
Sheets, Abby Moore and Jacob Robinson.
1883-2009
126 Continuous Years
8516, Rd. 137, Paulding
(419) 399-3160
Paulding County Early Intervention enjoyed a day of music and dancing
during a recent class.
Paulding Elementary students
have been participating in a bowl-
ing unit in Physical Education
classes during the month of
January. Shown is first grader
Maci Kauser.
Mrs. Amanda Gerardot from Payne is one of the new teachers
at Paulding Elementary School this year. She is a Title I teacher
and spends her day working with students in the computer lab.
Students in grades 3 - 5 enjoy having the opportunity to work
with her on Study Island. The younger students work with her on
such programs as starfall.com, abcmouse.com, scootpad.com,
and abcya.com. Mrs. Gerardot is also teaching some of the stu-
dents keyboarding skills. She says it is fun watching students
learn to type correctly. In this photo, Mrs. Gerardot is shown
working with Dakota Ousley, a second grader.
The
Weekly Reminder
deadline is
Thursday at 3 p.m.
All line ads must be
prepaid.
Visa, Mastercard & Discover
accepted.
Call 419-399-4015
Fax 419-399-4030
100 East Jackson St., Paulding, Ohio
419-399-4444
www.straleyrealestateinc.com
STRALEY REAL ESTATE
PLEASE CALL
Carolyn Straley @ 419-769-1352 or 419-399-3721,
Matt Straley @ 419-785-5161 or Rudy Straley @ 419-769-8996
for information concerning buying, qualifying for loan or selling
RANCH STYLE HOME with
separate utility Room, &
attached garage on a corner
lot in Paulding. #322
$19,900 for this 2 bedroom
home in Paulding on South
Williams. #333
3 BEDROOM - home having
electric heat and attached
garage. Located on Helen
St. in Paulding. #330
3 BEDROOM - 2 BATH
HOME Located on a cor-
ner lot in Latty, built in 1970
and remodeled in 1997.
Listed at $58,500. #346
3 BEDROOMS 1.5 bath
home located in Paulding,
having new furnace and cen-
tral air, maintenance free vinyl
siding, & large detached
garage that measures 24x30.
Listed at $69,900. #328
COMMERICAL BUILDING
with a 2-bedroom apartment
above. Known as the Keeler
building located on the north
side of the square in Paulding.
#307
ONE + HALF ACRES I N
PAULDING surrounds this
one & half acres in Paulding
surrounding this 3 bedroom 1
& a half bath home having gas
heat, central air, a formal dining
room, partial open stairway,
screened rear porch, 2 car
garage, barn-storage building
and has more for you to see.
Located on Paulding's south
side. #341
DUPLEX RENTAL: Tenants
pay all utilities. Rent out both or
live in one and collect money
from the other. #342
A FRAME - 2 bedrooms
up, one down, open 14 x 19
kitchen, 18 x 19 living area,
large 24 x 40 attached
garage with lots of space for
vehicles, work area and
more storage. Outside
theres two sheds and a large
rear yard. $59,900. #345
A FIVE UNIT APARTMENT
BUILDING where tenants
pay all utilities. Has a high
occupancy rate. Located in
Paulding on N. Williams.
#340
3 BEDROOMS home,
pond, situated on 1.75 acres
with space to grow. Located
near US 24 and Rd 424.
$64,900. #319
OFFICE/BUSINESS BUILD-
ING: 102 E. Jackson,
Paulding on the Square
with potential of 2 apart-
ments upstairs. $29,900.
#338
3 OR 4 BEDROOM HOME
with lots of room. This home
has 2 baths, dining room,
family room, living room, den
or office, sunroom, & base-
ment. Outside there's a 30'x
65'garage/storage building.
#328
SHADED 3-BEDROOM
Home with 1.5 baths located
in the Antwerp area. Is very
neat and clean, has fire-
place, attached garage, a 16
x 24' building, and 1.5 plus
acres. Listed now at
$98,900. #325
4 BEDROOMS, 2 BATH
HOME One bath with a
walk in tub/shower, has cen-
tral air, sunroom, and garage.
Located in Paulding.Listed
at $69,900. #324
NEW LISTING: 3 BEDROOM 1 &
1/2 BATH HOME - with eat in
kitchen, separate laundry, attached
garage, and storage shed outback.
The home has electric heat, village
utilities and is located in Paulding.
Listed @ $58,000. #347
#1533 Darling 3 bdrm, 2
bath, 1.5 Story Cape
Cod! 1,684 sq. ft., family
room & utility in
bsmt., fenced backyard,
Paulding. BIG REDUC-
TION! $104,900! Call
Sandra/Tamyra 419-
506-1015
#1527 Exquisite lofted
Cape Cod, 5 acres w/
lg. pond! 3 bdrm, 3
bath, extra 30 x 40
garage. Fenced back-
yard, full bsmt. Rural
Antwerp. $179,900.
Call Sandra or
Tamyra 419-506-1015
#1540 12741 Maple Ave.
Paulding 3 BDRM, 2
bath, spacious family
room, $89,900. Call Don
Gorrell or Joe Den
Herder
#1280 HUGE REDUC-
TION! Never-been-
occupied Villaminium
in Antwerp. Handicap
accessible, custom
built 1229 sq. ft., 2
huge bdrms, 2 baths,
$119,900! Sandra/
Tamyra 419-506-1015
To see nice color pictures & interior shots of properties offered
by Gorrell Bros. go to: www.gorrellbros-paulding.com
Multiple Listing
Service
#1486 3 Bdrm home,
1670 sq. ft., clean bsmt.,
lg. rear patio & shaded
lot. Antwerp. BIG
REDUCTION TO
$75,900! Call Sandra/
Tamyra 419-506-1015
Call Gorrells to get your home sold TODAY!
1550 - Quaint bungalow w/ newer roof, windows, etc. close to Auglaize River.
$47,000. Call Don 419-399-7699
#1538 - $165,000, 3 br,
2 bath home 3 1/2
acres - pole bldg w/ fin-
ished rec room, out-
buildings - Paulding -
Call Don 399-7699
#1549 - Remodeled 3
bdrm, 1 1/2 bath home w/
newer roof, C/A, N.
Cherry St., Paulding.
$79,900. Call Don
Gorrell 419-399-7699
#1106 - Old Hawthorne
Court Bldg. - $99,000
Call Don 399-7699
#1551 NEW LISTING -
One of a kind! Historic
immaculate 4 BR, 2
bath home. 3 floors w/
over 3,000 sq. ft. Many
updates! Original wood-
work is a must see. 607
N. Willliams St., Pldg.
Call Don 399-7699
FOLTZ REALTY
Donald K. Foltz, II - Broker: 106 N. Williams St. Paulding
www.foltzrealty.com 419-399-2347
REALTORS: Tim Boss 419-769-0823, Maurie Wannemacher 419-769-9090
Christine Hartman 419-506-1017
#2816 14819 SR. 127
Paulding: Nice build-
ing site! A little less
than 4 acres with well
and new septic sys-
tem. 32'x24' Morton
Building with concrete
floor & power; also, a
32'x18' implement
shed and over 1 1/2
acres of wasteland
grass. $38,500 Call
Maurie
#2801 401 W. Canal
St. Antwerp: Nice 3 Br,
2 Ba, brick & vinyl
sided home with 2 car
attached garage on a
corner lot in Antwerp.
City water and sani-
tary sewer on a crawl
space. Call Don
$82,000
#2802 13771 Rd.
162 Paulding: All
modern, 1650 sq. ft. 3
BR, 1 1/2 Bath, Ranch
home with 70x30
heated & air condi-
tioned metal building,
large pond all on 2
acres within 2 miles of
Paulding. $174,900
Seller says "MOVE
IT". Call Maurie
#2812 MOTIVATED
SELLER 2232 SR
114 Payne: Country
home features 7+
acres, 3 BR, 1 BA,
New Roof, vinyl siding,
replacement windows
with room on 2nd floor
for a 4th bedroom.
Morton Building.
$90,000 Call Maurie
#2807 208 Sycamore
Antwerp: Outstanding 3
Br., 2 Ba. Home w/ Gas
forced air heat and C/A
in wooded subdivision.
Many features includ-
ing appliances, hot tub,
balcony & deck off
master Br., whirpool tub
in master bath, hard-
wood flooring in kitchen
and 3/4 bath in fully fin-
ished basement. Call
Christine $249,900
#2804 5809 SR 500
Payne: Nice 3 Br., 1 3/4
Ba. Home in country
with hardwood floors in
living room and bed-
rooms, vinyl siding, at-
tached garage and
36'x 24' building w/
concrete floor. Call
Maurie $50,000
MUST
SEE!
NOTICE OF SALE
UNDER JUDGMENT
OF DISCLOSURE
OF LIENS FOR
DELINQUENT LAND
TAXES
Revised Code, Section
5721.19.1
IN THE COURT OF
COMMON PLEAS
PAULDING COUNTY,
OHIO
In the Matter of Foreclo-
sure of Liens for delin-
quent land taxes:
LOU ANN WAN-
NEMACHER, TREAS-
URER
PAULDING COUNTY,
OHIO,
Plaintiff, vs.
AARON T. POWELL,
Defendants.
Case No. CI 12 208
Whereas, judgment has
been rendered against cer-
tain parcels of real prop-
erty for taxes,
assessments, penalties,
costs and charges as fol-
lows:
Situated in the Village of
Cecil, County of Paulding
and State of Ohio, to-wit:
the South Half (1/2) of the
following described
premises, to-wit:
Commencing at a point
Forty (40) feet North of
the Northeast corner of
Lot Number Two (2), and
Twenty (20) feet West of
the center of Main Street,
as per the original and
recorded plat of the Vil-
lage of Cecil, Ohio; run-
ning thence West One
Hundred Forty-five (145)
feet; thence North Eight
(8) rods; thence East One
Hundred Forty-five (145)
feet; thence South Eight
(8) rods to the place of be-
ginning, in the Village of
Cecil, Paulding County,
Ohio, and being desig-
nated as part of Outlet No.
Two (2) on the Auditors
Tax List.
Property of Address: 400
North Main Street, Cecil,
Ohio
Parcel Number: 15-06S-
020-00
Total amount of judgment
is Five Thousand Five
Hundred Thirty-five and
36/100 ($5,535.36) Dol-
lars, plus interest and costs
of this suit.
Whereas, such judg-
ment orders such real
property to be sold by the
undersigned to satisfy the
total amount of said judg-
ment;
Now, therefore, public
notice is hereby given that
I, Jason K. Landers, Sher-
iff, Paulding County,
Ohio, will sell such real
property at public auction
for cash to the highest bid-
der of an amount suffi-
cient to satisfy the
judgment against each
parcel at 10:00 a.m. at the
East door of the Court-
house in Paulding, Ohio,
on Thursday, the 28th day
of March, 2013, and con-
tinue from day to day
thereafter. If any parcel
does not receive a suffi-
cient bid, it shall be of-
fered for sale, under the
same terms and condi-
tions of the first sale and at
the same time of day and
at the same place on the
11th day of April, 2013
for an amount sufficient to
satisfy the judgment
against the parcel.
PUBLIC NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN THAT
ALL SUCH REAL
PROPERTY TO BE
SOLD AT PUBLIC
AUCTION MAY BE
SUBJECT TO A FED-
ERAL TAX LIEN THAT
MAY NOT BE EXTIN-
GUISHED BY THE
SALE, AND PUR-
CHASERS OF ANY
SUCH REAL PROP-
ERTY ARE URGED TO
SEARCH THE FED-
ERAL TAX LIEN
INDEX THAT IS KEPT
BY THE COUNTY
RECORDER TO DE-
TERMINE IF NOTICE
OF A FEDERAL TAX
LIEN HAS BEEN
FILED WITH RE-
SPECT TO ANY SUCH
REAL PROPERTY. 26c3
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
SHERIFFS SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF OHIO,
PAULDING COUNTY:
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA, ACTING
THROUGH THE
RURAL DEVELOP-
MENT, UNITED
STATES DEPART-
MENT OF AGRICUL-
TURE, Plaintiff,
vs.
LARRY A. WOL-
FORD, JR., ET AL.,
Defendants,
Case No. CI 12 185.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the Fourth day of April,
2013 at 10:15 oclock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
13176 Nancy Street,
Paulding, Ohio 45879
Parcel Number: 23-
51B-099-00
Said premises appraised
at Thirty-six Thousand
and No/100
($36,000.00) Dollars
and cannot be sold for
less than two-thirds of
that amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriffs Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued.
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Stephen D. Miles, At-
torney for Plaintiff 27c3
SHERIFFS SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF
OHIO, PAULDING
COUNTY:
THE HUNTINGTON
NATIONAL BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DENNIE L. SKEENS,
ET AL., Defendants,
Case No. CI 12 189.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 4th day of April,
2013 at 10:00 oclock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
104 Smithfield Drive,
Antwerp, Ohio 45813
Parcel Number: 12-
37S-007-00
Said premises appraised
at One Hundred
Twenty-six Thousand
and No/100
($126,000.00) Dollars
and cannot be sold for
less than two-thirds of
that amount.
The appraisal of this
LEGALS
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriffs Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued.
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Douglas A. Haessig, At-
torney for Plaintiff 27c3
SHERIFFS SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF
OHIO, PAULDING
COUNTY:
JPMORGAN CHASE
BANK, Plaintiff,
vs.
HILLIARD Mc-
CLOUD, ET AL., De-
fendants,
Case No. CI 12 245.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 4th day of April,
2013 at 10:05 oclock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
15495 Road 201, Defi-
ance, Ohio 43512
Parcel Number: 02-
06S-014-01
Said premises appraised
at Sixty Thousand and
No/100 ($60,000.00)
Dollars and cannot be
sold for less than two-
thirds of that amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriffs Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued.
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Melissa N. Hamble, At-
torney for Plaintiff 27c3
SHERIFFS SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF
OHIO, PAULDING
COUNTY:
CI TI MORTGAGE,
INC., Plaintiff,
vs.
JASON M. GER-
MANN, ET AL., De-
fendants,
Case No. CI 12 190.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 4th day of April,
2013 at 10:10 oclock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
24731 Road 148, Oak-
wood, Ohio 45873
Parcel Number: 08-
01S-014-01
Said premises appraised
at Sixty-three Thousand
and No/100
($63,000.00) Dollars
and cannot be sold for
less than two-thirds of
that amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriffs Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
Paper Trained!
The
PAULDING
COUNTY
PROGRESS
has news to
satisfy your
entire family!
Subscribe to the
Paulding County
Progress so you wont
miss any of your
community news and up-
coming events.
See the subscription box
for details or call
419-399-4015.
NAME________________________________ ____
ADDRESS_________________________________
___________________________________________
CITY________________________STATE_______
ZIP________________PHONE________________
Stop in or mail to:
PAULDING PROGRESS
PO Box 180, Paulding, OH 45879
419-399-4015 419-399-4030
Delivered 2nd class
mail to your home.
Rates: $36.00 PER
YEAR
(Paulding, Van Wert,
Defiance,
& Putnam county ad-
dresses)
$46.00 PER YEAR
all others
E-Edition only -
$26.00
(Must call for user-
name & password)
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued.
Sheriff Jason K. Lan-
ders
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Richard L. LaCivita,
Attorney for Plaintiff
27c3
6B - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, February 27, 2013
PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
QUICKLY...EASILY...
JUST PHONE 419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
Want to see
more photos
of your
favorite
story?
94 BUICK LESABRE 155K
Runs great! Asking $2,300
OBO Call 419-399-9268 27p1
6 JET WHITE CORNER
Whirlpool Tub. Used little
Asking $500 Call 419-399-
9268 27p1
$125 QUEEN PILLOWTOP
MATTRESS SET. New in
plastic, can deliver 260-493-
0805. 25p4
FOR THE LATEST NEWS
updates, check our website
any day of the week at
www.progressnewspaper.org
. Unlimited access is free to
current Progress subscribers
- call 419-399-4015 or email
subscri pt i on@progress-
newspaper.org for password.
CENTRAL BOILER OUT-
DOOR FURNACES 25 Year
Warranty. Call Today.
419-267-5196 19p52
CENTRAL BOILER OUT-
DOOR WOOD & corn fur-
naces. Stop paying high
energy prices and use renew-
able energy. Call for current
specials. Classic Comfort
Heating & Supply. Greenville,
Ohio 888-296-3875. 19p52
IMMEDIATE OPENING - 2ND
SHIFT, full-time cook position.
Please apply in person at
Vagabond Village. 27c2
RNs AREA HOME HEALTH
AGENCY is looking for part-
time RNs to work in Defiance,
Fulton, Henry, Paulding, Put-
nam, and Williams Counties.
Submit resume, references,
and preferred counties to:
Human Resources P.O. Box
255 Bryan, OH 43506 27c2
YEARS AGO ANTIQUE
MALL, 108 W. Main Street,
Van Wert (419) 238-3362,
30+ Dealers. Closed Tues-
days. Buy & Sell. 27ctf
COUNTRY HAVEN - TAX
SERVICES - appt./drop offs,
Avon shop, misc. items. Give
us a call!! 419-399-2420. 25p3
AMISH CONSTRUCTION
CREW. New construction,
reroof, remodel, barns,
houses, additions, pole
barns. Reasonable rates. 1-
419-953-8215. 21p8
P&H MASONRY RESTORA-
TION & REPAIR Specialist.
Foundation,basement and
chimney repair or replace-
ments. Fully insured, Free Es-
timates 419-438-2101. 13ctf
*P&H MASONRY* Founda-
tion & Chimney Repairs,
Free Estimates. Peter
Ankney, 419-438-2101 36ctf
AL GRIFFITHS CONSTRUC
TION: Windows, light electri-
cal, drywall, siding, doors
and more. Call Al for your re-
pair or contruction needs.
419-506-2102 51ctf
1 STORY, 2-BEDROOM , 1
BATH COUNTRY HOME
FOR RENT. 1 mile south-
west of Payne, OH. Central
air, attached 1 car garage.
Storage Shed. Contact Jen-
niffer at 419-786-0467 27p1
NICE 2 BDRM. HOUSE with
1 car detached garage.
Stove & refrigerator included.
No pets. Located in peaceful
neighborhood of Paulding.
419-399-3003, 419-438-
0834. $550 per month. 26p2
USE YOUR TAX RETURN
FOR A DOWN payment on a
new home. We have many
remodeled homes and op-
tions to help you buy! 419-
586-8220 chbsinc.com 25p4
IN PAULDING - Whispering
Pines - 2 bdrm. Call 419-
506-2102, 419-670-4024 or
419-399-2419 8ctf
3 BDRM. 2 BATH HOME
$450 rent or own in Brent-
wood Community next to
Vagabond Restaurant 419-
388-9977. 43ctf
PAULDING STORAGE
CENTER: Now renting stor-
age units. Different sizes
available. Call 419-399-2419
for info. 18ctf
NOW LEASING: ONE &
TWO BEDROOM APART-
MENTS. Deposit & lease re-
quired. No pets. Please call
Straley Apts. at 419-399-
4444 or 419-399-3721 35ctf
PAULDING MINI STOR-
AGE UNITS. Located at
south side of Paulding on
US 127. Various sizes.
Please call 419-399-4444
or 419-399-3721 20ctf
RESPECTABLE FAMILY
WITH references looking to
rent a home in the Payne
area this spring. Phone 419-
786-2862, leave message.
26p3
REPLACING FOOTER AND
FOUNDATION - basement
repair floor leveling, roofing,
cement work. Call Bill Miner
419-596-3018 26p8
3 ACRE LOT $9,900, $500
DOWN, $119 mo.; 3 acre lot
with well, septic, electric and
driveway $29,900, $1,000
down, $325 mo. 813-349-
0618. 23
COINS, ANTIQUES, OLD
KNIVES, postcards, OLD
toys, jewelry, watches,
stamps, estates. Ausin White
419-399-3353 21p7
768 N. CHERRY ST.. PAULD-
ING. Just Reduced. 3 bdrm., 2
full bath, beautiful oak floors, 2
fireplace, FR, Game Rm, full
dry basement. Too many up-
dates to mention, yet keeping
the homes original character
and charm. I have listed my
home with Sandra Mickelson
of Gorrell Bros. Please contact
her for more information, 419-
506-1015 or www.gorrellbros-
paulding.com 22ptfn
RABBITS. good for 4-H proj-
ects. Or just a pet. Fun to raise.
Good to eat. Also dressed rab-
bits. 419-399-4647. Glens
Rabbit Barn 24p4
FREE PHONE, NO ACTIVA-
TION FEE, No Credit
Checks, No Hassle, No Con-
tract Phone, $45.00 Best
Value Unlimited Talk, Text,
and Mobile Web. Van Wert
Wireless the Alltel Store,
1198 Westwood Drive Suite
B, Van Wert, Ohio Call: 419-
238-3101 25c5
WESLO GYM-SIZE cross
training stepper. 419-670-
4085. 27k1
MOM 2 MOM SALE - at
Paulding Eagles, Sat. March
2, 9am-1pm. Looking for sell-
ers (new or gently used
items) to rent tables ($15)
and moms to shop for great
bargains! Door Admission:
$1. For more information call:
Julie Wirts at 419-399-9362.
All profits go to Hospital
Relay for Life Team. 27c1
ARTS AND CRAFTS VEN-
DORS WELCOME, Art-in-
the-Park, Defiance Library,
Fort grounds. Last Sunday of
June. June 30, 2013. 10:30
am to 4:00 pm. Booth rental
$25.00 and $35.00. Early
registration by June 15th.
Contact: Gary Boyer 419-
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THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
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PC Workshop Inc.
PO Box 390 Paulding OH 45879 26c2
HELP WANTED
Local Paulding County Company is looking
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High School Diploma or GED is a must.
Interested applicants please apply in person
at 250 Dooley Drive Suite B Paulding, Ohio.
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Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 7B
4B - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Antwerps Kaiya Jemison #35 gets inside for a critical second
half bucket against Hicksville last Tuesday night.
Lady Archers close out
season to Edgerton
By JOE SHOUSE
Sportswriter
BRYAN Two familiar
teams took to the floor on Sat-
urday night at Bryan as con-
ference opponents Edgerton
and Antwerp tipped it off in
girls sectional play at Bryan
High School. Antwerp played
their way into the finals with a
win over Hicksville earlier in
the week while Edgerton was
seeded first with their 19-4
record.
Antwerp was unable to
match the superior play of the
Bulldogs, who put the game
away early as they coasted to
a 47-14 win.
Edgerton set the stage early
with defense, holding the
Archers to just one-of-five
from the floor in the first quar-
ter while turning the ball over
six times. Their lone field goal
came with 47.8 seconds re-
maining on a long 2-pointer
from senior Avrial Sawyer.
Trailing 14-4 heading into
the second period, the Archers
settled down and played much
better, although their shooting
woes continued. Edgerton
outscored the Archers 9-7 to
take a 12-point lead to the
locker room at intermission
23-11.
In the first half Antwerp was
shooting just under 10 percent
from the field while the Bull-
dogs were shooting at a 42
percent clip. As it would turn
out, the poor Antwerp shoot-
ing would continue in the sec-
ond half.
The Bulldogs erased any
doubt that Antwerp would
make a run as Edgerton
outscored the Archers 15-2 in
the third. Antwerps two
points came with 27 seconds
on the clock when Kaiya
Jemison scored in the paint.
The fourth period had the
Archers scoring just one point
on a three throw from fresh-
man Audrie Longardner. The
Archers managed just three
points in the second half on 1-
15 shooting while collecting
21 turnovers in the contest.
Jones and Sawyer close out
their career as an Antwerp
Lady Archer with each scoring
five points. Also graduating
for the Lady Archers is Chay
Jackson.
For the game, Antwerp fin-
ished 4-of-47 shooting from
the floor for 8.5 percent with
Edgerton hitting on 19-of-44
for 43 percent. The Lady Bull-
dogs will move on in tourna-
ment play at Archbold where
they will tangle with Pet-
tisville on Thursday night.
Antwerp 4 7 2 1-14
Edgerton 14 9 15 947
Antwerp 14: Jones 1 0 3-4 5, Miller-Sweet
0 0 1-2 1, Sawyer 1 1 0-1 5, Longardner
0 0 1-1 1, Cline 0 0 0-1 0, Jemison 1 0
0-1 2. Totals: 3 1 5-10 14. Fouls: 14
Edgerton 47: Sack 0 0 0-2 0, Stark 3 0
3-4 9, Newman 0 0 3-4 3, Schraeder 1 0
0-0 2, Wheeler 1 0 0-0 2, Flower 5 1 1-2
14, Griffin 6 0 0-0 12, Landel 2 0 1-3 5,
Walker 0 0 0-1 0. Totals: 18 1 8-16 47.
Fouls: 13.
Last Tuesday, Antwerp was
paired against the Lady Aces
from Hicksville, whom they
had defeated twice during the
regular season. The old adage
you cant beat a team three
times in the same season did
not hold as the Lady Archers
defeated Hicksville by 10
points, 41-31.
Hicksville closed out their
season with a dismal 1-21 sea-
son with their one win coming
against Fairview in mid-Janu-
ary.
Antwerp had lost their pre-
vious 11 games and had not
won since Jan. 4 at Hicksville
when they dealt the Lady Aces
a 38-24 setback. Previously,
the Archers were victorious in
their first match up with
Hicksville in the Route 49
Classic when they picked up
an 18-point, win 59-26.
Alexis Jones paced the
Lady Archers with 22 of her
teams 41 points. Entering the
fourth quarter Antwerp was
holding to a slim 26-23 advan-
tage, but outscored the Aces
down the stretch to 15-8 to se-
cure the 10-point tournament
win.
In the final period, Jones
was perfect from the free
throw line on 6-of-6 and fin-
ished with hitting 8-of-10
from the line.
Antwerp 7 10 9 1541
Hicksville 9 8 6 831
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
The Lady Archers Alexis Jones #3 tries to work through a
tough Hicksville defense last Tuesday night in sectional play.
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Annie Miesle #12 fights for control of the ball against Hicksville
in first round sectional play last Tuesday at Bryan.
Senior Spotlight
Dooley is a valuable team
member for the Archers
By JOE SHOUSE
Sportswriter
When attending a basketball
or football game, even a vol-
leyball match at Antwerp High
School, most fans are sitting in
the bleachers watching the ac-
tion on the court or field.
Many fans have little under-
standing as to what goes on
behind the scenes in order for
a team to progress and get bet-
ter throughout the season.
They simply enjoy going to
the game, watching their fa-
vorite Archer play, and when
the final horn sounds hope-
fully the blue and white are
winners and everyone leaves
feeling good.
However, for the coaches,
they sit on the sidelines and
obviously watch the game
from a different perspective.
Sure, they want to win; every
coach does. But part of win-
ning and being successful is
through teaching and instruct-
ing, while getting the most out
of their team.
The after-school practices
on the gym floor or on the
field is the coachs classroom.
Its the place where practice
and instruction takes place and
where players work to become
better individuals that will
produce a better team. But
how do they become a better
team?
Again, its the hours spent
behind the scene when
coaches and their staff are in
the class room so to speak
breaking down game film.
From the film they can watch
their teams performance and
determine what they need to
work on in practice to become
better.
Thats when Antwerp senior
Shawn Dooley goes to work.
You will not find Shawn on
the court shooting 3-pointers
or trying to throw a 40-yard
touchdown pass. You will see
him at the game and he is al-
most like an assistant coach
but again you will not see him
sitting on the bench next to
Coach McMichael or Coach
Taylor.
You see, Dooley is the be-
hind-the-scene guy who is re-
sponsible for filming the
game. When Shawn does his
part then coaches will have
their homework following
the game and before the next
practice.
Shawn is a super kid. Hes
been filming for me during
his four years here at Antwerp
and is a valuable part to the
coaching staff and to the
team, said boys varsity head
coach Scott McMichael.
During the basketball sea-
son, Dooley arrives at the
gym early in order to set up
his equipment. He sits at
press row located at the cen-
ter of the gym at the top row
of bleachers.
Ive been doing this since
my freshman year. In about
20 minutes, I can have the
computer and the monitor
along with the cables in place
and after going through some
troubleshooting, its ready to
go.
When asked why he does
the filming Shawn said with a
grin, Well, after Mitch
Buchan graduated they
needed someone to take his
place and I showed an interest
and the next thing I knew it
was my job.
After the game is over,
Shawn takes the CD and la-
bels it and places it in the of-
fice of the athletic director
where it will be duplicated
several times over and made
available to the coaches.
Shawn is a reliable young
man and very trustworthy. He
always comes through on
anything I have asked him to
do, said McMichael.
Shawn, son of Shawn and
Michelle Dooley, has a
younger sibling Matthew,
who, is an eighth grader.
Shawn will graduate from
Antwerp in the spring and
plans to attend Ohio Northern
University in Ada, where he
plans to major in computer
science.
Originally from Philadel-
phia, Shawn shares an inter-
esting story about his parents
being fans of the Philadelphia
Flyers hockey team. I guess
you could say the Flyers are
my favorite team. I do all this
filming and none of it is
hockey, he said with a laugh.
A straight-A student, the
senior admits that basketball
is probably the reason for
going to Ohio Northern. He
tells the story of how
Matthew was going to basket-
ball camp one summer at
ONU and Shawn more or less
went along for the ride.
While on campus we took
a tour and I liked what I saw,
plus Ohio Northern has one of
the top computer science pro-
grams in the state.
Dooley hopes to secure his
degree and eventually do
something with creating soft-
ware and program develop-
ment. Once I get to college I
would like to find a college
internship with a company
and work as a software de-
signer.
Dooley, who ranks first in a
graduating class of 49 stu-
dents, feels Antwerp High
School has given him a solid
education that will prepare
him for the rigors of college.
As he finishes up, he is taking
advanced placement classes
in statistics, English and psy-
chology. Several of the
classes he is taking will qual-
ify him for college credit that
will transfer to Ohio North-
ern.
I believe I am ready for
college and I am looking for-
ward to a change, concluded
the National Honor Society
member.
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Antwerp senior Shawn Dooley monitors filming a recent Archer basketball game. Since he was
a freshman, he has been filming athletic events to help the coaching staff and players improve
team performances.
Player of the Year recipients
Since 2000, the Paulding County Progress has honored the
countys top basketball players by naming boys and girls
Player of the Year, First Team and Honorable Mention players.
Past Player of the Year recipients include:
Year Boys/School Girls/School
2012 Justin Bute AHS Jessica Farr PHS
2011 Devan Bermejo PHS Kacee Hockenberry WT
2010 TJ Short AHS Kacee Hockenberry WT
2009 TJ Short AHS Renee Bidlack WT
2008 Aaron Hockenberry WT Bryn Schlatter AHS
2007 Aaron Hockenberry WT Bryn Schlatter AHS
2006 None (First Team only) Ashley Clark PHS
2005 Aaron Taylor AHS Bethany Hughes WT
2004 Nathan Overmyer WT Ashleigh Stallkamp PHS
2003 Nathan Overmyer WT Tanya Rickenberg PHS
2002 Andrew Estle PHS Natalie Davis WT
2001 Chris Shepherd WT Natalie Davis WT
2000 Gabe Denning WT Debbie Koenn AHS
www.progressnewspaper.org
Want to
see more
photos of
your
favorite
story?
8B - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, February 27, 2013
THE OBJECT OF THE MARATHON GAMES
To raise money for the Paulding County Society for Crippled Children & Adults, Inc.
The Society helps to provide the handicapped of Paulding County with equipment & services
that they are unable to afford. The Society helps 100-150 people per year. Basketball
Marathon participants are encouraged to have a great time playing a game of basketball
& scoring as many points as possible in the 24-minutes allowed per game.
Sportsmanlike conduct is the rule, not the exception!!!
RULES GOVERNING PLAY
Please retain this paper for your records
Unsportsmanlike conduct will not be tolerated
No foul shots are permitted, fouls are awarded by taking the ball out of bounds
No time outs permitted
5 players maximum on the floor at one time
No dunking the basketball (we have had to pay for a cracked glass backboard & have had
to stop the game to fix broken break away rims causing the schedule to be interrupted)
No full court press in mini-tots, tots, or mini-youth divisions
In adult co-ed competition, at least two female players on the floor at all times
In adult co-ed competition, male players are not permitted to cross, remain, shoot, or
rebound from the area known as the key. Girls only in the key.
The mini-tots division will use 8 baskets & a youth basketball
The tots, mini-youth, women, & co-ed will use 10 baskets with a womens basketball
Youth division can use mens or womens basketball on 10 baskets
Men will use a mens basketball
OHIO HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION RULES
The OHSAA is organized to administer & supervise the athletic programs for students grades 7-12.
The constitution of the association does not contain any responsibility for any type of athletic program
below 7th grade. Anyone & everyone who is not yet in enrolled in 7th grade may participate in the
Marathon without jeopardizing their future eligibility.
Students in grades 7-12 who are participating in basketball now & in the future, may participate
in the Marathon so long as not more than two players from the same Jr. high or High school team
do not play on the same team.
AWARDS (Donated by Fessel Jewelers)
First place & second place trophies will be awarded to the top two teams in the mini-youth,
youth, women, men, & co-ed divisions. (If there is a tie the award will be given to the team
with the larger point spread over their opponent. Sportsmanship trophies will be given to
teams that were mismatched with a team of a higher skill level that caused the largest point
differential in each of the seven divisions.
Ten individual awards for first and Ten individual awards for second will be
awarded in the Mini-Tots and Tots Divisions.
THE MARATHON COMMITTEE
Chad Benschneider 419-263-2277 or 769-4708 Ashley Litzenberg 260-515-7623
John Claymiller 419-399-8440 Denise Smith 419-399-5886
Chad Cluts 419-263-0327 Adam Taylor 419-506-1702
Jeremy Dunderman 419-769-0680 Brian & Kristy Vest 419-263-0037
Doug & Vicky Etzler 419-263-3132 Kaleigh Young 419-263-2801
Allyssa Jackson 419-263-0327 Jennifer & Rylee Zartman 419-263-4007
Russ Zinser 419-506-0258 Myra Zartman 419-263-0312
Krystal Wannemacher 419-406-0134 Email: basketball24hour@yahoo.com
The Marathon Committee will endeavor to make this Marathon the most
enjoyable for you and the fans, and the most profitable for the Society and
the people in Paulding County who need our help. If you have questions,
you may contact any of the Committee members.
Thank you for participating in this most worthwhile
Paulding County charity event!!
CLIP & MAIL TODAY
35th ANNUAL BASKETBALL MARATHON
~~~~OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM~~~~
ENTRY FORM DEADLINE IS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13TH
This year the Marathon will be held in the Payne Elementary gym Good Friday,
March 29 & Saturday, March 30, starting at approximately 5pm Friday &
ending at approximately 7pm Saturday.
The team schedule/ pairings will be emailed to you if you provide your email address.
You can also find the schedule in the Weekly Reminder March 25, or the Paulding
Progress & West Bend News Paper March 27.
CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK AT: PLAYING BALL FOR THOSE WHO CANT
Please Check Proper Team Bracket
__MINI-TOTS(0-2nd Grade) __TOTS(3rd-5th Grade) __MINI-YOUTH(6th-8th Grade)
To make team pairings as fair as possible for the mini-tots, tots, and mini-youth divisions
__YOUTH(9-12th Grade) please designate: BOYS___ GIRLS___ CO-ED___
__MEN* __WOMEN* __CO-ED* *denotes no age restriction
REQUESTED WORDING ON BACK OF SHIRTS
One line of copy only:________________________________(print clearly)
Select Color Of Shirts (circle one)
Kelly Green, Forest Green, Kiwi Green, Burnt Orange, Red, Tennessee Orange
Maroon, Gold, Yellow Haze, Cyber Pink, Deep Purple, Oxford Grey, Black, Ash,
Light Blue, Royal Blue, Navy Blue, California Blue
Please pick your 10 shirts, extra shirts are $8.00/ 2xl & 3Xl shirts add $3.00
Select Size Of Shirts
Childrens Sizes Adult Sizes
Extra Small (2-4):______________ Small (34-36):______________
Small (6-8):__________________ Medium (38-40):____________
Medium (10-12):_______________ Large (42-44):______________
Large (14-16):_________________ X-Large (46-48):_____________
XX-Large _________*add $3.00
3X-Large__________*add $3.00
PREFERRED TIME OF PLAY
Please give several different time areas, this is a 24-hour event & we cant grant
everyones request. The little kids normally play Saturday morning
after 8am or afternoon.
Time #1_______ Time #2_______ Time #3_______
PREFERRED COMPETITION
Want To Play A Team??:_____________ Cant Play ATeam??:______________
_____________________________________________________________
IF YOU HAVE CERTAIN TIMES YOU CANT PLAY LIST REASON ABOVE
NOT EVERYONE CAN PLAY AT 8pm OR 9pm/ 10am OR 11am
ENTRY FEE CALCULATION
Basic Entry Fee (includes 10 shirts): $100.00
(players must also pay admission at the door)
Additional Shirts @ $8.00/shirt..............$________($8.00 X # of shirts in excess of 10)
Charge for XXL and XXXLarge Shirts..$________($3.00 X # of XXL or XXXL shirts)
Total Amount Due With This Entry..$_______________
Make checks payable to Paulding County Society for C.C. & A. Mail entry form & check
to: Basketball Marathon, 8602 Rd. 51, Payne, Ohio 45880.
**DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13TH, 2013**
TEAM REPRESENTATIVE
Name:_________________________Address:_________________________
Phone#__________________Email:___________________________
RETURN THIS FORM WITH YOUR CHECK
For The Paulding County Society For
Crippled Children & Adults
35TH ANNUAL BASKETBALL MARATHON
PLAYING BALL FOR THOSE WHO CANT