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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 29
Volume 107
March 14, 2013
Knutson
sisters
2
Philip
gun
show
2
High
school
music
contest
8
Pioneer review
by Del Bartels
Three main subjects dominated
the Philip Chamber of Commerce
meeting, Monday, March 11.
One was the upcoming Scotty
Philip Days, June 14-16. The
chamber has renamed the Philip
Festival Days to the Scotty Philip
Days. A second was the chamber
sponsored casino fun night to be
held Friday, March 29. The third
topic was the potential of area ben-
efit from the Keystone XL Pipeline
crews working in the area.
The seventh annual matched
bronc ride will be Friday evening,
June 14. The chamber will again
offer a free street dance that same
night, this year with the band
Crash Wagon. Activities such as a
parade, community water fight,
horse races, demolition derby, golf
tournament and a long list of oth-
ers will fill the rest of the weekend.
All we need is a mimic of last
year, said Matt Reedy about how
well everything was done and how
many people stayed in the area to
participate. Brit Miller said, If we
take a percentage of our (member)
dues, and put it toward this week-
end, and it helps all our local busi-
nesses, then thats what we are
here for. The chamber is doing
what it is supposed to do.
Are we going backward, no, but
... , warned Reedy, chamber treas-
urer. He concluded, Thats our
idea, to make this pretty much a
free weekend.
Details were discussed. Theres
a lot of stuff you dont even think
about, said Miller. As in 2012, five
sets of moveable bleachers are al-
ready reserved from the city of
Rapid City. Insurance has been
lined up, port-a-potties arranged,
ticket-taking volunteers are being
recruited, security is being
arranged, and the list grows. Miller
thought the one area which more
man-power is needed is cleaning up
the downtown area early Saturday
morning after the street dance.
Some suggested improvements,
though, included the possibility of
some business, organization or
ranch running a shuttle from place
to place and event to event. The use
of trailers and pulling vehicles
could easily be a business donation.
Concessions could be done at vari-
ous spots around town. One or sev-
eral businesses or ranches could
sponsor the horse races, which are
becoming more and more popular
each year.
We arent going to stop anybody
who wants an opportunity. We just
arent going to go to them first,
said Miller.
A big screen or something simi-
lar at the bronc ride was discussed.
People wouldnt miss any action at
the concession stands or talking
with friends. Its as much of a so-
cial event, said Miller. Gold buckle
seating and making attendance
easier and more comfortable were
discussed. Chamber leaders will
discuss these and other ideas with
the bronc ride promotors.
The annual casino night fund-
raiser will be held March 29 in the
community room of the 73 Saloon.
Last year, We did fairly well, said
Ron Larson. I cant think of a rea-
son not to do it.
Using Philip Bucks in lieu of
money and winnings, the evening
has been traditionally enjoyed by
attendees, chamber members
agreed. Its a fun night. Good for
everybody. Chamber involve-
ment!, said Doug West. Once used
for member recruitment, the
evening has evolved into a social
event for everyone. As with Scotty
Philip Days, the chamber is tweak-
ing minor points to improve the en-
joyment by all.
Miller will look into getting an
advertisement or feature article
into the South Dakota Magazine.
Such promotion can only help the
areas businesses and general ap-
peal to the rest of the public.
Inquiries for space and materials
are already coming in to accommo-
date work crews for the Keystone
XL Pipeline. The chamber is pro-
moting Philip as a central hub be-
tween the North Dakota and Ne-
braska state lines, and between
Pierre and Rapid City. Theyre
good people and pretty nice to talk
to. Itll be interesting, said Miller.
Hopefully, they keep calling and
show interest in our town.
The opportunity for the Philip
area to benefit in the short term
and the long term has high poten-
tial. Say, that if a family with kids
comes in for a year, whats to say
they wont want to stay? said
Reedy.
Chamber prepares for Scotty Philip
Days, casino night, XL pipeline crews
by Nancy Haigh
Highway department matters,
an on-sale liquor license resolution,
and upcoming meetings were dis-
cussed by the Haakon County
Commission last Tuesday, March
5.
During recent meetings the com-
missioners have discussed a possi-
ble on-sale Sunday malt
beverage/liquor license. All current
county malt beverage and liquor li-
cense holders may apply for the
Sunday license, but it will cost
them an additional $100. The
board will have a hearing on the
resolution at the April 2 meeting.
R. Lee Smith, Jacksonville, Fla.,
has requested that the county re-
move from its highway system a no
maintenance road that runs
through his property in northern
Haakon County. Smith uses the
land for a hunting business. High-
way Superintendent Kenny Neville
noted that it was graveled and
maintained at least 20 years ago. It
currently is grassed over but two
tracks are visible. The road is used
by local landowners to gain access
to their properties. Neville noted
the road is not a section line, but
does come off Robbs Flat Road and
winds it self north and west and re-
connects with road
The commission approved
Nevilles request to take the South
Dakota Department of Transporta-
tions swap monies in the amount
of $197,634.57. The county has
taken this option for the past few
years. It allows more flexible
spending for those dollars.
Neville discussed the upcoming
project of graveling a 10 mile por-
tion of Tornado Ranch Road. The
south end of the stretch starts at
the intersection of 11 Mile Road.
He informed the board that the
shop at Milesville will need to be
replaced in the near future.
The board approved Nevilles re-
quest to surplus pickups, blades,
tires and disk mowers as well as for
Neville and one other highway em-
ployee to attend a gravel road sem-
inar this month.
The board approved LyCox En-
terprises, Billings, Mont., bid for
two packers/rollers in the amount
of $39,978. The company was the
only bidder. The equipment will be
paid for with swap monies.
The board was presented with an
agreement from the South Dakota
Department of Agricultures Divi-
sion of Wildland Fire Suppression.
The agreement would allow for
state assistance in fighting prairie
fires within Haakon County. The
board tabled action on the agree-
ment until commissioners have re-
viewed the documents further.
Travel for meetings was ap-
proved for commissioners, Patsy
Freeman and Carla Smith for a
county commission and welfare of-
ficials conference March 20 and 21
and also a commissioners and
county officials meeting March 11.
Annie Brunskills travel request to
a library meeting in Custer was
also approved.
Nancy Nevilles request to sur-
plus a vacuum and a push mower
was approved.
The board set the countys board
of equalization meeting for April 9
at 1 p.m.
Reports reviewed included sher-
iff, veterans service officer and au-
ditor/treasurer.
The board entered into executive
session for about 30 minutes to dis-
cuss personnel. No action was
taken following the session.
The board approved meeting
minutes and warrants from Febru-
ary. They also approved the $39
annual dues for the National Asso-
ciation of State Agencies for Sur-
plus Property.
The board opted to not offer per-
manent part time employees insur-
ance or annual leave.
Basic business issues for commissioners
by Del Bartels
Dane and Amanda Nelson have
purchased the Triple XXX Spray-
ing business from Jeremy Note-
boom.
The weed and pest control oper-
ation is a home-office run business,
though the shop is still west of
Philip. The business specializes in
lawn care, weed management, tree
root treatments, tree spraying, out-
door pest control, bare ground veg-
etation management and prairie
dogs. Its new contact number is
441-8145 and new mailing address
is P.O. Box 554, Philip, SD 57567.
It was an opportunity. I worked
for Jeremy last summer, which was
invaluable hands-on training with
all of the services offered, said
Dane. In some ways it was a way
back into the ag world, since I grew
up in the country, ranching.
Originally established in 2007,
the business has been under the
ownership of the Nelsons since
January 2013. It is a full-time job,
busiest between the beginning of
April into November, depending on
the weather.
Amanda grew up in Philip.
Danes family came to the area in
2002. They met in school, gradu-
ated from Philip High School in
2007 and were married in 2009.
Now, for their business, both are
commercial applicators, certified by
the South Dakota Department of
Agriculture. Collaboratively, they
are certified in herbicides, fungi-
cides, insecticides, ornamentals
and pests such as prairie dogs.
Its a field that changes
monthly, said Dane. Youre con-
stantly learning new techniques,
new product, said Amanda. Weve
gone to seminars and classes. We
definitely learned a lot about some
new cutting edge products and pro-
cedures.
One of the classes we recently
attended was to become certified
applicators for one of our brand-
name products, said Dane.
Especially in tree care, contin-
ued Dane. Theres different dis-
eases and pests that move into our
service area and change with the
seasons. You have to try to stay
ahead of the curve as much as pos-
sible.
Im going to keep my job as a
medical transcriptionist, said
Amanda, but I am going to go out
and help him. She is the busi-
nesses bookeeper and public rela-
tions person. She thinks her doing
smaller jobs around town while he
is miles away doing a larger jobs
would be a good collaboration. The
possibilities and advantages are
not quite limitless; for example,
though they will barrier outer
walls to insect problems, they do
not do interior spraying.
Its not just lawns; its quite a
bit bigger than that, said Dane.
They can do diagnosis and treat-
ment for lawn care, including trees
and shrubs, all the way up to a five-
step program, but can also do nox-
ious weed management on range/
pasture land.
We enjoy supporting and help-
ing the community that has sup-
ported us all along, said Amanda.
We try to take a small town per-
sonal approach to what we do.
Every job is unique, said Dane.
We want to know first, and then
treat for whats wrong. A lot of
times it is not only a disease, in-
sects, nutrients or a growing envi-
ronment problem, but it could be
all of them and it takes a complete
management program.
As their website, www.triplexxx
spraying.com, states, theirs is a lo-
cally owned and operated chemical
spraying business aimed at provid-
ing safe and competitively priced
lawn care programs, tree and
shrub care, bare ground weed con-
trol, outdoor pest control, and nox-
ious weed management to commer-
cial, private and rural properties.
Their website has a weekly blog,
and they are on Facebook.
Dane and Amanda Nelson now
owners of Triple XXX Spraying
Amanda and Dane Nelson, owners/operators of Triple XXX Spraying.
The annual District 2 spring
meeting of the South Dakota Amer-
ican Legion will be held Sunday,
March 24, at the Hermosa Ameri-
can Legion Post home in Hermosa
for legionnaires from Haakon, Ben-
nett, Jackson, Jones, Mellette,
Todd, Custer, Fall River, Penning-
ton and Shannon counties.
Following an executive meeting
at 11:00 a.m, lunch will be held
from noon to 1:00 p.m. The Legion
business session will begin at 1:00
p.m. Participants will elect county
commanders and vice commanders
in the district for one-year terms.
Philip Pearson, a member of the
Wheeler-Brooks American Legion
Post #173 in Philip, is running for
the vice state commander position,
sometimes referred to as area com-
mander, for districts 1 and 2. There
are five American Legion areas in
South Dakota.
The District 2 session will also
feature post reports regarding the
past years unusual activities, Post
Americanism reports, a member-
ship turn-in, recognition of the Dis-
trict 2 Legionnaire of the Year and
South Dakota American Legion District 2 annual meeting
by Del Bartels
Sergeant Ryan Mechaley of the
South Dakota Highway Patrol was
the principle speaker at a commu-
nity meeting Thursday, March 7, in
the Fine Arts Building in Philip.
The first part of the session was
Mechaley informing the audience
on what the drug scene is in South
Dakota, in the nation and in the
world. He defined synthetic drugs
and explained their escalating
prevalence and preference among
users. The largest percentage of
users are teens and those in their
early 20s of all backgrounds. The
second part of the meeting were a
constant flow of questions from the
audience, from mostly parents of
teenagers, though there were
younger and older attendees.
I dont want to scare anybody,
but I want you to hear the truth,
began Mechaley. There are syn-
thetic drugs in Philip. Theyre
here. In a recent study of arrested
drunk drivers in parts of South
Dakota, approximately one-third
tested to have some other form of
drugs in their systems. It scares
me to know who is traveling the
road with the rest of us, said
Mechaley.
Synthetic drugs, also referred to
as designer drugs, are produced by
a minor modification in the chemi-
cal structure of an existing drug.
There are so many sources from
the Internet, black market and
downtown shops in some states
that If it says not for human con-
sumption, thats a pretty good indi-
cation you could get high from it,
said Mechaley. Many of these
drugs are packaged and marketed
as plant food or incense. Many of
these drugs can be detected in a
users blood or urine only with very
specific testing and a foreknowl-
edge of what to test for.
Mechaley also warned about pre-
scription drugs. Lock them up, se-
cure them, count them, he said,
adding that there has been a 300
percent increase in prescriptions
because of people needing or want-
ing the drugs over the last few
years. Theft has also increased,
and stolen prescription drugs are
often the basis of pharm parties.
With synthetic drugs, though ob-
servable symptoms and side effects
are extremely varied, often the
user is irrational to the point of
having hallucinations and being
extremely paranoid, and combat-
ive. Rationalize with them? Not
going to happen!, said Mechaley.
He warned that personal safety is
and should always be a priority.
Remember, they are not going to
react normally.
Film clips of people actually on
drugs on a trip were shown.
Mechaley warned that the action
was graphic and extreme. As one of
the overhead projections pro-
claimed, Unfortunately their trip
usually requires a stop at the hos-
pital or jail, in best outcome scenar-
ios.
The laws concerning synthetic
drugs vary from country to country,
and from state to state. South
Dakota is one of the leading states
to address the criminality of these
drugs, labeling their possession as
a felony. Yet, its not the criminal
thing that really scares Mechaley,
but what makes him the most
nervous is drug users loss of schol-
arships, student aid, future job pos-
sibilities and other ramifications
from being a convicted drug felon.
Because of the availability, vari-
ety and danger of these drugs,
Mechaley suggested that parents
make contracts with their children.
They should put in there that if
your child calls you anytime, you
will come and get them and not ask
them any questions that night. I
cant make them talk to me, but
there has to be a line of communi-
cations between you and them. He
said that, as a kid under their par-
ents roof, the constitution doesnt
apply. Parents may not want to in-
fringe on their kids personal
rights, but .... Its hard to be a par-
ent and a friend, said Mechaley.
Synthetic drugs topic in Philip
Above, the community turnout for the synthetic drugs lecture and questions/an-
swers was impressive. I think that speaks volumes for your community, that you
would be here, said main speaker South Dakota Highway Patrol Sergeant Ryan
Mechaley, shown at right. Photos by Del Bartels
an address by State American Le-
gion Commander Byron Callies,
Watertown.
The District 2 Auxiliary will hold
its meeting at 1:00 p.m. the same
day at a location yet to be deter-
mined.
The 2013 American Legion
South Dakota state convention will
be held in June in Rapid City.
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The Pioneer Review P.O. Box 788 Philip, SD 57567-0788
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Letters Policy
Opinion / Community
Thursday, March 14, 2013 The Pioneer Review Page 2
Pioneer review
Philip, SD U.S.P.S. 433-780
Subscription Rates: For Haakon, Jackson,
and Jones counties, Creighton, Wall, Quinn,
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Established in 1906.
The Pioneer Review, the official newspaper of
Haakon County, the towns of Philip and Mid-
land, and Haakon School District 27-1 is pub-
lished weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Pioneer Review office is located at 221 E. Oak
Street in Philip, South Dakota.
Phone: (605) 859-2516;
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Copyrighted 1981: Ravellette Publications,
Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied, or in any way repro-
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without the written consent of the publisher.
DEADLINES: Display & Classified
Advertising: Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m. (MT)
Legals: Fridays at 5:00 p.m. (MT)
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Gen. Mgr. of Operations/
Ad Design: Kelly Penticoff
Editor/News Reporter: Del Bartels
Reporter/Ad Design: Nancy Haigh
Ad Sales: Beau Ravellette
South
Dakota
Newspaper
Association
Thursday: Partly
cloudy in the morn-
ing, then clear.
High of 66F. Winds
from the WNW at 5 to
10 mph.
Friday: Mostly
cloudy. High of
72F. Breezy.
Winds from
the WNW at 10 to 25
mph.
Sunday: Partly
cloudy. High of 45F.
Winds from the
North at 10 to 15
mph shifting to the SSE
in the afternoon.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy in
the morning, then over-
cast with a chance of
rain. High of 46F. Winds
from the ESE at 5 to 15 mph. Chance
of rain 20%.
Get your
complete &
up-to-the-minute
local forecast:
pioneer-review.com
Monday: Mostly cloudy
with a chance of
rain. High of 46F.
Breezy. Winds from
the NW at 20 to 25
mph. Chance of rain 20%.
Lookin Around by Syd Iwan
Last Saturday was a bad day for
cooking. Three of us had problems
that day for no good reason except
that it was obviously a poor day for
cooking.
Take Ruth, for example. She
had recently acquired some fluted
metal forms for making edible
shells out of tortillas. You fre-
quently see these shells in Mexican
restaurants and may get your
salad served in one. Anyway, Ruth
carefully followed the instructions
as to oven temperature and baking
time only to come up with burnt
shells. She was not pleased but
tried again. This time she kept a
close eye on things and got an ac-
ceptable product, but the first at-
tempt was a no-go.
Marie also encountered prob-
lems. She was trying to make a
cake that starts with a mix from a
box but is fancied up with the ad-
dition of coconut and other goodies.
Well, Marie is an excellent cook.
Ask anyone, and they will say it is
so. She, however, suspected early
on that things were not as they
should be. She has made this
dessert many times, and the batter
seemed somewhat stringy and not
quite right. Nevertheless, she
threw the mixture into a pan and
baked it, but it came out very flat.
It didnt rise like it was supposed
to so, with disgust, it got itself
thrown in the garbage for misbe-
havior. I might have just frosted it
and relabeled it as bars instead of
as a cake, but Marie was frus-
trated with the whole business and
decided to give it up for the time
being. She could always try again
another day.
I, too, did not have much luck in
the kitchen. I was trying to decide
what to make for the coffee time
after church the next day and
couldnt make up my mind. Noth-
ing sounded good. Wife Corinne
saw me shuffling through recipes
and looking perplexed so she men-
tioned that shed seen some maple
recipes in her Good Old Days
magazine. She produced that mag-
azine, and the one for maple
muffins looked interesting. I de-
cided to give it a try, especially
since I happened to have some
maple syrup on hand.
This was not a complicated
recipe, and I followed it explicitly
with careful measurement of ingre-
dients and procedure. After every-
thing was in the mix and stirred
up, I realized I had a problem. The
batter was not nearly liquid
enough to spoon into muffin cups.
I would have had to roll it into
balls or something to get it into the
paper liners. Well, in the past
when making muffins out of a non-
calorie sweetener called Splenda,
Ive had to add extra milk since
Splenda makes dough quite sticky.
That had worked before so why not
try it again? I had to use a lot of
milk to get the batter right, but fi-
nally it was ready to bake. The
streusel topping was also a frustra-
tion since what the recipe called for
made way too much of it. There
wasnt room in the top of the cups
for it all. No matter. Use what you
need and stuff the rest in the re-
frigerator for possible later use or
for throwing out if no good use ever
presented itself.
I was pleased a bit later to see
that the muffins were getting nice
and high in the oven and looking
quite good. Maybe Id pulled it off.
Well, although those muffins were
pretty and probably nutritious and
all, they had almost no noticeable
flavor. They were okay with lash-
ings of butter, but by themselves
they were dull. Corinne and I could
discern no maple flavor whatso-
ever. I took them to church anyway
with a certain amount of disgust,
and people ate them. I didnt actu-
ally see anyone come back for sec-
onds, but neither did I see any in
the trash can. I did almost make
Fayola choke when I saw her eat-
ing one and told her that, although
the muffins were nice looking, it
was a pity they had no taste. She
guffawed but said they werent all
that bad, bless her heart.
There are days, apparently, that
just arent suited for certain activ-
ities. Ranchers and farmers know,
for instance, that animals are
nervous and hard to deal with if
there is unsettled weather or a
storm moving in. Fishermen know
that certain weather conditions
make it so fish will absolutely not
bite no matter what you tempt
them with. You cant always tell
ahead of time what jobs or activi-
ties are suitable for certain days,
but you will find out soon enough
when you try doing them. Like I
said, last Saturday was a poor day
for cooking. Come to think of it,
Tuesday wasnt much good for
doing bookwork either. Figures
wouldnt add up that afternoon.
So when you find a day simply
isnt suitable for what you hope to
accomplish, you can do as some
kids did on a TV show son Chance
was watching the other day. One of
the kids said, Everyone in favor of
doing nothing all day, say Aye.
Everyone said, Aye, albeit some-
what phlegmatically. Some days, I
suspect, are just best for doing ab-
solutely nothing at all and simply
hoping tomorrow will be better.
Hope youre having a good day. If
not, theres always tomorrow.
COUNTRY CUPBOARD FOOD PANTRY will meet in Philip
on Monday, March 18, at 6:00 p.m. in the Senechal Apts. lobby.
Please attend and learn how the food pantry is doing!
PHILIP CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet Tuesday,
March 19, at 6:30 p.m. in the Senechal Apts. lobby. Everyone is in-
vited.
THE GARDEN CLUB will meet on Tuesday, March 19, at 6:00
p.m. behind the Senechal Apts. Please note the different time and
place. Everyone is invited. Call Elke Baxter at 605-840-4810 for de-
tails.
AMERICAN LEGION AUXILIARY and the American Legion
will meet with a potluck supper Thursday, March 14, at 6:30 p.m.
at the Legion Hall in Philip. Meeting to follow.
HAAKON COUNTY YOUNG WOMENS Easter Egg Hunt is
scheduled for Thursday, March 28, at 4:00 p.m. at the Kiddie Park
in Philip. Three age groups, 0-3, 4-6 and 7 up to third grade will be
included. Contact Shandon Fugate for more information, 515-1951.
HAAKON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY will be hosting Gary
Phillips on Tuesday, March 19, at 7:00 p.m. as he talks about his
greenhouse, container gardening, and how to get those plants
started early. Call the library at 859-2442 for more information.
FREE TAX PREPARATION AARP TaxAide will be providing
free federal tax return preparations at the Bad River Senior Citi-
zens Center in Philip on Tuesdays from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. The serv-
ice is open to all ages with emphasis on low and middle income tax-
payers. Call Bob McDaniel, 859-2227, for appointment or more in-
formation.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Let it be green ... by Del Bartels
Saint Patricks Day, March 17, is when we celebrate the wearin
o the green. Green, though, is a year-round color.
The psychology of the color green is that it is a cool color. It often
symbolizes nature, tranquility, good luck, health ... and jealousy. It
is a theory that green can improve reading ability a transparent
green film over a page increases reading speed and comprehension.
Green has long been a symbol of fertility even being a common color
choice for wedding gowns in the 15th century. Yet green is often used
in decorating for its calming effect off-stage rooms in theaters and
television sets are often colored and referred to as the green room.
Green is believed to soften stress and help healing a green work
environment equates to fewer stomachaches for employees.
As of 2004, there are 192 flags of independent countries in the
world, and 87 contain the color green. The flag of Ireland is green for
its Gaelic tradition, orange for the followers of William of Orange,
and white for the peace between them.
In recent American history, old television icons include the Green
Hornet, the animated Green Lantern, Green Acres, the Ho Ho Ho
Green Giant and Mr. Green Jeans. Songs include Green Berets,
Green Green Grass of Home and Kermit the Frogs Its Not Easy
Bein Green. Colloquialisms include greenbacks (dollar bills), green-
horn (inexperienced), green thumb (good gardener), green-eyed mon-
ster (jealousy), green around the gills (nauseousness), the moon being
made of green cheese, and grass being greener on the other side. Food
can be green as in not being quite ripe, or green as in something
growing in the refrigerator emphasizing the quote I do not like
green eggs and ham!
There are many literary and modern references to green. No,
Psalm 23:2 of the Bible, He maketh me to lie down in green pas-
tures, is not a reference to the field in Arlington; at least I hope not.
In the Camelot story of Sir Gawain, the character of the Green
Knight is a tester of a knights chivalry and character. Because of
agriculture and songs, almost everyone knows of John Deere green.
Politically, there is the Greenpeace movement and the Green Party.
Sports-wise, there are the Green Bay Packers. Almost everybody, es-
pecially heroes, have to face their own version of kryptonite.
I like the color green money, a field after a good rain, a womans
eyes. I like St. Patricks Day clothing, lapel pins, shamrocks, fun-
loving leprechauns. It is appropriate that the celebration originating
from the Emerald Isle is only three days from the first day of
spring. The drab of winter is over, and hopefully the upcoming sum-
mer will not be as brown as feared in these parts. The multi-colored
rainbow may lead to a pot of gold, but I think everythings prominent
color is green.
The annual gun show in Philip, sponsored by American Le-
gion Post #173, was held Saturday and Sunday, March 9-10,
at the Philip American Legion Hall. Some people came to just
look and get information, while others bought. Some variety
was offered, with one booth selling polished and cut rock.
Annual Philip gun show a success
by Elizabeth Sam Grosz
Community News Service
Legislators finished their work
by passing a $4.1 billion general
appropriation bill March 8, encom-
passing more money for schools
and Medicaid providers than in the
most recent past.
Not everyone was happy, how-
ever, with the allocation of funds
during the final garnering of
amendments to HB1185, and $1.72
million was left on the table unal-
located. But legislators were as-
sured that $1.7 million was not too
much.
Representative Susan Wismer,
D-Britton, a frequent critic of how
the state spends its money, said
last years $1.6 million left on the
table had resulted in $47 million
going into reserves. She opposed
passage of the bill with that
amount of money unappropriated.
Wismer, fellow Democrats, and
several renegade Republicans were
critical of the money that should or
could have gone to help kinder-
garten through twelth grade edu-
cation and Medicare providers, but
instead was spent on constructing
new buildings, tearing down old
buildings and putting more money
into reserves.
Senator Billie Sutton, D-Burke,
who also serves on the Joint Appro-
priations Committee, was gener-
ally kinder and more conciliatory
in his attempt to amend the
budget. But, the frustration was
evident. The attempt had been to
give Medicare providers another
$4.6 million and education another
$2.1 million, both in one-time
money. They also sought to provide
$21,000 to a veterans service pro-
grams, which helps pay vehicle ex-
penses for volunteer drivers who
transport veterans to medical ap-
pointments.
It would also have taken away
$500,000 that appropriation com-
mittee legislators had voted for
Legislative Research Council pro-
grams that assist legislators.
Key Republicans, on the other
hand, were happy with the results
of the budget work. Sen. Deb Pe-
ters, R-Hartford, who chairs the
Senate side of the Joint Appropria-
tions Committee, said, once again,
education received the first dollar
and the last dollar. Both education
and Medicaid providers, she said,
have received one-time funds for
the current fiscal year, as well as
next. Utilizing one-time funds,
said Peters, allows us to continue
to be conservative with our ongoing
spending with all the uncertainties
that lie ahead of our state, such as
federal budget cuts, healthcare re-
form and an uncertain economy.
The governor, said Peters, left
$26.5 million in one-time funds in
FT2013 on the bottom line and the
change in estimates provided an-
other $5.1 million, for a total of
$31.6 million. We were able to in-
vest that money in K12 education,
providers, higher education, schol-
arships and economic develop-
ment, said Peters. The total gen-
eral fund spending for FY2014, she
said, will be $1,327,249,577, which
will allow the FY2014 budget to be
balanced both nominally and struc-
turally.
General fund spending was bro-
ken down as education, 46 percent;
taking care of people, 39 percent;
protecting the public 10 percent,
and all the rest of state government
at only five percent.
Major accomplishments, said Pe-
ters, was the three percent infla-
tionary increase in state aid to gen-
eral education, plus a one percent
one-time increase in the current
year for kindergarten-12 educa-
tion. Postsecondary technical insti-
tutes received the same three per-
cent inflationary increase, plus one
percent one-time increase.
The Board of Regents received a
$5.4 million increase to their base
budget, plus $3.7 million in one-
time funding.
Providers will receive a three
percent increase in their ongoing
allocations with an additional one
percent one-time rate increase for
the remainder of this fiscal year.
A three percent salary policy was
given to state employees, plus a
movement to job worth, said Pe-
ters. We were also able to fund
$4.1 million in ongoing general
funds and $3 million in one-time
general funds, she said, for the
new Public Safety Improvement
Act.
This will improve public safety,
Peters said, by investing in pro-
grams, practices and policies that
have been proven to reduce recidi-
vism, hold offenders more account-
able by strengthening community
supervision, and reduce corrections
spending and focus prison space on
violent, chronic, and career crimi-
nals. This is a budget that is re-
sponsible and will continue to serve
our citizens and our state for the
coming year and positions our state
for future growth.
The House adopted the bill with
a 48-17 vote, and the Senate
adopted it 31-4.
Legislature passes $4.1 billion budget
Out of 11 contestants, the Knut-
sons won this preliminary round.
They performed Rolling in the
Deep, written by Adele and Paul
Epworth, and Black Horse and the
Cherry Tree by KT Tunstall. Sec-
ond place went Emilee Wendte,
Box Elder. All contestants received
concert tickets to see a perform-
ance by Thompson Square at the
Deadwood Mountain Grand. First
and second place winners also re-
ceived backstage passes to a meet-
and-greet prior to the show.
The top two place winners will
move on to round two, to be held in
Belle Fourche at Herrman Park,
July 5. There will be a total of five
rounds, with the last round to be
performed in Nashville.
The competitors can be followed
on Eagle Country online at http://
www.myeaglecountry.com/.
Knutsons win 1st round of country music showdown
The Eagle Country crew and round one winners. From left: Jim Kallas from Eagle
Country (KZZI 95.9/96.3), Paul James, Emilee Wendte second place winner,
Katlin Knutson first place winner, Jack Daniels, Jamie Nash and Kianna Knut-
son first place winner. Courtesy photo
Kianna and Katlin Knutson com-
peted Saturday, March 9, in the
Texaco Country Showdown, spon-
sored by Eagle Country radio sta-
tion (KZZI 95.9/96.3) and Dana
Dental Arts of Spearfish and Rapid
City at the Deadwood Mountain
Grand, in Deadwood.
Thursday, March 14, 2013 The Pioneer Review Page 3
Rural Livin
Status of the
Winter Wheat Crop
There is increasing interest,
and concern, about the winter
wheat crop in much of South
Dakota. As addressed in this col-
umn two weeks ago, it will be dif-
ficult to accurately assess your
winter wheat stand until the
plants break dormancy, or in many
cases, until the seeds germinate
and emerge. Based on historical
soil temperatures, that will likely
occur in mid to late-March. The
statement, until the seeds germi-
nate and emerge, is of course due
to much of it being planted into dry
soil, some of which is still dry.
Based on soil temperatures at
several of the automatic weather
stations this winter and limited
field inspections, it appears that
much of the winter wheat that ger-
minated last fall may have escaped
winterkill, at least in south-central
South Dakota.
Two major concerns seem to re-
main. Many areas in South Dakota
are seriously lacking topsoil and/or
subsoil moisture. Seeds that ger-
minated last fall, and those getting
just enough moisture to germinate
this spring, could grow for a short
time once soil temperatures raise
to 39 degrees F or higher, and then
dry out if additional precipitation
is not received within a short time
after.
There are also fields that lack
topsoil as well as subsoil moisture,
and winter wheat planted into dry
soil also has the risk of not com-
pleting the vernalization process.
Neither seedling growth nor tiller-
ing is required for vernalization to
occur. This process can begin in
seeds as soon as they absorb water
and swell, and be complete if a pe-
riod of about three weeks passes
when the soil temperature at the
seed/seedling level remains below
about 48 F. The exact length of
time and temperature varies by
variety, and is correlated closely to
winterhardiness and relative ma-
turity. The more winterhardy and
later maturing a variety is, the
longer the time required and the
lower the soil temperature the
seed/seedling must be exposed to.
The vernalization process must be
completed for winter cereals to
joint and produce a seedhead.
As the month of March pro-
gresses and we move into April,
the likelihood of a three week pe-
riod with soil temperatures consis-
tently below 48 F diminishes. His-
torically, soil temperatures have
varied from one year to another on
any given date at each weather
station during this time period.
That makes it difficult to predict
how late in the spring a winter
wheat seed could absorb moisture,
germinate and complete vernaliza-
tion. If these dry fields do not re-
ceive enough moisture by late-
March to begin the germination
process, the rare occasion of winter
wheat planted in the fall and not
vernalizing may occur in 2013.
Significant precipitation in the
near future would relieve a host of
potential problems. Again, before
destroying a winter wheat field,
contact your crop insurance agent.
They can explain your options and
the requirements to maintain in-
surance coverage. Also, avoid
inter-seeding spring wheat into
winter wheat as this would result
in mixed wheat at harvest and re-
sult in marketing problems and al-
most certain price reduction.
Calendar
3/19: Next Generation of Live-
stock Production, 6:30 p.m. CT,
Presho Livestock Auction
3/20: Next Generation of Live-
stock Production, 6:30 p.m. CT,
Winner Livestock Auction
3/27: Drought Management We-
binar, 10:00 a.m. CST, S.D. Re-
gional Extension Centers
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
ce.
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S1op bg ]or o11
gour oo1v1ng needs:
Ear Tags
Calf Pullcrs
Mill Fclaccr
MucI, nucI norc!
First National
Bank in Philip
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Capital Terms:
90 days on any
$750.00 or more purchase
The signup deadline for Nonin-
sured Crop Disaster Assistance
Program, (NAP), for forage, graz-
ing and spring seeded crops is
March 15.
NAP provides basic catastrophic
insurance protection from natural
disasters for crop types which are
not insurable through standard
Federal Crop Insurance policies.
Producers who have farming inter-
ests in multiple counties will need
to apply for coverage in the FSA of-
fice(s) where their farm records are
maintained. The NAP application
fee is $250 per crop type with a
$750 maximum fee per county.
There are no late filed provisions
for NAP, so do not miss this impor-
tant March 15 deadline, to be eligi-
ble for 2013 NAP coverage and po-
tential disaster programs.
March 15 is also the deadline to
purchase Federal Crop Insurance
on spring seeded crops.
Call the Haakon/Jackson County
FSA Office at 859-2186 Ext. 2 for
more details about NAP or any
other FSA program.
Deadline for NAP, March 15
Farm Rescue Foundation, a new
nonprofit organization that helps
farm families recovering from in-
jury or illness, has announced that
individuals may now apply for as-
sistance in acquiring specialized,
non-medical equipment to over-
come physical challenges. Tempo-
rary volunteer labor is also avail-
able to help with physical chal-
lenges during the recovery process
to a limited number of cases.
Sustaining life on a farm can be
(a) challenge to anyone following
an unexpected physical setback.
The Farm Rescue Foundation is
here to help during the recovery
process to ensure that families
have an opportunity to continue vi-
able operations, said Bill Gross,
Farm Rescue Foundation president
and founder.
On March 9, Gross will be in-
ducted into the North Dakota Agri-
culture Hall of Fame for his contri-
butions to agriculture in the
preservation of the family farm.
Gross is also the founder of Farm
Rescue, a separate nonprofit organ-
ization that provides planting or
harvesting assistance to those who
have experienced a major illness,
or natural disaster. While Farm
Rescue provides assistance during
crises in the form of fieldwork, the
Farm Rescue Foundation provides
assistance during the recovery
phase consisting of special equip-
ment or physical labor. Applicants
for this new assistance need not
have received assistance from
Farm Rescue.
The mission of the Farm Rescue
Foundation is to improve the qual-
ity of life through charitable serv-
ices for rural citizens that have ex-
perienced a major illness, injury, or
natural disaster and provide finan-
cial grants to public charities who
focus their efforts in rural regions
of America.
As a result of the assistance pro-
vided by the Farm Rescue Founda-
tion, farm families can survive po-
tentially devastating circum-
stances, enabling them to remain
on the farm while in the recovery
process. The available assistance
provides an avenue to keep family
farms intact, which in turn helps
the economic, social and civic well-
being of rural communities.
For more information, or to offer
assistance, contact the Farm Res-
cue Foundation by calling 701-252-
2016 or visiting www.farmrescue
foundation.org.
Farm Rescue Foundation
assistance to farm families
by Senator John Thune
Nearly every day I meet with
groups, agencies, and organiza-
tions that are impacted by agricul-
ture production. Some are ranchers
and farmers, while others are
bankers, car dealers, and lawyers,
all of whom take a special interest
in agriculture despite not always
directly working in agriculture. All
of them know that because agricul-
ture is the number one industry in
South Dakota, the success of our
agriculture producers greatly im-
pacts South Dakotas economy.
In March, we recognize and cele-
brate the many contributions of our
agricultural producers across
South Dakota and our country with
Ag Appreciation Day. As a past
member of the House Ag Commit-
tee and now a member of the Sen-
ate Ag Committee I have had
unique opportunities to shape and
draft the past few Farm Bills and
address the needs of South
Dakotas and our nations agricul-
ture industry.
Although South Dakota farmers
and ranchers are much more at
home and comfortable tending to a
newborn calf or lamb, or operating
a piece of farm equipment, I sin-
cerely appreciate those who take
the time from their schedules and
farming operations to visit with me
as I travel around the state or in
my Washington, D.C. office to
share their concerns.
South Dakota agricultural pro-
ducers are very fortunate to have
several state-based organizations
representing their diverse interests
who also provide valuable advice
and assistance to me. If I have a
question or need information about
corn, wheat, soybeans, beef and
dairy cattle, hogs, grasslands, or
conservation practices, my staff
and I know who to call to find accu-
rate answers to our questions or to
obtain sound advice about an ag-re-
lated issue or legislation.
In spite of last years widespread
drought, thanks to their hard work,
willingness to pay for available risk
protection tools like crop insurance,
and their use of moisture saving
tillage practices and drought toler-
ant crop genetics, South Dakota
farmers and ranchers met the
weather-related challenges they
faced.
I not only appreciate the safe and
affordable food our ag producers
provide, but I also appreciate their
willingness to pull their weight in
addressing the runaway federal
spending that is plaguing this
countrys economic wellbeing.
Direct payments bring more
than $140 million to South Dakota
each year, yet South Dakota pro-
ducers are willing to give up direct
payments and other types of assis-
tance in the next Farm Bill. I do
not know a single farmer or
rancher who would rather receive
a government check than profit
from what they grow on the farm or
ranch.
As we celebrate Ag Appreciation
Day, we take this opportunity to
thank all South Dakota farmers,
ranchers, all other ag producers,
and ag-related businesses for all
they do.
South Dakota agriculture appreciation
Senator John Thune (R-S.D.) has
sent a letter to National Park Serv-
ice Director Jonathan Jarvis ques-
tioning whether the NPS is playing
politics in deciding to close Wind
Cave National Parks 64-site Elk
Mountain Campground.
The NPS decision to close the
Elk Mountain Campground came
following the implementation of se-
questration and appears to sub-
stantiate reports that the NPS is
intentionally trying to make the
cuts more visible to the public.
Thunes letter seeks information
from the NPS regarding its analy-
sis that closing the Elk Mountain
Campground, which generates rev-
enue for the park, and reducing vis-
itor center hours is more cost effec-
tive than making targeted cuts
elsewhere.
It seems difficult to say with a
straight face that completely elim-
inating a source of revenue for the
National Park Service is a smart,
targeted cut, said Thune. Instead
of cuts that reduce wasteful and
duplicative spending, the adminis-
trations politically calculated cuts
are targeting facilities like the
campground that actually serve as
a revenue source for the park. It
appears NPS is just another
agency following the White Houses
lead in trying to find the cuts that
can trigger a press release before
looking to internal cost saving
measures that are less news wor-
thy.
Thunes letter requests a re-
sponse from NPS regarding the
NPS and Wind Cave National Park
sequestration strategies by March
20.
Is closing Wind Cave
campground political?
Hit & Miss
Thursday, March 14, 2013 The Pioneer Review Page 4
by Vivian Hansen vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Mar. 14: BBQ Meat-
balls, Red Mashed Potatoes, Gar-
den Veggies, Roll, Fruit.
Friday, Mar. 15: Potato Crusted
Cod, Mashed Red Potatoes, Nan-
tucket Veggies, Garlic Cheddar
Biscuit, Spiced Apples.
Monday, Mar. 18: BBQ Pork
Loin, Mashed Sweet Potatoes,
Prince Edward Veggies, Roll, Diced
Peaches.
Tuesday, Mar. 19: Chicken
Djon, Potato Puffs, Broccoli Au-
Gratin, Roll, Fruit.
Wednesday, Mar. 20: Cookout
Day! Hot Dogs and Burgers,
Baked Beans, Potato Salad, Ice
Cream.
***
March 1, 2013, at Somerset
Court, we had the special activity
of wheel of fortune. Thank you to
Sandy and Susan for setting up the
game, passing the spinner and
keeping score. Players were Floy
Olson, Jim and Eleanor Holmes,
Mary Lou Peters, Marcella Kraft,
Shirley Hodgson, Marilyn Butts,
Connie Stevens, Irene Arbach,
Irene Cox, and Vivian Hansen.
Each team won generous Somerset
bucks. One puzzle that we solved
was, I mean it from the bottom of
my heart. Another was hickory,
dickory dock, the mouse ran up the
clock.
Thank you to Marilyn Butts who
brought a poem, Rock of Ages, for
the Somerset Court scrapbook that
is by the fireplace. Rock of Ages
youre stronger than you think you
are, for I dwell within your soul.
Even at your weakest point, I am in
control. Ill bless your life, and I
will set you free. You have no need
to fear, although the tempest some-
times rages, I love you so, Ill care
for you. I am the Rock of Ages. by
Sharon Lee Roberts
Thank you to Ben Stone who lent
me his brand new New Yorker
magazine.
Sandis daughter, Sarah, came to
visit at Somerset Court Friday,
March 1. Sarah attends Western
Dakota Tech.
Nancy Haigh has a new column
in the February 28, 2013, Philip Pi-
oneer Review. In it she describes
bale gardening and it sounds very
practical. It might be a plan for
people in the Senechal apartments
in Philip to have compact and eco-
nomical bale garden. I also need to
say thanks to Mary Eide. In her
Grindstone News column in the Pi-
oneer Review, she brings up mem-
ories of old times. The Posson Hill
between Cottonwood and Grind-
stone is long and steep. You would
have to stop and rest your team of
horses part way up with a load of
coal. Just one time, when I was
maybe five or so, Rolla and Effie
(my parents) took me along to Cot-
tonwood. On the way home, we
slept overnight at a schoolhouse.
Schoolhouses were always un-
locked and the schoolhouses had
barns for horses. We had a cowhide
robe and a horsehide robe to make
sleep possible.
Saturday, March 2, at Somerset
Court, we had exercises with bonus
bucks and almost every chair filled.
In the afternoon, activity director
Susan held a class on decorating
shamrocks. There was a good
group enjoying this activity and
they put together many shamrocks,
all different.
David Plocek, Lemmon, visited
Eileen Tenold and other acquain-
tances at Somerset Court over the
weekend.
New Somerset Court resident on
third floor, is Lila Fiest. She and
her husband, Tony, have a home at
the other end of Rapid City. We
hope she will like it here at Somer-
set Court.
At Somerset Court, the movie
The Color Purple was re-run Sat-
urday, March 2. It is based on a
novel by Alice Walker (1983).
Wikipedia gives a condensed run-
down of the story. It seemed to me
to show much more misery than
joy.
Black Hills State University has
put out their spring, 2013 alumni
magazine. There is a nice article
about a Philip graduate and 1971
graduate of BHSU, Matt Schofield.
Matt has written two books, When
Reason Fails, and The Protest.
Schofield credits English assign-
ments at BHSU as foundation for
his novels. He loved his college life.
There he met his future wife,
Carol, and played drums in a local
rock band. Matt and Carol live in
Philip.
BHSU graduate, Gertrude
(Doughty) Woodden, most recently
of New Underwood, was mentioned
in the alumni magazine in the
memory column. Jim Gottsleben
and Mary Pekron were also men-
tioned in the memory column.
BHSU is developing on campus a
native plant garden with a basis of
buffalo grass. (Please do not dig up
the buffalo grass on my cemetery
plot in the Philip Masonic Ceme-
tery.
The weather was fine for March
2, 2013, and Maxine Kilmer took a
ride around the grounds at Somer-
set Court.
Sunday, March 3, at Somerset
Court, several residents went out
to church. At 2:00 p.m. we had
church with Terry Pulse. Steve
talked first. And Jack played the
piano. He played Showers of
Blessing and several other hymns
for us to sing. Terry said that we
need to say, Here I am, what am I
good for, let me know.
Another new resident here at
Somerset Court is Marilyn Bailie.
We hope you like it here.
The March 3, 2013, Rapid City
Journal had a good article about
Monarch butterflies. At Zitacuaro,
Mexico, the man relating the infor-
mation, Jason Skipton, tells us
that millions of Monarch butter-
flies gather at San Cayetano. A
Monarch butterfly lives only four to
five weeks, so it requires four or
five generations to make the jour-
ney north and south. One of Gods
miracles. Therein lies the strength
of the Monarch. Each new genera-
tion carries the built-in instinct to
go back to the native home. Thanks
to my daughter, Vinnie, who took
me some years back, to see a
Monarch butterfly gathering place
somewhere near Santa Cruz. It
was exciting to see thousands of
them.
Als Oasis of Oacoma, has been in
the Mueller family since 1919. Als
sons, Steve and Mark, have been
running it. The year, Als Oasis will
have different ownership owner-
ship. I believe the Muellers still
have an interest. My husband, Vir-
gil Hansen, painted many large
road signs of Als Oasis, as well as
carving some beautiful signs for
the fronts of the line of stores. They
were a light colored wood, with
back grounds of black sheet steel.
Thank you to Fred Smith, Som-
erset Court resident, who has
brought me a song book with piano
notes for Somerset Court. People
who attended the Rapid City Cal-
vary Lutheran Church were given
them at their church service today.
Irene Cox had company on
March 6, her son and his wife, Don
and Pam Cox, of rural New Under-
wood.
Wednesday March 6, 2013, at
Somerset Court, we had resident
council with a very good atten-
dance. We sang Happy Birthday
to our good buddy, Ryan Love,
(Somerset Court director). Shawn
reviewed some of the highlights
scheduled for Somerset Court for
March cooking with Sandy, music
with Skeeter, setting our clocks
ahead with a reminder not to try to
stand on chairs to do this as staff
will help us, foot clinic, ice cream
trip, painting with Susan, St.
Patricks Day, goofy golf, bingo
with the Boys Club, camp in, stair
climbing, coloring Easter eggs and
an Easter party, and many other
delightful activities.
Residents may ask staff mem-
bers to accompany them on walks
outdoors. Sign out and wear your
safety buttons when you walk out-
doors. Also carry your cell phone as
safety buttons only work near the
Somerset Court building.
For April Fools Day, we could
have scrambled seating. Just for a
lark. Several people expressed
their enjoyment of our random
seating when we were installing
the new dining room carpet.
Somerset Court will present each
resident with a mug to take drinks
to his apartment. Residents may
arrange with a staff member to
play Wii bowling, at times when it
is not scheduled.
When residents are expecting
guests, they should give notice to
Kammi at the desk so that she can
reserve a table or provide seating
for guests as soon as it is available.
Tuesday, March 5, 2013, at Som-
erset Court, we had the activity of
ping-pong poker. Thanks to Shawn
and Sandy. Those playing were
Eileen Tenold, Irene McKnight,
Fred Smith, Jim Holmes, Addie
Rorvig, Marilyn Butts, Irene Ar-
bach, Bert Schneider, Marjorie
Gaffin, Kay Daughterty, Mildred
Young, Mary Lou Peters, and Vi-
vian Hansen. Marilyn B. won the
first game and the second one was
won by Mildred Young.
Thank you for calling Somerset
Court Tuesday bingo.
For snack and chat, we had
treats of coffee and ice water and a
light fluffy banana cupcakes with
whip cream and a banana chip.
Later, we had a table of whist
with Irene Cox and Ina Oerlline
standing Marcella Kraft and Vi-
vian Hansen. Others played Quid-
dler.
The Hillsdale College Imprimis
magazine arrived today, thanks to
my son-in-law, Al Vogan. It has an
article by Amity Shlaes from her
book, Coolidge. She outlines the
action taken by Coolidge. President
Coolidge is quoted as saying, We
must have no carelessness in our
dealings with public property or
the expenditure of public money.
Such a condition is characteristic of
undeveloped people, or of a deca-
dent generation. He and his
budget director, Herbert Lord,
went right to work and announced
deepened cuts in two politically
sensitive areas: spending on veter-
ans and District of Columbia Pub-
lic Works. Her article expresses
hope for our political situation. The
frugal policies of Harding and
Coolidge occurred after a long pe-
riod of Progressive ascendency.
Be sure to attend Somerset
Courts resident council Wednes-
day, March 6, 2013. Wear your
safety locket. You never know
when Somerset Court bucks will be
awarded.
Thursday, March 7, at Somerset
Court, we had the activity of Wii
bowling.
Thursday we also had bowling
with snack and chat following. We
had brownies with a dusting of
powdered sugar and coffee for a
treat.
After bingo, Irene Cox, Mary Lou
Peters, Addie Rorvig and Vivian
Hansen played bananagrams for a
while. They didnt want to get tired
of quiddler. My niece, Wanda
Meyer Artz, and husband Ed,
Humboldt, sent a letter. They have
been playing a card game called
Liverpool, which they find chal-
lenging. Maybe we can look into
Liverpool. And what was that table
game my nephew, Leonard Meyer,
mentioned? Five crowns? Better
look into that too.
Ben and Danni Stone have a big
amaryllis blooming. It can be seen
from the Somerset Court over-
pass. I went over to see it in per-
son. It is red and very grand. It
does your heart good to see such a
flower. Ben has an extensive li-
brary of classic books and other fa-
vorites. He might be willing to lend
some of them.
It is almost spring! Some people
have even sat outdoors in the Som-
erset courtyard for a little while.
Sometimes now the sun shines in
and wind lies low.
My reblooming amaryllis grew
two inches in two days. Now, it is
17 inches tall. I repotted it into a
bigger pot, the one that had the big
blooms last week.
continued on page 7
Gem Theatre
859-2000 Philip
March 15-16-17-18:
Safe Haven
(PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
March 22-23-24-25 &
March 29-30-31, April 1
The Croods (PG)
Steve & Teddi
(Knutson) Reckling
will be celebrating
their 40th Wedding
Anniversary on
March 20, 2013.
They were united in marriage at
First Lutheran Church in Philip, SD, in 1973.
Warmest wishes from their son, Ryon and his wife Linda,
and grandsons Samuel and Nathan of Sioux Falls, SD
and their son Brady of Lincoln, NE.
Cards & warm regards may be sent to Steve & Teddi
Reckling, 2211 W. Millstone Rd., Lincoln, NE 68522
Spring Lecture Series
at Your Library
Thank you to everyone who partici-
pated in the One-Room Country School
evening discussions, and thanks to all
of you who have stopped by the library
to help place our old country schools on
the map. Im still missing locations for
quite a few schools, especially in the
very northwest corner (Indian Springs
District), the central and east central
areas (Grandfield, Carlin, and Manila
districts), and most of the southeast
corner. Im sure there are additional
schools that existed during homestead
days that I dont have on any of my
lists yet, so if you have any informa-
tion or stories that you would like to
share, please stop by the library. In
due time, we hope to have a completed
map of old schools and towns on the
wall in the community room, as well
as some kind of compilation of the sto-
ries that go with them. This has been
an exciting project thus far, and a
great way to preserve the history of
our county.
For the March session of our spring
lecture series, everyone is invited to
come to the community room at 7:00
on the evening of March 19th. We will
be hosting Gary Phillips who will talk
about his greenhouse, container gar-
dening, and how to get those spring
seeds started and into our gardens
and flowerbeds.
Remember the library is open from
10:00 to 5:00, Monday through Thurs-
day and our phone number is 859-
2442.
Quote: I had always imagined par-
adise as a kind of library. (Jorge Luis
Borges)
The children of
Thelma Heltzel
are hosting a party in honor
of her 85th Birthday
on Sunday, March 24, 2013
from 2 to 4 p.m. at the
Bad River Senior Citizens Center,
downtown Philip.
Everyone welcome!
No gifts, please.
Did you all remember to set
your clocks ahead? Our poor clocks
were so confused one of them
'sprung ahead' Friday night and
another one Saturday afternoon!
Then there are the ones you move
ahead manually, which are proba-
bly the most reliable.
Donna and Tina Staben and
Nina and Grace Pekron were in
Kadoka Friday for the 4-H presen-
tations and judging contests. Con-
gratulations, Grace, on your purple
ribbon for your presentation.
Sandra Parsons spent some
time in Rapid City over the week-
end visiting her daughters. Shan-
non came from Sioux Falls and
Amber lives in Rapid City.
Jim Elshere left last Thursday
to spend some time at J.J. and
Lindsay Elshere's place. Jim is
doing chores while J.J.'s family is
in Houston for the rodeos there.
Thayne stayed home to be with
Grandpa.
Jenna Elshere spent Friday
night with Grandma Lana and Sat-
urday they went to Rapid City to
watch Trey wrestle at the region
AAU tournament. Jim and Thayne
also came from Hereford for the
wrestling tournament.
Jackie Radway was in Pierre
Thursday and Friday taking care of
grandson Deacon Ries who was
sick and couldn't go to day care.
Spending the weekend at Glen and
Jackie's was Gene Walth, Pierre,
Jackie's cousin.
Keagan and Colby Fitch wres-
tled at the region AAU tournament
Saturday in Rapid City. Colby
placed second, so he will be advanc-
ing on to the state tournament in
two weeks in Brookings. Keagan
placed fourth. Congratulations,
boys!
Sunday, Christa Fitch and
Colby attended a baby shower for
Tylissa and Brock Geffre in Stur-
gis. Tylissa is Trevor's youngest
sister and their baby is due in
April.
Gayla Piroutek arrived home
after spending a week with daugh-
ter, Erin Logan and family. They
visited Savannah, Ga., Myrtle
Beach, S.C., and Dan's sister, Phyl-
lis and Rod Hinman at their new
home in Pinehurst, N.C. It was a
wonderful trip, except that it was
cold everywhere Gayla went.
Joe Piroutek, Dan's brother, ar-
rived last Saturday from his home
in Missouri. He will be staying with
Dan and Gayla for two weeks, trav-
eling with Dan to bull sales.
Wednesday, Tim and Judy
Elshere were in Rapid City. They
Milesville News
by Janice Parsons 544-3315
Church & Community Thursday, March 14, 2013 The Pioneer Review Page 5
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip 859-2664 sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass: 10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m. (Feb., April, June, Aug.,
Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m. (Jan., Mar., May, July,
Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the other
meets on the second Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. at
the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland 843-2538
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru
Feb.); 6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY
CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00
a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH,
Philip
(605) 669-2406 Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services:
1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH
MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143
facebook.com/midlan-
dobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30
a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30
p.m.
Womens Ministries: 2nd
Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN
CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke 462-
6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00
a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m.
CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE
CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl Philip 859-2841
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl Philip
859-2841 garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church: 8:30 a.m.
Ladies Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 9:00 a.m.
1st Wednesday Every Month:
Contemporary Worship, 7:00 p.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
And Jacob lifted up his
eyes, and looked, and,
behold, Esau came, and
with him four hundred men.
And he divided the children
unto Leah, and unto
Rachel, and unto the two
handmaids. And he passed
over before them, and
bowed himself to the
ground seven times, until
he came near to his
brother.
Genesis 33:1,3 (KJV)
Lsau had vowed to ki l l J acob aIter J acob had stol en hi s bi r thr i ght. l n thi s passage,
J acob took a r i sk, bowed to the gr ound i n huni l i ty and hoped Ior r econci l i ati on. l t
wor ked. God took the ul ti nate r i sk and sent hi s 5on to di e to r econci l e the si nIul
nan to hi nsel I. The 5on hunbl ed hi nsel I and becane obedi ent to death on a cr oss.
l I you haven' t al r eady, take God' s oIIer oI r econci l i ati on today.
Obituaries
This space for rent! Call
859-2516 to have your
message placed here!
continued on page 7
Easter is March 31st
It is with great sorrow that our
Fr. Reuben Valades passed away
on Tuesday, March 5, 2013, at the
VA- BHHCS in Ft. Meade, S.D.
Fr. Reuben was born on Septem-
ber 26, 1929, to Catarino and An-
drea (Uvalle) Valades in Edge-
mont.
Fr. Reuben graduated salutato-
rian in his class of 1947. He then
worked in Wades Grocery Store
and in the Southern Hills Bank
from 1949 to 1952. He served his
country in the Korean War from
1952 to 1954.
When he returned from the
Army, he attended Chadron State
College from 1955 to 1957. He then
graduated from Black Hill State
University with a bachelor of sci-
ence in education degree in 1959.
He taught conversational Spanish
for one year in Lead and taught
freshman and sophomore English
at Provo High School in Igloo for
three years.
In 1963, Fr. Reuben attended St.
Marys College in St. Mary, Ky.,
where he did his undergraduate
studies for the priesthood. From
1966 to 1970, he attended Immac-
ulate Conception Seminary in Con-
ception, Mo.
Fr. Reuben was ordained June
8, 1970, by the late Bishop Harold
J. Dimmerling. His first assign-
ment was as an associate pastor at
the Cathedral of Our Lady of Per-
petual Help in Rapid City.
In 1973 to 1981, he was assigned
to Sacred Heart Church in Philip,
St. Marys Church in Milesville and
St. William in Midland.
He also worked with the Haakon
County Alcohol Center, the Alco-
holics Anonymous and Alanon
groups, Meals on Wheels, and
Haakon County Area Right to Life.
In addition, he served as a hospital
chaplain and was a member of the
Philip Ministerial Association.
From 1981 to 1986, he was as-
signed to Christ the King Church
in Presho. In July, 1986, he was as-
signed to St. Josephs Church in
Gregory and in 1990, Sacred Heart
Church in Burke was added to his
mission. In 1992, he was assigned
to New Underwood and Lakeside.
He retired from that parish in
1999.
Fr. Reuben will also be remem-
bered by his love for music, espe-
cially the guitar which he mastered
and the song he wrote titled,
Walking Down Those Forty Days
of Lent.
In addition to his many friends
that he served as their parish
priest, he leaves one brother, Sal-
vador (Chuck), Sturgis; one sister,
Inez Martinez, Chadron, Neb.; and
numerous nephews and nieces and
their families.
His father and mother, a sister
Alice Gnojek and three brothers,
Catarino, Jr., Vincent F. and
Gabriel preceded him in this jour-
ney.
The family also remembers Sis-
ter Agnes Holzapfel, a longtime
companion, and also his loyal dog,
Benji, who also preceded him in
death.
A Christian wake service with
Rosary was held on Thursday,
March 7, at the Cathedral of Our
Lady of Perpetual Help. Mass of
Christian burial was celebrated on
March 8 at the Cathedral of Our
Lady of Perpetual Help with the
Most Rev. Robert D. Gruss presid-
ing and other priests of the diocese
concelebrating.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Father Reuben Valades_____________ Monday, Tony Harty visited
Shirley Hair and make the usual
phone calls to friends to visit with
them during the day.
Monday, I was the Haakon
County Prairie Transportation van
driver from Kadoka, stopping in
Philip to exchange vehicles and
pick up another passenger, then on
to Rapid City for appointments. It
was really one of those super windy
days, and on the way home there
were some patches of flurries, but
nothing to write home about and
thankfully it wasnt any worse.
Thankful we were in the Rapid
City area, since in the Sturgis area
they had a full-fledged snowstorm,
no travel was advised from Sturgis
to the Wyoming border. While in
Rapid, I had the chance to slip into
the hospital and visit Vi Moody
who was holding down a bed in
ICU but coming along nicely after
quite a bout with some fast occur-
ring health issues.
Tuesday, Tony Harty visited his
niece, Kathy Brown. Wednesday
was a quiet day with a visit to
Shirley Hair, then Tony hit the
mother lode when he stopped by
the Kadoka locker plant and there
were a lot of beef tongues available.
Sandee Gittings was in the
Kadoka area Tuesday and Midland
area Thursday on her job.
Tuesday morning, I was a visitor
at the home of Mary Schnee. In the
afternoon I had a van run to Philip
for a dentist appointment for a cus-
tomer and while there visited at
the home of Kay Ainslie, who let
me in on a pending birthday party.
Kay even found me a great card to
take, so I crashed the party for Ber-
dyne (Peterson) Parsons with only
an appetite. Berit Bendickson fixed
up a cake recipe from Norway and
Shirley OConnor, Eileen Fitzger-
ald, Kay Ainslie were also there.
Berit said her sister, Ingred, and
the folks at the bank she works for
in Holgerson, Norway, all read the
Pioneer Review. Greetings to all
you readers in Norway from the
Bendicksons and this writer.
George Gittings helped Ed Mor-
rison get a truck to Pierre Wednes-
day.
Wednesday morning, I caught a
ride to bowling with Lila Whidby,
along with Cindy Wilmarth and
Joyce Hicks. Next time a team asks
me to bowl they may reconsider
since I didnt even make my aver-
age. Tony Harty visited at our
place in the late afternoon.
Thursday, Tony Harty and
Shirley Hair made a trip to Wan-
blee. Tony visited with Carol Solon
while she was babysitting at the
home of Patrick Solon in Kadoka in
the afternoon.
George Gittings visited at the
Lorraine and Henry Hanson home
one afternoon.
Thursday was a beautiful day. In
the morning, the HCPT van was
busy with some in town errands for
folks and also a trip to Rapid City
by way of Highway 44. Since the
appointment the customer had was
quite lengthy, I visited at the hos-
pital checking in on Bonnie
(Briggs) Riggins who was recover-
ing from surgery as well as Sheryl
Bouman and Vi Moody, who had
her own room. Bill Sumpter went
by the bowling alley after cards and
watched bowling and had supper
since it was later when I got home.
Friday, after Cathy Fiedler got
off work, Ralph and she went to
Rapid to get her a new chair. Some-
times sitting is punishment and
that is what Cathy was dealing
with. They found one, did a couple
of other errands, and then stopped
at a pizza place for supper and met
Karen Nelson, her daughter, Kath-
leen Nelson, and granddaughter
and Karens folks, Don and Mary
Keyser. They enjoyed a short but
nice visit.
Friday was a usual day for Tony
Harty, visiting with the Hairs and
getting the mail. Saturday, Tony
made a trip to Wanblee to pick up
some things then visited at the
Hairs and at his great-nieces,
Misty Hamar, Steve Doughty, Russ
Hattel, Kathy Brown, and Thesa
Ireland.
A call from the Moodys from
their Rapid Valley home let us
know that Vi was out of the hospi-
tal and coming along nicely. Noth-
ing gets your attention faster than
things going wrong with your sys-
tem and nothing is more appreci-
ated as when it gets back on the
right track. Now they can watch
the geese flocking back from their
vantage point in Rapid Valley and
enjoy other wildlife until they ven-
ture back to the ranch.
Friday morning bright and early,
Bill and I went to Madison, and
took grandson, Chase May, Carly
and little Jaxon to lunch. Shelley
Seager joined us for an afternoon of
visiting and playing with Jaxon.
Carol Solon shared her rabbit cos-
tume with me, so I dressed up and
got pictures with the little guy. His
parents were amazed he didnt get
scared of that big fuzzy thing. Bill,
I and Shelley went on to Sioux
Falls to the home of grandson, Eric
Seager, and enjoyed a visit there
before going to granddaughterg
Amanda and Adam Claflin for sup-
per. Bill and I were overnight
guests at the Claflins and Shelley
a guest at Erics. The important
thing to do, is be sure to eat, so we
gathered for lunch at Erics Satur-
day, the Easter Rabbit came out
again for fun with grandkids, then
we all went bowling and grandpa
Bill had charge of little great-
grandson, Elijah, who kept him
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter 837-2048 bilmar@gwtc.net
Self-contained, portable,
large capacity machine.
We clean all types of grain.
Juston Eisenbraun
605-391-6967 (c) 605-386-2210 (h)
605-279-2411 (w)
Eisenbraun Grain Cleaning
Certified Grain Cleaner

Thursday, March 14, 2013 The Pioneer Review Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
continued on page 14
It is Sunday, March 10, and I
am still in Mitchell. Plans were to
head home Saturday. Plans
changed, as it began raining, turn-
ing to rain-snow mix and with
those temperatures turning colder
it made for very icy conditions. We
woke up Sunday morning to cold
temperatures and overcast skies.
Called Jerry to see what it was
doing in Midland. He reported the
sun was shining. Checked on road
conditions throughout the day, was
told it wasnt good around Presho.
The sun came out for a while, but
then became overcast once again
and there was wind. Our daughter,
April Meeker, and her husband,
Steve, were at the state tourna-
ment in Watertown this weekend,
as, their daughter, Miranda, plays
for the Spearfish Spartans basket-
ball team. They were excited to
make it to state this year. Before
heading back to Spearfish, Steve
and April drove to Sioux Falls and
from there headed home. I called
them about 20 minutes ago, to see
about the road conditions, they
were driving by Kadoka, said roads
were fine there, but that they had
driven on some bad roads on I-90
back to the east. They slowed down
to 40 miles per hour, saw two semi-
trucks and two cars in the ditch.
So, I guess it was a good thing I
didnt start out for home. I am not
what you would call an experienced
driver on bad roads. So, we will see
what Monday brings. Just between
you and me, Ill take our West
River weather compared to East
River. They get more ice down
Sioux Falls way. But, that rain and
wet snow Mitchell did get would
have been welcomed in our area.
We do need moisture. The good
news is that our granddaughter,
Laura, is feeling much better. She
is a busy little bee.
Time to get at the news. Tried
calling folks, but some werent
home and others didnt have any
news.
Keith Hunt and Christine
Niedan headed for Smith Center,
Kan., early Friday morning to pick
up their niece and nephews, Dei-
dra, Blake, and Stuart Hackerott.
With weather conditions predicted
for Saturday, they headed back
home to Midland the same day.
The kids have a week off from
school for spring break. Deidra is a
senior this year so graduation
plans are in the making.
Wilma Saucerman and Prerry
Saucerman were in Philip Thurs-
day with Wilma visiting her hus-
band, Gaylord Saucerman, at the
Philip Nursing Home and Prerry
visiting her mom, Marlin Evans, at
the Senechal apartments. Marlin is
scheduled for knee surgery in
April, I believe it is, so Prerry was
helping her mom out with a few
projects. Wishing you good luck
with your surgery, Marlin. When it
is all done with, you will be glad
you had it done. I know I was.
Tuesday, March 5, Keith Hunt,
Midland, along with Sylvia Huber
and Kevin Huber, Rapid City, at-
tended the funeral of William Bill
Huber which was held at the
United Church of Christ in Belle
Fourche. Keith met Bill when he
was living with Danny and Thilda
Mulcahy in Ft. Pierre and attended
the eighth grade at the school in Ft.
Pierre. Bills wife, Violet Huber,
was a cousin to Sylvias late hus-
band, Leroy Huber. The Barnes
family was pleased and surprised
Sylvia was able to come to the fu-
neral. Keith had a short conversa-
tion with Debbie who he had not
seen since 1961. They were also at
the Black Hills National Cemetery
near Sturgis for the full military
honor services. On the way back to
Midland, Keith attended the Re-
gion 7 boys basketball champi-
onship game between White River
and Oelrichs, which was held in
Wall.
I am closing my news column
for this week. Road conditions were
not the best Monday morning, so
waited until afternoon with tem-
peratures warming up and the sun
shining before heading home. The
roads were good, but you could see
where a number of vehicles had
gone in the ditch between Mitchell
and Chamberlain. I made a pit-
stop at Chamberlain. They re-
ported they had gotten rain Satur-
day and then six to seven inches of
snow on top of that. About five
miles east of Presho the wind was
blowing strong. I bucked the wind
the rest of the way home with fields
of dirt blowing. Not good. We des-
perately need moisture. While at
Mitchell, Christopher, Stephanie
and I watched the girls state tour-
nament at Watertown on TV. Jerry
was watching the same games, so
we were on the phone following the
games. The Spearfish Spartans lost
the first game, but won the next
two, so went home with fifth place.
Our daughter, April, said they had
icy conditions beginning on Friday
evening at Watertown. So, every-
one is glad to be home. I will try
and collect more news next week.
Have a good day and a good week.
The family of
Ed Flom
would like to wish
him a very happy
special birthday!!
Cards can be sent to:
PO Box 6
Midland, SD 57552
Cell: 605-441-2859 Res: 605-859-2875 Fax: 605-859-3278
520 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 38
Philip, SD 57567 www.all-starauto.net
I can find
WHATEVER
youre
looking for!
David Burnett,
Owner
2006 Chevy Impala LT
3.9L V6 Auto
Remote Start, Sunroof and More
Jerry and Sonia Nemec, Midland, put up for auction Frank and Florence Schwalms F7 quarter circle brand at Tuesdays
Philip Livestock Auctions sale. The Nemecs had purchased the brand several years ago but decided to sell the brand with
the proceeds going toward a scholarship at Black Hills State University. The Schwalms daughters, Linda Bowman and Mary
Scott, liked the idea. BHSU scholarships in memory of Olga Meyers and Harold DeYoung, relatives of the Nemecs, already
existed, but it was decided to combine those two scholarships with the proceeds from the brand sale and form the Meyers,
DeYoung and Schwalm Scholarship. Nemecs son-in-law, Steve Meeker, vice president of University Advancement at BHSU,
helped facilitate the sale and scholarship. The scholarship is for any South Dakota resident, but preference is given to stu-
dents from Midland and/or Haakon, Stanley, Jones and Jackson counties. The brand sold for $400. Pictured from left are
Meeker, Bowman, Sam Koedam of Philip, who purchased the brand, Scott, and J. Nemec. Courtesy Photo
Brand sale adds to scholarship fund
Greetings from sunny, cool,
breezy, very dry northeast Haakon
County. We haven't had any mois-
ture, but we have had excess wind
recently. I heard that Cheyenne
School in Stanley County has been
closed recently because of blowing
dust! I hope and pray that we re-
ceive some moisture soon.
It is getting closer to spring,
which means there are more birds
showing up every day. I noticed a
yard full of robins recently, scratch-
ing through last year's leaves
under the apple trees, searching for
something to eat. And more birds
means more crashes. This morn-
ing, a small bird tried to fly
through my picture window. It
wasn't successful, and now it is sit-
ting on the sidewalk in front of my
house, too stunned to fly. I hope it
recovers its senses before the cats
find it otherwise, it won't be good
news for the bird! I have a new the-
ory about why the birds keep flying
into that window. From a bird's eye
view, they are probably looking
into the south facing picture win-
dow and seeing the sliding glass
door on the north side of the
house they obviously think they
can fly right through here! I don't
think I have a solution to the prob-
lem, so I just have to hope that no
large birds try to make their way
through the house.
First of all, condolences to Ron
and Helen Beckwith and family.
Helen's father, Leo Gebhart,
Brookings, passed away last week-
end at the age of 95. He leaves one
son, eight daughters, 37 grandchil-
dren and 74 great-grandchildren.
That is quite a legacy!
Congratulations to the cast and
crew of the Hayes play. There were
three performances at Hayes Hall
last weekend, and it sounds like
the attendees were well enter-
tained. It takes a lot of time and ef-
fort to put on these productions,
and I applaud the folks who work
to keep the Hayes play tradition
going. This was the 60th annual
Hayes play good job!
And speaking of Hayes, I was in
Hayes early Saturday morning to
pick up my Bountiful Basket.
There is a Hayes food co-op, and
baskets of fresh fruits and vegeta-
bles arrive every two weeks. The
produce is so fresh and delicious,
and the value is excellent. Bounti-
ful Baskets are available in many
communities, and if you are a fruit
and veggie lover, it may be worth
your time to look into it.
While I'm thinking about it, I
want to remind you that National
Ag Day is next Tuesday, March 19.
The farmers and ranchers of this
country work hard to provide the
world's population with the food
and fiber we need. According to Na-
tional Ag Day information, "We
know that food and fiber doesn't
just arrive at the grocery or cloth-
ing store or magically appear on
our dinner table or in our closet.
There's an entire industry dedi-
cated to providing plentiful and
safe food for consumption as well
as a wide range of comfortable,
fashionable clothing choices. We
rely on agriculture for the very ne-
cessities of life. From beef and pork
to cotton and corn, agriculture is
working harder than ever to meet
the needs of Americans and others
around the world. And it's impor-
tant to remember that American
agriculture is not just doing it, but
doing it better and more effectively!
Each American farmer feeds about
144 people, and agriculture is
America's number one export. And
with new technology, farmers are
more environmentally friendly
than ever before. That's really
what this day is all about recog-
nizing the role of agriculture and
celebrating it."
Lola Roseth was in Philip Thurs-
day, and she paid a visit to her
friend, Jill (Fitch) Alfaro. Jill and
Lola were next door neighbors
when Lola's children were in high
school. Jill's daughter, Dorothy,
was there also, and the ladies had
a wonderful visit. Sunday after-
noon, Thor, Jackie, and young
Royce Roseth came to the ranch to
visit grandpa Duane and grandma
Lola. Royce is growing fast, already
"running" all over the place. (That
is such a cute age however, I
must admit that I enjoyed all the
ages and stages of our children.)
Monday, Lola Roseth and her sis-
ter, Linda Smith, made a trip to
Rapid City. They did some business
and visited their mother, Joy
Klima.
Carmen and Clark Alleman are
proud grandparents. Their grand-
daughter, Morgan Nelson, recently
competed in the state swim meet in
Aberdeen. Morgan competed and
placed in nine events and came in
second for points scored in her age
group. Congratulations, and keep
up the good work!
Ed Briggs recently attended a
South Dakota Ag and Rural Lead-
ership event in Ft. Pierre. Ed man-
ages to stay very busy, and I can
seldom catch him to get caught up
on his news.
I wasn't able to catch up with
Clint and Laura Alleman this
week, either, but I do have some
news that came too late for last
week's column. Johnathon and
Justin Neuharth came to spend the
day recently at Clint and Laura's
house. Laura said it was awesome
to have the kids run and play in the
house. And little Alivya learned
that noise was more fun to make
when there were two other little
ones to help. Clint, Laura and
Alivya also helped Laura's father,
Randy Yost, celebrate his 57th
birthday, which was March 4.
Laura was the director of the
Hayes play this year, so now that
the flurry of Hayes play activities
is done, I hope she is able to take
things a little easy.
Dick and Gene Hudson were in
Rapid City last Tuesday to have
the stitches removed following
Gene's recent eye surgery. Wednes-
day evening, Dick and Gene at-
tended the pancake supper and
Lenten services at the Lutheran
church in Midland. The supper and
services were well attended, and
they enjoyed visiting with many
friends and neighbors. Friday, Dick
and Gene were in Philip to attend
a meeting on sorghum production,
and Friday evening they were on
hand for the first performance of
the 2013 Hayes play.
Randy Neuhauser and sons-in-
law, Ross Tschetter and Mike Hoy,
stopped by Sunday to pick up eggs
and visit for a bit.
Billy and Arlyne Markwed had a
visit from their grandson, Trent
Kurtz, Friday. He was on his way
to Rapid City to attend the girl's
basketball tournament there.
Trent spent Friday night with his
mother and stepfather, Cindy and
Bruce Bresee, in Spearfish. Friday
evening, Billy and Arlyne attended
the Hayes play, and the rest of the
weekend was spent watching the
girl's basketball tournament on tel-
evision. They attended church Sun-
day.
Nels and Dorothy Paulson were
in Pierre Wednesday to keep eye
appointments. While at the eye
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser 567-3325
Community
Thursday, March 14, 2013 The Pioneer Review Page 7
Check us out
online
(and in color!)
www.
pioneer-
review.com
Online subscriber
access only.
When securing meat prior to
cooking a lot of recipes call for
toothpicks. A reader suggested
spaghet- ti noodles instead. Good
thought, I always seem to miss at
least one toothpick.
Ive used recipes that call for
coating of nuts and chocolate chips
with flour before adding to your
batter, but didnt know the reason-
ing behind the direction. Now I
know its to keep them from sink-
ing to the bottom!
Ive always cut my cinnamon
rolls with small diameter string,
but have found out recently that
unflavored dental floss is even bet-
ter. It would work as well for cut-
ting cakes in half for layering or
cutting the top off a cake to make
it even prior to layering.
8 Years of The Neighbor Lady
cookbook I have suggested coating
your knife with butter before cut-
ting meringue pies. Now why
didnt I think of that; it would keep
the meringue from sticking and
pulling up.
Another one of those why didnt
I think of that is when making
deviled eggs put the hard boiled
egg yolks in a sealable plastic bag.
Add remaining ingredients, close
bag and mix by working the bag
with your hands. Cut a small tip
off one corner and squeeze into the
egg white.
,.
With March 17 St. Patricks
fast approaching I got to wonder-
ing just who he was and why is
this day celebrated in the manner
it is.
According to The History Chan-
nels website, Saint Patrick lived
during the fifth century and is the
patron saint and national apostle
of Ireland. Born in Roman
Britain, he was kidnapped and
brought to Ireland as a slave at
the age of 16. He later escaped,
but returned to Ireland and was
credited with bringing Christian-
ity to its people. In the centuries
following Patrick's death (believed
to have been on March 17, 461),
the mythology surrounding his life
became ever more ingrained in the
Irish culture: Perhaps the most
well known legend is that he ex-
plained the Holy Trinity (Father,
Son and Holy Spirit) using the
three leaves of a native Irish
clover, the shamrock, noted the
website.
As to how it is celebrated, the
website stated, On St. Patrick's
Day, which falls during the Chris-
tian season of Lent, Irish families
would traditionally attend church
in the morning and celebrate in
the afternoon. Lenten prohibitions
against the consumption of meat
were waived and people would
dance, drink and feast on the tra-
ditional meal of Irish bacon and
cabbage.
It is believed that the day has
been celebrated since the ninth or
10th century.
,.
We encourage our readers to share
their items of interest. Just email
nancy@pioneer-review.com, drop your
item off at our office or mail it to the
Pioneer Review, PO Box 788, Philip,
SD 57567.
We pass ideas along, but make no
guarantees to the reader.
CROP INSURANCE SPECIALISTS SINCE 1984
CREW
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OFFICE: (605) 433-5411
TOLL-FREE: 1-888-433-8750
We WILL be gLad
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(Sign-up deadline is March 15th)
Call us for coverage or a quote
WE REPRESENT SEVERAL COMPANIES!
Back row (L-R): Rusty Olney, Maurice Handcock,
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Reminder:
Livestock Price
Insurance is
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CREW AGENCY, LTD.
RUSTY: 605-837-2868 OR 484-2517
MAURICE: 605-837-2461 OR 391-2502
TANNER: 605-279-2144 OR 605-641-1360
Located off I-90 at cactus fLat exIt 131
859-2744
or 685-3068
Philip
Extended Cab, Automatic, 4x4
06 Ford F-150
FANNING ANGUS RANCH
The Ranchers Choice
21st Annual Performance
Bull & Female Sale
TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 2013 NOON (MST)
PHILIP (SD) LIVESTOCK AUCTION
SALE DAY PHONE: (605) 859-2577
Z190 Connealy Captain
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Selling 19 Purebred
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BLOODLINES INCLUDE:
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Connealy Captain
Connealy Reply
Sitz Upward 307R
Sitz Alliance 6595
Poss Total Impact
Mytty In Focus
S A V Final Answer 0035
NEIL TONY FANNING, OWNER
Cell: (805) 217-4300
RANCH MANAGER DENNIS ESBECK
(605) 685-BULL (2855)
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
D
a
n
ce T
h
e
Night
A
w
a
y
105th Annual Philip Vol. Firemans Dance
Friday, March 15th
8 pm to Midnight Legion Hall in Philip
Music by DeLa Cruz Band
Tickets: $5 Advance; $8 at Door
had supper with Shawn and
Thamy to celebrate Shawn's birth-
day which was Friday.
Weekend guests at Tim and
Judy Elshere's were son Scott and
Tia Elshere, Holden and Isaac,
Sioux Falls. Saturday, Rachelle
and Ashlynn Elshere came to visit.
Casey was unable to come as he
was in Oklahoma for work.
The Miles Hovland family spent
Saturday afternoon and evening in
Philip. They visited with Debbie
Prouty and later with Kelly and
Deanna Fees and Tyson and Hilary
Brooks, Taylor and Steven. They
enjoyed supper and bowling.
A week ago Sunday, guests at
Leo and Joan Pattons for lunch
were the Jim Stangles. Linda
brought supper down for all of
them that evening. Last Sunday,
Leo and Joan had Ralph and Carol
Kroetch and the Stangles for lunch,
visiting and cards.
Mathew Paul Stephens, son of
Paul and Moneik (Harty) Stephens,
was baptized Saturday at St.
Mary's Catholic Church in
Milesville. Aunt and uncle, Jane
and Tom Aasby, Rapid City, were
among those at the occasion.
Guests for part of the weekend at
Hugh and Ann's were Paul's
mother, Leslie Stephens, Paul and
Moneik Stephens, Mikaela and
Mathew, Jim and Adele Harty,
Molly and Owen, Ed Harty, Steph
Cooper and their son, Cooper.
Casey Reder and friend, Emma
Slovek, went to Rapid City Friday
night for a Rush hockey game.
Murdock Arthur, Enning, vis-
ited briefly with brother, Matt
Arthur, Sunday.
In visiting with Deb Smith,
(Cory) she said not much news ex-
cept they have added some animals
to their place. She is feeding some
bottle lambs and has a sow with
several little piglets. Someday Deb
would like to spin some wool from
her lambs using her drop spindle. I
didn't know what that was so
looked it up on the Internet. A drop
spindle is used for spinning and
looks something like a child's toy
top.
Thursday night, the Mark Rad-
way family met Gary and Stacy
Dole in Rapid City and they all at-
tended the Jeff Dunham show. Jeff
is a ventriloquist. Judith spent the
weekend in Deadwood for scrap-
booking.
Boyd and Kara Parsons were
callers Sunday afternoon at the
home of Mark and Pat Hanrahan.
Wade and Marcy Parsons cele-
brated their anniversary in Las
Vegas from Thursday until Mon-
day night. Marcy's parents, Jim
and Betty Smith, came out from
Philip to stay with Autumn, Kamri
and Keenan while they were gone.
Danielle Piroutek got to spend
an extra day at home from her
spring break. Her flight out of
Rapid City was canceled Friday, so
she left Sunday, returning to her
studies in Washington, D.C.
During Abby Carley's spring
break from Black Hills State Uni-
versity in Spearfish, she observed
classes at Philip High School for
her practicum. Another thing I
learned this week on the Internet
it's 'supervised practical applica-
tion' in the area of one's interests.
Karen Carley and Karyl Sandal
are among those who are taking
computer classes at the Haakon
County Public Library in Philip.
Their classes are on Tuesday and
Thursday nights.
Jeff and Crystal Schofield and
Chase spent Saturday afternoon
and evening at the Donnie
Schofields. The guys had a project
going and they enjoyed supper to-
gether. Donnie and Bobette
Schofield went to the Hayes play
Sunday afternoon.
Lee and Debbie Neville drove up
to Union Center Saturday to visit
their daughter, Lynsy and Kyle
Brink and son, Cayson.
Byron and Peggy Parsons spent
the past week with friends, Boyd
and Jeanie Waara and Burjes and
Cheryl Fitch, in Fredricksberg,
Texas, riding their motorcycles
Friday, Vonda Hamill, Nick and
Carson, traveled to Lead where
Carson joined the rest of the Philip
junior high basketball team partic-
ipate in the Mile High Tourna-
ment. They had games on both Fri-
day and Saturday. Brian Dela-
hoyde and family and Priscilla
Romkema came to watch the tour-
nament. Saturday, Fred Romkema
joined Priscilla and the Hamills for
lunch. He was returning from
Pierre's final day of the legislature,
where he serves as a representa-
tive for Lawrence County. Jason
had to stay home and take care of
calving duties.
The moisture is moving a little
farther north, so hopefully we will
be getting some very soon. Our
grandson, who lives in Grant, Neb.,
said they had rain and very heavy
snow over the weekend. Just what
we need!
Milesville News
(continued from page 4)
pretty busy. Sunday morning after
a breakfast at Erics for all of us,
Bill and I turned toward home, en-
countering some nasty roads until
about Vivian and Shelley plunged
off to the south in very nasty con-
ditions. She made it home safe, but
it was so bad she couldnt even find
a place to pull over and stop. In
Kadoka it was 50, go figure.
Saturday evening, Ralph and
Cathy Fiedler attended a retire-
ment party for a friend and co-
worker. She has worked at the
same nursing home for 45 years.
They got to see other gals who
Cathy worked with when she first
started at the Sturgis Nursing
Home, so it was like old home week
for them all.
Sunday afternoon, Don Klumb
and Hannah came to Sturgis to
help go through Cathy Fiedlers
computer and see what was wrong.
It was her modem, so the cable
company had to come and replace
it. Later, Eric, Sherry, Elsie and
Loman Hanson joined them, then
Caitlin and Tessa picked up
Lynette at work and they came
over for supper, with Caitlin driv-
ing. No special occasion, just
wanted to get together for supper.
After dessert of homemade peach
cake that Sherry made, everyone
headed for home.
Tony Harty had a fight with his
van Sunday when a sensor ran the
battery down. He took all the bulbs
out, so when the indicator said the
door was open (and it wasnt) and
the lights stayed on, it wouldnt
run down the battery. After he got
it started, he attended church.
Bernard and Barbara Herber vis-
ited at Tonys after church, as did
his niece, Kathy Brown. He had
dinner out after their visit and
stopped by the Hairs.
Liberty is not a gift from God,
but a hard-won achievement with
the help of God. Daysies
An interesting article caught my
eye as I was traveling through the
many pages of things that had been
collected by my ancestors and kept
by my mom. One such article, writ-
ten March 15, 1887, in Kalamazoo,
Mich., seems to be a letter to the
editor item. STOP! This Licensed
Iniquity of Rum Selling. PART-
NERSHIP WITH THE DEVIL
MUST BE STOPPED. Count the
Crimes Which are the Result of
Drunkenness. (This is just the
headlines). In its statistical as-
pects the magnitude of this evil is
simply appalling. Nearly ten hun-
dred millions of dollars in the ag-
gregate annually squandered for
drink to pour down the throats of
this highly cultured, civilized peo-
ple. The American people pay
more than six times as much in one
year for intoxicating liquors as they
pay for educating their children in
public schools, and other institu-
tions of learning. More than three
times as much for drink as for
clothing twice as much for whisky
as for bread, and the aggregate of
all the wages earned in America in
all branches of manufacturing in
one year does not equal the amount
paid out for intoxicating beverages
during the same period. What
stupendous folly to pay out such
enormous sums of money for so
worthless, so baneful a thing, that,
at the best biteth like a serpent;
and stingeth like an adder. But
it is said this is a land of freedom;
that you cannot constitutionally
control the people in the gratifica-
tion of their appetites that they
can eat and drink what they like,
etc. This is not true as a merely
legal proposition. The statutes of
all the states provide for the ap-
pointment of trustees, conserva-
tors, and guardians for minors,
spendthrifts, the imbecile, idiotic
and insane and all who are ad-
judged Incompetent to manage
their own business affairs. And
cannot the state legally protect and
take the guardianship of its spend-
thrift idiotic citizens who squander
their money for drink, and in so
doing evince such a lack of intelli-
gence and capacity to manage their
business affairs? Advocates of a
license or tax system point with
pride and great satisfaction to
money received from this source as
so much clear gain, clean profit
without any capital invested that
the whisky helps support crimi-
nals, the insane, paupers and
tramps that it pays the salaries
of judges, magistrates, sheriffs,
lawyers, constables, policemen,
and the officers and employees of
asylums, prisons, houses of correc-
tion and the reform schools that
it builds court houses, jails, pris-
ons, asylums, poor houses and
homes for the unfortunates, with
quite a nice margin left over for
general purposes. Does any sane
man believe this? Is it not a lie,
fresh from the devil himself, who is
said to be the father of lies. But all
the tax money is dearly earned. It
is not a bonus a free gift without
an equivalent. The government re-
ceives one hundred millions of dol-
lars as its share of the plunder
blood money but it does put in a
most costly valuable consideration
as its part of the capital stock in
this iniquitous business. The bodes
and souls of men and women and
children that is the equivalent;
that the price, and that is what the
money costs! Could this be written
about the push to legalize mari-
juana in order to collect the tax?
As I reread the above, I think to
myself, how lucky are those who
can skip to the next paragraph and
avoid some of this lesson from the
past.
Betwixt Places News
(continued from page 5)
South Dakota legislators gave
approval to three of eight bills that
were recommended by the governor
and attorney generals task force
on open government.
Last year, Governor Dennis Dau-
gaard and Attorney General Marty
Jackley appointed representatives
of state and local government, law
enforcement, businesses and news
media to review open government
laws and make recommendations
for legislation for the 2013 session.
Two of the three legislative propos-
als to win favor among legislators
dealt with open records issues
while a third bill amends the
states open meetings law.
House Bill 1112 clarifies that
certain three-member public
boards such as township boards do
not need to comply with the states
open meetings laws if they are
meeting only for the purpose of car-
rying out previously adopted public
policy and ministerial functions or
are conducting an investigation re-
lated to public safety.
The two open records bills
passed by the legislature deal with
clarifications related to public ac-
cess to database records main-
tained by government and a delib-
erative process exception in the
open records reform law approved
in 2009.
Among the open government
task force bills that were defeated
was a bill to clarify that certain
government committees and task
forces be subject to the open meet-
ings laws and that the contents of
a public meeting conducted by elec-
tronic communications such as
email be subject to open meetings
and open records laws.
Legislators also defeated propos-
als to make arrest photos public
and to clarify that law enforcement
logs were public.
Three open government
task force bills approved
Thursday, March 14, 2013 The Pioneer Review Page 8
School & Sports
Introduces our
New Dealer
Alan Rislov
in Philip, SD
Give him a call today!
(605) 685-5792
Corn, proso millet, forage crops
& many other seeds available.
Last Sunday Special:
March 24th
Then closed on Sun-
days thereafter.
859-2430 Philip
SundAY SPECIAL:
Salisbury Steak
Scalloped Potatoes,
Cornbread,
Salad & dessert
WEEKLY SPECIAL:
Reuben Sandwich
with French Fries
Philip League Bowling
Lucky Strike
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open we have orders to go!!
859-2430 Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Handrahan Const .....................26-14
Shads Towing...........................25-15
Dakota Bar................................24-16
Badlands Auto..........................17-19
Rockers......................................14-26
Petersens..................................14-26
Hightlights:
Jason Petersen......................207/556
Randy Boyd...........................205/558
Trina Brown.................................174
Tena Slovek..................................472
Connie Schlim..............................171
Neal Petersen.......................2-7 split
Jackie Shull ........................3-10 split
Tuesday Mens Early
Philip Motor................................25-7
Peoples Market .........................22-10
Kennedy Impl ...........................18-14
G&A Trenching.........................17-15
Georges Welding ......................15-17
Bear Auto..................................12-20
Philip Health Service ...............11-21
Kadoka Tree Service...................8-24
Highlights:
Tony Gould...................................542
Gene Jones ...................................513
Alvin Pearson .............3-10 split; 512
Steve Varner...............3-10 split; 507
Ryan Seager ......................5-7-9 split
Randy Boyd ..........................2-7 split
Curtis Bitting .......................5-6 split
Terry Wentz........................3-10 split
Todd Radway......................5-10 split
Fred Foland ........................3-10 split
Jim Larson...........................8-9 split
Kent Buchholz....................5-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
(standing at the end of week 26)
Invisibles.............................32.5-11.5
State Farm..........................27.5-16.5
Cutting Edge Salon ..................26-18
Bowling Belles ....................21.5-22.5
Jolly Ranchers ....................15.5-28.5
Highlights:
Shirley Parsons ...3-10 split; 176/458
Dody Weller ...4-5 split; 174, 162/450
Audrey Jones.................171, 153/449
Charlene Kjerstad.................197/446
Cindy Wilmarth...........................171
Kay Kroetch........................9-10 split
Shirley OConnor ..9-10 & 3-10 splits
Donna King...........................2-7 split
Kay Williams........................4-5 split
Vonda Hamill .......................2-7 split
Deanna Fees.......................3-10 split
Wednesday Night Early
Dakota Bar..................................28-8
Morrisons Haying ....................22-14
Hildebrand Concrete ................19-17
Wall Food Center......................17-19
Dorothys Catering ...................16-20
Chiefies Chicks ..................14.5-21.5
First National Bank .................14-22
Just Tammys......................13.5-22.5
Highlights:
Kalie Kjerstad.......................126/342
Amy Morrison .......................209/526
Val Schulz .............................194/505
Linda Stangle...............................193
Brenda Grenz........................179/478
Ashley Reckling ...........................178
Cheryl Behrend............................166
Marlis Petersen.....................180/494
Cristi Ferguson.....................180/470
Kathy Arthur ...............................176
Shar Moses ...................2-7 split; 172
Lindsey Hildebrand ...........8-10 split
Jessica Wagner.....................7-9 split
Tena Slovek ..........................2-7 split
Thursday Mens
The Steakhouse ..........................31-5
Coyles SuperValu.....................26-10
OConnell Const ........................22-14
Dakota Bar................................16-20
WEE BADD...............................16-20
A&M Laundry...........................14-22
West River Pioneer Tanks .......12-24
McDonnell Farms .......................7-29
Highlights:
Cory Boyd......................235, 213/621
Jordon Kjerstad ....................209/555
Nathan Kjerstad...................211/550
Matt Schofield.......................214/537
Jack Heinz ..........................3-10 split
Jay McDonnell....................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Randys Spray Service..............30-10
Cristis Crew.............................25-15
Lee & the Ladies.......................24-16
Roys Repair ..............................23-17
King Pins...................................14-26
The Ghost Team...........................0-0
Highlights:
James Larson...............................197
Deb Neville...................................151
Alvin Pearson..............204 clean/567
Duane Hand.................................200
Tanner Norman.........4-5-7 split; 521
Deanna Fees.........................4-5 split
Cory Boyd ...........................3-10 split
Aaron Richardson...............3-10 split
Ed Morrison........................9-10 split
by Del Bartels
Jeff OConnell, a 2011 Philip
High School graduate and son of
Roger and Teresa OConnell, ex-
celled in the 2013 Summit League
Indoor Track and Field Champi-
onship, February 24-25.
As a member of the University of
South Dakota, Vermillion, track
and field team, OConnell competed
in five events, placing in three. In
the long jump, and in his final at-
tempt, he cleared 243.75 to earn
first place. This is also his personal
best long jump distance to date.
Since attending college, OCon-
nell has taken up competition in
the high jump. David Gottsleben,
head manager of the USD team,
explained why OConnell entered a
new event. Hes such a good ath-
lete and competitor, he did the high
jump for the team. Hes a great
team player.
Im pretty quick off the ground,
said OConnell. I hadnt had any
experience, but he thought I could
be successful. At the Summit
League meet, OConnell placed
fifth in the high jump.
He was a also member of the
1,600 meter relay team. The four-
person team placed first to end the
meet. This is the third time the
4x400 team has taken a conference
championship. At this meet, the
USD boys team tallied up enough
points to be team champions.
The indoor track and field season
just ended, and the outdoor season
is just beginning. The next meet for
OConnell will be March 23 in Ari-
zona.
OConnell is also excelling in his
academics as well as his athleti-
cism. Hes is currently on the aca-
demic honor roll. Hes on his way
to an NCAA post graduate schol-
arship, predicted Gottsleben.
Its a goal, admitted OConnell.
Im looking into getting into coach-
ing, and am hoping to get a gradu-
ated assistant coaching job here.
OConnell is working toward a
physical education major and a
coaching minor.
According to his mother, Teresa,
Jeff has had a wonderful year due
to opportunities and working hard
for the track and field team. He is
a only a sophomore, yet was voted
to be a team captain.
As a mom I am very proud of him
for getting to attend the 2012 Na-
tional Collegiate Athletic Associa-
tion Leadership Forum. USD gets
to pick one male athlete and one fe-
male athlete out of all USD ath-
letes, and Jeff was chosen to attend
the leadership forum to represent
the USD male athletes. He trav-
eled to Dallas, Texas, November 1-
4, and met some amazing people
and I think it really made him see
things from a great point of view,
stated T. OConnell.
I am thankful for all the home
support, said J. OConnell.I am
grateful to be from Philip where
people follow you even after you
leave high school.
Jeff OConnell shining in USD track
Jeff OConnell with his mother, Teresa, and father, Roger. Courtesy photo
Philip area youth competed in
the AAU regions wrestling tourna-
ment in Rapid City, Saturday,
March 9.
The top eight wrestlers in each
division had advanced from dis-
tricts. Philip had 30 youth qualified
to competed at regions.
Three or four, depending on age,
of the top wrestlers in each age
bracket at regions will go to state,
which will be held in Brookings,
Saturday and Sunday, March 23-
24.
6 and under: Evan Kroetch 1st, Cannin
Snyder 3rd
7-8 year olds: Ryker Peterson and Strat-
ton Morehart 1st, Cohen Reckling and Lin-
coln Koehn 2nd, Brit Morrison 3rd,
Tukker Boe 5th,
9-10 year olds: McCoy Peterson 1st,
Ethan Burnett 4th, Levi Williams, Sawyer
Smith and Layton Terkildsen attended
11-12 year olds: Cody Donnelly, Reece
Heltzel and Jayden Coller 1st, Colby
Smith 2nd, Laeton Anderson and Jesse
Hostutler 3rd, Victor Dennis and Bosten
Morehart 4th, Richard Lamont 5th,
Parker Snyder and Juan Pinela attended
13-14 year olds: Hunter Peterson and
Kaylor Pinney 1st, Pedro Dennis 2nd,
Keagan Fitch 4th, Trey Elshere 5th, John
Daly attended
15-16 year olds: Nick Donnelly 1st
Regional
AAU wrestling
Musicians outstanding in contest
Instrumental solos. Back row, from left: Gavin Snook timpani, Tyshia Ferguson mallets, Katie Hostutler baritone sax-
ophone, Kaci Olivier tenor sax, Garrett Snook alto sax, Kelsie Kroetch alto sax, Gavin Brucklacher bassoon, Paul
Guptill trombone, Nelson Holman bass clarinet, and Katlin Knutson mallets. Front row: Amanda McIlravy clarinet,
Jordyn Dekker flute, Justina Cvach flute, Ellie Coyle flute, Rachel Koshersberger flute, Tyana Gottsleben flute and
Peyton DeJong clarinet. Courtesy photos
Vocal solos. Back row, from left: Hanna Hostutler, Peyton DeJong, Lexa Crowser, Lakin Boyd, TedDee Buffalo, Justina Cvach
and Katlin Knutson. Middle: Afton Burns, Amanda McIlravy, Jane Poss, Ellie Coyle, Rachel Kochersberger and Allison Pekron.
Front: Garrett Snook and Gavin Snook.
The vocal and instrumental mu-
sicians of Philip High School com-
peted in the Region VII High
School Band/Vocal Contest held in
Murdo, Wednesday, February 27.
Of its 53 contest entries, Philip
High School earned 35 outstand-
ings and 13 excellents, including
an outstanding rating in the large
group band category. Philip had
entries of vocal and instrumental
solos, duets and ensembles. The in-
strumental and vocal instructor at
Philip High School is Barb Bowen,
with volunteer help from others,
particularly Cynthia Finn.
Other schools that attended the
contest were Kadoka Area, Jones
County, Bennett County, Wall,
Todd County, White River, Lyman
and Stanley County. The rating
scale used by the judges tallied
earned points by the musicians and
used an outstanding I designa-
tion for top performances. The
other ratings, decreasing from
there, were then excellent II and
good III.
Philip Motor, Inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
We would love to have this
trade, or others like it!!
Check out our entire selection at
www.philipmotor.com
Stop in & see Ryan today!!
Legal Notlces0eadllne: Frldays at Noon
1hursday, Maroh 14, 2013 1he Pioneer Review Page 9
Notice of AppIication
for Executive
CIemency
Justin Carlin, who was sentenced from
Haakon County,, the 19th day of August,
1999, to two years in the South Dakota
State Penitentiary for the crime of Grand
Theft, has applied to the South Dakota
Board of Pardons and Paroles for Par-
don.
Rensch Law Office
731 St. Joseph St., Ste. 220
Rapid City, SD 57701
[Published March 7, 14 & 21, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $15.02]
SCHOOL LAND
LEASE AUCTION
A school land lease auction will be held in
the Haakon County Courthouse, in Philip,
SD, on March 28, 2013, at 1:15 PM (MT).
A list of tracts available for lease can be
obtained at the Haakon County Auditor's
Office, by visiting sdpubliclands.com, or
by contacting Mike Cornelison, Office of
School & Public Lands, 500 E. Capitol Av-
enue, Pierre, SD 57501-5070, or phone
(605) 773-4172. Disabled individuals
needing assistance should contact the
Office of School and Public Lands at least
48 hours in advance of the auction to
make any necessary arrangements.
[Published February 28, March 7, 14 &
21, 2013, at the total approximate cost of
$25.76]
LEGAL NOTICE
ATTENTION ALL CONTRACTORS:
Looking for weatherization, furnace, elec-
trical and plumbing contractors in Ben-
nett, Butte, Corson, Custer, Dewey, Fall
River, Haakon, Harding, Jackson,
Lawrence, Meade, Pennington, Perkins,
Shannon and Ziebach counties interested
in completing residential work for the July,
2013 June 30, 2014 contract year.
Contractors must submit a letter of inter-
est, provide copy of insurance (workers
compensation, full comprehensive, gen-
eral and automobile liability insurance
and certificate of insurance), certificate of
completion of EPA approved Lead-Based
Paint for Renovators Training and be a
certified EPA lead base paint renovator
firm. Attend Western SD Community Ac-
tion Core Competency Training and be
willing to comply with Davis Bacon Act
(wages, weekly reporting). Please return
requested information to Western South
Dakota Community Action, nc., 1844
Lombardy Drive, Rapid City, SD 57703 by
4:00 PM on Friday, March 15, 2013.
Please call 605-348-1460 or 1-800-327-
1703 for more information.
[Published March 7 & 14, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $21.44]
LEGAL NOTICE
The Board of Directors of Western South
Dakota Community Action, nc. are seek-
ing candidates interested in serving as
the Low ncome representative for
Haakon County.
Western SD Community Action, nc. is a
non-profit corporation governed by a
forty-two (42) member Board of Directors
representing (3) sectors: low-income peo-
ple, civic groups within the community
and each of the fourteen (14) county
boards of government.
The primary purpose of the CAP agency
is to focus local, state, regional and na-
tional resources on developing effective
ways of assisting low-income people. To
accomplish this, Western SD Community
Action, nc. operates weatherization, gar-
den programs, summer youth programs,
necessity pantry programs, employment
assistance, educational supply programs,
emergency food and commodity projects,
homeless programs, community food
pantries and clothing centers.
Low-income persons seeking to be
elected are required to have five (5) low
income persons over eighteen (18) years
of age sign a petition. Non low income
persons wishing to represent low-income
people are required to have ten (10) low
income persons over eighteen (18) sign
a petition. This person must also reside
in, work in or volunteer in Haakon County.
Persons at least eighteen (18) years of
age seeking to be a Board low-income
representative can obtain petitions from
Rose Swan, 1844 Lombardy Drive, Rapid
City, SD 57703. Phone: (605) 348-1460
or out of Rapid City (800) 327-1703.
Petitions are to be submitted to Western
SD Community Action, nc., 1844 Lom-
bardy Drive, Rapid City, SD 57703. f you
have any questions please contact West-
ern SD Community Action, nc., 1844
Lombardy Drive, Rapid City, SD 57703.
Phone: (605) 348-1460 or out of Rapid
City (800) 327-1703.
[Published March 7 & 14, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $38.99]
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
MUNICIPAL RESIDENTIAL
GARBAGE COLLECTION
CITY OF PHILIP, SOUTH DAKOTA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City
of Philip, South Dakota, City Council will
be accepting written, sealed
proposals/bids for a residential solid
waste disposal collection contract.
Proposals/bids may be delivered to the
City of Philip Finance Office, 140 S.
Howard Avenue, Fourth Floor, Haakon
Co. Courthouse, or mailed to PO Box
408, Philip, South Dakota 57567-0408.
Sealed proposals/bids must be plainly
and clearly marked to identify their con-
tents. Proposals/bids shall be submitted
no later than 4:00 PM MST, March 28,
2013.
Each proposal/bid shall be accompanied
by a certified check or cashier's check for
an amount of 5% of the total bid, or a bid
bond in the amount of 10% of the total
bid. Such check or bid bond shall be used
as a bid security in the event the success-
ful bidder fails to enter into a contract and
post an approved bond with the City
within ten (10) days after the formal ac-
ceptance of their bid. The check shall be
drawn on a solvent bank or an approved
surety company.
Proposal specifications may be obtained
at the City of Philip Finance Office, 140 S.
Howard Avenue, Fourth Floor, Haakon
Co. Courthouse, PO Box 408, Philip,
South Dakota 57567-0408 or by calling
(605) 859-2175.
No bid shall be withdrawn after the filing
time for a period of thirty (30) days without
the written consent of the City of Philip
Council. No faxed bids will be accepted.
The City Council of the City of Philip,
South Dakota reserves the right to reject
any and all proposals/bids or to waive any
informalities or technicalities in bidding
and to accept the bid that is to the advan-
tage of, and in the best interest of, the
City of Philip, South Dakota.
Dated this 1st day of March 2013.
/s/ Michael Vetter, Mayor
City of Philip, South Dakota
ATTEST:
/s/ Monna Van Lint, Finance Officer
[Published March 7 & 14, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $43.54]
NOTICE OF
CANCELLATION
OF MUNICIPAL
ELECTION
CITY OF PHILIP, SOUTH DAKOTA
Notice is hereby given that no Municipal
Election will be held on the 9th day of
April 2013, for the City of Philip, South
Dakota.
The election for which public notice was
given has been cancelled because no
certificates of nomination were filed for
the following position to be filled and the
incumbent will hold over for the new term:
Jennifer Henrie, Council Member
Ward Two Year Term
The following individuals have filed valid
certificates of nomination in the office of
the Finance Officer for the following posi-
tions to be filled:
Greg Arthur, Council Member
Ward Two Year Term
Marion Matt, Council Member
Ward Two Year Term
Because each of the candidates are un-
opposed, certificates of election will be is-
sued in the same manner as to
successful candidates after election.
Dated this 25th day of February 2013.
Monna Van Lint
City Finance Officer
[Published March 7 & 14, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $31.19]
Exempt Property
in Haakon County
March 14, 2013
CITY OF PHILIP:
LegaI Description:
S2 LOTS 7-8, BLK 1, HGH SCHOOL
ADD
2A TRACT N SE4SE4, 16-4-18
LOT 2, BLK 7, CTY OF PHLP
LOT 1, LOT 2 EX N100', LOT 3B, BLK 1
1-20
LOT 10, BLK 1, RVERCREST ADD
TRACT N SE4SE4 1A 16-4-18
ALL EX W50' OF LOTS 8 & 9, BLK 4,
W23' & E 30' LOT7, ALL LOT 8, BLK
16
S2 LOT 9, BLK 3
LOT T1, NW4 26-6-20
LOT 11R, BLK 2 ORGNAL TOWN
PHLP
LOT 1, A PORTON OF THE SE4SE4,
16-1-20
LOTS 8, 9, BLK 2, LOT 10, AND STRP
OF LAND 20'X100' ADJACENT TO N
LNE OF LOT 10, BLK 2, CTY OF
PHLP
LOTS 7, 8, 9, BLK 10, PORTON OF
VACATED HLLSD DRVE ROW, 1/2
OF VACATED ALLEY ON N SDE,
CTY OF PHLP
LOT 1, BLK 2
LOT 7,8,9 BLK 10 PHLP
LOTS 8,9 BLK 2
TRACT N SW4, 9-2-18
LOT, SW4NE4, 1-1-20
75' STRP FOR HWY ACROSS NW
CORNER OF TRACTN SW COR-
NER NW4SE4 13-1-20
TRACT N SE PART OF SW4NW4, 13-
1-20
TRACT N S PART OF NW4SE4,
SW4SE4, TRACT N S PART
SW4SE4 EX HWY 14-1-20
OUTLOT J, A PORTON OF NW4SE4
14-1-20
THAT PART OF S2SE4 LYNG SOUTH
OF RY 1-1-24
8.17A TRACT N NW4SW4 FOR HWY
16-3-18
LOT 1 21.8A 30-7-19
LOT 5 29.5A 17-7-20
LOTS 12-22, BLK 8 COURT HOUSE
LOT 7, OUTLOT R 24-1-20
LOT 3, BLK 1 KURKA ADDN
BEG 9618' W OF 21' N OF CORN.
STONE SET N NW CORN OF SW4
TH. N 150' E 158.9' S 150' W 158.9
13-1-20 PHLP
TR N E PART OF SW4NE4SE4 6-1-25
LOT 1A EX A TRACT & LOT2B, BLK 27
LOTS 1-10, BLK 2
LOTS 1-10, BLK 3
LOTS 1-6, BLK 5
LOTS 1-8, BLK 6
OUTLOT 10 & 11, BLK 7
TRACT N BLK 7, HGH SCHOOL AD-
DTON
LOT 1 OF OUTLOT 1 N NE4, 23-1-20
LOT 1A CONT. .42 EX TR, BLK 27
TRACT N SW4, 20-4-19
LOT 1 GOLF COURSE SUBDV
N2SE4, 1-1-20
TRACT SE4NW4 13-1-20,
NW4SW4NE4 13-1-20, TRACT F
VRGL HANSEN ACREAGE 13-1-20,
LOT 1 TRACT A 13-1-20
W 100' LOT 1, BLK 5, CTY OF PHLP
LOTS 6-12 BLK 3, 10-3-23
1.13A TRACT N NE4NW4, 21-4-23
LOT 23, N2 LOT 24, LOT 25, W 85' LOT
26, BLK 7, CTY OF PHLP
LOT 1, BLK 10 ORGNAL TOWN
TRACT N NW4SE4 23-1-20
W2 BLK 1, OUTLOT A, GEM ADDTON
METES & BOUNDS DESCRPTON
BLK 18, ORGNAL TOWN
TRACT "A" NW CORNER SW4 13-1-20
TRACT OF LAND NW4SW4 13-1-20
LOT 4, BLK 5, HGHLAND ADD
LOT 18, BLK 3, HGHLAND ADD
E 20' LOT 5, BLK 2, MANNS ADD
LOT 9, BLK 6, ORGNAL TOWN
N2NE4 SW4NE4 120A, NW4 160A,
NE4SW4 & NW4SE4 80A, 16-1-21
TRACT A SW4NW4, 24-1-20
LOT H1 SW4SE4, 14-1-20
OUTLOT 3, CTY OF PHLP
S EXT OF MYRTLE AVE & LOT 1,
PORTON OF OUTLOT A, SW4SW4,
13-1-20
S 64' OF W 80' LOT 6, BLK 11, & N 16'
LOT A OF LOT 6, BLK 11, ORGNAL
TOWN
LOT 1, FREHALL SUBDVSON
OUTLOT S SW4SE4, 14-1-20, & LOT 8
FARGROUNDS SUBDVSON,
CTY OF PHLP
LOTS 2B, 3C, & 7A OUTLOT R,
N2NW4 24-1-20
TRACT J & - 70' STRP ROW TO
CTY-WOOD AVE
TRACT NT. & REV. RGHT WOOD
AVE
W2NE4 1-1-20 LAKE WAGGONER
LOT 1, WASTEWATER SUBDVSON
24-1-20
TRACT A, SW4SE4 13-1-20
OUTLOT 2 OF TRACT C N2SE4 13-1-
20
TR N S2NE4NE4NW4 24-1-20
LOT 24 HOAG'S VALLEY ADDN
LOT 23 HOAG'S VALLEY ADDN
LOT 22 HOAG'S VALLEY ADDN
E 50' LOTS 4,5,6, BLK 4 HGH
SCHOOL ADDN
LOT 2, BLK 2 W50' N1/2
LOTS 8-14 & LOTS 16-17 EX S140',
LOTS 15,18,19,20 EX H-1 HWY LOT
20, BLK 4 RUSSELLS ADDTON
W 50' LOTS 1 & 2 BLK 3 RUSSELS AD-
DTON
LOT 18 OF OUTLOT R, FREHALL
SUBSTATON LOT SZE 87' X 250'
CTY OF PHLP
LOTS 1 & 2, BLK 22, CTY OF PHLP
LOTS 8,9,10, BLK 25, CTY OF PHLP
LOTS 1,2,3,4,5, BLK 15, CTY OF
PHLP
LOTS 1,2,3 BLK 20
LOT 4 BLK 20
TRACT A C-1, SUBDVSON OF
TRACT A N S2NE4 & TRACT C N
N2SE4, 13-1-20
LOTS 1,2,3 & N2 LOTS 7,8 BLK 1 HGH
SCHOOL ADDN
LOTS 1-3 BLK 4 HGH SCHOOL ADDN
4A TRACT N SE4SE4 17-5-20
2.5A TRACT N N34NE4 29-5-19
LOTS 4-6 BLK 1 HGH SCHOOL ADDN
LOTS 4-6 EX E 50' OF LOTS 4-6 BLK 4
HGH SCHOOL ADDN
OUTLOT 1 BLK 4 HGH SCHOOL
ADDN
PORTON OF SW4SE4, 32-2-25
TRACT A N LOT 1, 5-1-22
LOT 1 MOENVLLE TANK STE
SW4NW4SE4 30-6-24
LOT A NE4 OF 4-2-23
LOT E-1, TRACT OF .52 ACRES N
NE4 OF 35-4-20
LOT 1 A SUBDVSON ON GOVT LOT
4, 3-3-23
LOT 1, NE4NW4NW4, 25-5-24 PLUM
CREEK TANK STE
LOT 1 T MOOS, FRST ADDTON, A
SUBDVSON OF SW4 12-1-20
LOT 1, SW4NW4SE4, 30-6-24
LOT WR-1, TRACT OF .895 ACRES N
SE4NE4, 8-3-18
SOUTH 300' LOTS 4 & 5, HANSENS
ACREAGE
LOT WR-1, NE4SE4, 26-2-20
OUTLOT L N SW4SE4 14-1-20
TOWN OF MIDLAND:
LegaI Description
LOTS 6,7,8, BLK 1
LOTS 9,10 & W10'4" LOT 11 BLK 1
LOT 1 N RVER, 8-8-23
CEMETERY: TRACT N NE4, 7-6-24;
CHURCH TRACT SE4 6-6-24
LOT 24 BLK 2, MDLAND
LOTS 1,2,3,10,11,12 OF BLK 23
S 15' OUTLOT E MDLAND OUTLOTS
OUTLOT E EX S 15' & LOT H-2 HWY
OUTLOT C MDLAND OUTLOTS
TRACT N SW4SE4NW4, 5-1-25,
TRACT N SW CORNER, SW4NE4
EX HWY & LOT A2, 6-1-25
LOTS 15,16,17,18, BLK 1, TOWN OF
MDLAND
S 635'OUTLOT 1 JONES 1ST ADDN
LOT 1 OF LANDFLL SUB N NE4SW4
7-1-25
LOT C OF OUTLOT 1 N SE4SE4 6-1-
25
LOT R-4 A POR OF SE4SW4 6-1-25
TR N SW4NE4 6-1-25
LOT C N NE4NE4 7-1-25
12.5' LOT 9, LOTS 10 & 11 BLK 11
LOT 12 BLK 11
LOTS 1-18 BLK 21
OUTLOT C EX LOT H-2 HWY MD-
LAND OUTLOTS
OUTLOT D EX H-2 HWY & E75' OF
S100' HELD BY C. NEDAN (HUNT)
LOT 1 A (LOT A OF OUTLOT 1)
SE4SW4 6-1-25 MDLAND OUT-
LOTS
LOT 1 LANDFLL SUB NE4SE4 7-1-25
OUTLOT F
LOT 13, BLK 4 VLLAGE OF NOWLN
2-1-23
2A TRACT N SW4SE4, 2-1-23
LOTS 1,2,3,4,21,22,23,24, BLK 5,
TOWN OF MDLAND
LOTS 4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12, BLK 10
TRACT N SE4NE4 34-8-23
LOTS 9 & 10, BLK 3 TOWN OF MD-
LAND
1.06 ATRACT NW4 1-3-18, 50A TRACT
N NE4 17-3-19
TRACT N NE4SW4, 6-1-25
TR N SE4SW46-1-25 MDLAND OUT-
LOTS
TR N NW4NW4 25-2-18
LOTS 1 & 2, BLK 19
MILESVILLE:
LegaI Description:
TR N NW4 26-6-20
LOT 1 N RVER, 9-7-20
LOT 1 POR OF SE4SE4 16-1-20
TR UB BW4 26-6-20 VLLAGE OF
MLESVLLE
LOTS 5-12 BLK 2 VLLAGE OF
MLESVLLE 6-20
TR N NW4 26-6-20 VLLAGE OF
MLESVLLE
LOT 11, BLK 1; N2 LOT 6, BLK 8
LOT 1 N SE4SE4 10-5-20
TRACT N NE4NW4, 35-6-20
TR N NW4 26-6-20 VLLAGE OF
MLESVLLE
LOT W-1 N NW4NW4 26-6-20 VL-
LAGE OF MLESVLLE
LOT W-2 26-6-20 VLLAGE OF
MLESVLLE
W2 LOT 17 BLK 2 27-6-20 VLLAGE OF
MLESVLLE
E2 LOT 17 BLK 2 27-6-20 VLLAGE OF
MLESVLLE
LOTS 18,19,20 BLK 2 27-6-20
NW4NW4NW4NW4 27-6-22
Toni Rhodes
Haakon County
Director of Equalization
[Published March 14, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $129.60]
Proceedings of
Haakon County
Commissioners
UNAPPROVED MINUTES
MARCH 5, 2013
The regular meeting of the Haakon
County Commissioners was held on
Tuesday, March 5, 2013, at 1:00 PM. A
quorum was established by recording
Chairman Stephen Clements, Vice Chair-
man Tom Radway, Members Nicholas
Konst, Gary Snook and Edward Briggs at-
tending the meeting. States Attorney Gay
Tollefson, Auditor Pat Freeman, Deputy
Auditor Carla Smith, Highway Superin-
tendent Kenneth Neville, Veteran's Officer
Terry Deuter, Haakon County Sheriff Fred
Koester, Director of Equalization Toni
Rhodes, Extension Secretary Sheryl
Hansen and Pioneer Review Represen-
tative Nancy Haigh were also present.
There were three proposed amendments
to the agenda. First, Auditor Freeman re-
ported that the State Land Lease Auction
would be held on March 22, 2013, at
10:00 AM in the Commissioner's Room at
the courthouse with two leases on the
agenda.
Secondly, there needed to be a hearing
set and a cost set for the Sunday on-sale
liquor license.
Third, the travel needed to be approved
for the month of March for 4-H Supervisor
Carrie Weller. A motion was made by
Commissioner Konst and seconded by
Commissioner Snook to approve the
changes on the amended agenda.
A motion was made by Vice Chairman
Radway to approve the February 5, 2013,
Regular Meeting Minutes. Commissioner
Snook seconded with all in agreement.
Another item needed to be addressed
about permanent part-time employees
being eligible for health, vision or dental
insurance. Vice Chairman Radway mo-
tioned that it not be offered. Commis-
sioner Snook seconded the motion with
all in agreement.
The County Commissioners and Welfare
Officials Workshop at the Ramkota in
Pierre, SD, on March 20-21, 2013, had a
revised agenda sent out. No commis-
sioner could commit to going as it was
during calving season. They will get back
to the Auditor if things changed. Auditor
Freeman also requested that Deputy Au-
ditor Carla Smith attend as the training is
for Welfare Officials. Training is on work-
ing with Medicaid Expansion, information
on the Human Services Center and So-
cial Security Public Affairs. Then there is
training on Care of Poor Statutes and
ability to pay training. Commissioner
Snook made the motion to approve both
Auditor Freeman and Deputy Auditor
Carla Smith to attend the Welfare Officials
Training due to the uncertain changes
concerning the health insurance. t was
seconded by Commissioner Konst. Mo-
tion carried.
State's Attorney Gay Tollefson responded
to questions by the Commission about
paying for a mentally ill individual that was
determined to be a resident of Haakon
County by the mental illness board at
Human Health Services in Yankton, SD.
Veteran's Officer Terry Deuter came down
and reported any information he had on
file. These are the types of situations a
Welfare Official (Auditor's Office) has to
determine before taking these expenses
to the commission for approval. Every av-
enue of assistance must be considered.
The county is the very last resort when
the resident does not qualify for any other
available programs.
Discussion with State's Attorney Tollefson
turned to the possibility of getting a Sun-
day on-sale liquor license for the four
county licenses that are issued. A motion
was made by Commissioner Snook and
seconded by Commissioner Briggs with
all in agreement. The question was asked
of the commission why they did not
charge for this option. After discussion, it
was decided to revisit the original motion
to withdraw it and place a charge of $100
for the option to serve on-sale liquor on
Sundays. The Hearing was set for the
next Regular Commissioners Meeting on
April 2, 2013, at 1:15 PM.
Resolution 2011-09 will be amended to
include the following paragraph:
WHEREAS, the County Com-
mission determined that the
on-sale license holders may
sell, serve or allow alcoholic
beverages to be consumed on
Sunday. The Hearing was set
for the next Regular Commis-
sioners Meeting on April 2,
2013, at 1:15 PM.
The Haakon County Commissioners
have determined that T-34 Truck Stop,
Lake Waggoner Golf Course, American
Legion Wheeler Brooks Post #173 and
South Fork Ranch, LLC are eligible to
apply for the option to serve, sell, or allow
alcoholic beverages to be consumed on
Sunday except between the hours of two
a.m. and seven a.m. There will be a fee
charged of $100.
Only one bid was submitted in the
amount of $39,978.00 from LyCox Enter-
prises nc. out of Billings, MT, for two (2)
WR 90 Series 3 Walk'n'Roll Packer/
Roller complete with Quick Attach Re-
ceiver and bracket ready to attach to the
Rear Ripper of your Caterpillar M-2 Motor
grader. Commissioner Konst motioned to
accept the bid. Commissioner Briggs sec-
onded. Motion carried. These were to be
paid for out of the SWAP Exchange
Funds.
The following February 2013 fuel bids
were submitted:
FUEL BDS:
Courthouse:
02-05-13 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.48 No. 1
02-05-13 Cenex...................$3.45 No. 1
Highway Dept:
02-07-13 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.67 No. 1
02-07-13 Cenex...................$3.77 No. 1
02-08-12 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.54 No. 1
02-08-13 Cenex...................$3.38 No. 1
There was discussion on the same
stretch of road that a determination was
made that a gate could not be padlocked
to deny access on a section line. States
Attorney Tollefson and Highway Superin-
tendent were going to research this mat-
ter and have a final decision made as to
whether or not it is counted on the county
road system. There is no record of it
being abandoned. This was tabled until
the April meeting.
Superintendent Neville requested that all
the highway workers could attend a
gravel road seminar on March 20-21,
2013, at the Ramkota in Rapid City, SD.
The highway workers would attend one
day of the meeting and the superintend-
ent and foreman would attend both days.
A motion was made by Commissioner
Snook to approve the travel. Commis-
sioner Briggs seconded the motion. Mo-
tion carried.
Two new employees had been hired by
Superintendent Neville. The first new em-
ployee is Richie Baye. The second new
employee hired is Lucas Neville. He will
not be starting until late May of this year.
Foreman Hugh Harty will be retiring in
May of 2013 and Dean Block from Mid-
land, SD, stated he would be retiring in
September of 2013.
Highway Superintendent Kenny Neville
reported that 2013 SWAP Agreement pa-
pers had been received from the (DOT)
Department of Transportation and shown
to have $197,634.57 available in STP
Funds for county use. A motion was made
by Commissioner Briggs and seconded
by Commissioner Konst to approve the
Funding Exchange Agreement for 2013.
Motion carried.
The following items were requested by
the Superintendent Neville to be sur-
plused:
Pickups
#0302 1984 Chevy Serial
#2YCEK14Z3K120
#0304 1998 Chevy Serial
#1GCGK24RXWE244862
#0308 1991 Chevy Serial
#1GCDK14ZOME121176
#0313 1994 Chevy Serial
#1GCHK3372RJ341146
Blades
#0905 2004 CAT140H Serial
#CCA00680
#0000 2009 CAT M Serial
#B9M00307
#0927 2004 CAT M Serial
#B9M00806
Tires
Assorted tires and rims
Disk Mowers
#1201 1996 JD270 Disc Mower
#1212 1995 JD270 Disc Mower
All items listed above except for the three
blades, would be sold at the Philip Live-
stock Auction this spring. The blades
would be sold with the help of Alex from
Butler.
Vice Chairmn Radway made a motion to
surplus the above items for the Highway
Department. Commissioner Snook sec-
onded the motion. Motion carried.
Neville informed the commission of the
plans to gravel Tornado Ranch Road from
Jerry Nelson's mailbox south to 11 Mile.
Estimated half the gravel would come
from the Ramsey gravel pit and the other
half from Parsons. He also told of plans
to pull the shoulders up on the Old Curt
Bentley Road. The road is used by sev-
eral ranchers to transport farm produce.
Mowing tractors, once again will be used
at no cost to the highway department.
Neville reported that one tractor had ar-
rived already.
The Milesville shop was discussed as it is
in pretty bad shape. Superintendent
Neville asked the commission to keep in
mind that to research the cost of a heated
new pole barn and possibly relocating the
shop to another location. The shop is also
small and only one blade and one pickup
can fit into it. The commission agreed to
look into it as well as Superintendent
Neville. The Deep Creek shop also
needed some attention, as the poles were
rotting off at the ground. There needs to
be some reinforcements around the
poles. Deep Creek shop is bigger than
the Milesville shop and will hold a loader,
blade and pickup and has electricity.
Haakon County Sheriff Fred Koester
joined the meeting with his monthly re-
port. Deputy Sheriff Seth Marbry has
been accepted into the police academy in
Pierre, SD, to begin his certification. He
was fortunate to get accepted into the
second class of the year. The training is
all paid for by the State of South Dakota.
Haakon County still pays the salary dur-
ing the training.
The South Dakota Department of Agricul-
ture, Division of Wildland Fire Suppres-
sion out of Rapid City, SD, offers the
county the "County Rangeland Fire Pro-
tection Agreement to sign. The agree-
ment facilitates the State providing
assistance on rangeland fires within the
county, when requested by the County.
There is also a list of people authorized
by the Commission to request assistance.
The county has not signed this agree-
ment in the past. t was decided to table
this issue until next meeting.
Auditor Freeman requested that the
(NASASP) National Association of State
Agencies for Surplus Property dues of
$39.00 be paid as it is in support of creat-
ing a better way of handling surplus prop-
erty. A motion was made by Vice
Chairman Radway and seconded by
Commissioner Snook. Motion carried.
Custodian Nancy Neville requested per-
mission to surplus SC5815 A-Z Model
Sanitaire vacuum and a 1K247C80360
push mower. A motion was made by
Commissioner Snook and seconded by
Commissioner Konst. Motion carried.
Commissioner Briggs motioned to ap-
prove the travel for any county official to
attend the Black Hills District Association
of County Commissioners and County Of-
ficials to be held in Sturgis, SD, in the
commissioner's room at the Meade
County Courthouse on March 11, 2013,
at 1:00 PM. Commissioner Konst sec-
onded the motion. Motion carried.
Librarian Annie Brunskill requested ap-
proval to travel to Custer, SD, on
Wednesday, April 3, 2013, at the West
River Rural Librarians quarterly meeting.
Vice Chairman Tom Radway motioned to
approve the travel. Commissioner Briggs
seconded with all in agreement.
Director of Equalization Toni Rhodes met
with the commission to establish the time
and place of the yearly Haakon County
Board of Equalization Hearing. The date
was set for Tuesday, April 9, 2013, at 1:00
PM in the commissioner's room in the
Haakon County Courthouse. Your written
requests must be received and filed with
the Auditor's Office by April 2, 2013, in
order to be on the agenda.
The monthly travel sheet submitted by 4-
H Program Advisor Carrie Weller was dis-
cussed. A request was made by the
commission to see what travel was being
done and a little more information as to
what the travel was for. The motion was
made by Commissioner Briggs and sec-
onded by Commissioner Snook. Motion
carried. After more discussion the Auditor
was asked to e-mail or call Weller to find
out more about travel that was listed for
Sioux Falls, SD, over a weekend. Was
this attendance being done for the
Haakon/Jackson participants in activities
and what were the activities. The county
pays the State $4,187.50 for the services
of a 4-H Program Advisor. They feel that
when 4 (four) counties are involved,
(Haakon, Jackson, Jones and Mellette), it
would be nice to have a face to face quar-
terly report to the commission as the
other departments are required to do. t
was decided to revisit the motion. Com-
missioner Briggs withdrew his motion and
Commissioner Snook seconded. Motion
carried.
When the information requested was re-
turned, Auditor was to call them to get
phone approval for the monthly travel.
The Auditor's Account with the County
Treasurer was presented as taxes for the
month of January 2013
Haakon County Certificates of
Deposit .............................235,000.00
Haakon County Library Certificate of
Deposit ...............................62,298.34
Cash Management Fund...1,152,526.15
Bank Balance...........................1,400.00
Checks & Cash on Hand..........7,134.79
The Gross Courthouse Salary & Pay-
roll Warrants for January 2013:
Commissioners, Wages ...........2,820.00
Auditor's Office.........................4,746.89
Treasurer's Office ....................4,746.89
State's Attorney's Office...........3,665.84
Director of Equalization............3,430.89
Register of Deeds ....................3,542.13
Janitor ......................................1,844.80
Veteran's Office...........................583.33
Sheriff's Office..........................5,480.87
Highway Department .............21,841.69
WC and Health Nurse Sec......1,075.20
Librarians .................................1,822.60
Extension Secretary....................944.00
Emergency Management............975.80
Weed Supervisor ........................368.62
Wellmark Blue Cross Blue
Shield...................................9,041.14
Special nsurance (GAP) .........1,398.66
AFLAC, premium ........................535.15
SD Retirement System ............5,687.67
Delta Dental ................................725.52
Vision Service Plan.....................148.25
First National Bank,
SS & WH............................12,057.90
The Vendor Warrants were presented
for beginning March 2013:
Health Nurse
State Treasurer, Prof Service...1,030.00
1,030.00
Mentally Ill
State Treasurer, Prof
Services ...............................1,823.26
1,823.26
9-1-1
ESCC, 9-1-1.............................2,748.27
2,748.27
Schools
Haakon School Dist #27-1, Jan 2013
Apportionment ...................76,265.01
Kadoka Area School Dist 35-2, Jan
2013 Apportionment ..........14,098.77
90,363.78
Cities & Towns
City of Philip, Jan 2013
Apportionment ...................22,792.57
Town of Midland, Jan 2013
Apportionment..................... 4,377.68
27,170.25
Water District
West River Water Develop Dist, Jan
2013 Apportionment ...............505.47
505.47
Motor State Vehicle
State Treasurer, State Motor
Vehicle ...............................47,496.19
47,496.19
Fire District
Midland Fire Protection Dist, Jan 2013
Apportionment ........................109.44
Milesville Fire District, Jan 2013
Apportionment ........................185.58
295.02
Birth & Death Fees
State Treasurer, Birth & Death
Cert ........................................620.00
oontinued on page 10
Legal Notlces0eadllne: Frldays at Noon
1hursday, Maroh 14, 2013 1he Pioneer Review Page 10
oontinued from page 9
620.00
Modern/Preservation
SDACO, M&P SDACO ...............142.00
142.00
Total Checks.........................172,194.24
Commissioners
NASAAP, Annual Dues & Membership
Fees .........................................39.00
Pioneer Review nc, Publishing...204.69
Pioneer Review nc, Supplies .......60.18
303.87
Courts
SDACO, Court CLERP Legal ns
Exp .........................................630.04
630.04
Auditor
Century Business Leasing, nc., Maint -
Copier .....................................172.98
First National Bank, FNB BCBS Wire
Trans Fee .................................10.00
Golden West Tele Co, Tele..........180.70
Petersen's Variety, Supplies ...........2.79
366.47
Treasurer
Golden West Tele Co, Tele............69.75
McLeod's Printing & Supply,
Supplies .................................136.20
Noble nk & Toner, Supplies .......195.97
Quill Corporation, Supplies ..........98.58
HCS, Professional Fees .............652.39
Haakon County Treasurer,
Postage ..................................117.00
1,269.89
State's Attorney
Jessica Paulson, Transcription/
Discovery Comp .......................31.80
Tollefson Law Office, Rent .........150.00
Tollefson Law Office, Tele..............75.00
256.80
Courthouse
Cenex Harvest States, Utilities-
Fuel .....................................7,422.12
City of Philip Utilities .....................73.00
Coyle's SuperValu, Supplies ........55.91
Heartland Paper Co, Supplies ....608.72
ngram Hardware, Supplies ..........96.13
Kone nc, Professional Fees ......230.03
Servall Uniform, Supplies ...........186.72
Walker Refuse nc, Utilities ..........72.50
West Central Electric, Utilities ....922.20
9,667.33
Director of Equalization
Best Western Ramkota nn,
Travel .....................................132.43
Coyle's Standard, Repairs &
Maint ........................................12.50
Coyle's Standard, Fuel .................18.00
ENVRO Systems Research nst,
Supplies .................................400.00
Golden West Tele Co, Tele..........125.96
Toni Rhodes, Fuel ........................21.71
SDAAO, Travel ...........................100.00
Haakon County Treasurer, Other
Exp .........................................165.30
975.90
Register of Deeds
Century Business Leasing, nc.,
Supplies ...................................95.50
Golden West Tele Co, Tele..........102.25
McLeod's Printing & Supply,
Supplies .................................179.80
Microfilm maging Systems nc,
Professional Fees ..................200.00
PMB 0112, Professional Fees.......60.00
637.55
Veterans' Service
Golden West Tele Co, Tele............40.62
40.62
Sheriff
AT&T Mobility, Utilities ..................85.50
Capital One Bank, Fuel ..............183.60
Cenex Harvest States, Fuel .........75.53
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities ....136.69
MG Oil Company, Fuel ...............219.27
NEVE's Uniform & Equipment,
Supplies .................................138.85
839.44
Jail
Winner Health Mart, Jail Exp.........58.82
MG Oil Company, Jail Exp ............13.62
Winner Police Department, Jail Ex-
penses .................................3,134.40
3,206.84
Support of Poor
SDACC, Prof Services ...............638.00
638.00
Library
Haakon County Public Library,
Supplies .................................242.06
The Penworthy Company,
Supplies .................................125.64
367.70
Extension Service
Carrie Weller, Travel ...................119.26
Golden West Tele Co, Tele............56.03
SD State 4-H Office, Supplies.......21.50
196.79
Soil Conservation
Haakon Co Conservation Dist, Soil Con-
servation District ..................7,200.00
7,200.00
Weed Control
Crossroads Hotel/Event Center,
Travel .....................................224.97
Virgil Smith, Travel .....................192.16
Paul Staben, Salary ...................368.62
785.75
Road & Bridge
AT&T Mobility, Utilities ..................48.10
Butler Machinery Co nc, Repairs &
Maint ...................................3,210.39
Cenex Harvest States, Fuel ....3,371.89
Philip Clinic, Prof Services ........... 85.00
D & T Auto Parts, Repairs &
Maint ...................................1,041.88
D & T Auto Parts, Supplies ...........15.22
Dale's Tire & Retreading nc,
Supplies .................................100.00
Eddie's Truck Sales nc, Repairs &
Maint ........................................80.79
EMC ns Companies, Liability/Work-
man's Comp ns. ....................543.00
Ernie's Building Center, Suppl.....383.94
Fitzgerald Oil Co, Supplies.......1,079.20
Fitzgerald Oil Co, Fuel ............1,981.80
French's Upholstery, Repairs &
Maint ......................................345.00
George's Welding, Repairs &
Maint ........................................22.90
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities ....250.57
Grimm's Pump Service, Repairs & Maint
................................................370.83
Grossenburg mplement nc,
Supplies ...................................35.50
Heartland Waste Management nc,
Utilities ......................................28.00
ngram Hardware, Repairs &
Maint ......................................187.25
ngram Hardware, Supplies ........178.85
Kennedy mplement & Auto Co, Repairs
& Maint .....................................84.40
Konst Machine, Repairs &
Maint ......................................604.02
Lawson Products nc, Supplies...191.88
Les Body Shop/Noteboom Glass, Re-
pairs & Maint ..........................546.12
LyCox Enterprises nc, DOT/CO SWAP
Exp ....................................39,978.00
McQuirk Ditching, Supplies ........249.85
Town of Midland, Utilities ..............22.00
Morrison's Pit Stop, Supplies .....252.00
Moses Building Center nc,
Supplies .................................234.65
Motive Parts, Supplies ...............444.30
Philip Body Shop, Repairs &
Maint ......................................126.00
Philip Motor, nc, Repairs &
Maint ......................................344.17
Pioneer Review nc, Publishing.....20.14
Rockmount Research & Alloys,
Supplies .................................569.24
SD Dept of Transportation, Road/ Bridge
Projects ..................................160.33
SD Federal Property Agency,
Supplies .................................204.00
SD Department of Revenue, Prof
Services ...................................20.00
SD Dept. of Revenue, Travel .......18.00
Stan Huston Equip, Co, Suppl ....444.00
Walker Refuse nc, Utilities ..........72.50
West Central Electric, Utilities ....500.49
West River Water Develop Dist,
Utilities ......................................67.50
58,513.70
Debt Service
Merchants Capital Resources,
Principal ............................41,987.28
41,987.28
9-1-1
Centurylink, 9-1-1 .......................113.40
Golden West Tele Co, 9-1-1 .......491.43
604.83
Emergency & Disaster
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities ....101.79
Lola Roseth, Travel ....................333.20
434.99
Total Checks.........................128,923.79
The motion was made by Commissioner
Konst to approve the above vendors.
Commissioner Snook seconded. Motion
carried.
Commissioner Snook motioned to go into
executive session on personnel at 4:22
PM. Commissioner Konst seconded. Mo-
tion carried. At 5:01 PM, the Regular
Meeting was called back to order with no
action taken.
The next Regular Meeting date was set
for Tuesday, April 2, 2013, at 1:00 PM in
the Commissioner's Room in the court-
house. The meeting of the Board of
Equalization is scheduled Tuesday, April
9, 2013, at 1:00 PM in the Commis-
sioner's Room in the courthouse. The
meeting was adjourned at 5:27 PM.
HAAKON COUNTY COMMSSON
Stephen Clements, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
[Published March 14, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $253.75]
Proceedings of the
City of PhiIip
REGULAR MEETING
MARCH 4, 2013
A regular meeting of the Philip City Coun-
cil was held on Monday, March 4, 2013,
at 7:00 p.m. in the Community Room of
the Haakon Co. Courthouse. Present
were Mayor Michael Vetter, Finance Offi-
cer Monna Van Lint, Council Members
Greg Arthur, Jennifer Henrie, Jason
Harry, Marty Gartner, Trisha Larson, and
Marion Matt. Also present were Deputy
Finance Officer Brittany Smith, PWD Matt
Reckling, Police Officer David Butler, Del
Bartels with the Pioneer Review, Wade
Rhodes with nnovative Employee Solu-
tions, Mary Burnett with First National
Agency; and later, City Attorney Gay
Tollefson.
Absent: None
Motion was made by Harry, seconded by
Henrie to approve the agenda as pre-
sented. Motion carried.
Motion was made by Harry, seconded by
Henrie to approve the minutes of the last
meeting as published in the Pioneer Re-
view. Motion carried.
The Council reviewed a claim from
Haakon County for the State Radio Com-
munications Teletype services in the
amount of $2,250 for one-half of 2013. n
the past, the City has shared this ex-
pense with the County, contributing one-
half of the annual expenses. t was noted
that during the 2013 budget process, the
Police Committee, at the recommenda-
tion of Chief Graham, did not appropriate
for this expense in 2013. The main rea-
soning was that the City Police Dept.
does not utilize this service nor has it in
years. n addition, they felt that by elimi-
nating this expense, it would help offset
the office rent increase with the County,
from $60 per month to $500 per month ef-
fective Jan. 1, 2013.
Following review, motion was then made
by Matt, seconded by Gartner to approve
the payment of the bills from the appro-
priated funds with the exception of
Haakon County's claim for $2,250 for
teletype services. Motion carried.
Gross SaIaries - Feb. 28, 2013: Adm. -
$5,111.59; Police - $6,085.73; Public
Works - $3,187.59; Street - $4,945.20;
Water - $2,308.80
AFLAC, Employee Supplemental ns. -
02/13 .......................................323.75
EFTPS, SS., Medicare, Withholding -
02/13 ....................................4,893.52
SDRS, Employee Retirement -
02/13 ........................................2,884.59
Add'I BiIIs - Jan. 2013:
Lake Waggoner Golf Course, ssue Do-
nation Rec'd - 01/13.............1,500.00
Airport Improv. Projects:
Kadrmas, Lee & Jackson, nc., MRL
Const./Adm Eng. thru
1/26/13 .................................1,569.56
Muth Electric, nc., MRL Pay Req. #4
(Final) ...................................5,971.33
Pine St. Phase III Project:
SPN & Assoc., Bidding Phase Eng. thru
2/23/13 ....................................120.00
Wood/WaIden Ave. Improv. Project:
Haakon Co. Register of Deeds, N.
Wood Ave. Plat Filing - 02/13....60.00
SPN & Assoc., Bid/SpAssess/Const.
Eng. thru 2/23/13..................2,705.00
This Month's BiIIs:
Alco Pro, nc., (2) PBT's/(1) Printer -
02/13 ....................................2,381.00
AT&T Mobility, Cell Phone
01-02/13....................................82.02
Cenex Harvest States, Fuel -
02/13 .......................................900.60
CRA Payment Center, Supplies -
02/13 .........................................40.32
Credit - 02/13..........................(40.32)
Dakotacare Health ns., Employee
Health Premium - 03/13......11,153.55
Delta Dental ns., Employee Dental Pre-
mium - 03/13 ...........................688.90
1st Nat'l Agency, Com. Package & Umb.
ns. - 2013 ..........................21,515.00
1st Nat'l Bank - Philip, Utility Billing -
02/13........................................118.31
1st Nat'l Bank - S.F., SRF Loan #02 Pay
#172 - 03/13.........................2,163.90
SRF Loan #03 Pay #75 -
03/13 ....................................2,223.41
Fitzgerald Oil Co., LP - 02/13......884.45
Fox, Robert, Cust. Deposit Refund -
03/13 .......................................100.00
G&G Excavation, LLC, Pump Lift Sta-
tion/Manholes - 02/13..............415.00
Golden West, Telephone/nternet 01-
02/13 .......................................590.63
Haakon Co. Register of Deeds, Plat
Copies - 02/13...........................10.00
Haakon Co. Treasurer, Office Rent-
03/13 .......................................500.00
HD Supply, Fire Hydrant Repair Kits -
02/13 .......................................416.60
Heartland Waste Mgmt, nc., 367 Resi-
dential Collection - 02/13......4,000.30
ngram Hardware, Supplies -
02/13 .........................................39.27
ngram Pest Service, nc., R.Site Pest
Control - 02/13 ..........................77.00
M.G. Oil Co., Fuel - 01/13 ...........760.34
Neve's Uniforms & Equip., PD Holster -
01/13 .......................................149.95
Philip Chamber of Commerce, 2013 Ap-
propriations ..........................2,000.00
Pioneer Review, Publishing -
02/13 .......................................266.42
Quill, Supplies - 02/13.................195.97
SD Dept. of Revenue, Sales Tax
Payable - 02/13.......................310.40
Water Coliform Testing -
02/13 .........................................13.00
SD Municipal League, (7) District Mtg
Reg - 03/13 .............................140.00
SD Municipal Street Maint. Assoc.,
PWD Mtg Reg. - 03/13..............50.00
Tollefson, Gay, Attorney Retainer - 03/13
200.00
USDA, RD Loan Pay #99 -
03/13 ....................................3,069.00
U.S.T.., Maintenance 03/13-
02/14 ....................................2,790.00
Utility Billing Cards/Env. -
02/13 .......................................400.00
Van Lint, Monna, SDGFOA Mtg Mileage
Reimb. ......................................64.38
VSA-UMB Bank, Norton/Travel Exp. -
02/13 .......................................124.19
West Central Electric, Electric 12/29/12-
02/01/13 ...............................3,700.91
WR/LJ Rural Water, 2,001,000 gals. -
02/13 ....................................2,501.25
Contract Min. - 02/13............2,500.00
Airport Water - 02/13.................40.00
South Shop Water - 02/13.........20.00
Wohlenberg, Ritzman & Co., FY2012
Annual Report Prep..............2,310.00
Total Expenditures -
03/04/13 ...........................$80,291.64
OId Business:
PWD Reckling updated the Council on
the Lift Station wet well inspection. He re-
ported that during the inspection and re-
view of the pictures taken, it is in better
condition than was expected. Unfortu-
nately, it still needs to be repaired and ac-
cording to the City's Engineer, Harlan
Quenzer with SPN & Assoc., it should be
completed within the next two years.
Council then reviewed an engineering
agreement with SPN & Assoc. for the
preparation of plans and specifications for
the lift station wet well rehabilitation.
Council Member Larson asked for a syn-
opsis of the engineering services as well
as the overall estimated costs for the proj-
ect. The engineering is estimated at
$17,000 and would include the design
specifications, bidding and construction.
n addition, SPN & Assoc. have provided
estimated construction costs at $44,550
and a contingency estimate at $7,770 for
a total estimated cost for the project at
$68,800.
Council Member Gartner noted that they
are planning on using a cement and
epoxy liner on the wet well. He noted that
according to the, Quenzer, this has been
done in lift stations around the Mitchell
area and they have had excellent results
with the material.
The engineer's limitation of liability as out-
lined in the engineering agreement was
discussed in detail. t was questioned why
they are recommending a $50,000 limit or
the total engineering fee, whichever is
greater, when the total estimate of the
project is greater than either of those
amounts.
Mayor Vetter stated that his concern is if
there happens to be an error in the spec-
ifications. He gave the example of the
thickness of the concrete being miscalcu-
lated and questioned if the City would be
out all or part of the financial investment.
As City Attorney Tollefson arrived, Council
Member Matt requested her opinion as to
the engineer's liability statement, ques-
tioning if they would be liable for all the
costs incurred for the rehabilitation or just
the engineering expenses.
Tollefson reviewed the engineering
agreement briefly and confirmed that in
her initial opinion, SPN & Assoc. would
pay up to $50,000 for any negligence on
their part. She also questioned some of
the language in the agreement and in-
quired if the risks and benefits for the rec-
ommended work have been reviewed
with the Council.
Mayor Vetter confirmed that the risks and
benefits have been reviewed to a degree,
but the general consensus of the Council
was that they would like further clarifica-
tion on the language in the agreement.
Following a lengthy discussion, motion
was made by Matt, seconded to Arthur to
table the engineering agreement with
SPN & Assoc. for the lift station wet well
rehabilitation until further clarification from
Mr. Quenzer is available. FO Van Lint will
contact Mr. Quenzer to schedule a meet-
ing with the Council to review their con-
cerns in the near future. Motion carried.
DFO Smith updated the Council on the
University of North Dakota's "Pay it For-
ward volunteer day in Philip. She stated
that the plans for their arrival and work on
Mar. 8th and 9th, respectively, have been
finalized. They will be volunteering at the
softball field, nursing home, assisted liv-
ing center, and possibly the United
Church. n addition, Pastor Kathy Ches-
ney has volunteered to be the contact
person for the group during their time in
Philip.
New Business:
Wade Rhodes, nsurance Representative
with nnovative Employee Solutions, ad-
dressed the Council with a request to
offer City employees Colonial Life Sup-
plemental nsurance policies such as ac-
cidental, cancer and disability insurance.
f approved this would be offered as a tax-
free deduction from the employees' pay-
roll.
FO Van Lint advised the Council that cur-
rently, City employees are able to enroll
in AFLAC Supplemental nsurance on a
tax free basis through payroll. This is paid
100% by the employees and deducted
from their gross payroll before taxes. She
noted that the Colonial Life insurance can
be done the same way with the Council's
approval.
Council Member Henrie questioned if
they require a certain number of employ-
ees to enroll with the company in order to
offer the payroll deduction option and if
they offer a type of group rate discount.
Mr. Rhodes confirmed that at least two
employees must sign up for the insurance
in order for it to be eligible as a tax free
payroll deduction. n addition, there may
be discounts available if more than five
employees sign up for the same type of
coverage.
Motion was then made by Henrie, sec-
onded by Arthur to offer Colonial Life Sup-
plemental nsurance to the City
employees as a tax-free payroll deduc-
tion. Motion carried.
Mayor, Council and those in attendance
thanked Mr. Rhodes as he left the meet-
ing at this time.
Mary Burnett, Agent with First National
Agency, then addressed the Council with
an update on the City's insurance cover-
age. She presented a detailed listing of
the City's property coverage with their val-
ues being at actual cost value (ACV) or
replacement costs estimate (RCE) along
with the individual 2013 premiums.
She highlighted some of the properties,
noting that most of the buildings have
been changed back to cash value by the
insurance company due to their condition
and age. t was stressed that when the
City makes improvements to the buildings
such as roofs, electrical or plumbing, the
coverage values can be increased.
She then reviewed the airport properties
that are of concern. The first one is that
of the airport windcone with an annual
premium of $1,060. This is considerably
higher than the other buildings and in
turn, she has inquired with the underwrit-
ers for further clarification. The other
building is the airport office/hangar build-
ing that has a damaged roof and ceiling.
According to the insurance underwriters,
this building will not be insured until those
areas are repaired.
Council questioned the airport
office/hangar building repairs in which FO
Van Lint advised that the City budgeted
for the new roof in 2012, but it was not
completed. PWD Reckling also added
that he had contacted Moses Building
Center on two separate occasions and re-
quested a measurement of the roof. Un-
fortunately, neither the measurement nor
the repairs were done as intended.
t was also noted that the insurance pre-
miums for 2013 have increased approxi-
mately $4,000 from 2012, to $21,515.
Mrs. Burnett confirmed that she would up-
date the Council once more information
is available on the airport windcone as
well as the lift stations as some of them
are at replacement cost while others are
at cash value. Once this is finalized, the
City's premium may increase or decrease
from the annual premium amount ap-
proved this evening.
With nothing further, the Mayor, Council
and those in attendance thanked Mrs.
Burnett as she left the meeting at this
time.
Wood/Walden Ave. Utility and Street m-
prov. Project:
The SD Dept. of Environment and Natural
Resources (DENR) has approved the fol-
lowing project documents: Addendum's
#1 and #2 to the design specifications;
contract award to Rosebud Concrete,
nc.; and, the engineering agreement with
SPN & Assoc. for the design and con-
struction engineering services.
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Gartner to authorize Mayor Vetter's sig-
nature on the Notice to Proceed and Con-
tract Documents for the project. Motion
carried with all members voting aye.
The preconstruction meeting for the proj-
ect has been scheduled for Thursday,
March 14th at 1:00 p.m. in the Commu-
nity Room of the Haakon County Court-
house.
E. Pine St./Wray Ave. Overlay Project:
Mayor Vetter reported that following fur-
ther review of the low project bidder, J&J
Asphalt, the Street Committee along with
the City's Engineer have recommended
awarding the bid to them.
Motion was made by Gartner, seconded
by Matt to formally award the contract to
the low bidder of the project, J&J Asphalt
Company, in the amount of $217,135.10.
Motion carried with all members voting
aye.
Airport:
Council reviewed the project status up-
date for the Land Acquisition and Environ-
mental Assessment (LA/EA); and, both
the project and construction status up-
dates for the Medium ntensity Runway
Lighting (MRL) project as prepared by
Rod Senn, Airport Engineer with Kadr-
mas, Lee and Jackson (KLJ).
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Harry to approve Change Order #3 in the
credit amount of $96.98 and authorize
Mayor Vetter's signature thereon. Motion
carried.
Motion was made by Gartner, seconded
by Arthur to approve the MRL project's
final pay request in the amount of
$5,971.33 to Muth Electric, nc. Motion
carried with all members voting aye.
Motion was made by Matt, seconded by
Harry to approve and authorize Mayor
Vetter's signature on the Final Review
and Acceptance and Closeout documents
for the MRL project. t was reported that
the one-year warranty for the project
began on Dec. 20, 2012. Motion carried
with all members voting aye.
Council reviewed the following building
and flood plain development permits:
Marty Hansen - move house with at-
tached garage from 319 E. Cherry St. to
501 Hansen St, place house on concrete
foundation, level site, install culvert, install
new water & sewer services; and, Steven
Stewart - remove trees, deck, porch and
walkway, install retaining wall, remove
and replace house, construct two decks.
t was noted that Mr. Hansen's construc-
tion will be within the designated flood
zone area. He has complied with all of the
flood plain regulations including the instal-
lation of a flood proof foundation. Mr.
Stewart will be locating his trailer house
in a trailer court and therefore is not sub-
ject to trailer coach placement regulations
outlined in City Ordinance #11-1916.
Following review, motion was made by
Gartner, seconded by Arthur to approve
the above the building permits as pre-
sented. Motion carried.
Council was informed that the residential
garbage contract with Heartland Waste
Management will expire on May 31, 2013.
Motion was made by Matt, seconded by
Gartner to authorize advertising bids with
the Garbage Committee opening bids on
Mar. 28th at 4:00 p.m. Motion carried.
Council reviewed the following L/P
Propane bids received this month:
Feb. 15, 2013
Fitzgerald Oil Company..........$1.33/gal.
Midwest Cooperatives ............$1.35/gal.
Motion was made by Harry, seconded by
Gartner to approve Beau Torres to sal-
vage scrap metal at the rubble site to at
$45.00 per ton. Motion carried.
Council discussed options for the swim-
ming pool sidewalk handrailing that had
been appropriated for in the 2013 budget.
Last summer, the Council decided to wait
until the expense could be budgeted for
and in addition, have the high school in-
dustrial arts class build the railing.
PWD Reckling reported that he had vis-
ited with Doug Hauk, ndustrial Arts
teacher, regarding this and they would
like to get started as soon as possible, but
would like input on the style of the railing.
He then questioned if the Council would
prefer round pipe or square tubing for the
railing. t was noted that the only cost to
City would be for the materials of the rail-
ing and they will be purchased through
Scotchman ndustries. The City has ap-
propriated $1,500 for this expense.
Discussion regarding the style of the rail-
ing ensued regarding if spindles were de-
sired. Council Member Henrie stated that
she would like spindles as they may deter
children from climbing on the railing.
Council Member Arthur also recom-
mended it look similar to the one installed
along the handicap ramp last year in
which he noted has curved spindles. t
was also mentioned that the curve spin-
dles may increase the costs considerably
so straight spindles may be the ideal.
Following, motion was made by Matt,
seconded by Arthur to authorize PWD
Reckling to determine the material and
design of the railing within the appropri-
ated amount taking into consideration
and attempting to match it to the existing
railing at the pool if it is possible to do so
within the set appropriation . Motion car-
ried.
Council Member Larson inquired about
the 2013 pool employees, more specifi-
cally which positions would be advertised.
For instance, if we have received confir-
mation from Molly Coyle regarding her in-
terest in being the pool manager again
this year.
DFO Smith advised that she has con-
tacted Coyle regarding a Certified Pool
Operators course that is being offered in
May, but has not received any feedback
from her. She will contact her again for
confirmation of the 2013 pool manager
position. n addition, Smith noted that in
the past they have sent letters of interest
along with applications to the previous
year's lifeguards and plans to do so again
this year.
Following, motion was made by Henrie,
seconded by Larson to authorize adver-
tising for swimming pool personnel for the
2013 season. This shall include lifeguards
only, unless Coyle denies the pool man-
ager position. Motion carried.
Council was informed that the Fire De-
partment's fire bar telephone bill has in-
creased following an update by Golden
West Telecommunications. t was noted
that the City was only being charged for
ten of the seventeen numbers assigned
to receive calls on the fire bar. This in
turn, will add an additional $10.50 per
month on to the bill as it costs $1.50 per
call number.
PWD Reckling also advised that the fire
department may be adding an additional
three numbers in the near future, up to
twenty numbers receiving calls on the fire
bar.
Departmental Reports:
The quarterly Airport report was re-
viewed.
The year to date airport fuel revenues
was reviewed.
Council reviewed an inquiry from NetJets,
nc. to operate small cabin business jets
weighing up to 20,000 pounds at the air-
port on an infrequent basis.
t was noted that the airport runway is not
designed for these aircrafts as it is only
rated for those weighing up to 12,500
pounds. n addition, the width and length
of the runway are not as compatible with
this larger aircraft.
FO Van Lint reported that following the in-
quiry, she has visited with both Jason En-
gbrecht with the SD Dept. of
Transportation Aeronautics Division, and
Rod Senn, the City's Airport Engineer
with KLJ. According to Mr. Engbrecht, the
City cannot deny the landing of the air-
craft, but can put stipulations on their
landings. Mr. Senn confirmed with Mr. En-
gbrecht and has recommended the fol-
lowing stipulations. The City should
request advanced notice of their intent to
land; inspect the runway prior to and fol-
lowing the landing and departure; con-
sider the weather conditions as the
pavement tends to be more susceptible
to damages during extreme heat and cold
weather; ensure that they park the aircraft
on the concrete apron; and, request their
acknowledgement to hold the City harm-
less from any damages to their aircraft as
well as their liability for any damages to
the City's airport facilities.
City Attorney Tollefson also recom-
mended that the City require them to pro-
vide a copy of their insurance to ensure
that they will be able to cover any dam-
ages that may be incurred to the airport
or themselves.
Following discussion, motion was made
by Gartner, seconded by Matt to approve
NetJets, nc. request if they will agree to
all of the stipulations noted above, both
Mr. Senn's and Attorney Tollefson's rec-
ommendations. Motion carried.
The quarterly Administrative report was
presented and reviewed with FO Van Lint.
FO Van Lint presented and reviewed the
2012 Annual Report of the City of Philip
(Annual Financial Statement and Man-
agement's Discussion and Analysis) with
the Council. The MD&A is designed to
highlight the main funding sources and
expenditures for the year while providing
a comparison to the previous year.
She then went on to ask for any questions
or comments and noted that the report is
on file in the Finance Office.
Following review, motion was made by
Matt, seconded by Harry to approve the
2012 Annual Financial report as pre-
sented. Motion carried with all members
voting aye.
Council reviewed the City's Depository
Disclosure for the account balances end-
ing Feb. 28, 2013, as follows.
oontinued on page 11
DEPOSITORY DISCLOSURE - CITY OF PHILIP, SD
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF PHILIP, SOUTH DAKOTA
Oct. 31, 2012 Feb. 28, 2013
GENERAL FUND
Checking Account 11,074.89 11,288.42
Petty Cash (Finance Office) 50.00 50.00
Savings/Cash Mgmt. Acct. 561,722.44 465,007.11
CD #27909 73,000.00 73,000.00
Assigned Cash 183,000.00 402,300.00
Assigned Cash - R. Site 59,904.92 62,588.92
888,752.25 1,104,234.45
WATER
Checking Account 3,120.72 3,095.25
Savings/Cash Mgmt. Acct. 384,178.15 397,664.92
CD #27910 40,000.00 40,000.00
Assigned Cash 87,863.00 107,863.00
Restricted Cash - Rural Dev. Loan 37,000.00 37,000.00
552,161.87 585,623.17
SEWER
Checking Account 13.23 34.43
Savings/Cash Mgmt. Acct. 328,643.76 279,961.45
CD #27911 2,000.00 2,000.00
CD #27979 10,000.00 10,000.00
Assigned Cash 80,400.00 115,400.00
Restricted Cash - Surcharge - SRF 24,279.55 32,645.95
445,336.54 440,041.83
GARBAGE
Checking Account 18.61 20.57
Savings/Cash Mgmt. Acct. 63,603.59 59,223.44
CD #27982 20,000.00 20,000.00
Assigned Cash 21,150.00 24,650.00
104,772.20 103,894.01
TotaI Checking 14,227.45 14,438.67
TotaI Petty Cash 50.00 50.00
TotaI Savings/Cash Mgmt. Acct. 1,338,147.94 1,201,856.92
TotaI Certificates of Deposit 145,000.00 145,000.00
TotaI Assigned/Restricted Cash 469,317.92 782,447.87
TOTAL CASH 1,966,743.31 2,143,793.46
(SEE BOX BELOW)
Council also reviewed the City's nvest-
ment report which includes the City's Cer-
tificates of Deposit and the year to date
sales tax revenues.
Mayor Vetter stated that the sales tax rev-
enues are promising and thanked the
community for shopping local.
Council then reviewed the following
quotes from Century Business Products
for a new color copier for the Finance Of-
fice that was appropriated for in 2013. t
was noted that the prices include an
$800.00 trade-in allowance for the old
copier, Kyocera 2050 purchased in March
2008 for $3,151.80.
Kyocera C8525 Full Color Copier/
Fax/Scanner
Century Business Products
Cost: $5,665.00
Maintenance: $661.80 - includes
30,600 black/white copies per year plus
$.013 overage and 2,640 color copies per
year plus $.10 overage; parts; labor;
mileage; and, toner.
Kyocera 2550ci Full Color Copier/
Fax/Scanner
Century Business Products
Cost: $6194.00
Maintenance: $490.80 - includes
30,600 black/white copies per year plus
$.01 overage & 2,640 color copies per
year plus $.07 overage; parts; labor;
mileage; and, toner.
DFO Smith reviewed the need and use of
the new color copier with the Council, not-
ing that it will save money on the pur-
chase of color cartridges as well as the
City Office will be able scan colored doc-
uments.
t was noted that the City had appropri-
ated $5,500 for the purchase of the new
copier and even though both quotes are
above that amount, the Finance Office
would recommend the purchase of the
Kyocera 2550ci model. t is known for its
easy operation as well as its annual main-
tenance costs are considerably lower
than the Kyocera C8525.
A motion was made by Gartner, sec-
onded by Henrie to approve the purchase
of the Kyocera 2550ci Full Color Copier/
Fax/Scan machine at a cost of $6,194.00
including an $800.00 trade-in value for
the current machine, Kyocera 2050. Mo-
tion carried.
The monthly Police Dept. report was pre-
sented and reviewed with Officer Butler.
The monthly Street Dept. report was re-
viewed.
Council was updated on the option for a
zero rate rental agreement for 6000 se-
ries John Deere tractors with Grossen-
burg mplement from April thru November
2013. The agreement provides 250 hours
of use per tractor at no cost to the City
with exception of the insurance coverage.
PWD Reckling confirmed that they would
not exceed the allotted 250 hours as any
hours over that amount are billed at $10
per hour.
Motion was made by Matt, seconded by
Arthur to authorize PWD Reckling or FO
Van Lint to enter into the tractor
rental/lease agreements with Grossen-
burg mplement for the 6000 series John
Deere tractors. Motion carried.
Mayor, Council and those in attendance
thanked Grossenburg mplement for pro-
viding this opportunity to the City.
The monthly Water Dept. report was re-
viewed.
PWD Reckling noted the increase in
water loss from 8.26% in January to 15%
in February. He is concerned about a po-
tential water leak, but has been unsuc-
cessful in identifying any areas. He then
questioned Mayor Vetter if West
River/Lyman Jones Rural Water System's
(WR/LJ) SCADA system is back in oper-
ation in order to help pinpoint those areas
in the City with excessive use during the
night time hours.
Mayor Vetter advised that SCADA system
is not operational at this time. He is hope-
ful that it will be up and running again
mid-month and will contact Reckling at
that time.
Council then reviewed and discussed im-
plementing the water and sewer rates for
free water users for 2013. This applies to
the parks and recreational areas outlined
in the City's Park/Recreational Free
Water policy as well as the City depart-
ments.
t was noted that the policy stipulates how
much free water is allotted to each park
area per year based on their square
footage size, either 200,000 gals. or
400,000 gals. of free water. The policy
also currently states that any water usage
consumed above the allotted free amount
is then billed to the organization that is in
charge of the park area at $4.00 per
1,000 gallons.
FO Van Lint advised that last fall, there
were concerns with the billing to the park
areas along with the amount that was
being billed for the overages. n addition,
the water rates outlined in the policy are
no longer the current water rates charged
to the consumers. This in turn, brought
forth a review of the water and sewer
costs to the City per 1,000 gallons of
usage.
She then went on to review different sce-
narios regarding the City's actual costs
per 1,000 gallons of water for the years
2007 through 2012. These included the
water expense plus the operational and
maintenance (O&M) expenses at 100%
and then at 50%. The 50% O&M ex-
penses were considered at Mayor Vet-
ter's request since in his opinion; these
users are only on the system for half of
the year. n addition, the GO Water Bond,
depreciation and reserve expenses were
also included with the O&M in one sce-
nario.
As for 2012, the City's water costs for
2012 ranged from $3.02 per 1,000 gal-
lons (with O&M at 50%) to $4.15 per
1,000 gallons (with O&M at 100%) and
then at $5.80 per 1,000 gallons. (with only
O&M at 100% plus the depreciation and
reserve expenses).
The sewer expenses are based on the
usage of water to those park areas and
City departments that have restroom fa-
cilities (i.e. A.A. building, fire hall, swim-
ming pool). Different scenarios for the
actual costs for sewer included that of the
O&M expenses at 100% and then O&M
plus the deprecation and reserve ex-
penses. The City's sewer cost per 1,000
gallons of water for 2012 were $1.70 per
1,000 gallons with only O&M expenses
and $3.22 per 1,000 gallons with O&M,
depreciation and reserve expenses.
Van Lint then requested the Council con-
sider giving a credit amount to each of the
park areas during the spring based on
their allotted amount of free water. This
would allow them to keep better account
of the water usage through the summer
months as the credit balance decreases
with the gallons consumed.
She then requested the Council's deter-
mination on the amount to charge per
1,000 gallon of water usage over the al-
lotted amount of free water plus establish
the sewer rate based on the information
provided.
Council Member Matt mentioned that the
City needs to make it affordable to the
park areas as they do not have a surplus
of cash flow, but on the other hand, they
need to be accountable to the amount of
their water usage. He also stressed that
he is in favor of applying a credit to each
of the parks to help them monitor their
water usage.
Following discussion, motion was made
by Matt, seconded by Gartner to establish
the 2013 water rate at $3.02 per 1,000
gallons and the sewer rate at $1.70 per
1,000 gallons based on the water usage
for free water users. These rates will be
used in calculating the credit balance of
free water to each of the park areas; and,
any overage above the allotted free water
will also be assessed at these rates. Mo-
tion carried.
PubIic Comments: none.
In Other Business:
The April 9th election has been cancelled:
petitions for Council Member Ward &
Ward have been filed by the incum-
bents and no petitions were filed for the
Ward position.
Motion was made by Harry, seconded by
Gartner to authorize PWD Reckling's at-
tendance at the SD Municipal Street
Maint. Assoc. meeting on Apr. 17-18,
2013, in Deadwood. Motion carried.
Motion was made by Harry, seconded by
Gartner to authorize the following atten-
dance at the SDML District 8 Meeting on
April 16th in Murdo: Mayor Vetter; Council
Members Arthur, Harry, Gartner, Matt; FO
Van Lint; and, DFO Smith. Motion carried.
DFO Smith, President of the SD Associa-
tion of Code Enforcement (SoDace), ap-
prised the Council of their upcoming
meeting scheduled for May 8-9, 2013, in
Oacoma. She stated that the organization
has put forth a lot of effort to offer training
from the nternational Code Council on
the fundamentals of the 2012 nterna-
tional Property Maintenance Code. This
code is an updated and more in depth
code from the City's adopted 1997 Uni-
form Code for Housing and the Abate-
ment of Dangerous Structures. She
would highly recommend the Council take
advantage of this opportunity as it may be
beneficial for the City to adopt the current
code.
Motion was made by Arthur, seconded by
Gartner to authorize the following atten-
dance at the SoDace Annual Meeting on
May 8-9, 2013, in Oacoma: DFO Smith;
Officer Butler; and, Council Members
Henrie, Arthur, Gartner and Matt. Motion
carried.
Council will meet in Special Session-
March 18, 2013, at 4:00 p.m. in the Com-
missioner's Room to sit as Board of
Equalization. Citizens are advised that
the official PT-17 form must be filed by
with the Finance Office no later than 5:00
p.m. on March 14, 2013.
The next regular Council Meeting will be
held on Monday, Apr. 1, 2013, at 7:00
p.m. in the Community Rm.
With no further business to come before
the Council, Mayor Vetter declared the
meeting adjourned at 8:27 p.m.
/s/ Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/ Brittany Smith
Deputy Finance Officer
[Published March 14, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $393.16]
Legal Notlces0eadllne: Frldays at Noon
1hursday, Maroh 14, 2013 1he Pioneer Review Page 11
oontinued from page 10
[Published March 14, 2013, at the total approximate cost of $215.64]
F0R 8ALE:
1998 Iord Lxpedton XL1 4x4
U|oth 5eats, Uood 1res
Power Wndows & Locks
$3,750
Ua|| 685-8155
I wouId IIko fo sfnrf n sorIos of
sforIos nbouf somo oId Inndmnrks,
somo fnmous hIIIs In fho nron on
our counfry ronds. Tho fIrsf Is fho
!ndgon HIII, Infor chnngod fo fho
!oynIck HIII, fhnf Is nbouf fwo nnd
ono hnIf mIIos norfh of our Inco.
CombInos, cnrs, Ickus, somI-
frucks Iondod wIfh cnffIo or grnIn
wouId hnvo froubIo on fhnf hIII,
wIfh sovornI InndIng In fho dIfch.
Konnofh wouId hnvo fo chnIn u
hIs M frncfor nnd go nnd uII fhoso
foIks u fho hIII or nf Ionsf ouf of
fho dIfch. In fhoso dnys, fhoro wns
no grnvoI nnd mosf ovoryono knows
how sIIory fhnf gumbo gofs nnd
how If bnIIs u on fho whooIs whon
If hns drIod jusf n IIffIo.
WoII, I hnvo ono funny sfory fo
foII nbouf fhnf hIII. I won`f monfIon
nny nnmos ns somo of fho fnmIIy
sfIII IIvo In fhIs nron. If somo of
fhom wnnf fo foII you who If wns If
Is u fo fhom fo foII. A schooImnrm
wns comIng homo from fho IIbon
SchooI nnd wns comIng down fho
!oynIck HIII nnd If wns sIIck nnd
Icy. Sho rnn off In fho dIfch, so sho
wnIkod fo !oynIck`s nnd fhoy cnIIod
Konnofh. Ho sfood nnd Ickod
hor u nnd sho wonf wIfh hIm fo
uII hor ouf. Yos, wo dId hnvo
honos ouf horo duo fo oIs
Cnrsfonson`s hono IIno If wns n
nrfy IIno whoro ovoryono hnd n
dIfforonf rIng fo Iof fhom know
whon fho cnII wns for fhom. And
yos, ovoryono IIsfonod In whon you
fnIkod on If nnd so ovoryono know
n schooImnrm rnn off fho !oynIck
HIII nnd fhnf Konnofh wonf fo uII
hor ouf.
Whon Konnofh cnmo bnck homo,
ho cnmo In InughIng sfnfIng fo mo
fhnf ho hnd fho crnzIosf fhIng hn-
on. Ho wns unnbIo fo gof fho cnr
uIIod ouf duo fo fho Ico nnd so foId
hor fo gof bnck In fho frncfor nnd
ho wouId fnko hor bnck fo !oyn-
Ick`s. So sho dId nnd whon fhoy gof
fo ChnrIIo nnd IImn`s sho wonf fo
gof ouf of fho frncfor nnd hor dross
cnughf on fho shIffIng Iovor. Kon-
nofh snId fhnf If skInnod hor jusf
IIko n rnbbIf. So, ho snId, !ndy you
wIII hnvo fo cIImb bnck u horo so I
cnn gof you unhookod. So sho dId
nnd wns sho ovor ombnrrnssod.
I nskod Konnofh If If ombnr-
rnssod hIm nnd ho snId no, buf hor
ronIIy foIf sorry for hor. Sho wns
onIy nbouf 25 yonrs oId nnd sho
wns ronIIy ombnrrnssod nnd wns
nbouf fo cry.
ThIs Is fho hIII sfory for fhIs
wook. I wIII fry fo wrIfo nbouf ofhor
hIIIs on nnd off. Thoro nro mnny
momorIos In fhom oId hIIIs. So
mnny of fhom woro nnmod for fho
ooIo who IIvod or homosfondod nf
fho boffom of fhom or woro nnmod
nffor ofhor cIrcumsfnncos.
Iob Thorson, JodI, nnd hor foIks,
Id nnd CIoon, nnd JossIcn nnd
Kurf IIosnor nII fook nn Inforosf-
Ing rond frI fhnf consIsfod of l02
mIIos from homo nnd bnck. Thoy
wonf norfh of horo nnd fhoy cnIIod
fho oIsons fo gof ormIssIon fo
cross fhoIr Innd. Thoy vIsIfod fho
!oso Comofory, fho owIIng Como-
fory, Iocnfod wosf of fho !owoII
Koysor Inco, Jnko HnnIoy`s nnd
nround fho CroIghfon nron. Tho
frI wns ImmonsoIy onjoyod by nII
who wonf. JossIcn Jonos, fook hor
grnndnronfs, Id nnd CIoon, fo
WnII for bIngo. Thoy nII nffondod
fho movIo In IhIII Snfurdny nIghf
nnd woro nof Imrossod wIfh nII
fho bnd Inngungo usod In If. Thoy
nro nII IookIng forwnrd fo fhIs
Tuosdny, Mnrch l2, whon
Cnrsfonsons nro InyIng nf fho
IhIII ursIng Homo. Thoy nII
Inn fo nffond. If Is so nIco of Id
nnd CIoon`s fnmIIy fo soo fhnf fhoy
nro onforfnInod whIIo fhoy nro horo
vIsIfIng fhoIr dnughfor, JodI, nnd
Iob.
MnrvIn nnd KovIn CoIomnn on-
joyod coffoo nnd n vIsIf wIfh Horb
nnd HnzoI SIoIor Mondny mornIng,
Mnrch 4. HnzoI mndo n frI fo
IhIII for n hnIr noInfmonf fhnf
snmo dny. Af Ionsf fwo ooIo Iook
boffor In fhIs communIfy, ns I nIso
gof n orm fhIs wook. HnzoI sfnfod
fhnf fhoy hnd somo cnIvos fhIs
wook. Thoy sfnrfod boforo fhoy
woro suosod fo, ns dId so mnny
fhIs yonr. Horb ronfs fhoIr Inco fo
hIs cousIn so If`s hIs cows fhnf nro
cnIvIng. Horb nnd HnzoI wonf fo
QuInn for n sfonk suor Snfurdny,
Mnrch 2. Thoy roorfod fhnf fhoro
wns n Inrgo crowd fhoro nnd nnd
snId fhnf fho food wns doIIcIous.
0rIndstcne News
by Mary BIde SS9-B1SS
HnzoI snId fhnf fhoy rnn ouf of
rImo rIb duo fo fho Inrgo crowd.
IhIIIIs Thorson Is bnck homo In
IhIII now nffor sondIng fho wIn-
for In SonrfIsh nonr hor dnughfor,
CornI Snnd, nnd son, IIII Thorson.
Sho dId nof go soufh fhIs yonr. Sho
Is bnck fo wnIkIng, wonfhor ormIf-
fIng, nround IhIII.
MoI nnd Iofh SmIfh nffondod fho
woddIng of ono Iofh`s foIIow works
In !nId CIfy Snfurdny, Mnrch 9.
Thoy sonf fho rosf of fho wookond
jusf cnfchIng u nround homo.
Crnndson Cndo sfood In brIofIy
for n vIsIf durIng fho wookond.
B, /le /ine non reolicee /lo/
no,Ie lie fo/ler uoe rigl/, le ueu-
oll, loe o eon ulo /lin/e le`e
urong. ChnrIos Wndsworfh
Tle noe/ renor/oIle /ling oIou/
n, no/ler ie /lo/ for oll /le ,eore
ele eerteJ /le fonil, no/ling Iu/
lef/otere. Tle originol neol uoe
neter founJ. CnIvIn TrIIIIn
ThIs Is nof fruo In my fnmIIy.
Thoro woro so mnny of us woro nof
nny Ioffovors nffor n monI In fho ox-
cofIon of boIIod ofnfoos from su-
or fhnf woro fhon sorvod for
bronkfnsf ns hnsh browns fho noxf
mornIng.
My symnfhy fo fho fnmIIy of III-
nor McCrnff.
Grindstone News
by Mary Eide 859-2188
Classifieds 859-2516
Thursday, March 14, 2013 The Pioneer Review Page 12
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional
word $5.) Call this newspaper or
800-658-3697 for details.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS BLOW OUT
SALE! Early bird spring discounts!
Save up to 40% off on machinery
storage and shops. Limited Offer!
Call Jim, 1-888-782-7040.
* * * * * * * * * *
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 2005 Ford F-150
XLT Super Crew Cab, 5.4 Triton
w/80,000 miles. The vehicle is
in excellent condition, just put
brand new tires all the way
around. Asking $16,800. For
more information call 433-5060,
evenings, or 685-4608, days.
P14-2tc
FOR SALE: 2004 Pontiac Grand
Prix GT, gray with gray interior,
107,300 miles, looks and runs
great. $7,000 is the asking price,
but I will consider reasonable of-
fers. Call Keith at 454-3426 or
859-2039 for information or any
questions. PR22-tfn
FOR SALE: 1998 Ford Expedi-
tion XLT 4x4, cloth seats, power
windows, locks & seats, good
tires. Call 685-8155. PR10-tfn
BUSINESS & SERVICES
NEED PAINTING DONE? Inte-
rior/exterior painting, staining,
minor repair work. Openings
still available for winter/sum-
mer. Free estimates. Licensed.
References. Call 488-0008. Ku-
sicks Painting & More.
K14-1tp
FITCH FENCING: Line your
summer projects up now! For all
your corral, windbreak and pas-
ture fencing needs, call Truett at
859-2334. PR23-tfn
OCONNELL CONSTRUCTION,
INC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 37th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven,
cell: 490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-
0291. K36-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 390-
8087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
HORSE OWNERS: Get your
colts started this spring to be
ready for summer work. Also
taking sale horses to ride and
get ready for summer sales.
Contact Jamie Willert, 441-
4407. P13-4tp
WANTED: Summer pasture for
50 to 150 head of cows. Call
Steve Pekron, 544-3202.
P12-tfn
SUMMER PASTURE WANTED:
Looking to rent pasture or com-
plete ranch, short term or long
term. Also looking for hay
ground. Cash, lease or shares.
Call 798-2116 or 798-2002.
P10-tfn
SUMMER PASTURE WANTED
for 40 to 200 pairs within 80
miles of Philip or can lease whole
ranch. 685-9313 (cell) or 859-
2059 (home). P7-tfn
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les Body Shop, 859-
2744, Philip. P40-tfn
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Janitor at the
Kadoka Area School District. Ap-
plications available on the web-
site www.kadoka.k12.sd. us or
may be picked up at the school.
Open until filled. Contact Jamie
Hermann, 837-2174, Ext. 100.
EOE. K14-2tc
FUN SUMMER JOB: Badlands
Trading Post & Prairie Home-
stead, Cactus Flat, Exit 131 off
I-90. Convenience Store / Gas
Station / Historic Sod Home /
Gift Shops. Full or part time.
Flexible scheduling. Call Heidi at
433-5411. P14-5tc
BADLANDS TRADING POST &
PRAIRIE HOMESTEAD: Part
time yard work & light mainte-
nance position. Very flexible
scheduling & hours. Call Heidi
at 433-5411. P14-5tc
THE WALL POST OFFICE is ac-
cepting applications for the po-
sition of Postal Support Em-
ployee (PSE). PSE's work in-
volves continuous standing,
stretching, lifting and reaching.
The PSE will work Saturdays;
other workdays and hours will
vary. The beginning salary is
$12.38 per hour. Limited bene-
fits include opportunity for
raises, paid vacation, and access
to health insurance after the
first 360-day term. Contact:
Candee L. Kitterman, Postmas-
ter, at (605-279-2466) for more
information. Apply online at
http:// usps.com/employment.
The US Postal Service is an
Equal Opportunity Employer.
WP28-2tp
HELP WANTED: Service Advisor
position open at Philip Motor.
Please call Craig at 685-3435 for
details. PR28-tfn
GREAT SUMMER JOB! Sales
experience preferred but will
train. Salary plus commission.
Housing is supplied in Wall. You
will make great wages, meet peo-
ple from all over the world and
have fun. Must work some week-
ends. Position available April 1,
2013. Apply at GoldDiggers on
Mt. Rushmore Road in Rapid
City or call Jackie at the factory
at 348-8108 or fax resum to
348-1524. PW13-tfn
HELP WANTED: Head house-
keeping, full time position. Flex-
ible hours, competitive wages,
available immediately. See Ken
or Cindy at Rodeway Inn,
Kadoka, 837-2287. K13-2tc
JOB OPENING: Full TimeMain-
tenance Director/Custodial Su-
pervisor for Haakon School Dis-
trict in Philip, SD, beginning
May 1, 2013. Wage depends on
experience. Applications may be
picked up at the Haakon School
District Administrative offices or
send a resum with cover letter
to Supt. Keven Morehart, PO
Box 730, Philip, SD 57567, or
email to Keven.Morehart@
k12.sd.us. Any questions may
be directed to Supt. Morehart at
859-2679. Position open until
filled. Haakon School District is
an Equal Opportunity Employer.
P13-4tc
CUSTOMER SERVICE REP:
Work from home. Starting $7.50
to $10.00/hour. Growth poten-
tial. South Dakota family busi-
ness, est. 2001. Must have good
computer skills. Some nights
and some weekends required.
High-speed Internet access.
Email resum: careers@smart
salesandlease.com P12-4tp
CEDAR PASS LODGE IS NOW
HIRING for experienced Cooks
and kitchen staff. We are looking
for hardworking, outgoing staff
to join our 2013 season team.
Experience in the kitchen with
ability to work in a fast-paced
enviroment is helpful. We can
teach you the rest!! Hourly
wages paid for all hours worked,
bonus for season completion.
Weekly optional meal package,
retail discount, activities, oppor-
tunity to make new acquain-
tances from all over the world.
Download application at
cedarpasslodge.com or call
Sharon Bies at 433-5562.
PR29-1tp
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Several nice used
refrigerators. All come with war-
ranties. Dels, I-90 Exit 63, Box
Elder, 390-9810. PR29-2tp
FOR SALE: Pheasant hens.
Ready for spring release. Con-
tact Larry for details on pricing
and delivery at 840-8097 or
843-2830. PR29-2tc
BISON FOR SALE: $4.50 per
pound. You pay transport and
processing. Call 859-3271,
evenings and weekends or 859-
2279, anytime. P13-3tp
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10 lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
NOTICES/WANTED
WANTED TO BUY: Old farm
machinery and cars for crush-
ing. 433-5443. PR27-4tp
REAL ESTATE
WANTED: Small acreage close to
Wall. Im interested in bare land
or an established home site.
Please call 391-9162.
PR29-3tp
FOR SALE: 7 bedrooms, 3
baths, large basement, 2 fire-
places, attached garage. Could
be separated and used as a 2
bed, 1 bath rental. $56,000 firm,
Kadoka. 488-0846.
K12-3tp
HOUSE FOR SALE: 300 E. High
St., Philip. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
attached garage on nice corner
lot. Full basement, central air,
propane heat. Modest price. In-
quire at 859-3367, 567-3515 or
859-3249. Former home of Joy
Klima. P11-tfn
HOUSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP:
2 bedrooms, downtown, fenced
yard. Make an offer. Call 859-
3095 or 859-2483. P10-tfn
RENTALS
FOR RENT IN PHILIP: 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, small shed. Con-
tact Deb at 544-3291. PR28-2tp
4-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT IN WALL: Call Stan, 381-
2861. WP5-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first in-
correct insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when or-
dered. A $2.00 billing charge will
be added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
THANK YOUS
We want to thank all those
who sent us cards and well
wishes for our 65th wedding
anniversary. We truly appreci-
ated all of the lovely cards and
notes!
Mickey & Shorty Woitte
Thank you for the surprise
birthday bash that Debbie and
Janice were able to pull off. It
was great to see all my friends
(who would have thought I had
that many?) and my relatives
(you know who you are) at the
party. The feast was great and
the crowd was fun. Thank you
for all the gifts, flowers and
many calls. Just another year
young!
Norma Oldenberg
We would like to thank all of
our family and friends for their
gifts, calls, cards and well
wishes celebrating our 40th an-
niversary.
A special thanks to our kids
and grandkids for the cute ad
they put in the paper. We are
blessed to have the very best
family and friends. The time
went by fast, but it always
does when youre having fun.
Joe & Kathy Gittings
The families of Hans E. Han-
son wish to extend our most
sincere appreciation for every-
ones thoughtfulness and care
provided to our father over
these last five years, and for all
the expressions of sympathy
following his passing. We are
extremely grateful for the won-
derful care provided by Doctors
Holman and Klopper and Terry
Henrie (PA-C), as well as all the
nurses and medical staff at the
Philip Hospital and Nursing
Home.
We also would like to thank
everyone who attended his fu-
neral to help our family cherish
Dads memory and celebrate
his life. Special thanks is re-
served for Pastor Westerlund
for her support to our family
during this difficult period and
for making his day a time of joy
and celebration. We also would
like to thank those who as-
sisted in his funeral, to include
Elvera Moos and Marianne
Frein for their musical support;
the ladies and men of First
Lutheran Church for serving a
much appreciated lunch; and,
the Rush family for being so
professional and caring
throughout.
Lastly, we would like to
thank all the people of Philip
and Haakon County, and be-
yond, for being such special
friends and loyal customers to
both of our parents over the
past half-century. Their lives
were truly enriched by all, and
they were always extremely
proud to tell others that they
were from Western South
Dakota.
Mike Hanson and Family
Sharon Johnson and Family
Steve Hanson and Family
EMPLOYMENT
BURKE SCHOOL DISTRICT HIRING
for MS or HS, flexible assignment.
Innovative, problem-based teacher
with multiple certification. Team-
teaching opportunities available.
Looking more for a teaching style,
than a specific content area. Contact
Superintendent Erik Person,
erik.person@ k12.sd.us.
PARTS INVENTORY MANAGER -
JOHN DEERE DEALERSHIP: Parts
manager sought by multi-store John
Deere dealership operation. Position
currently open at C&B Operations,
LLC, a 22 store John Deere dealer-
ship group headquartered out of
Gettysburg, SD. Applicants should
possess the ability to manage parts
inventory over multiple stores, lead
parts sales team marketing efforts,
create and achieve budgets in a
growth oriented dealership. We offer
progressive marketing plans, com-
petitive pay, full benefit package, in-
cluding bonus plan. Please send re-
sume to Mark Buchholz, buch-
holzm@ deerequipment.com or call
Mark 605-769-2030.
HELP WANTED: ESTIMATOR and
salesperson. Send resume/qualifica-
tions to Johnson Lumber, Attn. Dan,
22 W. 5th Ave., Webster SD 57274
phone 605-345-6000
MAINTENANCE DIRECTOR/ CUS-
TODIAL SUPERVISOR Opening for
Haakon School District in Philip, SD.
Wage depends on experience. Con-
tact Keven Morehart at 605-859-
2679 or Keven.Morehart
@k12.sd.us.
RDO EQUIPMENT CO. Competitive
wages, benefits, training, profit
sharing, opportunities for growth,
great culture and innovation. $1,500
Sign on Bonus available for Service
Technicians. To browse opportuni-
ties go to www.rdoequipment.com.
Must apply online. EEO.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL-
Custer Clinic and Custer Regional
Senior Care in beautiful Custer, SD,
have full time and PRN (as-needed)
RN, LPN and Licensed Medical As-
sistant positions available. We offer
competitive pay and excellent bene-
fits. New Graduates welcome! Please
contact Human Resources at (605)
673-2229 ext. 110 for more informa-
tion or log onto www.regional-
health.com to apply.
HEALTH AND BEAUTY
IF YOU USED THE MIRENA IUD be-
tween 2001-present and suffered
perforation or embedment in the
uterus requiring surgical removal, or
had a child born with birth defects,
you may be entitled to compensa-
tion. Call Johnson Law and speak
with female staff members 1-800-
535-5727.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota.
Scott Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig
Connell, 605-264-5650, www.golde-
neagleloghomes.com
The Pioneer Review
Business & Professional Directory
RONALD G. MANN, DDS
Family Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. South of Philip Chiropractic
Rent this space
$7.25/week
3 month min.
Rent this space
$7.25/week
3 month min.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
HEE-HAW SHOW 2013. South
Shore School Gym. Saturday, April
6-7:30 pm, Sunday, April 7-2:00
pm. Reserved seats $12, Adults $10,
grades 5-12 $5, grade 4 & under
FREE/add $1 at door.
PHILIP BODY SHOP
Complete Auto Body Repairing
Glass Installation Painting Sandblasting
Toll-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 Philip, SD
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PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate ad-
vertised in this newspaper is subject to the
Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which
makes it illegal to advertise any preference,
or discrimination on race, color, religion,
sex, or national origin, or any intention to
make any such preference, limitation, or
discrimination.
This newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real estate which is a vi-
olation of the law. Our readers are informed
that all dwellings advertised in this newspa-
per are available on an equal opportunity
basis.
HOURS: M-F: ? A.M. TO S P.M. - SAT: S A.M. TO NOON
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY ?3 - SS9-2100 - PHILIP
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for your
free estimate!! Shop our large selection of power tools!
NOTICE
Is your roof one that needs reshingled?
Now is the time to buy your shingles. Most major
shingle companies are taking a 22-25% increase April 1st.
Moses Building Center just purchased several loads of shingles at
current pricing. We will pre-sell these before the increase and
store them for you. Give us a call well measure your roof
and give you a quote!
MOSES BLDG. CENTER
S. HWY 73 859-2100 PHILIP
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups) Apartments
carpeted throughout, appliances
furnished, laundry facilities available.
SENECHAL APARTMENTS:
1 Bdr. This is Elderly 62+,
Disabled and Handicap Housing
For app||cal|or
& |rlorral|or:
PR0/Rerla|
Varagererl
1113 3rerrar 3l.
3lurg|s, 30 5ZZ85
05-31Z-30ZZ or
1-800-211-282
www.
prorenta|
management.
com
BUSINESS FOR SALE
Pizza Etc.
175 S. Center Ave. Philip
Great Family Business
1 Year In Newly Remodeled Building
Lots of Possibilities for Expansion
Contact
Kim or
Vickie
(605)
859-2365
For all your
concrete
construction
needs:
Gibson
CONCRETE
CONSTRUCTION
859-3100
Philip, SD
ads@pioneer-review.com
Thursday, March 14, 2013 The Pioneer Review Page 13
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\lI|K 1||IlK
lkllll, |Ik 01KI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE, FECULAF CATTLE SALE & FANNINC
ANCUS DULL SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. FANNING
ANGUS: 12 P.M. BRED CATTLE & OPEN CONSIGNMENT
HORSE SALE TO FOLLOW.
DISPERSIONS:
BAXTER ANDERS AGE DISPERSION" - 120 DLK 3 TO SOLID
MOUTH COWS (1 LOAD OF 3 & 4 YF OLDS, 1 LOAD OF 5 & 6 YF
OLDS, 1 LOAD OF SOLID MOUTH}; DFED. DLK TO SONS OF 5050;
CLV. 4-1 FOF 50 DAYS
RICHARD JOBGEN AGE DISPERSION" - 70 DLK HOME
FAISED SOLID MOUTH COWS; DFED. FOFTUNE ANC; CLV. 4-5
FOF 60 DAYS
STOCK COWS:
MIKE HEATHERSHAW - 80 DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 4-5 FOF 50 DAYS
BAXTER ANDERS - 80 DLK 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV. 4-1 FOF 50 DAYS
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - 30 DLK MIXED ACE COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-10 FOF 60 DAYS
RANDY VOLMER - 20 DLK DFED HFFS; DFED. PFOVEN LDW
DLK ANC; CLV. 4-20 FOF 25 DAYS
JOHN OLDENBERG - 15 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-15
EXPOSED COWS:
KELLY RICARD - 45 DLK & FED MIXED ACE COWS; EXPOSED
DLK & HEFF; CLV. MAY
FANNING ANGUS - 19 PUFEDFED YEAFLINC ANCUS DULLS;
40 PUFEDFED YEAFLINC ANCUS FEPLACEMENT HEIFEFS &
DFED COWS
MOR CONS1GNMNTS BY SAL DAY. CALL THOR ROSTH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & e1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS 12.00 P.M. MT - SELLINC 19
PUFEDFED YEAFLINC ANCUS DULLS & 40 PUFEDFED YEAFLINC
ANCUS FEPLACEMENT HEIFEFS & DFED COWS
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CE-
NETIC DULL SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M.
MT
TUESDAY, APR. 16: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00
P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, MARCH 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOL-
LOWINC THE CATTLE SALE.
CATTL RPORT: MARCH J2, 2DJS
A b1g run o] ]eeders. Mos11g s1eodg. We1g-ups
s1og good.
FEEDER CATTLE:
GENE & SHERYL MICHAEL - PHILIP
91 ..............................DLK STFS 604=.......$160.50
41 ..............................DLK STFS 519=.......$169.75
VIRGIL RUST - BATESLAND
62....................DLK & DWF STFS 521=.......$168.25
16....................DLK & DWF STFS 392=.......$179.00
29 ...................DLK & DWF HFFS 472=.......$154.00
DENNIS & MIKE SEILER - QUINN
12 ..............................DLK STFS 533=.......$170.00
29..............................DLK HFFS 592=.......$143.00
JOHN CAPP RANCH - FAITH
94 ...................DLK & DWF HFFS 499=.......$155.75
82....................FED & DLK HFFS 551=.......$152.25
18 ...................DLK & DWF HFFS 438=.......$160.50
LARRY & JOHN DOLE2AL - BELVIDERE
71....................DLK & DWF STFS 574=.......$165.75
144..................DLK & DWF STFS 650=.......$152.75
ED THOMPSON - STURGIS
224 ............................DLK STFS 798=.......$132.25
44 ..............................DLK STFS 662=.......$151.25
KNUTSON RANCH - QUINN
75..............................FED STFS 799=.......$132.00
JOHN & JUSTIN LONG - UNION CENTER
76....................DLK & DWF STFS 742=.......$139.25
85....................DLK & DWF STFS 665=.......$153.00
94....................DLK & DWF STFS 601=.......$158.00
163 .................DLK & DWF HFFS 665=.......$133.50
99 ...................DLK & DWF HFFS 591=.......$141.26
BURJES & TREVOR FITCH - PHILIP
65....................DLK & DWF STFS 905=.......$124.00
146..................DLK & DWF STFS 831=.......$128.00
82....................DLK & DWF STFS 772=.......$126.50
BEARPAW RANCH - FT. PIERRE
48 ....................FED & DLK STFS 740=.......$134.25
9......................FED & DLK STFS 626=.......$133.00
57....................FED & DLK HFFS 688=.......$131.75
7......................FED & DLK HFFS 563=.......$144.00
ARLIE RADWAY - HOWES
143............................DLK HFFS 738=.......$130.50
18 ..............................DLK STFS 821=.......$124.00
STEVE & COLTON MCDANIEL - MIDLAND
20 ..............................DLK STFS 618=.......$153.25
23.........................X DFED STFS 545=.......$136.50
21 ...................DLK & DWF HFFS 586=.......$135.00
20.........................X DFED HFFS 515=.......$135.00
MIKE PERAULT - BELVIDERE
14..............................DWF STFS 548=.......$167.45
13 .............................DWF HFFS 570=.......$137.25
7 ...............................DWF HFFS 495=.......$146.00
MARION SCHULT2 - BATESLAND
35 ....................FED & DLK STFS 597=.......$151.00
29....................FED & DLK HFFS 508=.......$150.25
ERIC NORDSTROM - FT. PIERRE
14....................DLK & DWF STFS 640=.......$150.00
16 ...................DLK & DWF HFFS 652=.......$132.00
2......................FED & DLK STFS 1475=.....$108.00
BEUG & KETELSEN - STURGIS
50..............................DLK HFFS 506=.......$156.00
21..............................DLK HFFS 435=.......$164.00
JASON HAMILL - MILESVILLE
2......................DLK & DWF STFS 735=.......$137.00
11....................FED & DLK HFFS 637=.......$134.25
JOE STANGLE - NEW UNDERWOOD
3 ................................DLK STFS 770=.......$126.00
5 ................................DLK STFS 592=.......$153.00
7................................DLK HFFS 589=.......$137.50
SCHOFIELD BROTHERS - PHILIP
49..............................DLK HFFS 687=.......$133.00
CHARLES & LUKE VANDERMAY - KADOKA
70..............................DLK HFFS 570=.......$148.00
LYLE & BRETT WILCOX - RED OWL
61..............................DLK HFFS 584=.......$147.00
CUNY & CONGER - BUFFALO GAP
13..............................DLK HFFS 680=.......$130.00
BRAD & SHAWNA ROGHAIR - OKATON
11 ..............................DLK STFS 415=.......$178.00
12..............................DLK HFFS 399=.......$154.00
ROCKY WILLIAMS - PHILIP
6......................FED & DLK STFS 521=.......$164.00
9................................DLK HFFS 618=.......$138.25
3 ...................CHAF & FED HFFS 572=.......$144.00
JOHN NEUMANN - PHILIP
14 ....................FED & DLK STFS 459=.......$162.00
DON EYMER - MILESVILLE
6................................FED STFS 360=.......$163.00
10..............................FED HFFS 358=.......$148.50
RICHARD KIEFFER - STURGIS
6...........................X DFED STFS 538=.......$161.00
GARY HERRINGTON - HERMOSA
5................................DLK HFFS 677=.......$133.50
RUSSELL SIMONS - FAITH
12....................FED & DLK HFFS 890=.......$117.00
WEIGH-UPS:
RICK KING - PHILIP
1 ................................DLK DULL 2200=.....$112.00
LEONARD REMER - HERMOSA
1.................................DLK COW 1365=.......$89.50
1.................................DLK COW 1695=.......$85.00
JOHN & PAULINE STABEN - ORAL
1 ................................FED COW 1275=.......$89.50
1 ................................FED COW 1235=.......$87.00
1 ................................FED COW 1335=.......$86.00
ED HEEB - MIDLAND
1 ................................FED COW 1390=.......$89.00
HORTON RANCH - WALL
1.................................DLK COW 1260=.......$88.50
1.................................DLK COW 1315=.......$85.00
3 ...............................DLK COWS 1578=.......$80.00
GALE BRUNS - NEW UNDERWOOD
1.................................DLK COW 1155=.......$88.00
1.................................DLK COW 1630=.......$85.00
ED THOMPSON - STURGIS
1.................................DLK COW 1400=.......$87.00
RUSSEL CURTIS - ORAL
1.................................DLK COW 1325=.......$86.50
ROSS BLOCK - MIDLAND
1 ................................FED COW 1595=.......$86.00
RODNEY SHARP - KADOKA
1 ..............................HEFF DULL 2490=.....$105.00
4 .............................HEFF COWS 1335=.......$81.50
ART & BONNIE RISSE - MARTIN
1.................................DLK COW 1265=.......$85.50
2 ...............................DLK COWS 1408=.......$84.00
2 ...............................DLK COWS 1280=.......$83.75
2.........................DLK COWETTES 1010=.......$91.50
DAY & KNIGHT - HOWES
1 ................................DLK DULL 1870=.....$103.00
CREW CATTLE CO - PHILIP
1.................................DLK COW 1285=.......$85.00
JIM JOHNSON - QUINN
1.................................DLK COW 1510=.......$84.50
BEV TAYLOR - NEW UNDERWOOD
1...............................CHAF COW 1455=.......$84.50
1 ................................DLK DULL 1935=.....$102.00
DARREL WILCOX - UNION CENTER
1.................................DLK COW 1385=.......$84.00
3.........................DLK COWETTES 1015=.......$94.00
JW CATTLE - BELVIDERE
1 ................................FED COW 1380=.......$84.00
BOB HELMS - CREIGHTON
1 ................................FED COW 1325=.......$84.00
1 ................................FED COW 1185=.......$82.50
W O WELLER - KADOKA
4 ...............................DLK COWS 1251=.......$84.00
LARRY DENKE - LONG VALLEY
1 ................................FED COW 1500=.......$83.00
TIM NEMEC - MIDLAND
1 ................................FED COW 1240=.......$83.00
MIKE LUEDEMAN - WALL
1.................................DLK COW 1170=.......$83.00
BRIAN & JENNIFER PHILIPSEN - NEW UNDERWOOD
1.................................DLK COW 1355=.......$82.50
DUSTIN HARVEY - INTERIOR
1.................................DLK COW 1345=.......$82.50
3.........................DLK COWETTES 972=.........$94.50
MICKEY DALY - MIDLAND
2 ...............................DLK COWS 1438=.......$83.00
1.................................DLK COW 1345=.......$82.00
GERALD RISSE - MARTIN
4 ...............................DLK COWS 1504=.......$82.75
PAUL HARVEY - INTERIOR
1.................................DLK COW 1370=.......$82.00
SETH THOMSEN - LONG VALLEY
1................................DWF COW 1325=.......$81.50
1................................DLK HFFT 895=.........$97.00
BRADY CARMICHAEL - NEW UNDERWOOD
1.................................DLK COW 1320=.......$80.50
KENNY RHODEN - UNION CENTER
1.................................DLK COW 1430=.......$78.50
1................................DLK HFFT 1015=.......$99.00
CHAUNCY & JESSE WILSON - KYLE
6 ..............................DLK HFFTS 800=.......$114.00
LYLE WILCOX - RED OWL
5 ..............................DLK HFFTS 865=.......$109.00
CASEY SLOVEK - PHILIP
4..............................FED HFFTS 871=.......$108.00
MIKE NEMEC - MIDLAND
2..............................FED HFFTS 870=.......$108.00
UDDER EXPRESS - NEW UNDERWOOD
2 ..............................DLK HFFTS 985=.......$106.00
DON KELLY - QUINN
2..............................FED HFFTS 745=.......$105.00
NICHOLS CASPERS - NEW UNDERWOOD
2 ..............................DLK HFFTS 833=.......$104.50
BOB SCHOFIELD - PHILIP
1................................DLK HFFT 995=.......$102.00
SPRING CREEK RANCH - HERMOSA
1................................DLK HFFT 1045=.....$101.00
KELLY RIGGINS - PHILIP
2 ..............................DLK HFFTS 930=.......$101.00
JAMES GOOD - MARTIN
1................................DLK HFFT 850=.......$101.00
CHARLES & JANET VANDERMAY - KADOKA
2 ..............................DLK HFFTS 913=.......$100.50
TIM BERNSTIEN - FAITH
1 ..........................DLK COWETTE 1005=.......$93.50
SCARBOROUGH RANCH - HAYES
1 ..........................DLK COWETTE 1200=.......$91.00
1................................FED DULL 1940=.......$99.00
STEVE PEKRON - MILESVILLE
1 ................................DLK DULL 1605=.......$97.50
SUSAN KIEFFER - STURGIS
1................................FED DULL 2450=.......$94.50
Thursday, March 14, 2013 The Pioneer Review Page 14
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Downtown Philip
Reservations:
859-2774
~ Saturday, March 16 ~
Top Sirloin Special
~ Monday, March 18 ~
1/2 lb. Cheeseburger
Basket
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday
S
a
la
d
B
a
r
A
v
a
ila
b
le
a
t
L
u
n
c
h
!
~ Tuesday, March 12 ~
Prime Rib
~ Wednesday, March 13 ~
Basket of Barbecued
Pork Ribs
~ Thursday, March 14 ~
Philly Steak Sandwich
~ Friday Buffet, March 15 ~
Ground Sirloin
Crab Cakes Shrimp
doctor, they got to visit with a niece
from Draper who was also waiting
to see the doctor. Dorothy was a bit
under the weather Sunday, but she
is feeling fine now.
Julian and Coreen Roseth at-
tended the Hayes play Sunday af-
ternoon. Coreen said it was a cute
play, the actors did a good job, and
there was a good crowd on hand.
Nick, Adam, and Jodi Roseth, as
well as Jodi's sister, Jenny, at-
tended the play Saturday night.
Bill and Polly Bruce had com-
pany over the weekend. Both Vince
Bruce and his wife, Katie, took part
in this year's production of the
play, so some family members ar-
rived to enjoy the play. Bill and
Polly's son, David, came for the
weekend to attend the play and
help Vince with some work around
the place. Their daughter, Vicki,
and her friend, Willie Foley, also
arrived Friday to attend the play.
The group attended the Friday
evening performane. Vicki and
Willie spent the night and returned
to Madison Saturday afternoon,
and David returned to his home
Monday. Polly hosted the group for
lunch Saturday. Sunday, Bill and
Polly attended church in Midland,
then hurried back to their com-
pany. Sunday afternoon, Polly's
sister, Francis Terkildsen, and
Francis's son, Rocky, Kadoka, at-
tended the play in Hayes, then
came to the Bruce ranch for a visit
before returning home.
Frank and Shirley Halligan were
in Mobridge last Tuesday for the
regional basketball tournament.
Their grandson, J.J., is a member
of the Faith team. Sunday, the Hal-
ligans took Frank's father, Ken, to
Willie and Loretta Cowan's place
for participation in a story telling
project. The project is meant to
share and preserve this history to
share with future generations. Ac-
cording to one of the organizers,
Carmen Cowan Woodward, "Think
about the days when we took more
time for family and friends and ac-
tually just visited and told stories
instead of texting and emailing." It
is important to "have a great ap-
preciation for the old times and
the things that these folks have to
tell us. Story telling is another one
of the lost arts that used to be
common place. We seem to be too
busy to just have fellowship time
with folks we enjoy and appreciate.
It's a good way to remember where
we came from, have some fun and
good laughs, perhaps a few tears,
but also show respect by just listen-
ing."
Ruth Neuhauser enjoyed a visit
from Connie (Hudson) Johnson
Saturday. Connie was in Highmore
attending a shooting match. They
enjoyed coffee and a visit, and Con-
nie gave Ruth a copy of a book that
was written by Connie's sister,
Debbie Burma.
Kevin and Mary Neuhauser at-
tended a birthday party for a friend
in Pierre Saturday evening. Sun-
day, they attended the afternoon
performance of the Hayes play.
Their daughter, Brianna, went to
Rapid City Thursday, and she
joined her sister, Sarah, in attend-
ing a comedy performance at the
civic center. Brianna spent Friday
with Sarah before returning to
Pierre. Kevin said he talked with
his brother, Myron, who lives in
Virginia. The recent storms in that
area knocked down a bunch of
trees, leaving Myron's area without
electricity for several days.
Max and Joyce Jones continue
with the process of having new sid-
ing and windows installed at their
home. The work crew had to quit
yesterday because of the wind, and
today doesn't seem to be a good day
for siding installation, either.
When I talked to Max, he said we
probably couldn't print the words
he had to say about the wind, and
I assured him that I probably
couldn't spell them, anyway!
Todd and Darcy Jones and chil-
dren were in Highmore last Satur-
day for the BB gun match.
Jon and Connie Johnson at-
tended the BB gun match Satur-
day, and their son, Noah, had a
very successful day of shooting.
Noah took first place aggregate
score in the eight and nine year old
division. He placed in all shooting
positions. He also shot as part of
the 10-11 year old Kirley team, and
that team took first place in their
division. The shooters will be in
Pierre next weekend for a match.
Jon and Connie's son, Wyatt, was
home for spring break last week,
and Wyatt and Connie were in
Rapid City Friday for doctor's ap-
pointments. Wyatt returned to
Brookings Sunday it was a slow
trip due to icy road conditions.
Thankfully, he made it without in-
cident.
Mary Briggs worked from home
Thursday morning, then she and
Lee traveled to Sioux City, Iowa,
Thursday afternoon to be on hand
for a marketing seminar. They saw
some folks from Philip at the meet-
ing. They returned to the ranch
late Friday evening. Lee and
Mary's granddaughter, Kinsey,
took part in the BB gun match last
weekend in Highmore, taking third
place in standing position. Mary
said that her mother-in-law, Lil
Briggs, is feeling a bit better these
days, which is great news. Lil en-
joys company and loves hearing
news from the country.
Following is the February 2013
weather data from Marge Briggs:
The high temperature was 56 on
the 17th, we had five days of 50 or
above, and nine days of 32 or
below. The lowest maximum tem-
perature was 18 on the 19th.
The low temperature for the
month was -10 on the 1st. We had
three days of zero or below, and 16
days of 20 or below.
The average high for the month
was 38, and the average low was
17, giving us an average tempera-
ture of 28 for the month.
Precipitation for the month was
.52, and normal is .58, leaving us
.06 below normal for the month.
Precipitation to date for 2013 is
.94, and normal is .93, leaving us
.01 above normal for the year.
We received 7.1 of snow in Feb-
ruary, and year-to-date we have re-
ceived 12.9. So far, winter-to-date,
we have received 20 of snow.
Marge provided the following in-
formation to refresh our memo-
ries in February 2011, we had
2.20 of precipitation. Snow for
February 2011 was 25, year-to-
date snowfall at the end of Febru-
ary 2011 was 32, and the winter-
to-date snowfall at the end of Feb-
ruary 2011 was 54! I sure wish we
had some of that moisture now.
Thanks to Marge for the infor-
mation! Hopefully one of these
days she'll be able to report more
precipitation for our area. But until
then, I guess we'll just wait our
turn.
The weekend here at Neuhauser
ranch was wonderful. Our daugh-
ter, Chelsea, and her husband,
Mike, arrived Friday morning to
spend the weekend with us. After
lunch Friday, our daughter, Jen-
nifer, called to say she and her hus-
band, Ross, were headed our way to
spend the weekend also. What a
happy surprise! We had a great
weekend lots of laughing, card
playing, cattle checking, cooking,
sewing, etc. It was wonderful! Jen
and Ross had to travel over some
pretty treacherous roads on their
way back to their home in Salem,
but they made it safe and sound.
This week, I am grateful for elec-
tric seat warmers in the vehicles. It
seems that each year I get more
and more adverse to cold weather.
I tried telling Randy that I really
should live in the south, but I'm
afraid that "South" Dakota is prob-
ably as far south as I will get! Any-
way, the warm seats help me deal
with the cold, and I love it! A couple
of years ago, the seat warmer even
helped warm up a calf that was
chilled down! Don't you just love
conveniences that do double duty?
The weather in the next few days
is supposed to warm up and be
beautiful. It will be a good opportu-
nity to get outside and get some ex-
ercise. And while you are at it, be
thinking about something nice you
can do for someone. The random
acts of kindness do double duty
also they make you feel good as
well as the recipient of your kind-
ness!
Moenville News
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